(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

u 




THE DULUTH HERAL 



VOLUME XXXI— NO. 123. 



FRIDAY EVENING, AUGUST 29, 1913. 




TWO CENTS. 



THAW'S LAWYERS GET 
"GENTLEMAN ROGER 



»> 



RELEASED ON BONDS 



Driver of Car That Took 

Thaw From Matteawan 

Is Freed, 



Claim of Canadian Citizen- 
ship Repeated By 
Thompson. 



Jerome's Next Move to Get 

Fugitive Out Is 

Uncertain. 



Sherbrooke, Que.. Augr. 29. — "Gentle- 
man Rosrer" Thompson, the New York 
chauffeur who whirled Harry K. Thaw 
away from Matteawan In an automo- 
bile, walked the streets of Sherbrooke 
today a free man. Police Magistrate 
Ifulvena admitted him to |500 ball 
after he had appeared for trial charged 
with aiding- Thaw, a lunatic and there- 
fore an undesirable, to enter the Do- 
minion. F. Campbell, for the Immigra- 
tion department, announced to the 
court that he wished to press first the 
charge of Thompson having entered 
Canada by stealth. 

Thompson's counsel, Louis St. Laur- 
ent, acting with the Thaw counsel, ob- 
jected to proceeding on this charge 
and at their request the adjournment 
was granted until Wednesday. Sept. 3. 
William Travers Jerome, District At- 
torney Conger of Dutchess county. 
Deputy Attorney General FrankUn 
Kennedy and others here trying to get 
Thaw back to Matteawan, were in 
court. Thf littlf courtroom was packed 
DrHdc-d Lull LIkelr. 
With Thaw in jail for an Indefinite 
period, probably till the sessions of the 
king's bench " In October, and the 
Thompson case postponed, indications 
were today that there had set in a de- 
cided lull in matters pertaining to 
Stanford White's slayer. 

Mr. Jerome's unproductive visit to 
Quebec, wht-re he had hoped to see the 
premier and attorney general, brought 
the case back to where it was w^hen 
Thaw was first committed to the Sher- 
brooke Jail. Mecsrs. Jerome and Ken- 
nedy still were here today, but what 
move, if any. New York would make 
next they would not say. 

Thompson's ball was" supplied by the 
Thaw family. They have done all in 
their power to ease his position, fol- 
lowing his veiled threat to "squeal" and 
reveal who wa« behind the plot tl.at re- 
sulted in Thaw's liberation. 

Jem»m«'« Plaas VJukvovra. 
•"I do not think I shall return to Que- 
bec," said Mr. Jerome. "We did not 
see the premier; he was not In town. 
I cannot say now what v/ill be our next 
step." 

•'Gentleman Roger," dressed neatly in 
a gray suit, came Into court at 10:05 
o'clock. He had told his lawyers that 
he would plead not guilty and insist 
that he was a Canadian subject, having 
been born In Toronto and therefore not 
subjef?t to deportation. 

Thaw evinced marked interest in the 
Thompson case today, as he thought it 
might involve a subsequent test as to 
his own sanity. 

Jerome was one of the first to appear 
in coirt. Thompson held a conference 
with his lawyer, Louis St. Laurent 
Thaw's lawyt-rs. White and McKeown, 
assisted him. The case of "Gentleman 
Itosfcr" is so interwoven with Thaw's 
that the Thaw counsel were anxious 
that no false step be made. 



STATE'S CHIEF WITNESS 
IN CAMINETTI TRIAL 




SHIP ABLAZE 
AT NEW YORK 

Oil Steamer Burns Fiercely 

in Harbor for 

Hours. 



SEEK UNIFORM OFFICIAL WASHINGTON IS 

COURT RULES 



Blazing Blocks Drift About, 

Endangering Other 

Vessels. 



MARSHA WARRINGTON, 
Who Was the Companion of Maury 
I. Diggs in What the Latter, Dur- 
ing His Trial, Called "the Reno Ep. 
isode." 



HITCHCOCK 
KICJ(S OVER 

Refuses to Be Bound By 

Caucus on the Income 

Tax. 



New York, Aug. 29.— The steamer 
Burgermesiter Hechmann, with 600,000 
gallons of crude oil and benzine in her 
hold, still was a flaming torch in the 
Buttermilk channel this morning, four- 
teen hours after her cargo had been 
fired by a spark created by friction 
when two tin cases struck violently last 
night. The S.OOO-ton vessel had listed 
fifteen feet to port at 9 o'clock, and 
the water was then within a few inches 

of her deck. 

A battery of three flreboats sur- 
rounded the craft and pumped water on 
her all night. Nothwithstandlng, she 
burned steadily. Blazing blocks of 
wood, dislodged from her steel frame, 
floated down the river menacing other 
craft. Nine thousand gallons of ben- 
zine had not been reached by the 
flames at 9 o'clock, and fire fighters 
were nopeful she would sink before the 
benzine exploded. 

With a hiss that sounded blocks 
away, the vessel sank to the bottom of 
the channel this afternoon. The chan- 
nel is shallow there and the super- 
structure remained above the water 
when the ship settled, but did not burn. 

Thousands of persons lining the wat- 
er front were swept back by police re- 
BfTves. and a zone extending a block 
back from the river was established, 
through which no spectators were per- 
mitted to pass. 

The Buttermilk channel lies between 
the crowded South Brooklyn water 
front and Governor's Island, the lat- 
ter covered along the shore with army 
storehouses and barracks. 

SECRETARY OF WAR 
SEES FORT SHELLING 

Jvm City Business Men 
Entertain Garrison on 



Federal and State Judges 
Will Confer at Mon- 
treal Meeting, 



Saving of Time and Money 

in Litigation Is 

Sought. 



Offers Amendment Includ- 
ing Special Levy on 
Monopolies. 



CONSUL'S CURIOS COST 
HIS LIFE IN FUMES 



Spa 



niard and Wife Both 
Die as Result of 
Fire. 

New York. Aug. 29.— Thousands of 
curios gathered In many lands and 
stacked high In the apartments of 
Hipolito Uriarte, for fifty years a Span- 
ish consul, fed a fire kindled in lighting 
a cigar today, and blocked the way of 
the aged diplomatist and his wife to 
safety. Uriarte was found dead, lean- 
ing across a window sill; his wife, 
Marie Louise, mistook a window leading 
to an air shaft for one opening on a 

flre escape, and plunged four stories to 
her death. 

Uriarte was 82 years old. For four- 
teen years he was Spanish consul gen- 
eral in New York. His last service was 
In Canada. During his travels for his 
government he had accumulated souv- 
enirs and mementoes in every country 
where he had lived. They crowded 
every nook and cranny of his apart- 
ments, and in the smoke and confusion 
resulting from the flre effectually cut 
him off from escape. 

The fire was kindled, it Is believed, 
when Uriarte lit a cigar which he in- 
tended to smoke before going to bed. 
The aged couple had been up until a 
late hour celebrating the homecoming 
of their son. Louis, an accountant in 
Cuba. 



Washington, Aug. 29. — Denunciatlrn 
of the Democratic senate caucus as a 
•■political machine" by Senator Hitch- 
cock, one of the Democrats who re 
fused to be bound by the caucus on 
all features of the tariff bill, marked 
today's reopening of the fight over 
the income tax. 

"Why should senators be expected 
to be bound by the hasty decisions of 
a secret caucus on details of the in- 
come tax?" demanded Senator Hitch- 
cock. "Why should they be expected 
to vote down every amendment, how- 
ever good, simply because It comes 
from the other side of the chamber? 
Why should the income tax section 
not be amended here upon the floor 
of the senate if debate convinces sen- 
ators that it should be?" 

MTIIl iBMlat on InrresMrs. 

The Insurgent Democrats, who yes- 
terc'ay demanded that the bill be 
changed to Increase the income tax 
On large fortunes, apparently had 
gained strength, and insisted that they 
would force the party conference late 
today or tomorrow to make substan- 
tial increases. Senate leaders wer*" 
prepared to grant concessions, but the 
in.'-vfrgents were not satisfied that 
thfir proposals would fully meet their 
views. 

Hitchcock's attack was delivered in 
connection with his amendment for a 
heavy penalty tax on trusts or monop- 
olies controlling more than one-fourth 
of the country's production or trade in 
any given line. Five per cent would 
be added to incomes of corporations 
doing from one-fourth to one-third of 
all business In any given line; 10 per 
cent for doing one-third to one-half, 
and 20 per cent for tliose above one- 
half. It would apply to no corpora- 
tion capitalized at less than J50.000,000 

(Continued on page 11, fourth column. ) 

RUSH fOlARRY WHEN 
SILK MILLS REOPEN 



His Visit. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 29.— (Special to 

The Herald.) — Secretary of War Lind- 

ley M. Garrison arrived here from 

Omaha today for an Inspection of Fort 
Snelling. A program of entertainment 
was arranged by a Joint committee of 
army and business men. 

A number of prominent men of the 
Twin Otles Including National Com- 
mitteeman Fred B. Lynch, met Secre- 
tary Garrison when he arrived here 
from Omaha. He was the guest of 
local business men at noon luncheon at 
a local club, and this afternoon is hear- 
ing arguments In favor of the enlarge- 
ment of Fort Snelling. 

unwrittenIaw IS 

ILUNOIS MAN'S PLEA 



Galesburg, 111., Aug. 29. — The "un- 
written law" will be the defense of- 
fered by Everett Buck of Gilson, 111., 
who last night stabbed to death Har- 
ley Dalton because he suspected Dal- 
ton of paying attention to Mrs. Buck 

Dalton, who is 22 years old, visited 
the Buck home last evening ana quar- 
reled with the husband. Buck thrust 
a knife blade through Dalton's left 
chest close to the heart. Dalton stag- 
gered from the house and fell dead 
after walking a few steps. . Buck was 
arrested. 



Washington. Aug. 29. — Federal and 
state judges from erery state will 
confer tomorrow night at Montreal, 
Can., at the American Bar association 
meeting to formulate plans for a com- 
plete reform of the rules of pleading 
and practice on the law side of the 
supreme court of the United States 
and all Federal district courts for the 
purpose of eventually making uniform 
the practice In all the courts In the 
United States. The aim Is to elim- 
inate delay and reduce the expense of 
all litigation. 

The metliod to be discussed will be 
to obtain legislation from congress 
to permit the supreme court of the 
United States, of its own motion, to 
reform its law rules just as it already 
has its equity rules and soon will 
make uniform the admiralty and bank- 
ruptcy rules. 

Foliow EngUab Plan. 
It also is hoped to obtain legisla- 
tion to give the suprt-me court super- 
intendency over the rules of pleading 
and practice In all F^^deral and state 
courts as is the method in England 
and thus gradually make uniform 
court procedure Is every court in this 
country. 

A memorandum embodying the pro- 
posed changes, prepared by W. P. 
Hughes of the depaatment of justice, 
is to be the basis for the reforms 
proposed at the Montreal meeting, at 
which Attorney General McReynolds 
will be present. It le understood that 
the proposed changes have the in- 
dorsement of the American Bar asso- 
ciation. It was at the suggestion of 
the uniform procedure committee of 
the association that the discussion of 
the subject was arranged, 

DRUGGED IN FARGO; 
FOUND IN SPARTA 

Wisconsin Police Seek to 

Identify Well Dressed 

Stranger. 

Sparta, Wis., Aug. :■. — Found wan- 
dering about the strft- .^ here and 
picked up by the polK -.ve!! dressed 

man, wearing valuab."' jt»welry and 
with considerable money In his pock- 
ets. Is unable to tell his name. He 
Informed the police that he was 
drugged at Fargo, N. D., and does not 
recall anything that happened since. It 
is believed he may have been put on 
the train at Fargo while unconscious. 

The Sparta police have communi- 
cated with the Fargo authorities in 
an effort to identify the man and 
restore him to his family. 

THOUSANDS SEE 

AERONAUT FALL 

Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 29. — Thousands 
of spectators attending the Erie coun- 
ty fair at Hamburg saw Albert Gers- 
ner, a balloonist, lose his grip on the 
trapeze of his parachute and plunge 
200 feet to hie death. "Two men made 
the ascent, with three parachutes. 
The first had made hl» descent suc- 
cessfully and Gersner, who was mak- 
ing a double drop, had cut loose from 
his first parachute and was making a 
graceful descent when he fell. 



PUZZLED BY REPORTS AS TO 
UNO'S PLANS AND ACTIONS 



NO MOVEMENT 
BY M ARMY 

Gen. Bliss Has Full Author- 
ity Along Mexican 
Border. 



Americans Are Leaving 

Southern Republic By 

Thousands. 



Washington, Aug. 29.— There was 
no indication today of additional troop 
movements. Br«g. Gen. Tasker H. 
BllsB, commanding the Southern de- 
partment, which includes most of the 
troops along the Mexican border, has 
full authority to move the different or- 
ganizations under his command with- 
out instructions from Washington He 
also IS authorized to call upon other 
departments for additional troops If 
in his discretion the situation war- 
rants such action. 

Consul General Hanna at Monterey 
reports that a supply of medicine has 
arrived from San Antonio, Tex., and 
is being taken to Torreon for stamp- 
ing out the epidemic of smallpox and 
typhoid ravaging that city. An 
other supply received from Capt. Oli- 
ver of the battleship New Hampshire 
is being taken to Torreon by auto- 
mobile. 

Consul Holland at Saltlllo reports 
direct telegraphic communications 
with Mexico City resumed. 

Amerlcanai Lieaving. 

Americans in Mexico are heeding 
President Wilson's warning to get out 
and state department officials believe 
that two weeks hence there will hard- 
ly be 1,000 of them left In the troubled 
southern republic. 

Although many had refused ta 
consider leaving before the word 
came of the presidents urgent advice, 
hundreds have been starting for home 
or abroad daily, during the last three 
weeks and it is estimated that nearly 
10,000 or about as many as are still In 
Mexico, have gotten away. 

Of those now preparing to leave, 
4,000 will need help from the govern- 
ment, so the 1100,000 appropriation 
asked for b Sec-i^tary Bryan some 
time aso to p a refugees, will be need- 
ed immediately. 

Since last February, the state de- 
partment has aided. It was said, be- 
tween 4,000 and 5,000 refugees, fur- 
nishing money or transportation In 
some Instances, and in others securing 
special rates or accommodations. 

Department officials estimate that 
there were about 60,000 Americans in 
Mexico two or three years ago, and 
Ambassador Wilson places the num- 
ber as high as 75.000. In aiding Amer- 
ican refugees, the American Red Cross 
has spent about $23,000. 

BRYAN GOES out" 

ON LECTURE RUN. 



FAMOUS JURIST ON 

VISIT TO AMERICA 




Have Heard of No Cancella- 
tion of His Return to 
Mexico City. 



Vera Cruz Tells of Placing 

of American War 

Vessels. 



Gamboa Resents Warning 

to Americans to Leave 

Mexico. 



VISCOUNT HALDANE, 

Lord High Chancellor of Great 

Britain. 



LORD HALDANE 
IN AMERICA 

Lord High Chancellor of 

Great Britain on Five- 

Day Visit. 



Washinglon, Aug. 29.— Administra- 
tion officials were puzzled today by 
news dispatches saying that John 
Lind had reconsidered his plans to 
go to Mexico City, and would remain 
in Vera Cruz several days. While It 
has been left entirely to Mr. Llnd'B 
discretion to determine his own move- 
ments, the understanding had been 
fron official messages received yester- 
day that he would take an early train 
today for Mexico City to resume nego- 
tiations with the Huerta government. 

Early today no word had been re- 
ceived from Mr. Lind indicating any 
change in plan. Secretary Bryan and 
President Wilson had an early confer- 
ence and awaited further dispatcheg. 
The president hoped to leave for 
Cornish, N. H., late today unless de- 
velopments required his presence In 
Washi igton. 



Will Address American Bar 

Association at 

Montreal. 



Washington, Aug. 29. — Secretary 
Bryan left here early today for Doy- 
lestown. Pa., to deliver a lecture late 
this afternoon. He will speak at Ken- 
nett Square, Pa., tonight, returning 
here tomorrow morning. Mr. Bryan will 
speak In Oxford, Pa., tomorrow after- 
noon and In Belalr, Md., in the eve- 
ning, returning to Washington again 
Sunday. 




YOUR HELP IS NEEDED. 



BULL MOOSERS WANT 
GAYNOR FOR BENCH 



Hope to Simplify Mayoralty 

Race By Judiciary 

Ticket. 

New York. Aug. 29. — A movement 
which, if carried out. will eliminate 
Mayor Gaynor as a factor In the 
mayoralty race, took form last night 
with the unofficial announcement tjiat 
the mayor's name would be presented 
to the conference committee of the 
Progr-^^^sslve party in Rochester, Sept. 
20, as a candidate for nomination as 
chief justice of the court of appeals. 
It is understood the Progressives who 
favor the mayor's nomination for the 
Judicial office hope that other parties 
will follow suit and name him for the 
place. 



HondaraN Aeeeptit Peare Plan. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Honduras to- 
day became the fifth country to accept 
the details of Secretary Bryan's peace 
plan. 



Romance, Discouraged By 

Strike, Breaks Out in 

Paterson. 

Paterson, N. J., Aug. 29. — Romance 
in the silk mills of Paterson has re- 
vived with the resumption of work. 
So many workers stormed the mar- 
riage license bureau today the regis- 
trar decided to keep his office open 
tonight to accommodate all comers. 
This never has been done before. Dur- 
ing the strike practically no licenses 
were issued. 



SICILIANS ALARMED 
BY QUAKES AND WIND 

Several Huts in American 

Quarter of Messina 

Are Wrecked. 

Messina, Sicily, Aug. 29.— The seismic 
instruments here have registered dur- 
ing the last twenty-four hours contin- 
ued earth disturbances. A strong hur- 
ricane also has been blowing, whia"! 
has caused the virtual destruction of a 
number of huts in the American quar- 
ter. The populace fears that these con- 
ditions foretell of a disaster, 




New York, Aug. 29.— The steamship 
Lusitania, bearing Viscount Haldane, 
the first lord high chancellor of Great 
Britain to leave his country for 400 
years, entered New York harbor this 
morning. A reception committee, con- 
sisting of representatives of the Unit- 
ed States government and of the 
American Bar association, whose 
guest he will be during a five days' 

I^f iJ ^'" ♦ *i\!^ country and Canada, 
waited at the pier to welcome the dis- 
tinguished visitor to the United 
btates. 

After a reception aboard ship. Lord 
Haidane and his party, which includ- 
ed Sir Kenneth Muir-Mackenzle clerk 
of the crown, and Miss Elizabeth Hal- 
dane, the chancellor's sister were es- 
corted to the Hotel Plaza, 'where he 
received newspaper men for the first 
interview he has given to the press 
since election to his high office 
Gneat of C. A. Severance.' 
A Sightseeing tour of New York 
late this afternoon was the first event 
of the many arranged for his enter- 
tainment. Tonight he will be the 
guest at a dinner given by C A Sev- 
erance of St. Paul, a member of the 
American Bar association. Tomorrow 
J. P. Morgans yacht. Corsair, will 
take him to West Point, where he 
will review the cadets. As a former 
secretary of state for war, Lord Hal- 
dane is expected to find in this event 
unusual interest. 

Charles J. Doherty, minister of Jus- 
tice of Canada and Sir Lomer Gouin, 
premier of the province of Quebec 
will be at West Point to meet the 
chancellor and will accompany him to 
Albany, where the minister of jus- 
tice will entertain him at dinner in 
the evening. 

AddreHs Bar Assoclatloa. 
At midnight the party will leave for 
Montreal, and Monday afternoon the 
chancellor will address the annual 
meeting of the American Bar associ- 
ation in that city and receive the de- 
gree of doctor of civil law from Mc- 
Gill university. 

His busy five days will end In New 
York Tuesday, wheu the chancellor 
will again board the Lusitania for his 
lomeward voyage. 

TRAPPERS DENITtHE 
STEFANSSON CLAIMS 

Declare They Are the Dis- 
coverers of the Blonde 
Eskimos. 

Edmonton, Alta., Aug. 29. — Three 
Fort Simpson trappers, G. L. Deschan- 
beault and Joseph and William Hud- 
son, who have Just returned from a 
long journey to the Far North, deny 
the claim of Viljhalmur Stefansson, the 
Arctic explorer, that he Is the dis- 
coverer of the tribe of blonde Eskimo. 
They declare that In penetrating the 
wilds of the Far North with an Eskimo 
guide they heard stories of a tribe of 
strange Eskimo, and that, guided to 
the camp of this tribe,, they found Es- 
kimos whiter than the white men who 
have Epent years in the cold and winds 
of the Far North. 

They claim they spent three weeks 
with the strange tribe, which num- 
bered 300, and secured many valuable 
skins. When Stefansson arrived, they 
declare, they already were there, and 
the members of the tribe then told of 
other and larger tribes similar to them- 
selves on the shores of the Arctic. 

The trappers claim they pushed on 
northward for some distance, delaying 
their return to civilization, when they 
learned Stefansson had claimed the dis- 
covery of the tribe. 



Remaina la Vera Cms. 

Vera Cruz. Aug. 29.— John Lind 
will remain in Vera Cruz for several 
days. This announcement was mada 
late last night. Only unexpected hap- 
penings or a special request from the 
Mexican government will ceuse hlra 
to return to Mexico City 

Senor Gamboa, minister of foreign 
affairs, has not asked Mr. Lind to re- 
turn to the capital. 

T.^*^ Is further announced that Mr. 
Lind will make Vera Cruz his head- 
quarters because he has suffered from 
ill-health in Mexico City. 

William Bayard Hale sailed yester- 
day afternoon for Havana. Se will 
disembark there and proceed bv tho 
Key West route to Washington" He 
carries with hlra the i-rlginals of the 
Mexican gx'Vfciii>ncnfg o-nimunications. 

M T. I^*' \^^^ ^ ^^^'¥ confprfcnce witii 
Mr. Lind prior to sailing, and tne lat- 
ter attaches much Importance to Dr. 
Hales trip to Washington, where he 
is to place the whole situation before 
the president. Towards the end of the 
conference they were joined by Rear 
Admiral Fletcher. The steamship was 
delayed In port for more than two 
hours waiting for Dr. Hale 

_. Placing of Warahlpa. 

The United States gunboat Nash- 
ville Is expected to reach here today. 

hi 'l.-1''Pvf^*^i' *^^^ *^« warships wlU 
be distributed as follows- 

r./"^ Vera Cruz, the Louisiana, Michl- 

gan and South Carolina; at famplco. 

New Hampshire; Tuxpam and Mlhat^ 

Ian, Tacoma; Campeche, Wheeling 

*w""-1 transport will carry supplies for 

the fleet, and the Nashville will carry 

orders. All the vessels have instruc- 

tlons to receive refugees and to fur- 

(Contlnued on page 11, third column.) 

COPPER^OUJJTRY 
INQUEST RESUMED 

Union Men Claim Deputies 

Shot Strikers in Cold 

Blood. 

Calumet. Mich., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Inquest Into the 
killing of strikers two weeks ago at 
the Champion mine by deputies and de- 
tectives, following an attempt made 
by the deputies to arrest two strikers 
for an alleged disturbance of peace, 
was continued at Houghton this morn- 
ing. The Federation of Miners' at- 
torneys will introduce the testimony 
of sixteen more witnesses to show that 
the strikers did not flre at the depu- 
ties; that they did not resist arrest, 
and that the killing was cold blooded 
and the shooting unnecessary. The 
defense will also introduce new testi- 
mony. The six officers held on a tech- 
nical charge of murder will appear be- 
fore the inquest, but will not testify. 

There were no strike disorders Last 
night or this morning beyond an at- 
tack on another miner, at Osceola, wh© 
had pepper thrown into his eyes by a 
woman. The strikers at Mohawk pa- 
raded again last night, but heavy 
rains kept nearly everyone indoors. 

The state troops here were reduced 
again bj the departure of 150 men. 
There are 1,000 militiamen still on duty 
and it was announced that there will 
be no further reduction for the present. 

STEENERSOiToiTTHE 
CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE 

Is Chosen to Represent 

Minnesota — Woods of 

Iowa Chairman. 

From The Her»td WuhlaglMi Bureav^ 
Washington, Aug. 29. — Representa- 
tive Bteenerson was today selected as 
the Minnesota member of the Repub- 
lican congressional campaign commit- 
tee at a meeting presided over by Sen- 
ator Nelson. Mr. Steenerson attended 
the committee meetings and assisted 
in Its organization. 

The committee elected Representative 
Frank P. Woods of Iowa chairman. The 
committee also elected Senator Brade- 
gee of Connecticut and Representatives 
Kahn of California and Patten of Penn- 
sylvania, vice chairmen, and John C. 
Eversman of Illinois, secretary. The 
treasurer will be named later. 

Chairman Woods will soon announce 
the executive committee of the con- 

freselonal committee, which will con- 
uct the coming conKresalonal cam* 
palgna. 



A^ 



1 



1 

t 

d 



^ 



>«?# 



Friday, 



THE DULUTTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 




WEATHER — Fair weather to- 
night and Saturday; warmer 
Saturday; westerly winds 



EARLY FALL 
SHOWING «f 
MEN'S SUITS 



make one glad the glorious 
lutumn days are just about 
here. 

The new High Art — the very- 
latest in style and fabric — 
which we are showing, are the 
same as are beginning to ap- 
pear on Broadway. 



You'll like 
this Fall's 
models and 
patterns at-- - 



others $15 to $40 



ADDITIOlAL SPORTS ) 



Paris 



New York 




TILLMAN IS 
BETTER MAN 

Minneapolis Boxer Wins 

Decision on Foul Over 

Salvator of St. Paul. 



Bout Stopped in Eighth 
Round When Contest Be- 
comes Wrestling Matcti. 






* 'Correct Dress for Women 
^FEATURE- 




i and Girls'' 



Final Close-Out Sale of 
Summer Wearables 



TOMORROW IN OUR BOY'S 
DEPARTMENT 

First showing of School Suits for fall — made 
just like papa's in all the best materials for Du- 
luth wear. Bring the boy here and start him for 
5chool in an Oak Hall Suit. 

SUITS ^Src^'" $2.95 to $15.00 

Boys' Shoes, Boys* Waists, Boys' Hats and Caps 



FIRST SHOWING KNOX AND STETSON HATS! 



We're proud of our new Soft and Stiff Hats for fall — not merely because 
they're exclusive creations from Knox. Stetson and other world famous 
makers, but becaiise they're here in such unusually fine assortments. 

KNOX HATS 

Stiff and Soft. 



$s.oo 

STETSON HATS 
S3.50 to S5 



BEACON HATS 

Made by Knox. 

$3.30 

ROSWELLE HATS 
$3.00 



OAK HALL "SPECIAL" 



.$2.00 



NEW 
NECKWEAR 

Every Saturday we 
show In limited assort- 
ments New Neckwear 
direct from New York, 
T«>morrow 

Cravata 



Duluth't Foremoit (Jlothing Store 



Meet Your 

Friends 

Here 



Open 

Late 

Saturdays 



Oak Hall Bldg. 



-«4^^^ v*-^^:' --f^^-^-^- :v:-^ <v-^' -:-^ 



PRISONERS 
POTTO^WORK 

Repairing Second Street 
Tar Macadam With Con- 
crete Surface. 



Commissioner Murchison Is 
Conducting Two Interest- 
ing Experiments. 



Two experiments which may have 
far-reachlngr effects, particularly on 
tar macadam streets. In street main- 
tenance In Duluth, are being conducted 
by Roderick Murchison, commissioner 
of public works. 

The tar macadam on the lower side 
of Second street, between Second and 
Third avenues east. Is to be replaced 
with concrete, and road oil is being: 
tried out on a piece of tar macadam 

on Jefferson street. 

The labor of city prisoner.^ sentenced 
to the county jail is being utilized for 
the Second street job. Thij? will not 
only reduce the expense to a minimum, 
but it win demon.strate the advisability 
of u.sing petty offenders for construc- 
tive street worlt. 

Tliis is a new venture as far as 
Duluth Is concerned, but it has been 
successfully tried out in other parts 
of the country, though more especially 
with reformatories and penitentiaries. 



If it is found that the men evince an 
interest in the work and prefer it to 
the close confinement of the county 
Jail, the experiment may well resolve 
itself Into a permanent Institution, 
beneficial to the prisoners as well as to 
the community. The work farm will 
be in operation next year, but would 
not necessarily conflict with such a 
program, and might further It. When 
the congestion at the jail is eliminated 
through the work farm, the prisoners 
used for the street work could be given 
better accommodations, working out- 
doors during the day and remaining at 
the jail over night, under suitable con- 
ditions which cannot be had at present. 
L'slns Crushed Rock. 
Under all of the tar macadam pave- 
ments is a cushion of several inches of 
crushed rock, explains Commissioner 
Murchison. He believes that this, or 
much of it, can be utilized In the mak- 
ing of the concrete, reducing the cost 
considerably, a» crushed rock Is esti- 
mated by him at J1.50 per cubic yard. 
As nothing of this kind has been done 
heretofore it is impossible to know 
approximately how It will work out 
but when the half block has been laid 
definite data will be available as each 
step is being carefully checked and 
recorded. As Duluth has considerable 
tar macadam in various stages of dis- 
integration, the outcome of this ex- 
periment win be watched with interest 
along with the success of the labor 
from the county Jail. 

The commissioner further believes 
that soaking tar macadam with water 
does not have the best effect upon it. 
To determine how oil would operate 
on Its surface, he Is having a small 
piece treated on Jefferson street, where 
the pavement Is in better shape than 
the average. The road oil used in Du- 
luth is 40 per cent asphalt. It Is be- 
lieved that this will form a binder with 
the fine dust particles which are pro- 
duced by the traffic, not only laying 
the dust but improving and preserving 
the surface. 

Among the tar macadam highways 
are Jefferson street. Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth avenues east. First 
avenue west and Ramsey street. West 
Superior street and Second street were 
paved with tar macadam but they are 
in such distressful condition that more 
heroic measures will be necessary In 
caring for them. 



HAVE HORSES 
^TEMPERAMENT?" 



Washington Woman Thinks 
Jangling Bells Irritate 
Their Nerves. 



Horses with ears attuned to music, 
which have been tortured by the dis- 
cordant Jangle of bells hung around 
their necks or attached to the shafts 
of the vehicles they draw, have found 
a champion in a fashionable woman of 
Washington. D. C who has filed 
formal protest against this form of 
cruelty with the humane agent of 
Washington. 

The woman said the clanking bells 
were enough to break down the nerv- 
ous system of any horse and she wants 
relief for the beasts. 

That a horse is sentimental and Is 
susceptible to crooning melodies has 
been noticed by Duluthlans. It is 
said that a horse on L.ondon road 
never turns his head toward Superior 
street but trots along In a daze, with 
his gaze directed toward the lake. 
The purring romance of ft\e water, It 
Is said, has as much attraction for a 
horse as for a young man in spring- 
time. 

That the musical instincts of the 
beasts may be in danger from the 
Jangling of discordant bells, however, 
has never been given much thought 
here. 



Last Raft Aitohs Lake. 

Ashland, Wis., Aug. 29. — The last 
Canadian raft to be brought across 
Lalte Superior this year has arrived 
in Ashland. This Is the fifth that has 
been here this summer and completes 
the best rafting record on the Great 
L/akes. The estimated value of the 
rafts Is $100,000. 



BY ORUCE. 

Before a north state boxing club last 
evening Johnny Tillman of Minneapolis 
was given the decision over Johnny 
Salvator in the eighth round of a 
scheduled fifteen round bout. Referee 
N. B. McNulty awarding the decision on 
a foul, when the little Dutchman of 
St. Paul attempted to throw the Min- 
neapolltan out of the ring. 

It was one of the best and altogeth- 
er one of the most spectacular battles 
that has been fought in this section of 
the country for some time. While Till- 
nian clearly had the better of the go- 
ing up to the time the bout was 
stopped, the stocky German youth was 
not groggy at any time, nor was he in 
a bad way when the contest was 
brought to an end. 

The men started cautiously. After 
some preliminary sparring Tillman 
rushed and worked his wicked right 
upper cut to head. This was the blow 
that the clever Minneapolis boy placed 
his chief reliance upon during the go. 
Tillman would feint, often drawing a 
lead from Salvator and then would 
slam in with the right. Occasionally 
he would work a straight left to the 
face, varying this with a left swing, 
but the blow tha| had the most effect 
was the upper cut, Salvator often aid- 
ing the effectiveness of the blow by 
coming in with lowered head and thus 
receiving the full force of the sting. 
Tlllnian Dropped. 
In the third round It looked like cur- 
tains for Tillman. This was the one 
round of the contest when Salvator had 
the better of the going. A short left 
hook caught Tillman flush on the chin 
and he dropped to the floor. Tillman 
claims that his head struck fhe canvas. 
However, whether this was true or not, 
the Minneapolis fighter arose groggy 
and da>ed. ' He hung on desperately 
flghtinef Salvator and despite the ef- 
fort of the Dutchnfian to shake him off, 
Tillman managed to weather the storm 
and grow stronger. Toward the end 
of the round Johnny's head cleared and 
he was flinging back strong when the 
gong brought the hostilities to a close. 
Tillman stalled at the beginning of 
the fourth round. Salvator was still 
eager to put over the finishing punch, 
but as the round progressed Tillman 
grew stronger and apparently gained 
confidence. Toward the end of this 
session the Minneapolis kid resumed 
his tearing In tactics and his old slash- 
ing right upper cut to face was begin- 
ning to slow the little German up. 

Just what effect the blows of Tillman 
had upon his stocky adversary, 'It 
would be difficult to say. Salvator 
never faltered; he kept coming in for 
more, often getting the brunt of his 
opponent's atj^'k as he was advancing 
with loweredStr^bd. 

Tillman pro^d far the more clever 
of the two hoyjj, but in the matter of 
gameness, credit must be given to Sal- 
vator, for he never showed the least 
indication of desiring to quit, nor was 
the foul a palpable effort to have the 
scrap brought to an end, for the Dutch- 
man was not weak in the final round, 
nor did he show any signs of being 
really groggy. 

From the fourth to the eighth each 
round was a repetition of the one pre- 
ceedlng. Tillman would rush his op- 
ponent to the ropes and while the Ger- 
man John was richocheting along the 
ropes, Tillman would bombard the face 
of his adversary, uppercuttlng, swing- 
ing with both hands and generally hav- 
ing clearly the best of the rally. 

Salvator's second claimed that Till- 
man was taking ,unfair advantage of 
his man and wrestling him over the 
ropes. He set up the claim that In the 
third round Tillman tried to throw Sal- 
vator over the ropes. It was in retalia- 
tion of this real or fancied act thai 
Salvator attempted, In pursuant to In- 
structions from his corner, to dump 
Tillman over the top string of tI;o 
hempen enclosure, and It was this de- 
liberate act that brought the bout to 
an end. 

It is not belfevied that Salvator did 
the act BO much through deliberate In- 
tent as through an error ot Judgment. 
While out-boxecT and out-fought In all 
rounds with the exception of the third 
and opening round, Salvator could have 
gone on. 

Young Azine and Abe O'Nell fought 
ten rounds In the curtain raiser, and 
the scrap was one of the best seen In 
the northern part of the state for some 
time. There was little to choose be- 
tween the two boys, but the little be- 
longs rightly to Azine, who exceeded 
in aggressiveness and hitting power, 
though O'Nell at several times out- 
boxed and out-pointed his adversary. 

According to the statement of Mike 
McNulty of St. Paul, manager of Sal- 
vator, his boy was not In the best of 
condition. McNulty claims that he 
took the scrap upon short notice and 
that his protoge had bat a few days to 
attempt to condition himself. 



$45 to $75 Women's and Misses' 

Suits-! 1 5 

Entire stock of Colored Cloth and Silk 
Suits. Sizes 34 to 47. 

$35 to $45 Women's and Misses* 
Suits-$|0 

Plain tailored and novelty styles, white 
and colors. 15 suits in the lot. 

Misses' and Junior Suits at $7.50 

(Former values $19.50 to $27.50.) 

Entire Stock of White Suits 
and Coats at V2 Price 

Clearance of Junior Suits at $ 1 

Bedford Cords and Eponges, white and 
colors. Formerly $32.50 and $35.00! 

Linen and Eponge Suits at $7.50 

(Formerly to $45.) 
White and colors in a variety of styles. 

Clearance of Blouses, $ 1 and $2 

Voiles, Lingeries and Crepes, Cluny and 
lace trim styles. Former values to $8.50. 



Clearance of Summer Dresses 

"'$5.00 

Our entire stock of Linen and 
Eponge Dresses, in white and colors. 
Former values to $18.50. 

20 Linen Dresses at 

$3.75 

(Formerly $12.50.) 

Clearance of Millinery at 

$L00 

Every Summer Hat in the house. 
Values to $18. 

Children's Headwear 
25c to $ 1 .00 

Our entire stock of Summer Hats. 
Formerly to $7.50. 

Clearance of Girls* Dresses at 

$3.00 

Linens, Eponges, Bedford Cords 
and Reps. White and colors. For- 
merly to $10.75. 

Ginghams, Linens and Reps 

at $2.00 

White and colors. Formerly to $6.75. 



I' 



I. 



Horeb, Dane county, to visit that place 
and assist in the formation of a ski 
association. The club will also join 
the national association, and will build 
a steel ski slide, one of eight to be 
built in the United States. 



Fighter 



Denver, Col., Aug. 29. — Benny Chavez 
of Trinidad and Frankle Burns of Jer- 
sey City rested today preparatory to 
their ten round match here tonight. 
They will fight at 118 pounds. 
* 

Will Play at Superior. 

The baseball team representing the 
Northern Electrical company of Duluth 
will meet the Superior Water & Light 
department team tomorrow afternoon at 
Hislop park. 

WHO WOULD NOT GO 
TO ELY SCHOOL? 



about 2 o'clock at his home, 426 Mc- 
Millan street. He had been ailing for 
some time and during the last week 
had been unable to attend to his du- 
ties as a locomotive fireman on the 
South Shore. The deceased man leaves 
a wife and four children, two girls and 
two boys. 



THREE STARS ON 



ONE PROGRAM 



'EARN WHILE 
YOU LEARN" 




GOPHER ' 

^ GREAT 3TATE < 

SHOEREPAmiNG 

£STABtl5HMENt. 



''A DOLLAR SAVED IS A DOLLAR EARNED" 

Shoe Saving 

AS EXEMPLIFIED IN OUR 
METHODS OF REPAIRING. 
s^SAVES YOUR PARENTS 
MANY DOLLARS YEARLY. 



The Gopher Charges Less. 
The Gopher Repairs Your Shoes Right. 

The Gopher Does It Promptly. 

While You Wait 



DULUTH 

MAIN SHOP 

17 Second Ava. 

We$t. 



OUR OTHER SHOPS 

10 First Avenue West, 
12 Fourth Avenue West 



SUPERIOR— HI 8 Tower Ave. 




RIFLEMEN PREPARE 

TO LEAVE CAMP. 

Camp Perry, Ohio, Aug. 29. — The 
final stage of the national team match 
was shot here today on the skirmish 
run. With the conclusion of this 
event, many teams will break camp. 
The Hawaiian team will be one of the 
first to go. 

The foreign teams expected to get 
Into action on the 300 metre range this 
afternoon. There was shooting on the 
revolver ranges In preparation for the 
national revolver match which opens 
tomorrow. 

The Peruvian team was occupied to- 
day in making arrangements to send 
back to Peru the body of Francisco 
Zegarra Ballon, who was accidentally 
shot and killed yesterday by a team 
mate, Juan E. Zegarra. 

CAVALRY TEAM 

WI NNER O F SHOOT. 

Camp Perry, Ohio, Aug. 29. — The na- 
tional team match was concluded at 
noon today, the United States cavalry 
team winning with a score of 2,67B. 
The victors were led by Capt. W. H. 
Clopton of the Thirteenth cavalry. 
Other leading scores were: United 
States navy, second, 2,656; Oregon, 
third. 2,605; United States marine 
corps, fourth, 2,602; Iowa, fifth, 2.601. 

Canadians Beaten. 

Nlagara-on-the-^ke, Ont., Aug. 29. — 
In the Intet-natlona^ lawn tennis tour- 
nament double here today Johnson and 
Griffin, California, beat Strachan and 
Hall, Toronto, 6-3, 6-4. 

New Ski Club. 

Ashland, Wis., Aug. 29. — National 
Secretary Aksel Halter of the National 
Ski association, has been Invited by 
the Liake P%rk aasociatlon of Mount 



Extra Week of Vacation for 

Pupils at West Duluth 

Building. 

Children in the Ely school district 
at West Duluth may lord It over less 
fortunate young Duluthians. They 
will have an extra week of vacation, 

for the Ely school will not open un- 
til Monday, Sept. 8. Sewer connec- 
tions broken In the course of con- 
struction of the Denfeld high school 
near the Ely building must be re- 
placed and the school will not be 
opened at the same time as other 
schools next Tuesday. 

Supt. R. E. Denfeld Issued a notice 
this morning to Ely teachers not oth- 
erwise assigned to report at the su- 
perintendent's office next Tuesday 
morning instead of at the school. A 
similar notice was issued to the teach- 
ers assigned to the E. R. Cobb school 
at Woodland and not otherwise as- 
signed. The Cobb school will not be 
opened until about Oct. 1. . , ,. 

There will be no seventh or eigntn 
grades In the Franklin or Nettleton 
school this year. Pupils entering 
those grades In the two schools will 
report at the Washington grade 
school. Lake avenue and Third street, 
Tuesday morning to be enrolled In the 
junior high s chool.^ 

GREAT^ROWTiT 

IN ROTARIANISM 

Duluth Delegate Returns 

From Annual Meeting 

at Buffalo. 

Frank E. Randall, president of the 
Duluth Rotary club, returned yester- 
day from Buffalo, where he represent- 
ed the local organization at the an- 
nual International meeting of Ro- 
tary clubs. . - 

"There were delegates present from 
Ireland England, Scotland, practically 
all of 'the countries of Europe and 
from Canada," said Mr. Randall today. 

"This gathering emphasizes very 
strikingly the growth of the rotary 
movement within the past year I be- 
lieve It Is safe to say that the ro- 
tary clubs of ths country and other 
countries, also, have Increased at least 
60 per cent within the past year. 
There has been a tremendous progress 
and this fact was signally demon- 
strated at the Buffalo meeting. 

"Much of the work before the con- 
vention was of a routine character^ 
The reports have not all been compiled 
nor have all of the statistics been 
gathered. It Is only necessary to 
state that It was the moMt successful 
conventlonin the history of the move- 
ment greatly exceeding the meeting 
heldhfrl last year In PoInt of at- 
tendance of delegates, and that the 
rotary movement has received a great 
Impetus t hrough It." 

South Shore Fireman Die*. 

Marquette, Mich.. Aug. 29.— Alexan- 
der Lattereil. aged about 45 years, 
dropped dead yesterday morning at 



Melba, Kubelik and Burke 

May Be Brought to 

Duluth. 

Duluth may hear Melba, Kubelik and 
Edmund Burke on one program this 
fall. 

The three noted artists have ar- 
ranged an all-star concert tour through 
the West for the coming musical sea- 
son. They have Nov. 25 open and have 



given the Lyceum management an op- 
portunity to sign a contract for that 
date. 

The offer Is now being considered 
by the Lyceum management. Tlie guar- 
antee demanded. |5,000, is an unusually 
high one and there Is some question 
where an audience can be obtained In 
Duluth to warrant such a guarantee. 
The decision will be made In a day 
or two. 



WAS RETU RNING JEWELS. 

So Charge Against Regina, Sask., 
Youth is Not Pressed. 

Kenmare, N. D.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Conscious smitten, and 
on his way to return Jewels which h« 
had taken from a farm house near 
Kenmare, Duncan MacDonald, aged 17, 
of Reglna. Sask., was on his way back 
to return the stolen property when ha 
TV as arrested. The owner agreed to 
dismiss the charge and the boy Is un« 
der probation. 



Fall Styles and Fabrics 
Now Ready! ' 







^^^ ^tt^*^ 







rf«>^e.o 



t^^"* 




a<i 



At^^ .. .^ 






ttv^- 



.tJtt 



English Novelties to order $ 

Beautiful grays, browns, blues, 
the new greens, fancy mixtures. 

Lined Top Coats— $ 

Made of the finest foreign fabrics, in all the 
newest and most exclusive patterns, to order — 



35 
35 




eSTADLISnCD 1890 

829 W. SUPERIOR STREET 



mmim 



■ ^^''-^ •" 



f r^r^,-,f^.' J. 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 




Closed All Day Monday^ Labor Day. 



> 




S4andS6 Wett JSuperior Street-^Near Fir»t Avt. We$t 
"Where Popular Prices Prevail" 

Featuring Fall 

Suits, Coats and 

Dresses 

We Specialize Beautiful Fall 
Tailored Suits at 






In the rough wintry materials and in the government 
serges---fabrics that are desirable for long service, 
showing over lb different styles, in colors of black, 
riavy, brown and Copenhagen. 

Also Strong Showing of Suits 
at $15.00 and $19.75 

And others up to $75.00. 

An unusual large showing of Fall Coats, at $15.00. 
The nobby chinchillas, boucles, fancy rough effects, 
in manv clever styles for fall; others at $19.75, $22.50 
and $25'.00. 

New White Chinchilla Coats, $19.75 and $25.00. 

New Tailored Skirts at $5.00 

New effects in serges, with slit opening and draped 
>tylcs. 

Nev7 Check Skirts at $6.50 and $7.50. 

Stunning Wool Dresses for school wear, $10.00, 
$12.50 and $15.00. 





And r.ll in perfect attune, sparkling innovation in 
fashion — extraordinary display, at popular prices. 





New Fall Waists on Sale at 98c 

Leiser leads at the start, with the new styles at 
low prices. Choice from 15 different stvles, all sizes. 
New Net Waists at $2.98, $3.50 and $5.00. 



^4^ 





OWNED 20 SE CTIONS, 

Late Steele County, N. D,, Farmer 
Was Well Fixed. 

Sherbrcoke. N. D.. Aug^. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — An appraisement of 
the estate of Flngal Enger, a promin- 
ent Steel county farmer who died 
Wednesday, reveals that he was the 
owner of twenty sections of choice 
Steel, Traill and Grand Forks countv 
farming lands, the total acreage being 
16.400 acres. 

Ten children survive, and only re- 
cently he made plans whereby each one 



of hl8 nine sons should receive a full 
section of land. 

Mr. Enger homesteaded In Steel coun. 
ty In 1871, and marketed his first grain 
at Fargo, seventy-one miles distant. 
He was tne first Scandinavian to settle 
in Steele county, though It Is now one 
of the strongest Scandinavian counties 
in North Dakota. 



Vrglns Se«d !^el««tlon Care. 

Fargo, N. D., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — To Insure next year's 
corn crop, bulletins are beln^ issued to 
the farmers of the state urging care In 
the selection of the seed for the next 
crop. As the corn is maturing now, 
the farmers are advised to go through 
the fields and make their selections at 
this time. 



Get 

Your 
Fan 
Suit 



as early as you can and 
have all the good of it 
from now on. 

Hart Schaffncr & Marx 
have made some of the 
snappiest styles for young 
men we've ever shown. 
Better see them. Prices, 
$18, $20 and up to $35. 

At $22.00 and $25.00 
some extremely good 
values. 

We will show the best values in this city in suits for 
$15.00, including Blue Serges. 




Copyright H*n Schaffner & Marx 



KENNEY & ANKER 

409 AND 411 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 



DULUTH IS ENTERTAINING!] 
RURAL LEHER CARRIERS 



Nearly Every County in Min- 
nesota Represented at 
Convention. 



Congressman Manahan Will 

Give Chief Address of 

Meeting. 



Anoka; state organizer J. F. McNally, 
Little Falls. 2 

Postmaster A. P. fiook ■ and other 
postoffice officials In Duluth are as- 
sisting in the entertainment of the 
delegates. The Duluth rural carriers 
number only four. They ace James B. 
Neil, James H. Neil, (}«orgfe W. Drake 
and William W. Schaub. 

FARM VAJUIAfrdiJS 
RIDICULOUSLY LOW 



Duluth is entertaining about IBO 
rural letter carriers today, delegates 
to the eleventh annual convention of 
the Minnesota Rural Letter Carriers' 
association, which opened at the Com- 
mercial clubrooms this morning. 

Almost every county in Minnesota 
is represented at the convention, and 
the attendance is the best ever re- 
corded at a meeting of the associa- 
tion. Many of the delegates are ac- 
companied by their wives and other 
members of their families. 

The feature address of the conven- 
tion will be given tomoirow after- 
noon by James A. Manahan, con- 
gressman-at-large from Minnesota. 
Mr. Manahan, who is now in Minne- 
apolis, will arrive tomorrow morn- 
ing. 

The convention opened this morning 
with President J. H. Drew of Red 
Wing in the chair. Postmaster A. P. 
Cook of Duluth gave the opening ad- 
dress. The assembly sang "'America," 
led by W. W. Schaub of I>uluth. Rev. 
W. F. Hovis, pastor of Endlon M. B. 
church, gave the invocation. Mr. 
Cook presented the gavel to President 
Drew, who introduced Mayor W. I. 
Prince for the address of welcome. ^l>^„I^■« ~t 

Mr. Prince commended the efficiency ,„^^? fu 
of the postal service in general and {"rl^^ '.^ V 
that given by the rural letter car- J,^" „„„„»♦ 
riers particularly. He referred to his °^^ consir 
own work in the postal service as a 
youth and remarked upon the effici- 
ency developed and the extensions 
made in the service in the last ten 
years. lie said the establishment of 
the parcel post and the postal sav- 
ings bank has made the postoffice de- 
partment more than ever a great 
branch of the public service. 
Efficient ServautM. 
The response was made by Vice 
President R. H. McKay of Rush City, 
who commented upon the extent of 
the rural mall service. He said that 
one-fourth of the employes of the 
postoffice department are now in the 
rural service and that branch of the 
postal work is only In Its infancy. He 
said that responsibilities have in- 
creased with the inauguration of the 
parcel post system, but the rural car- 
rier goes on faithfully performing his 
duties, certain that reward will come 
In shape of ample recognition in time. 
He said government reports have 
shown that the rural service ranks 
highly in efficiency and integrity and 
he urged upon the organized carriers 
to maintain that standard. 

President Drews annual address was 
a short message on the subject of 
organization. He said every rural 
carrier should be a member of the 
association, for his own good and for 
the good of the service. He said the 
rural delivery Is the most Important 
hranch of the postal service and it 
demands the service of men who will 
assume their responsibilities with a 
proper appreciation of what is re- 
quired of them. 

The roll call of officers, reading of 
the Journal, report of the committee 
on credentials, appointment of com- 
mittees and the report of the national 
convention by George R. Rose of Man- 
kato closed the morning session. 

James I. Blakslee, fourth assistant 
postmaster general, who was expected 
to attend the meeting, was unable to 
come to Duluth and his place will be 
taken on the program by Postoffice 
Ii;8pector W. F. Monroe of Duluth. 
Afternoon Seiialon. 
This afternoon's meeting opened 
with a vocal solo by H. H. Lobb of 
Winnebago. The question box w^ 
conducted by the program committee. 
Mr. Monroe gave a talk on the de- 
partment's work. E. W. Huntley of 
Hush City spoke on "Exceptions to 
Department Rulings." A roads sym- 
posium was participated in by H. F. 
Hines of Cannon Falls, Harry E. Roblc 
of Albert Dea, and H. H. Lobb of Win- 
nebago. A symposium on organization 
work was given by L. H. Wilson of 
Olivia, J. F. McNally of Little Falls 
and H. F. Moran of Slayton. 

This evening the delegate's will be 
entertained at a boat ride around 
the horn, leaving the Fifth avenue 
dock at 8:3'0. Tomorrow morning at 
i o'clock, a boulevard drive will start 
from the McKay hotel. The early drive 
Is necessary as the meeting will open 
at 9:30. 

The program for tomorrow's ses- 
sions follow: 

MorninK Seftslon. 
9:30 a. m. — Roll call of delegates. 
Address — "The Problems of a Fra- 
ternal Organization, " Mrs. Lucy Pur- 
dy, Duluth. 

Executive session — Report of sec- 
retary, F. H. Hesselroth, Braham. 

Report of treasurer, F. H. Hunter, 
Anoka. 

Report of state organizer, J. F. Mc- 
Nally. Little Falls. 

Report of executive board. 
Report of committees — Resolutions, 
constitution and by-laws, audit, mile- 
age and per diem, new ousiness. 
Afternoon Semilon. 
2 p. m. — Address Hon. James Mana- 
han, Washington, D. C. 
Election of officers. 
Election of delegates to the national 
convention. 

Selection of next convention city. 
Adjournment. 

Meeting of executive board. 
The present officers of the associa- 
tion are: President, J. H. Drew, Red 
Wing; vice president, R. H. Drake 
Rush City: secretary, F. H. Hessel- 
roth, Braham; treasurer, F. H. Hunter, 



Granger, N. D., Legislators 

Look Out for Their 

Property. 

Fargo, N. D.. Aug. 29.— (Spec'al to 
The Herald.) — The Cass county lands 
are listed the heaviest for taxation of 
any county Jn the state and still the 
figures are ridiculously low when the 
value of the land is taken into con- 
sideration. As a result of the large 
membership of the farmers In the 
legislature they are the most lightly 
taxed of any property owners of the 
state, not only on realty but personal 
property. 

AdMeHsed at $7.S8 nn Arre. 

Cass county lands are assessed at 
$7.58. At a 40 per cent valuation, 
which is the lowest legal assessment 
that could be made that makes a to- 
tal valuation of the land at $18.90. 
There is probably not a farm in the 
county that could be purchased for 
twice that amount, and nine of every 
ten In the county could be sold from 
$50 to $100 per acre. 

Traill county was second in valu- 
ation at $7.41. Richland third with 
$6.59, Grand Forks fourth with $6.44, 
Steele fifth and Walfeh sixth. 

Because of the absence of railroads 

and Dunn county are the 

e former at $2.03 and the 

2.66. Railroads are now un- 

ruction in those counties and 

values will be advanced. 




ilberstein& 



Linen Suits 

Sacrmcea 

One Lot ^^'"5"'.° 
One Lot ""'"" '° 




Company 



$3.75 

$25.00 at 9V« i & 

All Sizes, Colors, Styles and 
Materials. 



E xtraordinary Waist Offerings 

98c 



Still many pretty styles to be had 
from the big purchase of White Voile, 
White Net and Crepe Waists. Values 
in the lot up to $2.50. 

Fisk Clark and Flagg Tailored 
Waists — High-class White Voile 
Waists, trimmed with real lace — 

Novelty Summer Waists of all kinds to $6 in 

price. 

Clearance of Chiffon, Silk and 
Novelty Cotton Waists; formerly 
worth $12.50. 



$1.95 



$3.95 




TWO AIT KIN WE DDINGS. 

Duluth Girl Furnishes Music at One 
of Events. 

Aitkin, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The marriage of Clar- 
ence Li. McDonald and Miss Grace El- 
len Wittrup was solemnized Wednes- 
day evening at the home of the bride's 
parents. Rev. C. E. Wittrup of Wau- 
kon, brother of the bride, reading the 
service, as.sisted by the father, Rev. 
J. J. Wittrup. Miss Gertrude Wittrup 
was bridesmaid and Deon F. McDonald 
best man. Miss Seestad of Duluth 
played the wedding march. The rooms, 
which were decorated with ferns and 
sweet peas, were filled with relatives 
and friends. The occasion also marked 
the twenty-sixth anniversary of the 
marriage of the bride's parents. Rev. 
and Mrs. J. J. Wittrup. Mr. and Mrs. 
McDonald are both popular young 
people of Aitkin and after a short 
wedding trip will make their home on 
the Foley farm. 

Wednesday afternoon occurred the 
marriage of William Amos Taplln to 
Miss Doris May Phillips at the home 
of the bride's parents. Rev. A. L.. 
Richardson reading the service in the 
presence of relatives and friends of 
both families. Miss Anna Phillips was 
bridesmaid and Ben O'Fallen be.st man. 
Miss Marvel BalUles played the wed- 
ding march. Dlttle CFr?rissa Sutton 
carried the ring in a T'.««. The bride 
Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Phillips and has grown to womanhood 
here, while the bridegroom is the son 
of Rev. and Mrs. Taplln. After the 
wedding lunch was served Mr. and 
Mrs. Taplln departed In an automobile 
for a trip and will make their homo 
on the Taplln farm. Both young peo- 
ple have a host of friends here. 
Among the out-of-town guests were 
Mrs. Margaret Wade of Wayne, Neb.: 
Mrs. B. McLAln, Blackwell, Okla.. Mr. 
and Mrs. S. A. Dunn, Sheyboygan. 
Wis.. Mr. and Mrs. George Wagner, 
Falconer, Iowa, 

commTs sion"c harter, 

Marquette Is to Vote Upon New Plan 
Nov. 29. 

Marquette, Mich., Aug. 29. — On Nov. 
29, if everything moves as now planned, 
this city will vote on the question of 
adopting a charter carrying the com- 
mission form of government, and if 
adopted it will go into effect probably 
the next day or as soon as the city 
recorder files the certificates showing 
the results of the election with the 
county clerk. 

The charter commission finally wound 
up its work Wednesday evening at a 
lengthy session held in the council 
chamber of the city hall. The last reso- 
lutions covering the changes in ap- 
proved sections and new sections of 
the proposed instrument, were read and 
acted upon, and Commissioner God- 
win Introduced a resolution by the 
adoption of which the commission 
adopted the charter in its entirety, and 
provided that the charter jbe presented 
to the governor for his approval, »n 
accordance with the statutes. Mr. 
Godwin's resolution also fixed the date 
of the special election at which the 
charter will be submitted to the elec- 
tors. This date Is Nov. 29. 



Summer Dre^s Clearance 

$5.00 and $10.00 

Values to $15. Values to $25. 

An opportuntiy to buy a pretty 
wash dress, in some instances at less 
than the material would cost by the 
yard. 



« 

Last oi tke Hats, $1 

Every remaining Spring and Sum- 
mer Hat, no reservations, goes Satur- 
day at one price. $1.00; values are up 
to $16.50. (Saturday will clear up 
the department, so come early to get 
the choice of our stook.) 



Lingerie on Sale at 

Hair Price 

One heaping tableful of Fine Heavy 
Undermuslins — Skirts, Princess Slips, 
Combinations and Drav^ers. Very 
choice picking at Half Price. 

Third Floor. 



rlandkercnief Special 

15c 

New^ Bretonne Linen Handker- 
chiefs; hand embroidered and verv 
fine quality; regular 25c value, Satur- 
day, 15c. 



Sale of Corsets 

79c 

For average figures, of Coutil; new 
fall models; regular $1.50 value. 

Main Floor — Opposite Elevator. 



The New^ Suits and 
Coats 

are now here in large assortment — the latest 
style ideas of Paris origin are ready for your 
inspection, and the prices are reasonable: 

SUITS AT $18.50 to $57.60 

COATS AT $15.00 TO $45.00 



again with a large crew of men and 
teams. The work was discontinued 
several month ago on account of some 
unfavorable bills that the state legis- 
lature was about to pass, but which 
failed to go through. 

The company expects to rush the 
work through without any further de- 
lays. 



HYGIENISTS TALK 
OF MALNUTRITION 



LIGHTNING VICTIM. 

International Falls Man Killed When 
Boarding Place Is Struck. 

International Falls. Minn., Aug. 29. — 

The home of Mike Tormack here was 

struck by lightning during a severe 

storm yesterday, and Harry Spiruka, 
who boarded with him, was killed. J. 
Ruell's home was also struck. Exten- 
sive damage Is reported in outlying 
sections. 



Try a Pair 

or 1 oric-ICryptok 

BiTocals 

and you'll find you have the ideal 
lens, ':omhInlng thd oval shape 
which conforms to the chape of the 
eye, with the double len« which en- 
ables you to see both far and near 
without A change of glass and witli- 
oot a dividing line. 

They are really three pairs of 
glasses in one — try them here to- 
morrow. 

Bagley ^Co. 

JEWELERS & OPTICIANS 
ai5 WKST SUPKfSIOR STREET. 

(Established 1885.) 



SHIPPING STOC K NORTH. 

Minnesotans Are Purchasing Cattle 
From Drouth-Affected Districts. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 29.— W. H. Gold, 
president of the State Bank of Red- 
wood Falls, who was in the Kansas 

City stockyards Wednesday, bought 100 
h<'ad of cattle out of the Inrush of 
immature stock from the drouth-affect- 
ed territory of Kansas and Oklahoma, 
and ordered them shipped to his farm 
In Redwood county for feeding. 

This Is the first purchase made for 
feeding purposes on Minnesota pastur- 
age since George D. Dayton of Minne- 
apolis suggested, ten days ago, that 
opportunity to add to the wealth of 
Minnesota would result from the south- 
west conditions. 

Other Minnesota landowners are per- 
manently represented in the industry, 
and several thousand head will be 
brought into the state for feeding thig 
fall, if conditions in the Southwest 
market make It desirable. 

RESUME DAM WORK. 



Construction Held Up Possibly Hostile 
Legislation Going on. 

Couderay, Wis., Aug. 29.4— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Arpln Lumber com- 
pany, which is erecting a concrete dam 

I across the Chippewa ♦iver,' near Radls- 
son, has resumed d6aatrUction work 



Open Air Exercise Scored 

By Some Speakers 

at Buffalo. 

Buffalo, N. T., Aug. 29. — The rela- 
tion of mal-nutrition to mental de- 
fectiveness, and the possibilities of 
the penny lunch in the school, were 

discussed by the international con- 
gress on school hygiene today. 

The permanent international com- 
mittee on school hygiene last night 
approved the arrangements made by 
the permanent bureau for holding the 
fifth International congress on school 
hygiene In Brussels In 1919. 

The amout of exercise, mental and 
and physical, that a growing boy or 
girl should have, was one of the ques- 
tions upon which the delegates to the 
congress expressed divergent views. 
By some it was held that there should 
be more open air athletics, while oth- 
ers said a vigorous mental life Is the 
greatest source of health and more to 
be desired than a sturdy body with 
sluggish mentality. 

"A few minutes of arm-stretching 
and flnger-twltchlng cannot be called 
physical training," said Dr. William 
Steher of Philadelphia. "We must de- 
mand at least one hour dally of mus- 
cle work, adapted to the child ac- 
cording to age and sex." 

OppoMea Open Air liVork. 

On the other side of the question. 
Dr. Joseph Lee of Boston said: 

"Better a stuffy schoolroom with 
zealous work, than fresh air and mus- 
cular development with mental flab- 
biness." 

In the section devoted to mental hy- 
giene and the hygiene of the mentally 
abnormal child, Elizabeth Irwin, field 
worker of the committee on hygiene 
of school children, New York city, 
presented a paper on the particular 
need of mental classification In special 
schools. This Is a subject which many 
speakers of the country have dwelt 
on, and the opinion seems unanimous 
that Immediate steps should be taken 
to secure classification so that the 
normal child may not be hampered 
by the mentally defective, and that 
the bright child may find its proper 
level. 



'" J "u ^ '*'^* stages of tuberculosis 
and has in consequence just received 
a pardon from the state board. 

> 

Cancer "Cure" Man Pined. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 29. — ^B T 

WiiJiams, who has been advertising 

a cancer "cure," and who was ar- 

i^'sled Saturday on complaint of Dr. 



C. E. Dutton, health commissioner, on 
a charge of practicing medicine with- 
out a license at 2S00 University ave- 
nue southeast, changed his plea in mu- 
iiicJral court yesterday to guilty, was 
given a sentence of f50 fine or ten 
daye in the workhouse and paid th© 
fine. 



(\ 



HINCKLEY MEMORIAL 

C. D. O'Brien of St. Paul Will Deli- 
ver the Annual Address. 

Hinckley, Minn., Aug. 29. — The usual 
commemoration exercises of the great 
Hinckley fire will be held at the Fire 
memorial monument next Monday at 
1:30 p. m. C. D. O'Brien of St. Paul 
will deliver the address and the son^; 
service will be conducted by George 
Mackay. The procession will leave the 
town hall at 1 sharp. 



\our Credit Is Good 



FORMERLY 

AndersonThoorsell' 
Furniture Co. 



®^1RP^ 2I"AVE.W.A 
((SH^H^tlb SUPERIOR ST. 

%eBi^ House witf^tbe Little RenC 



Davenports in Genuine Leatlier 

There are juFt a few close-out numbers, d^AA Of" 

all at special prices; for quick selling fn»| T Vi\ 






some as cheap as 

Buliels in Solid Oak 

$10.85 
Dressers in All Woods 

$9.95 



Some splendid numbers at clearance prices. Plain 
or glass front. An excellent variety to choose 
from. Some as cheap as 



W| 



This department is very complete and has never be 
fore offered such good values ; well finished and well 
built dressers with French plate mirrors, as low as . . . 

Brass Beds of Good Quality 

Reliable lines, such as the Barcalo and Siman's d^'l A Of" 

lines ; no cheap construction ; a fine collection jll II X^ 

to choose from. Some for only VA"»V/ V 

All Felt Mattresses 

Felt Mattresses in all sizes, made under most sani- 
tary conditions. Filled with live felt only ; no dead felt 
used. Some as cheap as 



$8.50 



Biff Minnesota Nat Yield. 

Winona, Minn., Aug. 29. — Southern 
Minnesota farmers say the yield of 
nuts this year will establish new high 
leccrds for butternuts, hickory and 
hazel nuts. After the first frost, nut- 
ting parties will become general. 

Dylna; Man Pardoned. 

Luverne, Minn., Aug. 29. — William 
M. Everett of Rock Rapids, Iowa, who 
has been confined in the county Jail 
here on conviction of Issuing checks 
ou banks In which he had no funds, 



Beautiful Leather Portieres 

A new line of Leather Portieres just arrived. These are very 
beautiful. Big assortment of styles and colors to select from. 
Prices are moderate. 



September IStti to 20tli 

Big Kitchen Range 
Demonstration 

The most wonderful kitchen range demonstration that Duluth 
has ever had will take place at our store on the above date. If 
you are intending to buy a range, you should wait and see this 
range demonstrated. It is an unusual proposition and your old 
stove can be turned in as part payment. 




Friday."^ 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



Augusl 29, 1913. 







Furniture 
Factory 

Distributers 
Salesrooms 



2110 and 2112 
West Superior St., 



Saves 
Purcliasers 

25^^ to 
40% 

olflie 

Retail Shops 

Profits on 

"Good 
Furniture" 




Thousands of pieces 
shown on our floors right 
here in Duluth. Every 
piece correctly made and 
finished. 

"Your Credit OK" 




Cameron- 
Johnson- 
Horgan 

Factory Distributers 

Where You Don*t Pay 
Retail Prices. 




SALOONS WILL 
BEjCARCER 

Licenses Which Are Can- 
celled Will Not Be Again 
Issued. 



Commission Will Try to Get 

Within Limit Fixed 

By Law. 



The number of saloons In Duluth 
will ultimately be In accord with the 
state law, wh'ch limits the number 
to one for each 500 of population, as 
determined by the state or Federal 
census. 

Several men have come to Commis- 
sioner W. A. Hicken, head of the 
safety division, recently, to ask if sa- 
loon licenses would be granted them 
at certain locations. They have point- 
ed out that a number of licenses have 
been revoked, making- the total under 
the recent maximum. For that rea- 
son they have been under the Impres- 
son that they could secure licenses. 

Commissioner Hicken explains that 
it is the policy of the commlssiorr to 
grant no licenses to replace those 
which have been revoked. He says that 
no new licenses will be is.«<ued until 
the number is under the limit fixed 
by the state law. On a basjp of 80,000 
population that would mean not to 
exceed 160 saloons In Duluth. The 
number is now something less than 
180. but the law provided that It 
should not operate against saloons al- 
ready licensed at the time it was 
passed. 

It was believed that the strict law 
enforcement policy of the commission 
would compel a number of saloons to 
go out of existence for lack of busi- 
ness. But thus far, except for those 
saloons, the licenses of which have 
been taken away from them, the num- 
ber Is practically unchanged. Two 
places closed, but one was reopened 
shortly afterwards and the other will 

start again next week. 

♦ 

Fill Chair of Clvlo De»t«ni. 

Rochester, N. Y.. Aug. 29. — The new 
chair of civic design at the University 
of Illinois will be filled by Charles Mul- 
ford Robinson, Rochester, author of 
numerous works on city planning. The 
University of Illinois Ig the first Amer- I 
ican institution to establfsh the course. 



NO STRIKES 
BYJINIONS 

Labor Day Will Mark Close 

of Most Peaceful 

Year. 



Three Big Strikes of Year 
Were Among Unorgan- 
ized Men. 



The year that will end on Labor day 
has been the most propitious In the 
history of local labor unions. There 
has been but one strike involving a 
labor union, the street car strike, and 
that was one that was called before a 
union was organized. 

This la considered In labor circles a 
very remarkable record and one to be 
proud of. It is believed that much of 
the credit for this remarkable record is 
due to the sane and very sensible work 
that has been accomplished by the 
labor union leaders of Duluth. LAbor 
men point out that the organization of 
the wage earners has proved a link be- 
tween employer and employe, Instead 
of proving a source of continual strife 
between the man who employs and 
the man who labors. 

The strike of the sawmill men Is 
pointed to as one of the misunderstand- 
ings that arose during the year be- 
tween the employer and the employed, 
and the labor leaders point out that 
the employers found it very easy In 
this case to break the strike of the 
unorganized wage earners. 

Another example alluded to by union 
leaders Is the strike of the ore dock 
workers. Both of these strikes oc- 
curred among laborers that were unor- 
ganized, and it Is held u]) as an ex- 
ample by organized labor leaders that 
the only strikes of the past year were 
strikes occurring among unorganized 
labor. 

It is pointed out that labor unions 
are in better shape today than at any 
time since the lockout of 1907. Some 
that were not recognized then have 
completely regained their standing, ac- 
cording to the statement of labor lead- 
ers. Also it Is pointed out, building 
trades unions are fully 100 per cent 
stronger at the present time than at 
any time since 1907. It is further 
claimed that all of the trades unions 
are stronger and are being more gen- 
erally recognized. 



Jitny^ietnent$ 



TONIGHT'S AtTRACTiONS. 



LYCEUM — Klnemacolor. 
ORPHEUM— Vaud«vllle. 
EMPKESi^— ..Vaudi^ille. 
REX— Photdplay.f 



f-' 



Goodness combined 
with style — that's the 
WALK=OVER for 



women — 

Woven into the goodness of WALK-OVER 
shoes is a style that others try to copy but fail. 

Individuality, that's it, you can't explain it, 
but the makers of WALK-OVER shoes know 
how to put it there for 
you. The easy, comfort- 
able, serviceable and 
distinctive shoe — that's 
the shoe for you. //•/ 

Let your next pair be 
WALK-OVERS. 

This new WALK- 
OVER model will 
please you and make 
you say: "I never hod 
a shoe feel like that be- 



r 



fo 



re. 



For men and women. 



$3.00 to $7.00 



Walk-Over Boot Shop 

:06 WEST SUPERIOR 



ST. 



r 



Suits That Satisfy 



•1 



In Our 



Special Sale 



AT 




SEE CENTER SHOW CASE DISPLAY 
td^All Pressing and Repairing Free of Ctiarge 




QUALITY LJ^'m^^^^^^l^mP^^ CLOTHES 

I 1 12 West Superior St., Duluth 



J 



Amusement Notes. 

Students of penology will find great 
assistance In their fight for better 
conditions in state prisons in the dis- 
semination of the Reliance two-part 
dramatic subject entitled "The Fight 
for Right," a picture, dealing with 
the prison labor question, the story 
of which was written by the well- 
known author, James Oppenhelm, 
who is said to have made a study of 
the subject. It Is being shown at the 
Lyceum. So satisfactorily does the 
picture depict the conditions com- 
plained of that the National Com- 
mittee of Prison Labor has given It 
an unqualified endorsement. The scene 
of the story is a Southern mill town, 
of which a knittiffg company Is the 
principal Industry. This company is 
suddenly compelled to close its works 
because Durland has made a contract 
with the prison authorities to put in a 
knitting plant and the company which 
employes free labor, cannot compete 
with the prison product. John and his 
brother Joe are thrown out of work 
and hard pressed for money to procure 
medicine for their lupther who Is taken 
111. In this extremfty Joe attempts to 
rob the safe of Duflaiid. the cause of 
his trouble, but Is caught in the act 
and sent to prison where he is put to 
work on Durland's knitting machines. 
The balance of the story is made up 
of the brave struggle of his sister and 
brother for his freedom and the intro- 
duction of a law In the state legisla- 
tuer to put a stop to prison labor. 

The Kinemacolo^: two-part feature 
"A Scrap of Paper." Is a very clever 
comedy and the fashions as usual are 
very interesting. 

• « * 

An unpublished manuscript of Mas- 
cagnU the famous Italian composer, is 
the treasured possession of Mme. Delia 
Rosa, the Italian singer appearing at 
the Duluth Orpheum this week. 

Mme. Delia Rosa%was a pupil of Mas- 
cagnl in Naples. T^e famous composer 
of "Cavalleria Rusticana" was mucn 
taken with the promise of his young- 
pupil, and when ah* left him made her 
a present of one of his manuscripts 
which had never been published. It is 
a serenade, and Mme. Rosa and her 
partner sing it as a duet for the second 
number in their present act. Many 
musicians who have heard It have won- 
dered what the selection was, as it 
has the haunting melody which dis- 
tinguishes the Itftliaii composer's work, 
but nobody recognized it. 

Mme. Rosa and Marcella are Italians 
but have spent most of their profes- 
sional career in France and Spain. They 
sang In the Opera Comiiiue in Paris and. 
also in the oQ^ra In Madrid. While In 
Paris, singing In the Opera Comlque, 
they were heard by Martin Beck man- 
aging director of the Orpheum circuit, 
and Mr. Beck offered them an oppor- 
tunity to tour the circuit. They ac- 
cepted and Di;(lutli is the first city in 
which they ha»e appeared. Neither oi: 
them speak English and they know 
nothing of American vaudeville meth- 
ods. They did not even realize the 
necessity of preparing a list of their 
song numbers lor the program, and 
the audiences this week have not 
known what they were singing. Their 
numbers are a selection from "II Tro- 
vatore" the serenade mentioned above, 
and a Spanish bolero. 

• • * 

Another Interesting road show 
opened yesterday at the Empress the- 
ater for the remainder gf the week. 

Headlining the bill Is the clever 
sketch presented by Mr. and Mrs 
Thornton Friel who Introduce a 
realistic railroad station. The scenery 
is complete from the small creek 
alongside the boxcar station, where 
the station ageijt fl«>hes, to the siding 
and tracks ru«Mng to the rear of the 
-stage. 

Mr. Friel plays the old station agent 
ably and Introduces some very good 
comedy during his monologue act at 
the opening. He tells all he knows 
about the neighbors and visitors In 
the town.^hile he Is fishing alongside 
his station. Mrs. Friel comes in and 
wants to know when she can get to 
New York. It Is then that more com- 
edy situations present themselves. 

Pigs hold the cards for the animal 
show this week and they scored at tlw 
opening performances yesterday. The 
little animals are well trained and 
introduce some very clever tricks. 

A good comedy act Is presented by 
Hunter and Ross, who style them- 
selves "500 pounds of comedy." They 
are both heavyweights and there Is 
no denying that they might tip the 
scales at a quarter of a ton. But 
their comedy is light and their sing- 
ing the strongest part of the bill this 
week. "Down Chesapeake Bay" scored 
a hit, the performers having been en- 
cored several times at the close of the 
number yesterday. 

As a bashful man, North of Sllber 
and North takes all laurels and he 
proved a great asset to the song and 
dance act presented by the couple 
yesterday. He plays a country boy. 
who has just come to town and wants 
to meet a girl who knows a friend of 
his. Of course he runs right Into the 
girl, but the situation Is amusing. 

"The Bachelor," a comedy film, 
closes the bill, which will continue 
until tomorrow evening with daily 

matinees. 

• « * 

The feature entitled "The Child of 
the Sea," shoJwn at the Rex last eve- 
ning, was well received by a large and 
enthusiastic ktidlence. The story Is 
built arouiid *the keeper of the light 
and is interwoven with a thread of 
love throughout to make It very In- 
teresting. The scenes of the light- 
house, the light revolving, the waves, 
the rocks, etc, are realistic and pic- 
turesque. The comedy, "Come Seben, 
Come Leben." Is a scream. Another 
drama, solos and a duet by Mrs. Run- 
kel, Mr. Runkel and Miss Barry make 
the program one of exceptional merit. 
It will continue for the rest of the 

week. 

• * • 

The Indian feature at the Lyric, 
th"? "Snake." received considerable 
comment, especially the real Indian 
snake dance with live snakes. Mona 
Darkfeather shows her ability and 
display of nerve In this feature that 
is stirring and wonderful. 

The Odeum program la well worthy 
of mention, the headliner being a com- 
edy drama featuring Margaret Fisher 
In "Sally Scraggs. the Housemaid," a 
picture storv that brings both tears 
and smiles. It is one of the best Miss 
Fisher ever appeared in. 

M'DERMOn DENIES 
ALL MULHALL'S STORY 



MtlrtuXlSS— BoUl Phones —Grand 5^2 




(?' 



'*Th6 CtnUr 0/ Economy for Thrifty PeopW 



Rentick'8 Dance Folio No. 13 




Containing 42 of the season's most popular 
songs — especially arrani^d in the newest dancv 
fornui, viz: Turltey Trots, One, Two and Thre<* 
Steps; Tangos Argentine, Slow Waitzen, Valsos 
Boston, Barn Dances, Lancers, etc.; regular 
price 75c — special Saturday, ^^/* 

ner coov .... «J«Jt^ 



^ 



per copy 



r^ 



^^ 



H^ash J^ resses pinal Qlearance 

About 100 Left on the Racks— Values $10.00, $12.50 to $23.00 

Made in Linens, Ratines, Esponge, Polka Dot Ratines, Bedford Cords and a variety of other new 
fabrics of this season's. Colors are tans, browns, pink, rose, lavender, Wis- 
teria, blues of all colors, vi^hite and black and white. On account of low g1% mt ^^ ^^ 
price quoted we will not send on apptoval or exchange; values to $25.00. ^|L ^^ ■ !■ I 
The clearance price is ^0^%^ %\^\^ 



^ee 



ese floats 



c 



^ /? 



Final clearance of 50 Nobby Fall Coats; all lined 
and made of fine all-wool Bedford Cords; col- 
ors black and navy blue. 



Values $25 at $15,00, 




oats 



^ 



25 light colored Summer and Spring Coats to be 
closed out. Whip Cords, 
Serge and Fancy; regu- 
larly $19.50; full lined 
with fine peau de cygne 



r ana bprmg L-oats to be 

$7.50 



J/ ^omen's ^oolp resses Vi londerful J rotues 



100 Wool Dresses— values to $25.00 at $11.95. New dresses just received, mostly samples 
A genuine bargain, made in fine All-wool Ratines and 
Eponges, Cords, Serges and Checks; large variety of colors 
and blacks ; all sizes ; values to $25.00 at 



ist receive* 

$1 



New suits daily arriving in all the late 
models; new materials and colorings- 

Prices Ranging $25 to $85 



f? 



if ^ 



New Coats in cloth or pile fabrics; black 
and colors; large variety — 

Prices $19.50 to $75.00 



i^ hildren*s Jjest Rearing f^ chool Q tockings 



Two of the best wearing and best known 
brands are here for active boys and girls. 



Warrior Brand Stockings Black Cat Stockings 






Boys' and Girls' Stockings, 1-1 and 2-1 ribbed, 

acknowledged the best wearing 

stocking made for the price, 

per pair, all sizes, at 

only 



15c 



For active boys and girls; made of the best 
Egyptian cotton; 2 and 4- 
thread stockings, in 1-1 ribbed 
peerless fop service; all sizes; 
per pair 




Children's School Dresses 



^ /?■ 



In Cashmere, Serges, Plaids, Poplins, Checks and 
Fancies; all rich, warm colors and in the new 
styles such as Balkan, Peter Thompson, Sailor 
Suits, Buster Brown and others. The prices are 



/P 



$3.95 to $12.50 



^ 



^ ^ 



Men's Socks 



Men's Fine Silk Lisle Hose — a regular 25c 
quality, slight mill imperfections ; black only 



2 pairs for 25c 



The Great Sate Men*s $1,50 Shirts at 95c 

95c 



■^ 



Continues, and there is still a splendid assortment to select from; madras and percales 
negligee or plaited bosoms; coat style; cuffs attached; aLso negligee with French cuffs- 
attaclied and separate colar to match; high-class shirts for only 



Children's School Shoes 

Boy*s School Shoes 

Box calf, Russian calf or vici kid; heavy soles, 
lace and blucher styles; sizes 2j4 to 7; regular 
prices up to $2.50, special for ^ "t /JO 
Saturday %PX» \J%J 

Youth* s School Shoes 

Box calf, Russian calf or vici kid; h^avy soles; 
sizes 1354 to 2; regular $2.00 Q-a OQ 

kind, special for Saturday ^JL«0^ 

Little Gent's School Shoes 

Box calf and vici kid; medium soles, broad toes; 
sizes 8^ to 13j4; special for ^Y lO 

Saturday ^X • J. c7 

Misses* School Shoes 

In gun metal, vici and patent, on button or blu- 
cher styles; medium soles and ^ "t /JO 
broad toes ; sizes 1 1 J4 to 2; spe ^ X • \#c^ 

Children's School Shoes 

In gun metal, vici kid or patent, button or lace 
styles; sizes Sya to 11; special for O* "t AO 
Saturday ^J.» ^O 



'^ fF 



Jf 



Clearance Sale Hair Switches 



The final great Clearance Sale of Hair Switches 
before changing same to our new Hair Parlors, 
which we will open in a few days. 

Switches— Regularly $1.25 kind; spe- 
cial at 

Switches— Regularly $2.25 kind; 
special at 

Switches— Regularly $3.00 kind'; 
at only 

Switches — Regular price $4.00; 
at only 

Switches — Regularly $6.50 kind; 
at only 

Special Sale Reliable Quality 
Handkerchiefs 

Women's Fine Linen Handkershiefs, with a new 
style Irish hand embroidered corner; ^ ^ 

regularly 20c, special at i OC 

Women's Fine Sheer Linen Handkerchiefs, with 
the new Glossan hand embroidered t%^ 

corners; regularly 35c, special at ^5C 

Women's Shamrock Lawn Handkerchiefs, with 
embroidered corners; regular 18c, f r>iz_ 

special at J. }S/r2C 



75c 
$1.39 
$1.75 
$2.75 
$3.75 



w 



Representative Also Denies 

Charges of Mc- 

Michaels. 

Washington. Aug. 29. — Representa- 
tive J. T. McDermott of Illinois, testi- 
fying before the house lobby commit- 
tee today, put In a categorical denial 
of the charges against him by M. M. 
Mulhall. former lobbyist for the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers, 
and I. H. McMlchaels, former chief 
page of the house. . 

The charge that he had received 
$2,000 from a brewers' association in 
his 1910 campaign he characterized ■&.% 
"dreams, juat^reftus." He admittted 
having borrovijM V^ge sums of money 
from George* D. *^Horning, a local 
pawnbroker, /'as a»- friend." Mulhall 
and McMichaWs testified that McDer- 
mott boasted of having received $7,500 
from local pawnbrokers to work 
against the Federal loan shark law. 
McDermott declared that at times he 
had owed Hofnln^^s much as $10,000. 



W^itness after witness took the stand 
before the house committee yesterday 
and denied statements of Mulhall and 
iMcMichaols against McDermott. The 
chief witness was George W. Flem- 
ming, brother-in-law of the represen- 
tative, who worked with Mulhall when 
the latter went to Chicago In 1910 to 
collect campaign funds for McDermott. 
Flemmlng said Mulhall collected only 
two checks for $100 each and got a 
"rake-off" of $25 each. He told of the 
$250 McCormlck check, on which Mc- 
Dermott signed Mulhall's name, 
swearing that Mulhall had been called 
back to Baltimore and had authorized 
the indorsement. 

TO AFFJLiATE WITH 

EAST GRAN D FORKS. 

East Grand Forks, Minn., Aug. 29. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Another dis- 
trict school probably will be affiliated 
with the local public schools. Already 
three districts have affiliated with the 
East Grand Forks schools, and yester- 
day Superintendent H. E. Wolfe was 
notified that the district located north 
of the city had called an election on 
the question. 



I. W. W. AGITATOR 

RUN OUT OF COUNTY. 

Langdon, N. D.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Charged with being a 
public nuisance because of attempts to 
organize farm hands, and with creat- 
ing considerable trouble for farmers, 
a member of the I. W. W. giving his 
name as James Alberts, was arrested 
at Calvin and following a hearing here 
was ordered to le&ve the county. He 
was escorted to the county's boundary 
line by a deputy sheriff. 

HAMILTONLEAVES 

AITK IN NEW SPAPER. 

Aitkin, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Aitkin Republican 
yesterday announced the lease of that 
paper by .A L.. Hamilton, the owner 
and for nineteen years its editor, to 
B. L. Hollister, former publisher of 
the Aitkin Age. Possession will be 
given Sept. 1. Mr. Hamilton, who is 
postmaster, will give his entire time 
to the management of that office. 



WISCONSIN MAN 

FO R MISS OURI JOB. 

Jefferson City, Mo.. Aug. 29. — The 
public service commission today an- 
nounced the employment of J. L. Har- 
rop of Wisconsin as chief engineer of 
the commission in charge of the work 
of elimi.iating grade crossings In the 
large cities of the state. 

SHERIFF GETS REWARD 
THE N MAN ESCAPES. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald)— Soon after Sheriff 



Joseph Benson of Grand Forks county 
received a check for $250 as his reward 
Kansas cattle rustler, he received ad- 
Kansas cattle rustler, he received ad- 
vices that Henson had again made his 
escape. The reward check, however, 
stands while Kansas must pay another 
reward. 



Cuts Three Cropa of Alfalfa. 

Redwood Falls. Minn., Aug. 2». — 
Charles Lusenhop, a farmer here, Is 
experiencing remarkable success with 
alfalfa. Last August he planted two 
and a half acres. Three cuttings have 
been made this year, one June 28, the 
second July 2S and the last Aug. 21, 
At each the crop averaged one a half 
tons an acre, making a total of 11 V4 
tons. 




PRINTING 



We have recently added new material and 
equipment to our already complete plant 
and are in a position to take care of your 
printing wants in a prompt and up-to-date 
manner. We specialize in "Better Grade'* 
Printing. 



LANE PRINTING CO., 

130 AND 132 WEST MICHIGAN ST. 

Melrose 1604; Grand 2369-D. 







H 



\ 



itasa 



piHiii 



.7 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1013. 



t 





AMERICAS GREATEST 
CLOTHING SPECIALISTS. 



3 

WINNERS 

ARE NOW 

READY 

All the newest crea- 
tions for the coming fall 
and V .^iter are now on 
display here. The mate- 
rials are all wool and ev- 
ery garment is guaran- 
teed to hold its shape. 
The prices are always 
the same — 



$ 



1015 

and ^20 






SPECIAL FOR 
TOMORROW 

All- Wool Blue Serge 
Trousers: worth $4.00 
and $5.00, only 

$2.50 



All goods bought here 
are kept pressed free of 
charge. 



MONEY BILL 
IS APPROVED 

Democratic Caucus Agrees 

to It By Vote of 

163 to 9. 



Passage By the House 

Within Ten Days Is 

Predicted. 




WINNERS 



\t\0* P\T t^t) 



CT.OTHING COMPA:^* (Inc.) 

115 EAST SUPERIOR ST. | 

■ (Opposite the City Hall.) ■ 



JAe Englander 
CoucKBed 



Washington, Aug. 29. — The adminis- 
tration currency bill, after nearly three 
weeks of discussion, was finally ap- 
proved by the house Democratic cau- 
cus last night by a vote of 163 to 9. 

The nine dissenters are Representa- 
tives Henry, Eagle and Calloway of 
Texas; Hardwlck of Georgia: Lobeck 
of Nebraska; Buchanan and Fowler of 
Illinois; Neeley of Kansas, and Sisson 
of Mississippi. 

After agreeing to the bill, the caucus 
adopttd a resolution, by an almost un- 
animous vote, declaring the bill to be 
a party measure, and that "members of 
this caucus are pledged for the bill to 
Its final passage, without amendment: 
provided, liowever, the banking and 
currency committee may offer amend- 
ment in the house." 

The feature of the day's session was 
the adoption of a committee amend- 
ment as a substitute for the section 
on bank reserves, which in effect sim- 
ply served to clarify the section as 
originally drawn. 

The measure will be Introduced in 
the house by Chairman Glass and re- 
ferred immediately to the banking and 
currency committee, which will meet 
next Tuesday. 

PavB In Ten Days. 
It is expected that the bill will at 
once be reported back to the house, 
which Mr. Glass predicted would puss 
It within ten days, many Republicans 
having indicated their purpose to sup- 
port it. 

The measure as it stands after adop. 
tion by the caucus, is summed up by 
Chairman Glass, who piloted it through 
the caucus, as follows: 

"There has not been written Into the 
bill from one end to the other a sin- 
gle sentence, except by the lnitlativ«^ 
of the banking and currency commit- 
tee Itself, which has altered In the re- 
motest degree the essential portions of 
the bill as originally reported by the 
committee to the caucus. 

"The bill established twelve original 
reserve banks with a capital of not 
less than $5,000,000 each, to which na- 
tional banks are required to contribute 
an amount equal to 10 per cent of their 
own capital stock, and to become liable 
for an additional 10 per cent in case 
of call. This, it Is estimated, will givo 
the regional reserve banks a combined 
capital of $105,000,000. 

Castodlana of Rewerres. 
"These regional reserve banks also 
are made custodians of a large part of 
the reserve money of member banks, 
estimated at about $410,000,000 In the 
aggregate. They also receive the gov- 
ernment deposits, estimated at from 
$150,000,000 to $250,000,000. 

"Over the whole system of regional 
reserve banks Is to be a Federal re- 
serve board, consisting of seven mem- 
bers. This board Is given extensive 
powers of supervision, examination and 
control. 

"The measure provides an advisory 
council of bankers, without actual 
power, composted >>t one member froii* 
each of the twelve regional reserve dis- 
tricts." 



^■M" 




As a Cbuchi 




Partly Opea 




cAs a Bed 



Complete Homefnmisliers 




Second Ave. W. and First St. 




The Best Cobbler 

can't do shoe repairing that will 
stand up unless good material i.s 
furnished him. I use only the best 
leather and employ only the best 
workmen — that's why I solicit your 
shoe repairing. 

CHRIS. OLSEN 

523 WKST MICHIGAN ST. 



BANKRUPT SALE 
PRICES 

Men's Sample Undemrear 33c 

Men's Working Shirts S5c 

Gordon. McKlbbon and Lanpher 
Hats, only $1.50 

C. p. LARSON 

lis EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 
I. S. Golnn, Manager. 



DYNAMITE UNDER FEET. 

Milwaukee Police Official Unaware 
of Danger Menacing Him. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 29.— For two 
days Col. William Paulua, station 
keeper at the central police station, 
rested his feet on a neatly tied pack- 
age which had been laid beneath his 
desk. For two days Mr. Paufus lit his 
pipe and threw the matches beneath 
his desk and now says that he is the 
luckiest mortal on earth and that he 
IS through smoking and resting his 
feet on anything. 

This sudden resolution came about 
when Mr. Paulus investigated the 
package foot rest and discovered that 
it contained 800 dynamite caps and 
eight pounds of dynamite. 

A woman entered the station on 
Mondav and handed the package to 
an officer saying that she had found 
it. The officer, not wishing to spoil 
the appearance of the station keeper's 
desk, placed the package beneath it 
but It has been impossible for Mr! 
Paulus to ascertain which one of the 
officers was so kind as to place enough 
dynamite to blow the whole police 
station off the earth right beneath his 
desk. 

The official is now circulating a pe- 
tition among his fellows for the con- 
struction of a vault for strange pack- 
ages. 

graftInKeat'deal 

Packing House Employe Alleged to 
Have Tendered Bribe in Milwaukee. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 29. — George 
B. Daly, manager of the Milwaukee 
branch of the Cudahy Packing com- 
pany, was caught yesterday In the net 
of District Attorney Edward J. Yock- 
ey, who is making an extensive 
"graft" investigation among the Mil- 
waukee county institutions. 

Daly is charged with offering bribes 
to Dr William F. Beutler of the Mil- 
waukee county Insane asylum and to 
John Falbe, steward of the asylum. 

It is allegefl In both cases Daly 
sought to secure the meat trade of 
the county Institutions by offering 
money to oflJIcers in charge of pur- 
chasing^ provisions. 

Daly was arrested late yesterday 
and Is out on ball of $2,000. 

TOUGH YOUTH IS 
RETURN ED TO PARENTS. 

Waukesha, Wis., Aug. 29. — Six-year- 
old Richard Tuolovsky, Racine, recent- 
ly sentenced after a career of various 
crimes to the reform school here to 
rpmaln until he reaches his majority, 
has been returned to his parents for 
•the reason that the state is helpless 
to reform him. Were he two years 
older the industrial school could re- 
ceive him, but the law makes no pro- 
vision for burglarious Infants. 

IRON MOUNTAIN MAN 
DIES SEEKI NG WORK. 

Racine, Wis.. Aug. 29. — Armen Beck, 
a Journeyman watchmaker, who fell 
over senseless In a local factory while 
applying for a Job as watchman, died 
at the hospital Wednesday without 
regaininikir consciousness. He was a 
native of Germany and live<i formerly 
at Iron Mountain, Mich., where. It is 
said, his wife died. 






This Great Store and ThU Great Business Has Risen Here on the Foundation of Public 
Satisfaction With the V^ry Best Service, the Best Assortments and the Lowest Prices 



Following our usual 
custom, this store will 
be closed Monday all 
day, Labor Day. 



Cbe Glass Block Store 



"Th0 Shopping Ctitor ofDuluth" 



Cut Flower Specials 

Fresh Sweet Peas — per 
bunch, 10c and 20c. 

Asters — special per dozen, 
25c and 40c. 



School Starts Next Tuesday I Men^s $i and $1.50 7 ^ 

^r ^ / 7l , ;^ ^^ovtc^jr Negligee Shirts / O 



The Sale of School Toggery Is On 

Mothers will find this a very helpful sale as little money goes a long ways in out- 
fitting the youngsters for school. Special preparations have been made to supply the 
school needs at moderate prices. \ 

Girls' School Dresses 




This is the shop for school girls. We cater 
to them in a personal exclusive way that no 
other store can do. Saturday we feature a 
large assortment of school dresses — the smart- 
est styles of the hour in most fashionable ma- 
terials at very moderate prices. 

Blue Serge Dresses — In Balkan and sailor 

style; made of fine wool 
serge; well tailored; neatly 
braided. Sailor dresses have 
sailor ties ; ages 6 to 14 years 
— priced from ^^j t^(\ 

$16.45 down to. . . «P • •OvI 

Black and White Shep- 
herd Checked Dresses — 

Balkan style, with silk 
sash ; ages 6 to 14 years — 
priced $12.50 
down to. . . . 

Pretty Wash Dresses 

Made of Gingham, Galatea 
Cloth, Rep, etc., in pretty 
plaids, stripes and plain 
colors ; Balkan style Sailor 
Dresses and Smart French 
styles ; ages 6 to 14 years 
—priced from d»i qq 
$4.95 down to. . «P 1 •*'0 



Good School Shoes for Boys 



Boys^ Best School Suits 

Our clothing for boys is of distinctly high-grade 
character. Not only are make, fit and fabric the 
best, but we insist upon the same nobbiness — "style" 

it is called — being placed in our 

boys' clothing. 



$8.50 




Boys' Tan Mixed Norfolk Suits 
— with 2 pairs Knickerbocker 
pants; sizes 6 to 
14 years, at 




It's a clean-up of broken lines re- 
maining from the season's selling of 
lines selling regularly from 
$1.00 to $1.50. 



Made of Percale, Madras, 
in neat striped and figured 
patterns. Included are also plain 
blue chambray, plain or pleated 
bosoms; attached and detached 
cuffs. Regular values up to $1.50, 
clearance price 76c. 



$4.95 



Boys* Heavy Gray Mixture 
Suits — Norfolk style ; 
two pairs Knickerbock- 
er pants, at d^j^ »yg* 
only ^0» / D 



Men's 50c Poros Knit Shirts 
and Drawers, Special Only 



2S 



Boys' Fine Gray Mixture 
Norfolk Suits — Patch pocket 
— a pair Knickerbocker 
pants; sizes 6 to 
14 years, price. . 



$6.75 



Boys' Blue Serge Suits — 
Norfolk style; two pairs 
lined Knickerbocker pants ; 
sizes 6 to 14 A/* Itt 

years, at t|)0./0 



The genuine porosknit, made of fine Egyptian yarn, shirts 
long sleeves, high neck ; drawers ankle length. 

Men's $1.25 Wool Underwear at 79c 

Medium weight, in natural wool — just the sort for present 
wear. A little clean-up lot of $1.25 sort for 79c. 

Men's Summer Underwear — Shirts 
and Drawers — at each 

Poros kind, athletic style; sleeveless shirts, drawers ankle 
length. 



8c 



Drug Specials for Saturday 



Castile Soap — Regular 10c cake; 

Saturday, 4 bars for J85o 

BOc Mme Isabell's Face Powder; 
flesh white and brunette. .. .S2c 
25c Woodworth'B Trailing Arbutus 
Talcum Powder; flesh white.. l»c 
2Bc Aubry . Sisters' Qreaseleeg 
Dream for l<»c 



25c Mme. Yale's Tooth Powder 15c 

11.00 Jar Pompeian Massage 
Dream 75c 

2Bc Benzoin and Almond Lotion 
for 21c 

%-lb. Package Epsom Salts... 3c 
BOc size Pond's Extract 39c 



^ ^ J i^ • 1 ^ The Sort That 
ana VjiriS WeHandLool 



Wear 
Look Well 




Alden School Shoes for Boys — Shoes that speak for them- 
selves as to wear and style ; snappy mannish styles, in Gun Metal, 
Calf, button and lace, blind eyelets ; round drop toe. 

Sizes 2y2 to 5 at $4.00 | Sizes 1 to 2 at $3.50 



Boys' Gun Metal and Box 
Calf Shoes — Button or lace 
styles ; single and double sole — 
a shoe like dad's. 

Sizes 214 to 5 at $3.50 

Sizes 1 to 2 at $3.00 

Sizes 9 to 131^ $2.50 

Misses' School Shoes — In 
calf, vici kid and patent leath- 
er, kid or cloth top; button 
style. 

Sizes 11^ to 2 at $1.50 to $3.00 
Sizes ^Yz to 11 at $1.25 to $3.00 



Boys' Velour, Gun Metal 
and Box Calf Shoes — Blucher 
style, made solid throughout 
for rough wear. 

Sizes 2^ to 5 for $2.25 

Sizes 1 to 2 for $1.75 

Sizes 9 to 131^ for. . .$1.50 

Growing Girls* Shoes — Gun 
Metal, Calf and Patent Leath- 
er; kid and cloth top; solid oak 
soles and counter; sizes 23^ to 
6 for $3.00 to $3.50. 



FREE 



A Pair of $3.50 School 
Shoes 

To any boy or girl giving the 
three best reasons why the Glass 
Block School Shoes are the best to 
buy. Any boy or girl going to 
school may participate in this con- 
test. All answers must be in by 
Sept. 13 at 10 o'clock. Address same 
to Glass Block Shoe Dept. 




The New Fall Suits We Feature 
at $24.75 Are Different 

than the ordinary suits at that price. They carry a line of indi- 
viduality which women of taste require for their clothes. They 
are tailored by men who are experts in the making of popular 
priced suits and they compare favorably with suits sold up to $35. 

Mostly in simple tailored styles, in the fashionable 38-inch length back, 
cutaway coat, one, two and three-piece button coats. Skinner satin lined; 
skirts either draped or plain. 

The materials are Men's Wear Serges, Cheviots, Wool Reps, Bedford 
Cords, Wide Wale, Worsteds and Ottoman Cloth in all the fashionable 
shades. 

Women's Handsome Simple TaUored 
Men's- Wear Serge Suits at $19.75 

These smart tailored suits are made of fine quality Men's Wear Serge 
in mannish tailored styles; new 38-inch length back cutaway coat, lined 
with guaranteed Skinner satin ; hand turned lapel ; pretty draped skirt. 
Suits that will meet the average woman's every requirement. 
Ask to see the new Fall Suits we show at $29.76, $32.75, $37.75 and up, 
in all the fashionable fabrics and colors. 




Plenty of 

Wanted Rufflings 

In all widths in net, shadow 
laces» maline, chiffon, in ecru, 
white, black and black and 
white combinations. 

Priced, yard, 25c up to $1.25. 

New Guimpes — Plain net 
and shadow laces, priced 25c up 
to $3.25. 

Charming 

Dress Sets 

Collar and Cuff Sets will 
have a very important place in 
women's dress accessories this 
season. The most important 
sets are made of lawn, voile, 
pique and crepe, trimmed with 
dainty laces ; conservative in 
size. Priced from 50c up to 
$2.48. 



Ribbon Special! 



For Children's Hair Bows. 

5-inch All-silk Hair Bow Rib- 
bon, in fancy moire, fancy or 
plain edge, in all the wanted 
colors — special, the 
yard 



25c 



Initial 



Hair Bow Ribbon 39c 

Beautiful all-silk Fancy 

Ribbons, 5 inches wide, satin 

or plain edge, in all the new 

shades. 

5-inch Hair Bow Taffeta 

Ribbon, all colors, yd., 20c. 

Taffeta Ribbon, yd 20c 

Five inches wide, fine all 
silk, good heavy quality ; spe- 
cially suited for hair ribbons — 
the yard, 20c. 



Handkerchiefs 

Each 5c, or 55c Dozen 

Made of sheer Shamrock 
Lawn, with narrow hem ; nice- 
ly embroidered initial. 
Just the sort of Handker- 
chiefs for children to use 
for school. Each, 5c, or 
55c per dozen. 

50 dozen Unlaundered Hand- 
kerchiefs, sheer quality, special 
at nYiC. 

Children's Linen 

Handkerchiefs 

5c Each, or 55c Dozen 

All pure linen good quality, 
with narrow hem. About 50 
dozen on sale Saturday, each, 
5c, or 55c per dozen. 



Raftree of Brooklyn. In making ap- 
plication for a permit he told County 
Clerk Pjelstad he was 15 years old 
and welched rlnety-elght pounds. 
Melvln Sater of Madison, 16 years old, 
weight 104 pounds, was also granted a 
license. 



STARVING CHILD IS 
FOUND IN MIL WAUKEE. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 29. — A 6- 

year-old boy. giving his name as Rob- 
ert Randall, was found Itungry and 
emaciated In a vacant room here yes- 
terday. On the window lay a note 
purported to be written by the boy's 
mother, saying that she had come to 
Milwaukee from Gary, Ind., that she 
was too poor to support the boy and 
therefore left him behind. 

The police think the mother has 
committee suicide and are investigat- 
ing. 



pressure of business In congress and 
r« presentations that Jud^e Speer's 
health would be endangered were he 
to come to Washington at this time of 
the y«ar. 



SMALL HUNTER 

GIVEN LICENSE. 

Madison, Wis., Aug. 29. — The small- 
est person to be granted a hunting li- 
cense this year in Dane county is John 



JUDGE SPEER'S CASE 

DELAYED BY HOUSE. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Investigation 
of charges against Federal Judge 
Emory Speer of Macon, Oa., was post- 
poned by the house Judiciary commit- 
tee until late autumn because of th* 



McKERCHER QUITS 

GOVERNMENT WORK. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Clark Mc 
Keroher, special assistant attorney 
general, who conducted the govern- 
ment's prosecution of the Lumber 
trust, the Cotton Pool case, the East- 
man Kodak company and many other 
of the most important anti-trust cases 
for the department of Justice, has re- 
signed to enter private practice as 
counsel for several corporations in 
New York. He is a native of Seattle, 
Wash., and nad been In the depart- 
ment of Justice since 1907. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURI- 
OUS RESTAURANT IN DULUTHT 



W 



HOUSTON EAGER FOR 

ALASKAN RAILWAY. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Chairman 
Houston of the house committee on 
territories, conferred with President 
Wilson on the railway and other bills 
for development of Alaska. Mr. Hous- 
ton said he was eager to have this 
^vOrk completed by the present ad- 
ministration, and was much gratified 
over his talk at the White House. The 
territories committee will meet early 
nt^xt week for further consideration 
of the Alaskan railway bill. 

> ■■ 

Wilson Nominates. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — ^President 

Wilson has sent to the senate the fol- 
lowing nominations: 

Minister resident and consul gen- 
eral to Liberia, George W. Buckner 
of Indiana. 

Agent and consul general at Cairo, 
I'^gypt, Olney Arnold of Rhode Island. 

Collector of customs for the District 
of Laredo, Tex., Frank Rabb of Texas. 

Collector of customs for the District 
of El Paso, Tex., Zach L. Cobb of 
Texas, 

• ■ II 

Norvresrlan Bark Lout. 

MobUe, Ala., Aug. 29.— Capt. AJJos of 
the Norwegian steamship Crathcus 



Irom Jamaica, reported the wreck of 
the Norwegian bark Glamls, on the 
island of Grand Cayman, Aug. 14. The 
Glamis is a total wreck. The crew 
reached shore safely. 



FOR MUN ICIPA L PLANT. 

International Falls Council Takes 
First Step in That Direction. 

International Falls, Minn., Aug. 29. 

— The Initial step towards municipal 

ownership of the electric U^rhtlng and 
water plant was taken when Presi- 
dent Wilson of the council, appointed 
a committee consisting of City Attor- 
ney McPartlln, Clerk Fraser and him- 
self to secure options on sites. The 
one most favorably considered is at 
the foot of First street 

As soon as the site is obtained, bids 
will be asked for the construction of 
thm building and for the installation 
of equipment. It is planned to con- 
duct a city water plant in conjunction 
with the power plant, and bids will 
also be asked for pumping machinery. 

Aldermen litis and Koeneke and 
Health Officer Swinnerton were ap- 
pointed a committee to ascertain the 
location for an Intake pipe for the 
punping plant, with reference to the 
public health. 

Mayor Kane addressed the aldermen 



and said that he favors the municipal 
project. The council members met 
with President Backus of the Inter- 
national Power company, yesterday 
and attempted to obtain figures on 
the renewal of the lighting contract. 

GLYNN RECOGNIZED 

BY STATE SENATE. 

Albany, N. Y., Aug. 29. — The state 
senate late yesterday received Actlngr 
Governor Glynn's message commend- 
ing financial legislation, thus formally 
recognizing him as acting governor. 
Similar recognition was given by th« 
assembly Wednesday night 

Without acting upon any of the 
recommendations of Acting Governor 
Glynn, the legislature adjourned t> 
reconvene oh Sept. 17. at 8:30 o'clock. 

Butte Central Bankrapt. 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 29. — The Butte 
Central Copper company, a Delaware 
corporation with property at Butte, 
Mont., was petltiored into bankruptcy 
by creditors yesterday. The petition- 
ers alleged that the company acknowl- 
edged its inability to meet Its olalm 
when on July 10, it nan>ed three resi- 
dents of Butte preferred creditors and 
turned over to them certain proper- 
ties In that city. No financial BtAt«> 
ment was filed. 






I 



6 



Friday, 



THE DULUtTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



I 



DULUTH MAIL CARRIERS 

LEAVE FOR SAN FRANCISCO 




■T5 




Dress Well— labor Day— Never Miss the Money 

We Clothe the Whole Family! 

Every department in this store is now showing Fall merchandise. You can not go wrong by buy- 
ing here because the wrong thing is not here to be bought. All our merchandise is guaranteed-satisfaction or money back. 



Men^s Nobby Autumn Suits 



JUillilf 



41 



JOHN F. McDonald. 



ROBERT G. MALCOLM. 



John F McDonald, president of theftional speakers and government 
Dulath branch of the National AssocI- ^^^^^^^ t^^'^ \S ashington. 



of- 



ation of Mail Carriers, and Robert G. 
Malcolm, chairman of the committee 
In charge of the local benefit fund. 
and vice president of the Minnesota 
branch of the association, leit yester- 
day for San Francisco to attend the 
annual convention of the national or- 
ganization. 

The convention at San Francisco 
will assemble tomorrow morning and 
the sessions will continue dally until 
the followlnar Saturday evening. Tliere 
will be delegates present from every 
branch association in tlie United 
States, with a large number of na- 



The local delegates have been in- 
structed to fight for the Hammill re- 
tirement bill, which la to be the most 
important Issue to be taken up during 
the convention. Every delegate to the 
gathering this year has been Instruct- 
ed to vote for the bill, which provides 
for retirement on a percentage of sal- 
ary after twenty-five years of serv- 
ice. 

Mr. Malcolm Is taking a month's 
leave of absence and will not return 
to Duluth until Sept. 24, while Mr. 
McDonald will return Sept. 14, after 
spending several days visiting rela- 
tives in the West. 



rais 



Si 



SOCIETY ON 
GOO^BASIS 

Associated Charities Will 

Continue Its Work in 

Duiuth. 



Miss Meeker Will Succeed 
Mr. Dinwiddie Tempor- 
arily at Least. 



CAMPFIRE 
FOrVETS" 

Spanish-American War Sol- 
diers Hold Reunion on 
Lake Shore. 



I ! II! 



;>u t 



;'''i 



L'tfiiil 



AT 



itmr 



! i!: 






ifi 



Kill 



$ 



!! I 



I !i| 



!«^ ^ 



AND 



-T'-r^" 



Miss Edna G. Meeker, for the past 
two years assistant to Courtenay Din- 
widdie. secretary of the Associated 
Charities, will All the vacancy caused 
by his resignation until another suc- 
cessor is appointed. Mr. Dinwiddie's 

resignation will take effect on Oct. 1, 
but the society wlil continue Its work, 
being on a pood financial basis. 

The position of superintendent of 
the city's department of public wel- 
fare, from which Mr. Dinwiddle is 
also resigning, will be filled by Frank 
Hicks, probation officer, according to 
the announcement made yesterday by 
Mayor Prince. 

Mr. Dinwiddle yesterday declared he 
w^as leaving becau.se better opportuni- 
ties had presented themselves else- 
•whore. He has two or three positions In 
sight and as yet has not made definite 
announcement as to which one he will 
accept. 

After Oct. 1 he will leave for hl.s 
home in the state of Virginia, where 
he has a number of personal business 
affairs awaiting him. After a rest of 
a few weeks he will take up his new 
position, which will be along the same 
line of work. 

Mr. Dinwiddie declares that the As- 
Boclated Charities is now on a sound 
financial basis and that the new year 
will start with a balance to Its credit. 
The organization now has an annual 
Income from private subscriptions 
which nicely takf^s care of the run- 
ning expenses, he says. 

NAVY CONTRACTS 

ARE AWARDED. 

"Washington, Aug. 29. — Secretary 
Daniels has awarded contracts ap- 
proximating $1,087,445 to the Carne- 
gie Steel company, J. B. Kendall com- 
pany and the Carbon dteel company 
for materials for battleship 39, build- 
ing at tile New York n.ivy yards. 

After a conference with representa- 
tives of the Carnegie, Hethlohom and 
Mldvale Steel companies. Secretary 
Daniels rejected all their bids for 
armor plate for the same battleship. 
All w*"re identical on all classes as 
•well as identical with similar bids 
submitted by the same companies for 
armor plate for the battleship Penn- 
sylvania. 



Enjoy Feast of "Mulligan" 

Soup and Swap 

Stories. 



Seated around a campfire which cast 
its glow for miles out on the lake, 
fifty veterans of the campaign in Cuba 
and the Philippines during 1893-99 
swapped stories, sang and enjoyed a 
feast consisting principally of chicken 
"mulligan" and "canteen" refreshments 
last evening. The committee In charge 
had made preparations for entertain- 
ing about 200 veterans but threaten- 
ing weather Is believed to have kept 
many away. 

A huge bonfire built of old stumps 
and driftwood picked up along the 
shore was started early in the eve- 
ning and burned brightly late Into the 
night. Hundreds of residents of Lake- 
side were attracted to the spot by the 
fire and stood on the banks watch- 
ing the crowd of men enjoy them- 

Under the direction of W. J. Lourche, 
the mulligan stew was started early 
In the evening. Two huge kettles of 
the stuff gave the "boys" all they 
wanted. The men present represented 
every branch of Uncle Sam's service 
during the Spanish war and among 
them were men who had taken part 
In the Cuban campaign, the Philippine 
insurrection as well as many who had 
not left the country. 

The campfire was the third of its 
kind given by local camps of the 
United War Veterans. Three years ago 
the campfire was held at Lester park 
and In July, 1912, another was given 
on Park Point while local veterans 
were entertaining the state conven- 
tion. 



Every Suit AlUWool 

Made by the most reputable clothes makers in the Untied Statea. 
All suits are guaranteed to give satisfaction. All new styles and fab- 
rics at the right prices. 

$15, $18, $20 and $25 



Boys* 

School 

Suits 



Boys' Fall 
Suits 

Norfolk Style 



Smart, snappy models 
that have helped so 
much in making our 
boys' section so pop- 
ular. Norfolk styles, 
belted, plaited and plain 

— all seams aire taped in 
our boys suits; pants 
lined throughout. 

Fancy weaves, unfin- 
ished worsteds, diag- 
onals, stripes and 
serges. Our suits are 
especially prepared to withstand the hard usage 
that boys subject their suits to. All colors, at 
popular prices — 

$A.50 $Cf.50 $^.50 $Q.50 



.•li^*5:i'»:' 



Wonien^s 

Fall 

Suits 



I 



f/ 



It's just a matter of a 
few days now until you 
will actually want your 
new fall suit. Why de- 
lay? The styles are here 
now the season is at 
hand. The benefits of 
early selection is yours. 
All the new colorings. 
Delft blue, terra cotta, 
golden brown, taupe 
and navy blue — in 
serges, mixtures, pop- 
lins, eponge cloths> jac- 
quards and many other 

new weaves. Tailoring 
in all our ladies' garments is guaranteed. The 
fitting and altering is done free of charge. 
Prices are popular — 

$ t ^.50 $ I Q.50 ?0 Jli.50 

and up. 



^ 



Guaranteed— 

Shoes 

For Men— At $5.00, $4.00, $3.^0 and 

$3.00 

Our special shoe value at $3.50 is an 
unequaled value. 

For Women — ^This store has built a repu- 
tation on good shoe values for the ladies. 
All the new and popular ^O f\f\ 
styles, $5.00 down to ^0«l/\/ 

For Children buy the Educator Shoe — 
It is famous for comfort, health and wear. 
Sold by us at all prices. 



YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 

Our credit service is growing more and more popular 
every season. The reason is simple : It serves without 
extra charges. You can pay as you get paid, weekly or 
monthly. 





7rM.iMl4-^ Gen.Mngr. 

DULITH— SUPERIOR— VIRGINIA 



Sport Coats 

and Sweaters 

The new Sport Coats are unexcelled for 
evening outing and general wear. All 
the popular shades and materials are here. 

All-wool Sweaters from $10.00 down to 

$2.00 

Fall Furnishings 

Waists, Skirts, Petticoats and Millinery 
of the latest styles. 






a 




ENTIRE ESTATE 

LEFT TO WIDOW 



of the widow, Mr. Hawkes left personal 
property valued at |20,000 and upwards 
and real estate of the approximate 
value of 15,400, The petition prays 
for the appointment of W. M. Prlndle, 
A. W. Frlck and the widow as admin- 
istrators with the win annexed. 

ROUMANIAN FEUD IS 
FOUGHT OUT IN INDIANA 



Theron Holbrook Hawkes, vice pres- 
ident of W. M. Prlndle & Co., who 
died in this city Aug. 22. last, left 
an estate valued at upwards of |25.- 
000, according to the petition for the 
admission of his will, which was filed 
yesterday with Judge Gilpin in probate 
court by his widow, Mrs. Florence Cur- 
tis Hawkes. 

The will designates the widow as 
sole devisee. According to the estimate 




Five Men Are Dying of 

Wounds Received From 

Knives. 

Indiana Harbor, Ind.. Aug. 29. — A 
feud born in the mountain of Rou- 
manla was fought to a bloody finish 
in the streets here yesterday, and five 
men are dying from knife wounds aa 
a result of the battle. The injured 
are: 

John Campau, slashed and gtabbed 
in the abdomen. 

Samuel Metes, two knife wounda in 
the lungs. 

Joseph Serbu, slashed all over body 
and legs. 

Samuel Brassa, stabbed in abdomen 
and head. 

Nicholas Oeorges, stabbed nei^r 
heart. 

The battle was fought In the Rou- 
manian quarter. Nearly all the resi- 
dents of that section are foreigners, 
but one or two Americans, alarmed 
by the cries of the combatants, looked 
out and saw the knot of men strug- 
gling In the street. What their shouts 
meant none of the Americana could 
tell. 

No firearms were used. The fight- 
ers grappled and stabbed each other 
with their knives. Others probably 
were seriously Injured, as more than 
one had to be helped away by com- 
rades when the feudists retired from 
the field, leaving the five probably fa- 
tally wounded men lying in the 
street. 



THREE TEAMS 
IN RUNAWAY 

Boy Injured and Two Men 

Have Narrow 

Escapes. 



Automobile Frightens Team 

Which Starts Series of 

Dashes. 



One person was Injured, two had 
miraculous escapes, one wagon was 
wrecked, and a horse so badly hurt that 
he was shot, In a spectacular "pro- 
gressive" runaway on the central hill- 
Bide yesterday. 

The team of Sam Miller, drawing a 



heavy load of timbers, was frightened 
on Ninth street by the snorting of an 
automobile. The horses dashed around 
the corner and tore madly down the 
steep grade of Liake avenue. Pushed 
by the weight behind them, they 
plunged wildly downwards at break- 
neck speed. 

Farmer Has Bacape. 

Between Sixth and Fifth streets the 
crazed horses smashed head on Into 
the farm wagon of Stana Sobccyk, a 
Gnesen farmer, smashing his outfit Into 
splinters. One of Miller's horses wedged 
his foot in a wheel and the hoof was 
torn completely out of Its socket. The 
other was badly torn but was not 
dangerously hurt. 

The farmer was hurled from his seat 
just In time to be missed by the heavy 
timbers which shot ahead the next in- 
stant to the spot where he had been 
sitting. Miller was thrown from his 
perch on top of the load and also sus- 
tained nothing worse than minor 
scratches. Miller's young son, who was 
on the load with him, did not fare so 
well as the other two, receiving a 
couple of bad cuts and some very pain- 
ful bruises. 

Second Relar. 

The crash fortunately ripped the har- 
ness from Its fastenings to the farm- 
er's wagon or his team might have been 
killed. As it was they leaped from 
under with one bound the instant the 
runaway struck their outfit. Miller's 
team was down and the farmer's horses 
continued the sensational runaway 
from the spot they left off. They 
scooted down the hill and frightened 
a team hitched to a milk wagon, which 



RAILWAY DISASTERS 
ARE DUE TO DEFECTS 



HAS STOOD FOR SUPERIOR EXCELLENCE SINCE i860 

Duffy's Ihire Malt Whiskey 

is a predigested liquid food in the form of a medicinal whiskey and 
its palatability and freedom from injurious substances render it so 
that it can be retained by the most sensitive stomach. It is invalu- 
able for the prevention and alleviation of distressing summer com- 
plaints. Look for the " Old Chemist's Head " and be sure you ^et 
the genuine. Get a bottle today and you'll begin to notice an im- 
provement tomorrow. Sold by most druggists, grocers and dealers, 
|l.0O a bottle. Medical booklet and doctor's advice free on request. 

The Duffy Malt Whiskey Co., Rochester, N. T. 



Over 70 Per Cent in Quar- 
ter Ending March 30 So 
Explained. 

Washington, Aug, 29. — Defective 
roadway and defective equipment, 
jointly, caused more than 70 per cent 
of all derailments on steam railroads 
of the United States during the quart- 
er ending March 30 last, according to 
statistics announced by the Interstate 
commerce commission. Of derailments 
due to defective roadway, more than 
20 per cent were caused by broken 
rails. 

During the quarter 158 persons 
were killed and 3,028 were Injured in 
train accidents, these figures showing 
a decrease of 109 killed and 1,157 In- 
jured as compared with those for the 
corresponding period of 1912. 

In other than train accidents. In- 
cluding accidents to employes while 
at work, to passengers getting on or 
off cars, and to trespasaers, 2.086 per- 
sons were killed and 17,194 injured, 
showing a decrease of 80 killed and 
an increase of 1,480 injured. 



In your hand you hold a 
five-cent piece. 

Right at the grocer's hand 
is a moisture-proof pack- 
age of Uneeda Biscuit. He 
hands you. the package — 
you hand him the coin. 
A trifling transaction? 

No I A remarkable one— for you 
have spent tbe smallest sum tiiiat 
wUl buy a package of good food; 
and the grocer has sold you the 
most nuMtious food made from 
flour — as clean and crisp and 
delicious as it was when it came 
from the oven. 

hkriONAL BisGurr company 



then rattled down the street at a ter- 
rific pace. The farmer's horses did not 
run tar and the dairyman's team was 
stopped before any further damage of 
a serious iaature had been done, both 
being recovered by their owners In a 
short time. 

When the excitement calmed down 
somewhat Dr. Lepak was summoned 
and he dressed tlie wounds of the In- 
jured boy. The police were notified 
and the police patrol was sent to the 
scene. The injured horse was shot by 
Jailer Jack Hunter, after which the 
officers helped Miller and the farmer 
gather together such pieces ot the 
wreckage as could be salvaged. 

RESTRICTS MONEY 

OR DER P AYMENTS. 

Washington. Aug. 29. — An effort by 

Postmaster General Burleson to extend 
the postal money order system, came 
to naught when Comptroller Downey 
decided yesterday that money orders 
must be paid only by the offlcea on 



which they are drawn. Mr, Burleson 
contemplated having orders paid by 
any money order postoffice to which 
they might be presented. 

METEOR SHAKES 

TIVERE TON. R. I. 

Tiverton, R. I., Aug. 29. — A meteor 
fell into Seaconnett river here yester- 
day, churning up the water in a spec- 
tacular manner. Great volumes of 
steam rose and the accompanying re- 
port sounded like the discharge of a 
twelve-inch gun. 

The meteor fell during an electrical 
storm. The crash, resembling thunder, 
was heard for twenty miles. W^ln- 
dows were broken and crockery shaken 
from shelves, while at Island park. 
nearly two miles away, a merry-go- 
round was jarred into motion. 

Persons who saw the meteor assert 
that It was of unusual size and trav- 
eled so rapidly as to appear from a dis- 
tance almost like a lightning flash. 



9 




^SATURDAY 



TO 



TUESDAY 



AUG. 30 to SEPT. 2 

WILL BE BEST SPENT AT ONE OF THE 




FISHING AND 
LAKE RESORTS 



ALONG THE 



SCO LINE 



—IN— 

MINNESOTA, 

WISCONSIN, 

MICHIGAN 

FOR FARES, ETC. ASK AT 
TICKET OFFICE 

DUU TH— J, P. Gehrcy. D. P. A. City office, SpuK 
ill OR hotel block. Depot, eoracr Sni^rlor street 
auil Sixth aTeBne west. 

SLPKItlOR— J. D. Morrbmer, O. A. City office. WS 
Titwcp avenne. Depot, comer Winter street 
Mud Osdea areaue. 



J 




\ 



I 



?^ 



MANY LAWS TO SAVE 
LIVES OF W ILD GAME. 

Washington, Augr. 29.— Designed for 
the guidance of those seeking infor- 
mation on the game laws of the va- 
rious states, the biological survey of 
the department of agriculture has is- 
sued a directory containing the names 
and addresses of the various state 
game commissions and wardenships. 
with like Information concerning the 
many associations devoted to the pro- 
tection of wHd animal life. The direc- 
tory has been brought up to July 15. 

'*The most Important changes during 
the last year," says the foreword of 
the directory, "were the creation of 
the office of game and fish commis- 



sioner of Florida, the reorganization 
of the commissions In Connecticut, 
Montana, New Hampshire, Ohio. Okla- 
homa. South Dakota and Washington, 
and the reorganization of the Indiana, 
Massachusetts and Minnesota Fish and 
Game league. 

"In forty-five states and terrltorle."* 
the enforcement of game laws Is en- 
trusted to game commissioners, war- 
dens and otner state officers; In Mis- 
sissippi and Nevada to county war- 
dens; in Virginia to city and magis- 
terial district wardens; in Arkansas to 
sheriffs and similar local officers, and 
In the District of Columbia to the met- 
ropolitan police." 

Comment is made on the growth of 
societies for the protection of fish 
and game, such organizations now co- 
operating In this work in thirty-one 
states. 



D. H.. 8-29-'13. 



Back 

to 

school 

on 

Tuesday 

next. 



/ 




How he will look 
on his way to school 
if dressed in a new 
Columbia Fall Suit. 



Nothing too good for your boy to wear-^ 
therefore buy him Columbia clothes. A range 
of values to suit the wife of the section man 
as well as that of the president of the road. 

Prices, $1.95, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.90 and 
up to $15.00. 



Dnluth, 
Minn. 




At Third 
Ave. West. 



The Boys' Favorite Store. 
Foot-Note : Good shoes for live youngsters. 



TWO HARBORS 




SUNDAY, AUG. 31st 

On Steel Steamer America and Fasten, leaving Booth's Doek, foot of 
Lake Avenue South, at 10 A. M., 2 P. M. and 7 P. M. 
Returning leave Two Harbors at 4 P. M. and P. M. 

FARE- 50c ROUND TRIP 



FIRST CLASS MEALS. 



REFRESHMENTS SERVED. 



\i 



Minnesota 



state Fair 

ana 

Exposition 



^s® 



Sa?i 



Hamltne, Midivay between 
Minneapolis and St. Paul 
September 1-6, inclusive 

Take the family and attend the annual 
Minnesota State Fair. There will be 
many things entirely new this year. 
Ample entertainment for everybody — 
your complete enjoyment has been 
arranged for. 

Go to the Fair 
Everybody'll be there 

Call and see me about your railroad ticket. 
Remember this is the route of the famous 
"Great Big Baked Potato." 

C. P. O'DONNELL, C. P. A., 
J. I. THOMAS, G. A. 

334 West Superior Street, Duluth. 

NorthernPacificRy 



A. M. CLELAND, General Passenger Agent, ST. PAUL 




MATCHMAKING 
BY CHURCHES 

Religious Leaders Awake to 

Problem in New City 

Conditions. 



under the stim 
«1I- agencies, in 
Ind wholesome at- 
:corded for the 



Plan to Enable Young Men 

and Women to Meet 

Socially. 



Philadelphia. Aug. 29. — An experl- 
ment Is being made here by the Young 
Men's Christian association and the 
Young Women's Christian association 
which is attracting widespread atten- 
tion. The aim Is to enable young men 
and young women to meet socially un- 
der proper auspices. A series of re- 
ceptions and dances is being given on 
the roof of the Y. M. C. A., with the 
avowed purpose of helping the exiles 
In a great city to approximate ag near 
as possible the normal conditions or 
ordinary social life. 

This bit of news is chiefly worth not- 
ing only as a symptom of the fact that 
the religious leaders of America are 
awake to the positive and constructive 
side of the social question. 

The scientists may talk eugenics un- 
til they die, but unless the right sort 
of young men have an opportunity to 
meet the right kind of young women, 
the whole science of eugenics will be 
"as idle aa a painted ship upon a 
painted ocean." The simple fact con- 
fronts the men and women who accept 
a measure of responsibility for the 
world's moral conditions, that hundreds 
of thousands of young men and young 
women are entirely devoid of any nor- 
mal home life and of any opportunity 
to meet congenial young people of the 
opposite aex. 

CourtlBg Parlor Idea. 

Ever and anon some minister breaks 
into print with a proposition to estab- 
lish a courting parlor In connection 
with his church. The idea Is sound, 
but unworkable in such a crass fash- 
Ion. Young men and young women do 
not care to be ticketed for purposes of 
courtship, when they are still strang- 
ers. 

L»own In Washington a public-spirit- 
ed woman opened her parlor for the 
same avowed purpose and invited peo- 
ple to receptions at her home. This 
was too heterogeneous and dangerous, 
as well as being hindered by the same 
limitation of having been placarded 
, too publicly. The purpose of any such 
an aim is defeated when it is adver- 
tised. 

The secretary of the Washington 
Young Men's Christian association re- 
cently delivered an address to the 
association secretaries of the country 
upon this whole problem, and its 
developments. It is clear that some- 
thing must be done toward providing 
sane and wholesome relationship be- 
tween the young men and young 
women of the great cities. The Y. W. 
C. A. has given much thought to the 
problem, but has maintained a very 
conservative attitude, because of the 
necessity for guarding the girls in its 
care. 

I<o«lKlniic-houii« Problem. 

Recent social surveys have re- 
vealed the appalling extent of the 
Immorality and the dangers of the life 
of young men and young women In 
the great cities. The old-fashioned 
boarding house was bad enough in 
its day. but It has given way now to 
the lodging house and restaurants, 
where there are no social rtsiraints 
If the working girls in the great 
cities are to entertain friends, they 
are obliged, in most cases, to meet 
them In their rooms, which is most 
unwholesome and dangerous. 

The new cond""ons are shattering 
the time-honored restraints and con- 
ventionalities. The laxity of moral 
standards that is giving the present 
day so much concern is in good part 
traceable to these conditions. 

While there is a frivolous side to 
the idea of opening parlors where 
young people may meet, yet the ques- 
tion Is really fundamental. Anybody 
who looks at the multitudes of young 
men and young women who throng 
city streets Is bound to ask hlm.self, 
"Where are these young women to get 
husbands who will help to make 
homes to support the ideals of the 
republic!" The fact that the Y. M. 
C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. are taking 
advance steps is calling forth the ap- 
proval of farseelng persons, although 
some of the narrower view are horri- 
fied at the idea of a dance under 
Christian auspices. It must be ad- 
mitted, though, that these are persons 
who know nothing whatsoever about 
the dance halls of a great city. 
.MatcbniakiuK In Christian Endeavor. 

One of the old criticisms of the 
Christian Erdeavor movement and 
the allied young people's societies in 
thi> churcbes was that they were 
match-making organizations; that in 
them the young men and young wom- 
en became acquainted and proceeded 
to matrimony. The stricture was 
rather absurd, and it is no longer 
heard, for since the days of Noah, 
men and w^omen have been marrying 
and giving in marriage and even the 
oldest fogie.«i have come to see that it 
is more desirable that young people 
meet in the atmosphere of a religious 
organization, and under the aegis of 
the church, than on the street corners 
and in dance halls, for meet they 
certainly will somewhere. 

As a matter of fact, these young 
peoples societies are a not inconsider- 
able agency in providing social re- 
lationship for young men and young 
women. They, with the Sunday school, 
are the department of the church 
wherein young people find a social cir- 
cle. The extent to which the church 
is used by social bounders is incon- 
siderable alongside of the normal 
functions which It fulfills as a factor 
in which may be broadly called Chris- 
tian eugenics. 

Usini; Homes io Make Homen. 

There always has been, and that, too 



without a tinge of j»o»sionalIsm or 
prearrangement, a WldeSpread use of 
their homes by Christian people for 
promoting the sociaWwelfare of young 
men and young wo^n. Probably this 
function Is to enlar 
ulus of general Ch 
order that a normal 
mosphere may be 
meeting of young people 

There are sharply defined limitations 
to the service that the Y. M. C. A and 
Y. W. C. A. and the <)^urcl\ in its insti- 
tutional capacity rair render to assist 
In bringing together young men and 
young women; but by an extension of 
the big brother idea, which has been 
so useful In promoting the welfare of 
boys. Individual private homes will be 
utilized as social centers.' A recognized 
form of Christian service will be for 
tactful church members to open their 
residences to the young ijeople of the 
community who have not homes of 
their own. 

The average -church member can ac- 
complish more for the common welfare 
by opening his home as a center for 
the entertainment of young people, 
than he can by attending sociological 
conferences and reading the big books 
of scientific philanthropy. 

KAID M'LEAN IS~ 

TO BE MARRIED 




SEE 
WINDOWS 



ONLY 1 DAY MORE 

WONDERFUL 
SHOE SALE 




SEE 
WINDOWS 



Scotchman Who Led t-he 

Army of the Sultan 

of Morocco. 

London, Aug. 29. — The announce- 
ment of the engagement of Kaid Sir 
Harry Aubrey MacLean to Miss Ella 
Prendergast, daughter of the late 
Gen. Sir Henry Prendergast, V. C, 
recalls the exploits of the Scottish 
chieftan in the Moorish empire. Sol- 
dier of fortune and adventurer of the 
best type, his career has been as spec- 
tacular as it has been glorious. 

Forty years ago Harry Aubrey de 
Vere MacLean was an officer in her 
majesty's Sixty-ninth regiment of 
foot. He was too pdbr to go the pace 
with his brother officers, so he re- 
signed his commission and went to 
Tangier. He went to see the sultan 
of Morocco, Moulai Hassan, a grim old 
warrior, strong enough for himself, 
but worried about the succession of 
his heir, a puny, weak boy. There 
were pretenders to the throne who 
were waiting for the old sultan to 
die to place force behind their claims. 
MacLean proposed himself to Maulai 
Hassan as a commander and military 
instructor for the Imperial bodyguard 
who should be equipped with modern 
weapons. His propygal was accepted 
and MacLean soon knocked his 1,000 
fighting men into good shape. 

MacLean devoted himself for the 
next few years in putting down bri- 
gands and preserving order. Then the 
sultan died and there was an insur- 
rection when the weak son, Mulai 
Abdel-Azlz was put on the throne. 
MacLean put this down sharply, as he 
did several subsequent uprisings. 

Meanwhile, Ralsuli and his bandits 
had been ravaging the northern sec- 
tion of Morocco, and in 1907 Mac- 
Lean attempted to stop him. RaisuH 
had become world famous in 1904, 
when he captured Ion Perdlcarls, a 
wealthy American, and held him for 
ransom. Morocco, prodded by the 
United States finally raised |55,000 
to free Perdlcarls. Ralsull captured 
other foreigners and held them, and 
MacLean sent word to him that he 
would meet him In the desert alone. 
MacLean went alone, but Ralsull took 
some of his men and made MacLean a 
prisoner. The bandit demanded |200,- 
000 for MacLean's freedom. He 
dropped this price several times, but 
no one would pay It, and after Mac- 
Lean had been held prlaoner for seven 
months he was turnea free. 

It was not long after this that Mac- 
Lean returned to England and took a 
country home In Norfolk. MacLean's 
first wife was Miss Catherine Coe. He 
married her In 1882, and her social 
position was such that none of the 
European women at either Gibraltar 
or Tangier would consent to any so- 
cial intercourse with her. In spite of 
her husband's influence and power. Sir 
Harry continued to live with her until 
1905 when matters got so bad that he 
sued for a divorce. 

HOG FARM THAT 

IS RUN BY CITY 



Venture, Ridiculed By Farm- 
ers, Makes Good After 
Two Years. 



UNSIGHTLY SKIN 
^OON CLEARED 
BY POSLAM 



At times, when It is desired, for the 
sake of improving the appearance, to 
quickly clear the skin, to remove undue 
redness, an adolescent pimple or other 
blemish, Poslam will prove itself inval- 
uable. Used at night the Improvement 
is noticeable the next morning. Poslam 
Is unique in possessing this peculiar 
virtue. 

In all skin affections, Poslam pro- 
duces immediately noticeable results, 
stopping all itching, and rapidly restor- 
ing the skin to normal condition. Ec- 
zenia, acne, tetter, salt rheum, all forms 
of itch, scalp scale, psoriasis, pimples, 
rashes, etc., yield to Poslam as to noth- 
Ing else. 

POSLAM SOAP is without eo"-^ '^^^ 
tender skin; Jic Idefll iurs^ry'"soap, 
grateful, soothing aD«3 non-Irritating. 
Every piotherm^*^ rgjy upon its abso- 
lute safety >T^ purity. 

All drwggists sell Poslam (price, 50 

cent"; and Poslam Soap (price 25 

. Cents). For free samples, write to the 

Emergency Laboratories. 32 West 25th 

Street, New York City. 



Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 29. — The 
municipal hog farm is making money. 
This is really a big piece of news, as 
big as the hog farm Itself. It wasn't 
always thus, either. For months, aye, 
years, this municipal pork-chop factory 
has been run at a loss, sometimes se- 
vere, other times Just medium, and 
once in awhile it catne out even — but 

never did It make any money for the 
city. 

This all comes from education. Ele- 
vation of the intellect hasn't been tried 
on the porkers, but it has on the head 
of the farm, and since that day things 
have been different. So tiow the only 
municipality owned and municipality 
operated hog farm In the world is a 
paying Institution. But it took pork at 
8 cents a pound and a University of 
California degree to do it. 

The reason for all this gladsomeness 
in the city hall Is George R. Shuey, M, 
P. D., a graduate of the University of 
California engineering school. George 
admits he scarcely ever saw a hog. 
other than the end seat variety, before 
going on the farm, but he also insi.sts 
that he had some ideas which were 
valuable, despite the snickerlngs of the 
wise ranchers of Lone Pine. The M. F. 
D. after his name Is said to mean 
municipal farm director, a new degree, 
conferred by his friends. 

Shuey, shortly after he left college, 
became connected with the aqueduct 
bureau as civil engineer. The city 
owns 100,000 acres of land in the Owens 
valley. Most of this has been leased, 
but there are 700 acres Just south of 
Lone Pine which were used for various 
purposed while the aqueduct was being 
built. The i^ea of starting a municipal 
hog farm, to enable the poor people to 
buy pork meat at greatly reduced 
prices, popped into the head of a mem- 
ber of the water commission. A hun- 
dred hogs were bought and a man se- 
cured to keep the farm. The first thing 
noticeable about the enterprise was 
that it didn't pay. and the next was 
that all of the hogs raised were sold 
to the trust packers, and the poor peo- 
ple paid just as much as they ever did. 
Two years ago Shuey was hired. The 
first thing he did wasto begin putting 
the place on a self-sustaining basis. 

"The farmers up there made fun of 
me, but I kept at It. I believe the 
hog ranch will pay from now on," he 
added. "In addition, it is my intention 
to raise cattle for marTtet, and we soon 
will have a municipal cattle ranch. I 
have forty head of cattle «n the ranch 
now, and It won't be long before the 
people of Los Angeles will be enjoying 
municipal beefsteak. Pay? <Jf course, 
it will pay. I also hflfve 3^0 nogs left, 
which will be marketed in a few 
weeks. The hogs are jUipt what the 
packers want. They average 166 
pounds. The packer^ wlint pprkers 
welstirig 160 Or iii ti\>\xr\^. Anything 
below the former figure or more than 
the latter brings less hlorley. 

"I also think aiTy ;city could raise 
hogs at an advantage tc its citizens. 
The hog farm would Increase the 
amount of meat to be sold, thus in a 
measure holding prices firm. If not act- 
ually reducing them, and then again, if 
run right, the profits <»rouid be enough 
to lower the tax-rate somewhat." 







ow 

We now offer you the greatest bargains in shoes you ever heard of. 
They all go — nothing reserved. 

Our factory is now turning out new lines for fall with our own ne'Wi 
machinery. We must sell all shoes on hand before these goods arrive. 

Your Unrestricted Choice 

of any shoe in our store at these ridiculously low prices. 

HIGH OR LOW SHOES 

You should buy your supply for fall now. Come in Saturday and see what we are offering. 

A new shipment from factory — shoes made up 
for other stores — new styles — all go at these prices. 



Just Received 



FAMOUS 

RECTOR 

OXFORDS 

for men and women ; $5.00 value ; 
sale price — 




HIGH SHOES PUMPS 



This new style — button or lace, 
tan and black, $3.50 and $4 values, 



RUBBER 
SOLES 



WOMEN'S FINE SHOES 




These are nobby Pumps and Ox- 
fords. We offer you $3 and $3.50 
values at — 



Fresh from the 
bootmaker's 
last, the mould 
of fashion, all 
newest leath- 
ers; made to 
sell for %A and 
J5; at — 



$1-97 




$247 



FINE SEWED 
SHOES 

Heavy soles. A world-beater at — 




Rector and Waldort 

OXFORDS 



all go at 



$1.47 




WALDORF SHOE STORE ''^"°^' " 



Evenings. 



Filled. 



313 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 




.<s&s.«;s*sss^ 



UNCLE SAM'S 

Last Big Land Opening 







Information Free! 

CWrite to-day for free illustrated map, 
folders and detailed information regard- 
ing this big land opening. Fill out coupon 
below and mail to 

E. C. LEEDY 

General Immigration Agent 

113 Great Northern Bldg. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 



E. C. Leedy: Send me free descriptive 
map, folder and information regard- 
ing how, when and where to register 
for land« on the Fort Peck Indian 
Reservation. 



Name . 



m 
m 



Address . 

Town 

State...... 



I 

■ 
■ 



1,345,000 FertUe Acres Open to White 

Settlement on 

THE FORT PECK 

Indian Reservation 

In Montana, on Nain Line of Great Northern Ry 

C8,406 homesteads of 160 acres each on the Fort Peck 
Indian Reservation, located just north of the Missouri 
River on the fertile plains of Northeastern Montana^ 
will be open to white settlement. 

Cl»345,000 acres available— land with a rich, sandy 
loam soil capable of raising 20 to 30 bushels of wheat 
and 40 to 60 bushels of oats per acre. 

Register at Glasgow, Havre or Great Falls, Nont. 
Daily, September 1 to 20, Inclasive 

Drawing at Glasgow, Sept 23 

CThese lands have been appraised at $2.50 to $7.00 per acre, 
and can be taken up under the United States Homestead laws! 



i 







- ^^IS^^5^#" '^'*^^' *^"^^^^^"~' •■ c^"^N-^^m--s- 




1 


■ 1 


■ / : . 












s 


• 


1 








J 


1 






i ! 














, 



wBUBi 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1013. 



TO ¥DSiT— 



YOUR H0) 



THE CO 



SUNNYSIDE 



■MMY m mmmf 



y.^iii 



'■'>'^^ 



lae 



ITE 
LY STABBED 



When we put 
on sale our — 



THIRD ADDITION 



OF TEN-ACRE SUBURBAN FARMS, Suitable for Small Fruit, 
Vegetables, Poultry, Etc. Here is what SUNNYSIDE has to 
offer in the way of advantages— 



We are only four miles from the 
city limits of Superior. 

Only 2^2 miles from the Steel com- 
pany Belt Line railway, insuring good 
speculative value. 

Three railroads and ten passenger 
trains daily to and from Superior and 
Duluth. 

Two macadamized auto mobile 
roads leading into Duluth and Su- 
perior 

Daily mail and telephone. 

A fine soil, absolutely free from 
rocks and well drained. 

In a proven small fruit district, 
where growers have made as high as 
$1,000 an acre on strawberries. 



Where the last berries on the mar- 
ket are grown, assuring high prices. 

Where your berries can be picked 
today and placed on the market in 
Chicago, Milwaukee, St- Paul, Min- 
neapolis and hundreds of other towns 
early the following morning, without 
a change of cars. 

We have a few tracts with a nice 
creek and a few with several acres 
cleared and seeded to clover. 

Where you can buy a 10-acre farm 
with all these advantages at prices 
ranging from $57.50 to $70.00 per 
acre, and pay for it in small monthly 
payments. 

Where the land is so easily cleared 
that it can be done from $12.50 to $15 
per acre. 



Do you know of another locality that offers as much at twice the price? 

Here is your opportunity. Make up your mind to see this new addition to 
Sunnyside either Sunday or Monday (Labor day). Bring your lunch and spend 
the day there. You can take the train in the morning and return at noon or 
later if you prefer. Telephone or write us for maps and free literature, telling 
what others are doing at Sunnyside. Watch for our advertisement in Saturday's 
Herald and get our offer for free railroad fare to Sunnyside on Sunday and Monday. 



HEIMBAUGH & SPRING 



1103 TOWER AVENUE 



Both Phones 



SUPERIOR, WIS. 



September 

Wedding 

Gifts... 

"A Gift— its kind, 
its value and appear- 
ance; the silence or 
the pomp that attends 
it; the style in which 
it reaches you, may 
decide the dignity or 
vulgarity of the giv- 
er." — Lavater. 



BUFFALO BILL 

IS IN NEW ROLE 



United Copper company, It was 
brought out. amounted to J2. 750, 000, 
and against the Montana Ore Purchas- 
ing company $5,750,000. 



IHl 



:iiDOIICSEINI'l 

Jewelry and Art Store 
332 West Superior St. 



Direct Pageant in Con- 
nection With Sells- 
Floto Circus. 

Denver, Colo., Aug. 29. — It Is not 

true that "Buffalo BUI," Col. W. F. 

Cody, has ridiien his last round-up. It 
Is not true that he Is '"down and out." 
He has not "handed in his checks," 
nor committed any other of the final 
things tliat Eastern writers impose 
on him in their sorrowful stories of 
his recent differences with his late 
partner, MaJ. Lillie. 

"Buffalo Bill" Is about to become a 
larger and a sweeter figure in the 
eyts of childhood, than ever he has 
been. Next year he will personally 
direct a new and a great historical 
pa,^eant and .spectacle of Indian fight- 
ing and Indian romance In connection 
with the Sells-Floto Circus. He will 
make his first appearance In his new 
role at Madison Square Garden, Ne^* 
Y'jrk, In March. 

BIG CLAIMS AGAINST 

CO PPER COMPANY. 

New York, Aug. 29. — Claims of 

$8,500,000 against the failed United 

Copper company and its subsidiary, 
the Montana Ore Purchasing company, 
were revealed when Federal Judge 
Holt appointed Henry D. Estabrook a 
special master to take testimony on 
claims set up against the copper com- 
pany by the receiver of the Aetna In- 
demnity company. 

The total claims filfd against the 



WOMAN IN FRENCH 

E SPIONA GE CASE. 

Versailles, Aug. 29. — A serious es- 
pionage case, involving several non- 
commissioned officers of the Eleventh 
artillery regiment, has been unearthed 
by the authorities. Quartermaster 
Georges Guleu has been arrested and 
search is being made for the others. 

Compromising letters in cipher are 
alleged to have been found in Guieu's 
possession. A woman is also believed 
to be connected with the case. 



ONLY NINE GO ON 

BATT LESHI P CRUISE. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Only nine 
battleships of the Atlantic fleet will 
make the Mediterranean cruise 
planned for this fall, and they will 
not be accompanied by the torpedo 
fleet, as the original program pro- 
posed. Secretary Daniels announced 
that it had been determined that it 
would be Incurring an unnecessary 
risk to have the destroyers make the 
return trip acrqss the Atlantic in mid- 
winter, and that they would be sent 
to the Mediterranean during a more 
favorable season. 

« 

Demand TrlaU In Pekln. 

Pekln, China, Aug. 29. — Both houses 
of the Chinese parliament passed reso- 
lutions requiring the government to 
try the members of parliament who 
had been placed under arrest before 
the supreme court in Pekln. The gov- 
ernment afterward hinted that It 
would comply with the request, but 
the deputies representing the south- 
ern provinces express their distrust of 
the government. 



Cut Wi# Sharp Steel In- 
strument and Condition 
.Cntical. 

Deer River, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald. )y—Jonn Jones, husband 
of Mrs. Anna Jones, recently refused a 
new trial after being convicted of Bell- 
ing liquor to **polted" people, was per- 
haps fatally stabbed In front of the 
Jones saloon here yesterday afternoon 
by Frank RegeLsperger, who Is undor 
arrest. Jones was taken to the Bemld- 
Jl hospital. 

Jones was telling the bartender not 
to sell liquor to a certain posted per- 
son when Regelsperger "butted in," an- 
gering Jones, who turned to Regelsper- 
ger and said: "There's no use in my 
licking you, for your wife will do 
that." 

Regelsperger made a lunge for Jones, 
and a moment later Jones lay on the 
sidewalk with a slash In his left side 
Just below the stomach, and a second 
slash In his uack, on the left side over 
the kidneys. 

Dr. Farrell was called and after a 
brief examination sent a hurry call to 
Grand Rapids for medical aid and Dr. 
C. M. Storch responded, making rec- 
ord time. He examined the man and 
found that the injuries were very se- 
rious, but not necessarily fatal. Jones 
pleaded to be taken to Bemldjl, and 
after administering first aid treat- 
ment the doctors ordered his re- 
moval. 

Sheriff Riley took a freight train 
at the Rapids, and nabbed Regelsper- 
ger without trouble. When searched 
no knife was found on him, and he de- 
nies that he had a knife in his pos- 
session. Dr. Storch said that It was 
utterly Impossible that the wounds 
could have been made with anything 
but a sharp steel Instrument. 

MAURICTlRWiN OF 
GLOQUET IS DEAD 

Prominent Lumberman, the 
Father of Duluthian, 
Called at Mt. Clemens. 

Cloquet. Mich., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Maurice Irwin, superin- 
tendent of the Northern Lumber com- 
pany of this city, died suddenly last 
evening at the Washington sanitarium, 
Mt. Clemens, Mich., and the announce- 
tuen of his unexpected demise 
was a great shock to this city. He 
went there about a week ago com- 
plaining of a slight rheumatism at- 
tack but it was not considered serious. 
The body Is being brought here for 
the funeral which will be held under 
the auspices of tlie Masons. Mr. Irwin 
being a member of the Duluth com- 
mandery Knights Templar and of Aad 
Temple of Shrine. 

Old CIoQuet Renident. 

Mr. Irwin had b^en superintendent 
for the Northern Lumber company for 
tiixteen years, and was one of Cloquet's 
most distinguished and respected citi- 
zens. He had resided In Cloquet for 
more than thirty years, being 58 years 
of age at the time of his death. 

Mr. Irwin is survived by his widow 
and five children. The children are 
Claude Of Duluth. Mrs. F. W. Wilhelml 
of Cloquet, and tlie Misses Nellie, Alice 
and Frances of Cloquet, 



Make This 

Shop Your 

Downtown 

Stop. 



MMA^-Mcfdrnt 



B>^eL-USIV£ SHOP 



105 and 107 

West 

Superior 

Street. 



ii 





'I 



im, LIST iM 

OF ^yiysT^^ 

SUMMER GARMENTS OF ALL DISCRIPTIONS 
MUST VACATE BY SEPTEMBER 1st 



I 




Coats and Suits- 
worth up to $25.00. 

Coats and Suits— 



$j-i5 Summer Dresses- 
worth up to $13.50. 

% Summer Dresses- 
worth up to $22.50. 



■4' 



worth up to $42.50. 

d) Summer Dresses — 

worth up to $35.00.' 



m-^ 



# 



THE GU LL IS SAVED. 

Boat Reported Lost During Storm 
Still Floating. 

Baudette, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The steam launch Gull, 
one of the finest plying on local wa- 
ters that was reported lost In the 
heavy storm of last week. Is safe in 
the harbor at Budreau's point. 

The boat struck a rocky reef and 
stove a large hole In the prow. It Is 
said that one of the regular channel 
buoys had drifted out of the course 
and this caused the accident. 

Those on board were taken off on the 
Phoenix and landed at Burton Island. 
Before aid could be secured the boat 
was struck by the two storms the lat- 
ter part of last week and blown off 
the reef and out into the lake, but 
with the changing wind It drifted back 
to Budreau's point and came In with 
bells ringing. 

The boat suffered about $2,000 dam- 
age, as the hull was sprung from 
the pounding on the rocks, the engine 
loosened, the large plate glass win- 
dows smashed and the doors torn out 
and lost, as well as some parts of 
the partitions. 

The boat was partially Insured and is 
now awaiting the arrival of the in- 
surance adjusters, prior to having It 
repaired. 

TWO killed'when 

T RAIN H ITS AUTO. 

Nevada, Iowa, Aug. 29. — W. P. ZwU- 
line, a retired capitalist of this city, 
and his wife were killed when a 
Northwestern pa,8senger train struck 
their automobile here last night. The 
view of the track at the crossing was 
obscured by a freight train standing 
on a siding. 

THREE KILLED WHEN 
POW DER M ILL GOES. 

Cairo, III., Aug. 29. — Three men were 
killed when the black powder mill of 
the Miami Powder company at Fay- 
ville. 111., twenty miles north of here, 
blew up yesterday afternoon. The de- 
tonation was felt within a radius of 
five miles. 

The dead are: 

SUPT. J. H. KIEBLER. Chicago. 

JOSEPH MARTIN, Cairo. 

ALVY GRUBBS. Thebes, 111. 

The cause of the explosion could not 
be ascertained, as no one present re- 
mained to tell the story. 

LOOSE COINS NOT 
WANTED IN MA IL BOXES. 

In the future, rural mall carriers do 
not have to collect loose coins from the 
mail boxes in payment for stamps, ac- 
cording to an order Just Issued by 
James I. Blakslee, fourth assistant 
postmaster general. 

The copy of the order received here 
by Foreman Johnson states that the 
carriers are not required by the gov- 
ernment to collect loose coins from the 
rural mall boxes. Senders of mall, 
wishing to pay for stamps, must place 
the money in envelopes or wrap It so 
that It will not be loose In the bcfx. 

Mall carriers collecting loose coins 
are only doing so *s an accommodation, 
the order states. 

SCHULT Z PRE SIDENT. 

Chicagoan Headt Chief Interchange 
Car Inspeciofs and Foremen's Assn. 

Minneapolis Minn., Aug. 29.— With 
the election I of officers, the national 
convention if ti|9 Chief Interchange 

Car Inspectors' and Car Foremen's as- 
sociation ca»h« to a clojao Thursday. 
The officers! are: President. F. C. 
Schultz, Chicago; vice president, F. H. 
Hanson, Cleveland; secretary-treasurer, 
Stephen Skldmore, Cincinnati; execu- 
tive board, E. R.fcCampbell, Minneapo- 
lis; C. J. Streke, Buffalo; J. P. Carney. 
Detroit; J. K. Dft*anney, St. Loula; F. 
W Trajmell Kansas City, Mo.; W. R. 
Munn, N«w ^pck|s^W. W. ILnapp, Mid- 





FINAL WIND-UP DAY 



AT THE TWIN PORTS 

CLEAN-UP SALES 



All Summer Wear- 
ables now selling at 
cost and less. 

Be here with the 
crowds tomorrow — 
you will save money. 




mi imn so 
BOW ki mmmmt 

Fin^ES^ ^ 

ON $12.00 SUITS YOU SAVE $5.14 
ON $15.00 SUITS YOU SAVE $5.14 
ON $20.00 SUITS YOU SAVE $8.14 
ON $25.00 SUITS YOU SAVE $11.14 

NOTE — Medium and heavy weight suits at the above 
prices suitable for fall and winter wear. 

ON 15c HOSE YOU SAVE 5c 

ON 25c HOSE YOU SAVE 8c 

ON 50c SILK HOSE YOU SAVE 21c 

ON 25c NECKWEAR YOU SAVE 10c 

ON 50c NECKWEAR YOU SAVE 21c 

ON 75c NECKWEAR YOU SAVE 28c 

ON 75c SHIRTS YOU SAVE 36c 

ON $1.00 SHIRTS YOU SAVE 41c 

ON $1.50 SHIRTS YOU SAVE 61c 

ON $2.00 SHIRTS YOU SAVE 71c 

ON 50c UNDERWEAR YOU SAVE 13c 

ON $1.00 UNDERWEAR YOU SAVE 41c 

ON $1.50 UNION SUITS YOU SAVE 61c 

ON $3.00 UNION SUITS YOU SAVE $1.21 




New Fall Hats 
New Fall Shoes 
New Fall Suits 



COOK & GITTLESON 




i 

1 



405 and 407 West Superior Street 



dleton, N. Y.; and W. Stoll, Toledo. 

The selection of the place for the 
next meeting was left to the executive 
board. 



TAXICAB DRIVER 

IS REARRESTED 



Ollle Lowery. a taxlcab driver. 
Jumped bail of |25 rather than appear 
In court Tuesday to answer a charge 
of disorderly conduct, but he was re- 
arrested yesterday afternoon on the 
same charge by Officer Andree. 

Lfowery was arraigned before Judge 
Cutting and this time pleaded guilty 
to the charge He will be sentenced 
at 2 o'clock this afternoon. 

The complaint charges Lowery with 
having struck Officer Andree when 
the latter was placing Lowery under 
arrest. Lowery claims that the officer 
struck him twice with his club before 
he showed any signs of fighting. It 
was only when the officer split open 
his head, said Lowery, that he struck 
back to defend himself. 

THROWN FROM 

HI S MOT ORCYCLE. 

Hugh Server, 18 years old, 22 North 
Seventh avenue west, struck a ridge 
in the street at Fourteenth avenue 
west and Third street about 7:30 
o'clock last evening while riding on 
his motorcycle and was thrown to the 
pavement, sustaining a compound 
fracture of his left leg. 

Server was con.sclous when picked 
up and was Immediately taken to the 
St. Mary's hospital In the police 
emergency ambulance. 

According to his own story. Server 
had been riding at a rapid rate and 
was coming east on Third street. Just 
as he reached the corner of Four- 
teenth avenu3 his motorcycle struck a 
ridge near the curbing, throwing him 
to the pavement. 

Yeung Server Is a telephone oper- 
ator at fire headquarters. 

DROWNS" WWH ITEBEAR, 

Mrs. Wilcken of St. Paul Gets Into 
Too Deep Water. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 29. — A score of 
women bathers last night made vain 
attempts to rescue Mrs. Adolph 
"Wilcken, 25 years old, wife of a well 
known business man who was drowned 
in White Bear lake. The body was 
recovered, but an obstruction in the 
throat prevented resusltatlon. 

Mrs. Wilcken went into deep water 
when she feared her mother was in 
danger of falling from a boat nearby. 

« 

Indian Heads School. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Commissioner 
of Indian Affairs Sells has appointed 
Peru Farver, a full-blooded Choctaw, 
,T.s superintendent of the Armstrong 
male orphan academy, a government 
school at Academy, Okla. Farver has 
been for some time principal teacher 
at the academy. 



if^ 



CHICKERING 
PIANO 



Howardi Farweli & Co. 

120 East Superior St. 

W. J. ALLEN, Mgr. 



^ 



MANY HOGS DYING. 

Cholera Is Raging in Southern Minne- 
sota Among Swine Herds. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 29. — Reports 
from the Southern Minnesota coun- 
ties are to the effect that swine herds 
are being depopulated by the hun- 
dreds as the result of the epidemic of 
hog cholera. Dr. S. H. Ward, secre- 
tary of the state livestock and sani- 
tary board, states that, in his opinion, 
the loss to farmers In Minnesota •will 
reach 15,000,000. 

So serious has the epidemic become 
that the matter will be taken up with 



Gobernor Eberhart with a view to ar- 
ranging for the speedy distribution of 
protective serum and its manufacture 
by the state In greater quantities. It 
Is said the supply of serum now is 

very limited. 

» 

9100.000 Hall LOM. 

Langdon, N. D., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Hail losses in the Wales 
and Mowbray district, thia county, ag- 
gregated api>roxlmately $100,000 ac- 
cording to final estimates, just made by 
hall loss adjusters. The storm that 
swept that district a few days ago, ad- 
justers state, covered a strip about two 
miles wide and about fifteen miles long, 
while in addition to that there waft 
scattering damage. 



- / 




•.^H 
.^•- 







or Men 



IN TAN AND BLACK— $4 lo $6 

Have that extraordinary look — one glange and 
you become convinced mat you are correctly shod 



THEY ARE PINGREE MADE 



The North Country^ Largest Shoe 5torc 




218 West Superior Street 



■ I 

i 






_Y- 



iiMii 



'.x.^ iii^\ i. 



. ^.^-X ;< a^*...'-' 



1— ■• J.* 



w 



^ 




Friday, 



THE DUL^TH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



9 



SCHOOL 

Will Open 
Tuesday 

and we are prepared 
with the right 
clothes, made for us 
by Joseph Skolny & 
Co. of New York. 
Norfolk School 
Suits for boys 6 to 
16 years, priced $6 
to $15 ; Sailor School 
Suits for boys 6 to 
10 years priced $5.50 
to $9.00. Other good 
makes in blue serges 
and cassimeres. sizes 
5 to 16 years, two 
pairs of trousers, for 
$5.00. Balance of 
all our Summer 
Weight Boys Suits, 
Ys off. All plain 
Knee Pants Suits, 
J^ Price. 

Saturday will be the last day for cut price 
clearance sales on Men's and Boys' Clothing. 

KENNEY & ANKER 

409 AND 411 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 




Copyright Han Sciufecr & Mara 




Soo Line Trains 



to and from 



Duluth-Superior 



stop at 



Merriam Park 



Going — read down. 

1:45 PM|11:10 PM 
2:15 PMI11:40 PM 
6:30 PM; fi:20 am 
«t50P>I| 6:45 AM 

7:10 PMi 7;0U AJkl 



Station 



(Prior Ave.) 



DULUTH 

SUPERIOR 

ST. PAUL 

MERHIAM PARK 

MINNEAPOLIS 



Returning — read up. 
7:20 PMj 6:30 AM 
6:50 PMj 6:00 AM 
2:30 PMill:40 PM 
2tlOPMill:15P>f 
1:55 PM|11:00 PM 



Ticlcets may be purcliased and 

baggage checked to and 

from IMerriam Parle 

All Steel Electric Lighted Modern Train 

COOL LAKE TRIPS 





i 



SCHOOL 
DAYS 



STARTED IN OUR 




Boy s and Girls Shoes 



or Oxfords will be happy and profitable; all leath- 
ers. Popular prices. 



EXPERT FITTERS | 



A pencil box free with every pair school 
shoes or oxfords. 

AT THE SIGN OF THE DOVE. 



j 





S'KPijUL'MlNNEJtPOUS''DuLVTff* 

123 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



For Quick Results Use Herald "Wants** 






FAST TIME IN MEAT PIKES 



BRIDGE WORK 

City Crew Completes Re- 
pairs on Rustic Span at 
Lester Park. 



Defective Timbers Are Re- 
placed and New Plank- 
ing Laid. 



Record time was made by the crew 
which repaired the lustlc bridge in 
Lester park, Just below the dam, un- 
der the direction of Henry Cleveland, 
manager of the park department. 

Starting Tuesday morning- the work- 
men ripped off the entire top of the 
bridge. Including the planking, re- 
placed defective stringers, sorted the 
planks and had the structure back In 
Khape yesterday noon. The entire Job 
was done in two and one-half days 
and Manager Cleveland states that the 
total cost was undt-r $100. 

The bridge is probably used by more 
people each summer than any other In 
the local park system. Lester park 
Is one of the most popular outdoor 
recreation spots In Duluth and Is v's- 
Ited annually by thousands. Most of 
them cross and recross the span over 
the bc-autiful stream which divides the 
grounds. 

Some Plnnka Relald. 
Last year complaint was made that 
the structure was sagging somewhat 
and did not appear to be safe. The 
engineering dtvlsion made an Inspec- 
tion of the timbers and reported that 
no present danger existed but recom- 
mended that it be given attention as 
soon as possible. Tuesday morning 
tho repairs were started and rushed 
through at top speed. The bridge is 
approximately sixty feet In length 
When the top had been stripped the 
planks were sorted so that those 
which were sound could be relaid. 
About half of them were considered 
satisfactory. For the remainder new 
planks were brought to the ground. 

When the walk was put down the 
new planks were alternated by the 
old, giving the bridge's dres« a striped 
effect, which rivals that of the gayest 
rounder's holiday suit. The alternat- 
ing has another purpose. Should any 
of the old planks give way some time 
in the future there will be sound 
planks on the other side, making it 
practicaHy impossible for any one to 
drop through. The management does 
not expect anything of that kind, 
however, as It intends to Inspect the 
brUge at regular intervals to ascer- 
tain the condition of the planks so 
that any which appear to be weaken- 
ing may be replaced. 



GOJIGHER 

No Relief From Pressure of 

Higti Cost of Living 

Ahead. 



D. H., 8-29-13. 



Importations of Argentine 

Beef Will Bring No 

Reduction. 



There is apparently no relief in 
sight from the high cost of living or 
the cost of high living so far as meat, 
butter and eggs are concerned. 

The dealers, at least, hold out no 
hope. The only word they hand out Is 
that the prices will likely go higher 
than ever. It will be noticed that the 
price of pork loins and of lamb have 
Increased this week. Beef Is station- 
ary so far, but it is announced that a 
material advance may be expected be- 
fore long. The cause is, it is said, that 
the raising of beeves is not nearly ade- 
quate any more to meet the demand 
for the steaks and roasts that people 
want. 

one of the executives connected with 
the wholesale meat business, was asked 
aa to whether or not the taking off 
of duty from beef as proposed, in the 
new tariff bill will have any effect 
on the price. He shook his head. 

"Not the least," said he. "The Ar- 
gentine beef will not be any cheaper 
than American beef. In fact England 
is being supplied with that beef today 
and the price of meat over there is 
fully as hi^h as it i« here. What the 




n 




GOVERN OR PRO CLAIMS. 

Urges Minnesota People to Observe 
Labor Day Monday. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Aug. 29. — A Labor 
day proclamation by Governor A. O. 
Eberhart, who is In Colorado Springs, 
was issued from his offices here yes- 
terday. It recommends that all busi- 
ness places In the state be closed Mon- 
day. Sept. 1. 'That the day be ob- 
served by all citizens In a manner that 
will properly honor the man In the 
factor^', the workshop, the mines and 
all engaged In any form of Industry. 
In giving this tribute to the men who 
toil It is well to bear In mind the 
economic Independence of all our peo- 
ple. Tc the employer and employes 
these words are especially uttered. 
The success and prosperity of the one 
depends upon the prosperity and suc- 
cess of the other." 

WILLIS MOORE'S 

AIDE REDUCED. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — As punish- 
ment for alleged political activity, 
Norman B. Conger, weather bureau 
Inspector at Washington, has been 
reduced in grade and pay and made 
iocal forecaster at Detroit. After nn 
investigation It was found that Con- 
ger had received his promotion In re- 
ward for his activities in behalf of 
Willis L, Moore, former chief of the 
weather bureau, who had ambitions 
to become secretary of agriculture. 

SLAYER OF GIRL'S 

AS SAILA NT FREED. 

New York, Aug. 29. — A coroner's 
Jury acquitted William F. Cuff for 
slay.ng Joseph Borrandes on Aug. 4 
last while the latter was attempting 
to assault Miss Mary Burns, a tele- 
phcine operator on her way iiome from 
work In the early morning. Cuff, a 
stranger to the young woman, re- 
sponded to her cries for help an 1 
knocked Borrandes down. The man 
died later of a fractured skull. The 
.iury brought In a verdict of Justifi- 
able homicide. 



X'^eEn^aivder 




reason is. is hard to define." 

Same Packem In Control. 

It was claimed in an article recently 
printed in The Herald that when Ar- 
gentine beef begins to come into the 
United States with the duty off there 
will be no difference in the scale of 
prices for the reason that the same 
interests that control the meat situa- 
tion here control it there — that. Is that 
the Armours, Cudahys and others are 
kings of the beef business in Argen- 
tina. 

However that may be, beef Is due to 
ascend soon. It is claimed that the 
cause of the rise In pork is that hogs 
In several of the leading communities 
in the hog-raising part of the world, I 
are being swept by hog-cholera and 
the ravages of that disease are cutting 
short the supply of pigs for the mar- 
ket. Southern Michigan and Iowa, in 
particular, are having a hard time of 
It. 

In the matter of eggs, the supply 
has shortened up considerably. To 
paraphrase a famous signal, "America 
expects every hen to do her duty" but 
a lot of them are falling down on the 
job. Then, also, fewer good eggs are 
obtained from a case received from 
the country than formerly because ol 
the hot weather. And of course it is 
well known among dealers that con- 
sumers insist upon palatable eggs. 
Some may doubt their religion or the 
tealty of their friends but they cannot 
afford to doubt their eggs. 

Butter Hard to Obtain. 
Butter is harder to obtain. It is 
claimed. There Is not as good feed as 
earlier In the year, and also, among 
farmers, the fountain head, so to speak, 
of butter — which, however, is not sup- 
posed to spout and therefore the meta- 
phor is slightly mixed — there la a great 
deal of attention being paid to the 
crops Just now and the dairy business 
is being neglected. This, of course, 
has its effect upon the butter market. 
So far as fruits are concerned, pre- 
serving is still going on and there is 
also a world of pickling in progress. 
As to the latter the business in pick- 
ling goods was very heavy during the 
present week, It Is reported, and next 
week will see the high raafk of the 
season. It is claimed that the pick- 
ling season will be much shorter than 
usual this year for the reason that the 
stuff used in pickling is drying up and 
there will not be an adequate supply 
and not for very long, 

Duluth has again excelled, but In a 
new direction. Fitzsimmons-Palmer 
have cornered the Honduras crop of 
oranges. This is the first time that 
Honduras oranges have been sold in 
Duluth. and they are said to be most 
delicious, rather superior to the other 
brands that have been sold here. The 
company mentioned has purchased the 
entire crop of Honduras for this sea- 
son. 

In California fruits, plums are scarce 
and the market 1« higher than it was. 
Grapes are higher on account of a 
shortage of supply, but the quality 
of the grapes has improved. Califor- 
nia pears are now off the market but 
their place has been taken by the 
Washington variety. The crop of pears 
Is short but at that they are ruling at 
a cheaper price than they were. Cali- 
fornia peaches are all through for this 
season, and the market Is now being 
furnished with peaches from Colorado 
and Washington. 

Apples Are Plentiful. 
Apples are more plentiful than they 
were last week and are therefore of- 
fered at much cheaper prices, especial- 
ly for the early varieties. No great 
reduction, further than has already 
taken place, may be looked for. 

There are In the market Just now 
some of the most toothsome and attrac- 
tive looking fancy pink-meat melons 
that have ever been shown In Michi- 
gan street. They are from Colorado 
and are selling at a very low price, for 
the crop is abundant. Concord grapes 
are cheaper than they were, owing to 
the advance in the season. Their qual- 
ity Is fine. Blackberries and blueber- 
ries are off the market for the year. 
Watermelons are ruling at about the 
same prices as last week, but are get- 
ting better In quality, as they come 
from Iowa and have had a longer time 
to mature than the former supplies re- 
ceived. 

California oranges and lemons are 
ruling at about the same price. So are 
cantaloupes. 

CrabapDles will be in the market 
next week, and it is claimed that the 



Labor Day Lids 



Buy your new hat tomorrow. Sunday marks 
the end of the straw hat season. On Monday 
— Labor day — we'll shut up shop and rest. 

This is the big Hat Store of Duluth where 
every head can find a suitable covering. 

Prices — why we'll give you more for your money at $1, $1.50 
and $2 than the Specialty Stores and at $3 we give you the best 
three dollar hat on Superior street. Union Label hats — of course! 

And the suit, shirt and shoes to match the new hat. 



m 



Duluth, 
Minn. 




At Third 
Ave. West 




COLUMBIA COLUMBIA i^ULUfiBlA COLUMBIA 

New September Columbia Records 

NOW ON SALE 

Come in and get the new catalogues and hear a few of the latest records. 



f 



1 



EDMONT 



IS Third Ave. West 



3C 



-^l^MVfl 



pretty nearly as heavy as that of last 
year. Cabbage is a little cheaper and 
other heavy vegetables are about the 
same as formerly. 

New honey Is on the market, and is 
selling at a reasonable price. 



Girls Wanted 

Apply at Once 

NATIONAL CANDY COi 

1728 West Superior Street 



Initial supply will be of excellent qu*l 
ity. It will soon be time to preserve 
crabapples in Duluth. and It Is under- 
stood that heavy orders have been sent 
In with the view of meeting a strong 
demand for this purpose. Potatoes are 
slightly cheaper, and the crop is good. 
It is understood that unless frost hits 
it, the new crop of potatoes will be 



JMk 



.-- 



\gl^ "toMck of 3/0\ir f oof"- 
f;ra.i\Sf ornvxy mto a Bed 




"A l\ixurioW Bed 



Complete Boasefnmltlien 




5<cwidAve.W.aB4FirBt 



ntSL ^^P 



Don't Persecute 
your Bowek 

— «ltMil>— iinniwiry. Tiy ^ 

CARTER'S U 
UVER PILLS 

■en^ on the 
onunata bile. 
•ootkatlMdJical* 

aamknaa 

€«r«CM< 

bKmT 
IS' 

finaU PUl, Small Dom. Small Prle* 

f ' Genuine muKbeu Signature 



WOMEN ATTACK 

PR EMIER ASQUITH. 

Elgin, Scotland, Aug. 29. — The British 
prime minister was the object of an at- 
tack yesterday in which his chivalry 
restrained him from adequately de- 
fending himself. 

While he was golfing with his daugh- 
ter on the Lossiemouth links, two stal- 
wart suffragettes who had quietly come 
up to the green suddenly sprang at 
him. They knocked off his hat, grabbed 
him by the clothing and dragged him 
over the ground. 

The prime minister bore his rough 
treatment complacently and refrained 
from using force to make them desist, 
while they Imparted to him their opin- 
ion that he was a scoundrel and a past- 
master In the arts of Ananias. 

Miss Asquith, who was a little dis- 
tance off when the suffragettes pounced 
on her father, ran to his assistance and 
applied militant methods to the mili- 
tants. The battlte waged for onlv a 
few moments, when two detectives 
rushed up and with difficulty released 
Mr. Asqultn from the clutches of the 
suffragettes. 

At the station the women refused to 
give their names or addresses. 



THE 

HOMECROFTERS' 

CORNER 

Conducted by C. E. ROE. 

IQuefttions will be answered by Mr. Ro« 
in this column. 



■i 






SWEDEN PROTESTS 

CUSTOMS RULING. 

Stockholm, Aug. 29. — The Swedish 
government has instructed its minister 
at Washington, W. A. F. Ekengren. to 
protest to the United States govern- 
ment against the customs interpreta- 
tion which declares that Swedish wood 
pulp Is entitled to free entry Into the 
United States only when shipped In 
Swedish bottoms. The newspapers her^ 
comment on the customs order In the 
case as "not In harmony with Sweden's 
friendliness toward the Panama-Pacific 
exposition at San Francisco." 
« 

Minne'apolltan Releaiie<1. 

St. Paul. Minn., Aug. 29. — Frank E. 
Larson of Minneapolis was released 
yesterday by the state pardon board 
after serving eleven months of a year's 
sentence In the Hennepin county Jail 

,for misappropriating funds of a" Min- 
neapolis camp. Modern Woodmen of 

'America.' Larson's trial caused con- 
siderable comment at the time. 

Larson's father has died during his 
son's incarceration and the mother Is 
s4id tQ ))e serlouily ill. 



The AVInter Supply. 

Every gardener ought to be plan- 
ning his winter supply at this season. 
If there Is a surplus of beans, the 
tender ones should" be canned and the 
balance allowed to ripen for seed. 
Should there be more dry beans than 
are needed for seed, the balance can 
be used for baking during the winter 
months. 

In selecting seed corn the largest, 
fullest ears should be left to mature. 
They should be allowed to remain In 
the stalk until after the first hard 
frost. When picked, the husk should 
be stripped back and the ears hung 
In a warm, dry room for several weeks 
until the kernels become perfectly 
hard. It may then be shelled and put 
away. 

Peas, also should be allowed to be- 
come thoroughly dry before shelling. 
It is a good plan to pick all ripe pods 
from the vines and spread them out 
In a dry room so as to avoid injury 
from the fall rains or shelling out by 
the birds. 

The cellar should be made clean and 
dry in readiness for the root crops, 
but the roots themselves should be 
allowed to remain In the ground as 
long as possible. It Is well to have 
ready a good supply of sand with 
which to cover carrots, beets and par- 
snips, also for packing celery. Celery 
win stand a light freeze without In- 
Jury sand should not be carried to the 
cellar until October. However, celery 
should not be dug or handled while in 
the frozen state. If frozen, leave In 
tho ground until the frost is thor- 
oughly out and then move. 

It is a very easy matter to have a 
fresh supply of pnrsloy all winter bv 



potting a plant or two from the open 
ground for your kitchen window. 

Flower seeds, such as pansles. ast- 
ers, nasturtiums and sweet peas should 
be carefully watched now and gath- 
ered, cleaned and labeled as soon as 
ripe. Of course care should be used 
to see that these seeds are thoroughly 
dry before they are put away for the 
winter. 

If you are pfannlng on a hot bed or 
a storm window garden for next 
spring, it would be well to provide for 
some good top soil now. Garden soil 
well mixed with compost or thor- 
oughly rotted stable manure is the 
best for this purpose. A box of this 
can be stored in the cellar where It 
will be accessible when wanted. 

September is the month for moving 
hardy perennials Including peonies and 
Iris. These plants give better results 
when planted in September than they 
do when planted in the spring. There 
Is plenty of time for them to get 
rooted before the ground freezes, and 
most of them start to grow as soon aa 
the frost Is out In the spring. 
Cncnmbers. 

Those wishing a continuous supply 
of cucumbers should be careful to 
koep them cut. Where cucumbers are 
allowed to ripen on the vines, the 
vitality of the vine becomes exhausted 
and new sets cease to form. Slicing 
cucumbers and dills may be cut for 
the next three weeks and the smaller 
pickles Just before frost. It Is bet- 
ter for the vines to do the picking 
early In the morning than In the mid- 
dle of the day. Use a pair of sissors 
or a good sharp knife for this work 
so as to disturb the vines as little aa 
possible. Cucumbers need a careful 
hand at all times. 



He was a bold man 
that Jirst eat an oyster 

Swift- 1 745 

He is a sensible man 
who always wears a 
Gordon 

Gordon- 1 91 3 






Hats $ J 



10 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



THE DULUTH BERUD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 
Published every evenins except Sun- 
day hj The Herald Company. 

Both Telephones — Businesa Office, 324; 
Editorial Rooms, 1126. 

tBtfrwJ as s»^-^nd oliMs matter at the Puluth j>i)«l- 
Qf ac* under the act of congrem* of March 3. 1870. 

Ifficial paper, city of ddutb 



81 BSCRIPTIOX RATES — By mall, pay- 

.^ble in advance, one month. 35 cents; 

three months. |1: six months. |3; 

on* year. |4: Saturday Herald, $1 per 

rear; Weekly Herald. |1 per year. 
Dally by carrier, city and suburbs. 10 

:enta a week. 45 cents a month. 

eul»crtb«w wUl confer • f»Tor by making known 
■JB) complaint of g«rTlc«. 

M'hm chatiBln* the address of jour rai)«r. 11 to 
Imiortant to give both old aiid n*w Hddrtvses. 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tlelnff contracts' with the distinct guar- 
anty that It has the largest circulation 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 

tz== — 



THE HERALD AND 
VACATION 

Those going away for the summer 
or even for a short vacation should 
not leave without sending In an or- 
der for The Herald to follow. Keep 
up with what's going on In Duluth. 
Oet all the late.st news. Its like a 
dally letter from home. Have your 
address changed If you are already 
a subscriber. Do not miss a single 
copy. Both 'phones. 324. 



THE STREET RAILWAY SUIT. 

The statement by Mayor Prince 
that the city proposes to push to the 
finish the suit to test the street rail- 
Vfiiy franchise should put an end to 
the rumors of compromise that have 
been afloat of late. 

No compromise would be possible 
except on the basis of a new fran- 
chise, superseding the old legislative 
fninchise, which would put the city 
in the same relation to the street 
railway company that it bears to other 
public utilities, and that most cities 
nowadays bear to their important 
ptblic service corporations. 

The suit is brought in good faith 
to determine the validity of the jug- 
handled franchise which the legisla- 
ture enacted over the city's head 
miiny years ago, and it is to the in- 
terest of the street railway company 
aa well as of the city that the com- 
pany's rights and the city's rights 
should be definitely and finally de- 
termined in the highest courts. 



Even the broadcloth of monarchy has 
approved the Llndsey-woolsey of Amer- 
Icijn diplomatic policy. 



A NEW CURRENCY LAW SOON. 

The prediction by Chairman Glass 
of the house committee on banking 
and currency that the administration 
currency bill will be through the house 
within ten days is highly encourag- 
ing, and the conditions that prevail 
fully warrant the prophecy. 

Whipped into final shape after 
•w.<;eks of conference and compromise, 
during which the banking interests 
have been conceded everything that 
could be conceded without infringing 
or the public rights, the measure now 
is in excellent shape, and there should 
be no difficulty in making it a law 
wthin a short time. 

The tariff bill will soon be out of 
the way, thus clearing the decks for 
final action on the currency bill. 
There has been so thorough a con- 
sideration of the measure in commit- 
tee and caucus that no great delay 
sh ould attend its passage. The action 
of the house Democratic caucus last 
e^'ening in appr->ving the bill by a 
vote of 163 to 9, and in adopting it 
as. a party measure almost by a unani- 
mous vote, makes it certain that the 
house will pass it within a few days, 
and the senate, being thoroughly fa- 
ir iliar with its provisions and fully 
avvare of the public demand for 
p'ompt action on the currency, should 
not be far behind the house in its 
final approval of the measure. 

With the tariff and the currency 
Oil of the way, a foundation will be 
laid for many years of financial peace 
aid industrial prosperity, the like of 
which the country has never experi- 
enced. 



crs, and the German and his stein 
have been exalted by that class who 
proudly and independently boast that 
they "can drink it or leave it alone." 
It is not in the least likely that the 
bulk of the people of Germany will 
follow the example of their emperor 
in this matter of abstention, but the 
fact remains that the head of such a 
nation has determined to "cut out the 
booze." 

Nor, according to reports, was it a 
matter of sentiment with the emperor, 
hut wholly in the interests of health 
and efficiency. In other words, he 
has come to the same conclusion that 
many men in this and other countries 
have reached, that unnatural stimula- 
tion and proper and dependable phy- 
sical and mental power cannot exist 
in the same body. 

.Mthough it is probable that the 
kaiser's action was in no way related 
to Secretary Bryan and his favorite 
beverage, the fact is none the less 
plain that the emperor's decision is 
another victory for the principle that 
lay at the back of the secretary's 
grape juice dinner service. The sphere 
of influence of the non-intoxicant is 
growing. 



99 per cent of the satisfaction. And 
the satisfaction itself is so great that 
nobody cares how much the butter 
gets smeared around his mouth, or 
how long it takes him to get the 
shells out of his teeth afterwards. 

Then hats off — or rather manners 
off — to corn on the cob, the chiefest 
delicacy in the menu of the season and 
the one that not only takes us back 
the farthest into the history of the 
race, but raises us nearest childhood's 
ideal of carelessness of appearance 
and that satiety of appetite which puts 
the grouchiest of us all on the plane 
of simple humanity and worldwide 
brotherhood. 



Employes in Superior laundries wore 
given a dinner by their employers the 
other night. Now there's an occasion 
when there would seem to be no rea- 
sonable ground for objection to the 
serving of "suds." 



ON TO HIBBINGI 

Chairman Gravel of the trade ex- 
tension committee of the Duluth Com- 
mercial club, in charge of the Duluth 
day trip to the county fair at Hib- 
bing, said through The Herald last 
night that he expected three hundred 
to make the trip tomorrow, and that 
he would like to see five hundred. 

It OUGHT to be five hundred. 

The fair deserves it, Hibbing de- 
serves it, and Duluth owes it. 

Everybody who can possibly ar- 
range it should join the party tomor- 
row, and help to let Hibbing realize 
that Duluth knows enterprise when ^t 
sees it, and that it appreciates what 
the range metropolis has done with a 
valuable institution which went to 
seed when Duluth was supposed to bc 
handling it. " 

There is a different spirit in Duluth 
now, and if the county fair were still 
being held here it would be a vastly 
greater institution than it was the 
last time it showed in this city." But 
it is too late now to think of that. 
Hibbing plucked the fair away when 
Duluth neglected it, and has mosf 
distinctly made good with it. Du- 
luth holds no ill will, and harbors no 
jealousy. It is proud of what Hib- 
bing has done, and it will be in Hib- 
bing tomorrow in as large numbers 
as possible to show that it is. 



Mayor Gaynor has chosen the shovel 
as the official emblem of his new party. 
And here everybody thought that had 
been pre-empted by Governor Major of 
Missouri. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(Readen of The Herald are inrlted to make fre« 
use of this ctUumn to exiireaa their Ideaa about the 
topics of gE<neral Interest, t)ut dtscussiuns of sectarlaa 
religious differences are barred. Letters must not 
exceed SOO words — the shorter the better. They must 
be written on one side of tlie paper only, aud they 
must be accnmpantetl In every rase by the name and 
address of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A signed letter Is always more efTectlTe. how- 
ever. ► 



DO NOT APPRECIATE 

THEIR ADVANTAGES. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

It seems to me that the people of 
Minnesota do not appreciate at least 
one advantage that tliey seem to have 
over people in almost any other part of 
America, They apparently never have 
a crop failure, and never worry about 
one. They may have good crops or ex- 
cellent crops, but they never have a 
failure. In California they are always 
worrying for fear frost will hit the 
oranges. Florida men lie awake at 
night worrying over the same cause. 
In the Dakotas they are constantly 
fearing a drouth. In Ohio, Illinois, 
Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska and all those 
other Middle Western states they have 
hot winds and terrific heat that dry up 
the crops and wither thenu Every- 
body seems to worry about a crop fail- 
ure but Minnesota. Here we take It 
for granted that we will have good 
crops. There is always plenty of mois- 
ture, not too much heat, and long sun- 
shiny days to ripen the crops before the 
early frosts. It is a blessing we do 
not appreciate. FARMER. 

Duluth, Aug. 28. 



A New England 

I. Tariff Reformer 

EiUtorlal lu Houston Post. 



Count fjappiness a Duty 



rrom the Kansas City TitoM. 



With District Attorney Whitman of 
New York a candidate for re-election 
with his name on all four tickets, there 
is an opportunity to establish a repu- 
tation for conservatism by offering 
even money that he wins. 



A couple of the big league teams 
played a game the other day in which 
thlrty-flve hits were made. Evidently 
a reversion to the original corner-lot 
t.rpa. 



THE GRAPE JUICE SPHERE GROWS. 

Certain elements in the national 
press had rich sport over the dinner 
served to the diplomats at Washing- 
ton at which Secretary of State Bryan 
provided grape juice instead of the 
customary intoxicants. Some of the 
fan was good-natured, but some of it 
vas decidedly ill-natured. Even the 
vrilling acceptance of the change by 
the guests at that dinner, and the 
favorable comment that came from 
abroad, failed to stop the critics. 

There i« always another side to 
such affairs, and one wonders, in the 
light of the criticisms heaped upon 
l.im, how Secretary Bryan felt when 
it learned that Emperor William of 
(Icrmany had declared in favor of the 
Trr'.er wagon. If the Bryan smile did 
r : widen just a trifle, at least, then 
f;.e secretary of state failed to live up 
to 1ms reputation for being distinctly 
K:::.iatl. 

Probably there Is no other ruler in 
ihe world whose decision to abstain 
from the use of liquor would have 
exerted so strong an influence as did 
the kaiser'g, Germany has long been 
(iiown ^a t^ lan4 oi moderate drij^> 



CORN ON THE COB. 
What luxury is there In the whole 
wide range of things good to eat that 
even begins to approach corn on the 
cob? Men rave about the strawberry; 
and truly its lusciousness entitles it to 
a high place in men's regard. Yet 
there are those who prefer prunes, 
and even aside from that, imagine a 
hungry man getting any real satis- 
faction out of strawberries. He 
couldn't do it. 

The watermelon finds much favor, 
but the first part of its name forms 
so great a proportion of its make-up 
that when one has eaten half a large 
melon he is really no better fed than 
if he had swallowed a gallon or so of 
pink lemonade. 

But corn on the cob — well, nothing 
else is quite in the same class. The 
sense of accomplishment, of doing 
something, which modern educators 
tell us is inherent in all the race, is 
satisfied as the teeth crunch their way 
through the kernels. And if you 
think anybody is void of that sense, 
just watch him as he removes the cob 
from before his mouth and looks with 
evident satisfaction at the place where 
he has just gnawed off the seeds. 

Furthermore, there is enough sub- 
stance to it to satisfy the appetite. If 
you doubt it, try it sometime and see 
how few cobs you will have to take 
care of before you begin to get over 
the feeling of hunger and are ready 
to heave that first sigh that begins to 
indicate the satisfaction of appetite. 

And above everything else there is 
the taste of it. Um-m-m! There is 
where you get the natural sweetness 
of the products of mother earth. There 
is where you get away from all the 
frumpery and chemistry of the kitch- 
en, and find yourself down to bed rock 
in the matter of flavor. Close your 
eyes as you munch and you can see 
waving cornfields and all the joUiest 
scenes of your younger days. 

Maybe some of the satisfaction we 
get out of eating corn on the cob is 
a kind of harking back to the pre- 
historic days when our ancestors took 
bones in their hands and handled them 
as the small boy of today handles the 
Thanksgiving drumstick. Or maybe 
it isn't that at all. This much Is cer- 
tain — that when you tamely cut the 
corn off and eat it with a spoon you 
miss not only must of the flavor, but 



Proved He Could Bat It. 

Judge: A group of negroes stood in 
front of a little grocery store In a 
country town, admiring the display of 
"watermllyuns" lying out on the plat- 
form. For a while they discussed the 
fine points of the different •*mllyun8," 
and finally the argument settled Into 
whether or not one man could eat the 
biggest melon In the pile, which 
weighed about twenty-five pounds. 
While this discussion was going on, a 
long, lank darky Joined them. 

"What you'-all dlsputln' about?" he 
Inquired. 

"We's Jest arglfyln'," replied one, 
"whether or not one man could eat that 
there mllyun all by hlsself." 

"Shucks!" boasted the newcomer. "I 
could eet that mllyun, and it wouldn't 
be a snack I" 

A white man, who had overheard the 
remarks, turned to the long, lank 
darky. 

••Why, you fool nigger." he said, "you 
know you couldn't eat all that melon 
at one time! I'll bet you you can't." 

"What yo' bet?" asked the darky. 

"Til tell you what I'll do," proposed 
the white man. "If you'll eat it all, 
I'll pay for It; but If you don't you pay 
for It." 

The negro was a little cautious. 
"What does that mllyun costr' he 
asked the storekeeper, who had saun- 
tered out on the platform. It was priced 
at 25 cents. The darky scratched his 
head In doubt for a mlnote. 

"I'll tell you what I'll do, boss," he 
said to the white man. "It yo'-all 
lemme go down to my house a little 
bit, I'll tell yo' whether I kin eat that 
mllyun. I won't be gone more'n Ave or 
ten minutes." 

The white man consented, and In 
about ten minutes the negro returned 
and announced his readiness to take 
the wager. 

He ate the melon, scraped the rind 
and drank the Juice. 

"Well, you sure win," said the white 
man, In admiration for his capacity. 
"But now I would like to know why 
you went down to your hotise." 

"I done it all right, ain't I?" said the 
negro, a little uneasily. 

"You certainly have," assured the 
white man. "You have won. But I 
Just wanted to known from curiosity 
why you went to the house." 

"Well, I'll tell yo'. boss. Us niggers 
ain't got no money to lose, and I want- 
ed to be sure. I had a mllyun about 
this size down to my house, and I 
knowed if I could eat it. I could eat 
this one. So I went home and tried It" 



The Woman of It. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: "My wife la 
keen for a bargain." said the man who 
talks about his family. "What a pe- 
culiar woman!" exclaimed the one who 
has to listen. 

"Yes, sir," went on the other, "and 
I'll Juet give you an example of how 
she saves money. Yesterday was her 
.sister's birthday, and her sister lives In 
the southern part of the state. Well, 
my wife bought a present to send her, 
but when I got home last night there 
was the present all wrapped up but not 
sent yet. 

" 'Why. you ought to have sent that 
yesterday,' says I. 'She'll get It too 
late for her birthday, now.' 

" 'That's all right.' says my wife. *I 
called her up by long distance this 
morning and asked her to be patient. 
I told her she'd get it by the 16th. You 
see the package weighs nineteen 
pounds, so I can't send it by parcel 
post. And on the 15th the new ruling 
goes Into effect by which twenty 
pounds can be mailed. I save about 
22 cents by waiting until the 16th.' 

" 'How much did the telephone call 
cost you?' says I. And my wife got 
mad!" 



Doublesooke Cucumbers. 

Judge: A vaudeville contortionist 
was "limbering up" In his dressing 
room, when a laundryman, who hap- 
pened to open the door by mistake, 
stepped across the threshold and stood 
spellbound watching the performer, 
who was apparently tied In a knot on 
top of his trunk. 

Noticing the look of consternation on 
the face of the unintentional Intruder 
and resolving to have some fun at his 
expense, the contortionist assumed a 
look of deepest agony and groaned 
weakly. 

"By gravy, that's the last time I'll 
ever eat cucumbers for supper 1" 

• 

Wakln* Up. 

Washington Star: The British Board 
of Trade has approved an automatic 
device for launching a boat frooi a 
vessel. Somebody mu.st have presented 
the B^ B. of T. with an alarm clook. 



The people of New Hampshire, by 
one of those lucky accidents which 
sometimes cume about In the world of 
politics, elected not long ago a United 
States senator who has a head full of 
brains and a heart full of courage. He 
gave those senators who are bat- 
tling against a reduction of an In- 
iquitous protective tariff levied on 
everything from and between a cradle 
and a coffin some solar plexus blows 
a few days age, and even here in Tex- 
as there are some "protection Demo- 
crats" — a vile misnomer — who can 
profitably read what Senator Hollls of 
New Hampshire had to say: 

"As a Democratic senator from New 
England, born and reared In a hotbed 
of protectionism, I take my stand 
squarely upon the Democratic nation- 
al platform. I decline to separate 
New England tariff Interests from the 
Interests of the nation. The platform 
that won the confidence of the great 
West and the solid South Is good 
enough for New England." 

He said further that his people have 
no sympathy with the cry that New 
England must be coddled or "protect- 
ed" at the expense of the South and 
West, and they had bid him say that 
what is best for the country at large 
Is beat for New England. 

Senator Hollls tells this truth that 
the Democrats have long believed: 
The money the American people have 
yielded In the shape of taxes for the 
benefit of the worklngmen In New 
England's cotton mills has been di- 
verted from Its purpose and stolen for 
the stockholders, for It Is an estab- 
lished fact that, while these mills pay 
enormous dividends, they pay starva- 
tion wages to their operatives. 

"Women and children work, and the 
result Is exactly what one would ex- 
pect The women are sickly and the 
children are stunted. The death rate 
for children under 5 years of age In 
all the United States Is highest In the 
textile cities of New England, In one 
of the most healthful climates in the 
world. The reason Is, the mothers 
must do double duty as housewives 
and day laborers; children are neg- 
lected, mothers are overworked. Preg- 
nant women must work long hours for 
a bare living. In a stifling atmosphere, 
amid clattering machinery, and after 
the child is born the mother has lit- 
tle strength and little time to bestow 
on her offspring." 

Senator Hollls says the mill owners 
talk about protecting labor, yet laws 
are necessary to compel them to con- 
duct their business on decent lines. 
They fight every reduction of the 
hours of labor, keeping a lobby at the 
capital to resist all such legislation, 
yet prate about keeping up the tariff 
to enable them to pay high wages, 
and we have paid millions upon mil- 
lions of Indirect taxes under the Im- 
pression that we were helping to sup- 
port countless mill hands so they 
might not be pauperized; but the dis- 
closures following upon the Lawrence 
strike showed the millions never 
reached the employes' pay envelopes. 

"Here Is some sound talk. It is not 
pleasant to hold up the textile cities 
of New England In their true light 
but I can not be a party to the mon- 
strous fraud that has been perpetrat- 
ed on the American people by the Re- 
publican party. To represent that a 
high protective tariff Is desired by 
the cotton manufacturers of New 
England so that they may pay fair 
wages to their operatives Is brazen 
effrontery. No matter how high the 
tariff, no matter how large the divi- 
dends, they will continue to get work 
at the lowest possible rate." 

Coming from a New Englander, 
born In the very heart of protection 
territory, these are words as brave as 
they are honest and true. 

♦ 

Sulzer Dissected 

Norman Hapgood in Harper's Week- 
ly: Poor old Sulxerl — He has lived all 
his life In a struggle for appearances. 
He did not try to be. He tried to seem. 
He probably half deceived himself. A 
friend of mine called on him not long 
before the exposure, and it turned out 
In the conversation that she was sister- 
in-law to a well-known man named 

B . "What!" exclsJmed the governor, 

shaking her hand with great effusion. 
"You a sister-in-law of my dear friend 

B 1 Well, I am glad to see you." 

To the beat of B — 'a recollection, he and 
the governor have never met. It wasn't 
all conscious falsification. Part of It 
was the histrionic temperament gone 
mad. And It was so overdone that 
nearly everybody had begun to laugh 
at It A politician a few weeks ago 
brought me a message from the gx>v- 
ernor asking If I would go to Albany. 
"No," I said, "I certainly shall not 
Why should I. He doesn't want to see 
me. He Is Just urging people up there 
for effect and then making them sit 
around for hours until he gets ready to 
come out and do the 'great man* act" 
Wfe^ the messenger angry? Not he. "I 
am glad to hear you say that" he re- 
plied. "I agree with you." 

Every person I know laughed at him 
— and yet he won the people. He fixed 
his hair and his face like the mask of 
tragedy, and talked on the platform 
like a last-generation Fourth of July 
orator. He let It be understood he was 
a Jew, and let it be understood he 
wasn't a Jew according to political ex- 
igency. He never In his life went to 
work quietly to do good, without seek- 
ing noisy acclaim. He never stood up 
for h!s opinion against his Immediate 
advantage. He never relied upon rea- 
son, but placed his trust In pose and 
rhetoric. He had no element for su- 
periority, and yet the people trusted 
him. He posed and screamed, and the 
people took him at his word. 

. « 

His Duty Was Plats. 

Philadelphia Telegraphi Sitting in 
front of the clubhouse at High Point 
the other night after a day's success- 
ful fishing on the Baregat Charles B. 
Hewitt of Burlington reflectively re- 
marked that he couldn't quite recon- 
cile himself to golf when the conver- 
sation turned to that particular game. 

"Some time ago." said Mr. Hewitt 
in explaining his position, "a preach- 
er friend of mine who was a very de- 
vout dominie decided to take up golf 
as a means of outdoor exercise. 

"Buying a kit of tools and hiring a 
caddy the good man hit the trail for 
the links and teed up for a drive-off. 
At the first swing he missed the ball 
by about six yards. At the next swat 
he got a little nearer, but was still 
too far away to causa the ball any 
great Inconvenience. 

"Several more swings that racked 
his ribs, and finally the dominie hit 
the little sphere. Instead of beauti- 
fully sailing away over the sched- 
uled route, however, it took a side 
rood at right angles, sacheted down 
over the railroad track and got tan- 
gled 'n the box cars and semaphores. 

" 'That settles it,' exclaimed the dis- 
appointed dominie In a decisive voice, 
'I have got to give it upl* 

" 'What!' exclaimed the caddy, won- 
derlngly. 'Olve up golfl* 

" 'No,' was the quick response of the 
aominle, 'the mialftry.' 



Be happy all the time. It Is a wel 
established law that mental habits are 
as readily formed as physical. Happi- 
ness Is one state of consciousness. 

What mind may do for the body Is 
Incalculable, and what each Individual, 
working along the same line toward 
hapolness as every other Individual, 
could do toward uplifting the human 
race Is also incalculable. Pulling thus 
together, with mind gradually lifted 
above soi*dld broodlngs, and each tak- 
ing the best view of life, a few genera- 
tions and the whole plane of thought 
would be healthier, happier and broad- 
er, for progress and happiness — or, 
shall we say the capacity for happi- 
ness — are parallel. 

Make It a mental habit to see the 
good In everything. Keep before your 
mind a mental idea of happiness and 
harmony. Form the thought that evil 
exists only for the purpose of being 
developed Into the good and beautiful 
and then keep your mind trained to 
the tune of the good and beautiful. 

Remember "the imaging force Is a 
real creative force for each one of us," 
and that '"mental pabulum should be 
as carefully selected as the menu for 
dinner." You may choose, and should 
choose, what you will think as what 
you will eat, and let me warn you that 
Just as food you eat affects you physi- 
cally, so what you think affects you 
physically, for mind, body, and soul 
are Inter-dependent, and you have only 
to experiment to prove thl» to your 
own satisfaction. 

For Instance, If at this moment you 
are suffering from a dull headache, 
your brain Is sluggish and your mood 
depressed; If the headache is a sharp 
one, then your nerves seem "all on 
edge," and Instead of being depressed, 
In spite of the pain, you feel an exhila- 
ration amounting to excitement Simi- 
larly, too, excitement causes the blood 
to circulate more quickly and In the 
direction of the head, and, correspond- 
ingly, mental depression retards the 
circulation, so that it fails to stimulate 
as It should the various organs through 
which it flows. 

Physiology and psychology are very 
closely related, after all. and if we 
could only realize how desirable it Is 
to have the mental and physical forces 
working harmoniously together we 
should the more enthusiastically and 
earnestly endeavor to bring them Into 
that state. 

Do you think the old, trite saying, 
"Be good and you will be happy," is 
merely a saying? On the contrary, 
since everything Is by comparison, 
everything Is good or bad, lovely or 
unlovely, productive of good results or 
of bad, and so It follows, that If you 
are In the "good" class all the good 
things are due you — happiness, beauty, 
propriety. Some one has said "happi- 
ness is uncertain, transitory," but I 
must disagree. 



Duluth and The Herald 




BouauetB and Brlckbato froBi tbe State Presa. 



A Different Name. 

Hibbing Mesaba Ore: The Order of 
Camels has been started In Duluth and 
one of the principal parts of the obli- 
gation Is a vow not to buy a drink for 
a fellow member. In Hibbing we don't 
call such a man a "Camel" but a 
"tightwad." 



Duluth Known « Good Thlnff. 

Hibbing Tribune: The people of 
Hibbing and the St Liouls county fair 
are keenly appreciative of the fact that 
Duluth, since It lost the county fair to 
Hibbing, has supported It more loyally 
than ever before, Duluth has attended 
the fair every year with large delega- 
tions and its newspapers have boosted 
In season and put for tbe fair. 



Crood Rond Needed. 

Blwablk Times: There continues con- 
siderable newspaper agitation In favor 
of a concrete road from Duluth to the 
range, but as yet we have not noticed 
the plan being indorsed by road build- 
ers. And all the talk has centered 
about making the Improvement on the 
Miller Trunk road. Why not consider 
the Vermilion trunk, which does not 
pass through a low, swampy country 
and Is a scenic highway compared 
with (he Miller Trunk road. We believe 
that a little more activity In favor of 
the Vermilion trunk would result In its 
adoption as the main highway between 
Duluth and the Mesaba range. 



From a Cynic's Note Book. 

From the note book of Samuel But- 
ler: Our ideas are for the most part 
like bad sixpences, and we spend our 
lines in trying to pass them on one an- 
other. 

The evil that men do lives after 
them. Yes, and a good deal of the evil 
that they never did as well. 

I can generally bear the separation, 
but I don't like the leave taking. 

The public buys Its opinions as It 
takes In Its milk, on the principle that 
It Is cheaper to do this than to keep a 
cow. So it is, but thd milk la more 
likely to be watered. 

Poetry resembles metaphysics, one 
does not mind one's own, but one does 
not like any one else'a 

I do not mind lying but I hate Inac- 
curacy. 

The fight between thelst and atheist 
is as to whether Qod shall be called 
God or shall have some other name. 

We are like billiard balls in a game 
played by unskilled players, continual- 
ly being nearly sent into a pocket, but 
hardly ever getting right into one. ex- 
cept by a fluke. 

Life is one long process of getting 
tired. 

All progrress Is based upon a uni- 
versal Innate desire on the part of 
every organism to live beyond Its in- 
come. 

The world will always be governed 
by self interest. We should not try to 
stop thls^ we should try to make the 
self interest of cads a little more co- 
incident with that of decent people. 

Is life worth living? This Is a ques- 
tion for an embryo, not for a man. 

All philosophies, if you ride them 
home, are nonsense; but some are 
greater nonsense than others. 

They say the test of literary power 
Is whether a man can write an Inscrip- 
tion. I can say "Can he name a kit- 
ten?" And by this test I am con- 
demned, for I cannot. 

Prof. Garner says that the chatter of 
monkeys is not meanlnglessv but that 
they are conveying Ideas to one an- 
other. This seems to me hazardous. 
The monkeys might with equal Justice 
conclude that in our magazine articles, 
or literary and artistic criticisms, we 
are not chattering idly, but are con- 
veying Ideas to each other. 

To Know whether you are enjoying a 
piece of muslo or not you must see 
whether you flnd yourself looking at 
the advertisements at the end of the 
program. 



Terrible Torture. 

Walker Pilot: Word from the under 
regions states that his satanlc majesty 
is having lots of fun by compelling his 
subjects to pin a red ribbon to their 
skins with the wording "it's cooi in 
Duluth" printed thereon. 

Better Than Too Hot. 

Stillwater Gazette: Purs, heavy 
wraps and fires were necessary up at 
Duluth and Superior yesterday, owing 
to a heavy wind from the lake which 
sent the mercury down to 67. The fuel 
men were more busy than the lee men. 
Too cold for the ball game. 

Respects Contract. 

Aurora News: The strike situation 
at Duluth was handled in an admirable 
manner. Lawlessness was not tolerated 
in any particular and the enthusiasm 
consequently died out quickly. We be- 
lieve in worklngmen getting the high- 
est possible wage, but a contract made 
voluntarily should be lived up to if re- 
spect Is to be retained. 



Twenty Years Ago 



From Tbe Herald of UU* <JaU, liSI. 



•••Yesterday, the anniversary of the 
great storm of 1881, Savannah, Ga., 
was swept by a hurricane equaJed only 
by its great predecessor. For eight 
hours the wind swept over the city in 
gradually increasing volume, reaching 
Its climax at midnight Tybee, the 
port of Savannah, is a memory. Pour- 
teen lives are known to have been lost 
there. The property damage Is placed 
at not less than |1,000.000. There are 
forty or fifty persons who are reported 
missing, and it is supposed their bodies 
will be found later. The ruin at Quar- 
antine Is complete. Nothing Is stand- 
ing wiiere one of the finest stations of 
the South Atlantic was twenty-four 
hours ago, except the doctor's house. 
The wharves are gone, the city's new 
and expensive fumigating plant is In 
the bottom of the sea, and nine vessels 
are high and dry on the marsh. In 
Savannah the streets are Impassable 
from the fallen trees, masses of brick, 
fences, broken timbers and branches of 
tree« lying across them. In South 
Carolina the fury of the hurricane was 
unexampled and great damage wag 
done. At Port Royal 100 lives were 
lost in the cyclone, followed by a tidal 
wave that almost swept the town 
away. 



•••May Yohe, the American actress, 
has been married In London to Lord 
Hope and will retire from the stage. 



•••At a meeting of the West Duluth 
village council last night. J. A, Klrk- 
wood wa.s elected trustee from the 
Second ward, to succeed Trustee Dent 
who was disquallfled from serving In 
the council by his removal to the Third 
ward. 



From Omar Khayyam. 

I sometimes think that never blows so 
red 

The Rose as where some burled Caesar 
bled; 
That every Hyacinth the garden 
wears 

Dropt in her Lap from some once love- 
ly head. 

And this reviving Herb whose tender 

Green 
Pledges the River Lip on which we 

lean — 
Ah, lean upon It lightly; for who 

knows 
Prom what once lovely Lip It springs 

unseen! 

Ah, my Beloved, All the Cup that clears 
Today of past Regrets and Future 
Pears; 
Tomorrow! — why. Tomorrow I may 
be 
Myself with Yesterday's Sev'n Thous- 
and Years. 

Por some we loved, the loveliest and 

the best 
That, from the Vintage rolling Time 

hath prest 
Have drunk their Cup a Round or 

two before, 
And one by one crept silently to rest. 

And we. that now make merry in the 

Room 
They left, and Summer dresses in new 

bloom. 
Ourselves must be beneath the Couch 

of Earth 
Descend — ourselves to make a Couch — 

for whom? 

Ah, make the most of what we yet 

may spend, 
Before we, too. Into the Dust descend; 
Dust to Dust, and under Dust to He, 
Sans Wine, Sans Song, sans Slnyer — 

and sans £n4I 



Ifo Precis A Kent Needed. 

Hibbing Mesaba Ore: An Eastern 
man, who has been visiting In DulutR, 
suggests the need of a press agent for 
the Zenith City. With the two excel- 
lent papers Issued there, both devoting 
page after page each day to the ad- 
vantages of their municipality, there Is 
little need of any such departjnent, 

''Whiteslaves" 

Chicago Tribune: Under this title 
Harper's Weekly has an editorial this 
week in reference to the Dlggs-Caml- 
nettl case whloh is both intelligent 
and courageous. 

It points out the absurdity of a law 
which makes Dlggs and Camlnettl 
legally "white slavers" and the War- 
rington and Norrls -girls legally 
"white slaves*" 

All four were equally guilty. They 
were wayward, vicious young people 
devoted to what is called the life of 
pleasure. The women had been living 
for some time as the paramours of the 
men. All four, apparently, took the 
same delight In drinking sprees and 
Joy-rldlng. They came from the same 
class of life, they had about the same 
degree of education, which was not 
Inconsiderable. Poverty pressed no 
more heavily on the girls than on the 
men. 

If any were "slaves," then all were 
slaves equally — slaves to their own 
passions and love of pleasure. 

It is a legal Action, carefully em- 
balmed In the Mann law, that In sex- 
ual matters women are without voli- 
tion or intent hut remain forever the 
merely passive, self-helpless victims 
of men and opportunity. 

It Is not Justice to send Camlnettl 
and Dlggs to prison as "white slav- 
ers," for that they are not Nor are 
the young women in the case "white 
slavers," or anything but wayward, 
"fly" girls, who knew perfectly well 
what they were doing. 

But such is the hypocrisy of law- 
makers. Judges and newspapers that 
Dlggs and Camlnettl will go to prison 
as "white slavers." with hardly a 
voice to point out that they were not 
guilty of that offense. 

They were loose livers, rounders, 
unfaithful to their wives, "men about 
town," undesirable citizens. It Is for 
this general worthlessness that the 
Federal government, by a perfectly 
enormous stretch of its powers, is 
reaching out and sending them to a 
Federal prison for a term of years, 
while their paramours, having been 
advertised from coast to coast, will 
probably now go on the stage and 
make a great deal of money. 

According to the rulings of Judge 
Van Fleet In this trial if a boy of IS 
should pay the carfare of an Immoral 
woman of twice his age across a state 
line or in the city of Washington, he 
would be liable to twenty years in the 
penitentiary for white slavery. 

Overzealous legislation, enacted In 
an excess of reforming emotion, al- 
ways defeats its own purpose and re- 
sults in reaction. This is likely to be 
the case with the Mann act unless It 
Is amended. 



Bartendeni and Actors. 

H. L. Mencken In the Smart Set Mag- 
ozlne: Examine a hundred bartenders 
and you will flnd that fully sixty of 
them actually know how to tend bar. 
They can mix a cocktail that, what- 
ever Its faults, Is at least flt to drink, 
and they have the craft needed to 
draw a seidel of Pilsner and to beat 
the cash reg'ster. 

But in the allied art of acting there 
Is no such general dispersion of talent. 
A handful of (outstanding super-actors 
have It all. The rest of them not only 
don't know how to act, but they don't 
know that they don't know. 

Argue with them for years, and you 
will never convince them that the 
mushy Jargon they speak Is not Eng- 
lish. Chain them to mirrors until they 
d'e, dry up and blow away, and they 
will never notice that the clothes they 
wear are not worn by cultured white 
men, and that the way they walk, ges- 
ticulate, make love, blow their noses, 
commit murders, crawl, lope, die, eat, 
trot pace. Jump out of a window, climb 
up a ralnspout. sing, sneeze, roar, 
whoop, swear, pray, sit down and get 
up Is not the way affected by the free 
citizens of any Christian common- 
wealth. 

No, the average actor never notices 
these things. He never notices any- 
thing' — saving only the doings of other 
actors. These rivals, whom he de- 
spises (and usually with reason), he 
devotes h'mself to Imitating. The re- 
sult is the so-called art of acting — an 
art as thoroughly dehumanised as that 
of cutting tombstones. 



•••The Duluth city council laiit night 
refused to confirm the appointment of 
John B. Sutphln as a member of the 
board of public works, those voting 
against him saying they desired to re- 
tain Nils Nilson as a member of the 
board. 



•••Jesse Stoller, 13 years old. living 
on Esust Fourth street, accidentally 
shot himself in the neck with a rifle 
last evening, but the doctors say he 
will recover. 



•••Miss Jessie Gilbert, daughter of 
Mrs. Susan E. Gilbert of 1122 East Su- 
perior street, and Wright C. Dunning 
of the Marshall- Wells Hardware com- 
pany, sprang a big surprise on their 
friends and relatives yesterday by an- 
nouncing that they had been quietly 
married at Superior about two weeks 
ago. 



•••A marriage license has been Is- 
sued to Albert Salter and Lulu Mlnnler. 



•••The Duluth Street Railway com- 
pany has announced a general 20 per 
cent reduction In wages on Sept 1. 
Four cars are to be laid off, which will 
throw flfteen or sixteen men out of em- 
ployment. The men had an all-night 
session last night and a general strike 
Is probable. 



All InTallds. 

Pearson's Weekly: Father Bernard 
Vaughan Is still telling good stories 
of his experiences during his recent 
tour in America. 

At St. Louis a boastful American 
said to him: "Look at our Mississippi 
and Hudson rivers I Why compared 
with them, your Mersey and Severn 
and Thames are sleepy, sickly 
streams." 

"I think yours are Just as sickly as 
ours," observed Father Vaughan. 

"How do you make that out?" de- 
manded the other. 

"Well, they are all confined to their 
beds!" Father Vaughan replied. 



ImproTtng By Practice. 

Prom Four Hundred Good Stories: A 
father, whose looks are not such as to 
warrant the breaking up of ail exist- 
ing statues of Apollo, tells this on him- 
self: 

"My little girl was sitting on my lap 
facing a mirror. After gazing Intently 
at her reflection for some minutes ahe 
said: 

"'Papa, did God make you?' 

** •Certainly, my dear,' I told her. 

"'And did He make me. too,' taklnjr 
another look In the mirror. 

" 'Certainly, dear. What makes you 
askr 

*"0h, I don't know. Seems to ms 
he's doing better wx>rk lately.' " 



AMUSEMENTS. 



MEW «k Both Phones 241« 

^^ \ THEATER 

Second Ave. Ei. and Superior St. 

LiDA McMillan 

«THB LATE MR. ALLEN." 

Mack A Orth 
3 Bohemians. 

BoiTcrt A Nelson 
4 — Athletoa— 4. 

TwlMght Pie- Symphony 

tares. Orchestra. 



Delia Rosa & 
Marcello. 

Heuman Trio. 



Matinee Dally — Best Seats, 25e. 
Nlshta, lOc, 25o, 50e and 75e. 



LYCEUM I TODAY 

1 TO 5 — T TO 11. 



KINEMACOLOR — 

«*A Scrap of Paper** 
«<The Latest Fashions'* 

BLACK AND WHITE — 

•'The Flcht tor Rlsht" 
Two-Part Reliance Feature. 



SIGURD ERDTMAN, SoloUt. 



MATINEES — 10c NIGHTS— 10e-a»c 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY. 
«<Hlaivatba** In Kinemaeolor. 



Today and 
Saturday 



Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Friel 
Silber and North 
Hunter and Ross 
Rehlander's Pigs 

Matinee, 2:30, lOo; Nights, 7:40 
and 0:16, 10c, 15c 20c and 25o. 



REX 

THEATER BEAUTIFUL 



Continuous Performance 
1 Until 11 P. M. 

Chancss ttvmry Monday and TlHiradsy. 
ADMISSION to CENTS 






••mm 









I 



4^. 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



11 



'^ 




LUTHER LEAGUES 

IN CONVENTION 



Delegates From Lake Su- 
perior District Gather 
In Duluth. 

About 100 delegates representing 
fouTteen Luther leagrues of the LAke 
Superior district of Swedish Lutheran 
churches will be in attendance at the 
annual conference which will be held In 
the Bethany Swedish Lutheran church. 
Twenty-third avenue west and Thini 
street, Sunday and Monday. Many of 
the delegates will arrive in the city to- 
morrow evening. 

The convention will open with spe- 
cial services Sunday morning at 10 
O'clock. Vli!lting delegrates will speak. 
In the afternoon a session will be held 
commencing at 2:30 o'clock and in the 
eveninjr Dr. Frank Nelson president of 
the Minnesota college of Minneapolis 
"Will address the gathering. 

The buslnt'39 session of the confer- 

fnoe will be held on Monday. During 
he forenoon officers will be elected 
and action takne on the various rec- 
onunendatlons of the committees. A 
Dlcnic Is planned for the afternoon at 
Ldncoln park. A program of entertain- 
ment has been planned for this affair. 
On Monday evening the visiting dele- 
Prates win be entertained at a concert 
In the church. Two representatives 
from each of the Luther Leagues of the 
district will take part In this program. 
The local people who will take part are 
Daniel Olson, who will give a vocal 
»olo, and Miss Hlldegard Miller, who 
will give a selected reading. 

The looal delegates to the convention 
axe: George Anderson, Arthur Ander- 
Bon, Elfrelda Benson and Hlldegard 
Miller. The heads of the committees in 
charsre of the convention are Miss 
HlMa Olson, entertainment; Miss Rdlth 
Halgren, decoration; Miss Anna Nord- 
strom, refreshments; Miss Evodia Ol- 



son, reception; and George Anderson, 
badge and concert. 



PAVEMENT IS 



COMPLETED 



The paving of Twenty-seventh ave- 
nue west was completed yesterday. A 
concrete pavement has been laid from 
Michigan to Fifth street, a distance of 
six blocks. The cost of the Job has 
been about $25,000. 

Twenty-seventh avenue is the first 
street In the city to be given this kind 
of a pavement for any distance. The 
thoroughfare is twenty-four feet wide. 
The curbing is of the same material as 
the street. 

It Is proposed to lay a five-foot ce- 
ment sidewalk on each side of the 
street for these six block* The walk 
will be set eight feet from the curb- 
ing and the space between the side- 
walk and curbing will be seeded and 
trees set out at distances of about 
twenty feet apart. The property own- 
ers propose to make the thoroughfare 
one of the handsomest In the city. 



VANDALS TEAR 

DOWN RAILING 



who might make a mis-step off the 
sidewalk. 



MISSIONARY WILL 

SPEAK ON INDIA. 

Prof. Charles B. Simpson of Mora- 
dabad. India, will speak in Swedish on 
Sunday morning at the Swedish M. B. 
church. Twentieth avenue west and 
Third street, and will give an address 
In the English lang^uage at the Eve- 
ning service in the same church. Prof. 
Simpson is familiar with the mis- 
sion work of today in India and will 
be sure to give some very interest- 
ing information on that subject. 

The following musical program has 
been prepared By the octet In connec- 
tion with the address given in the eve- 
ning: 

Prelude — Selected 

Miss Ruth Larson. 
Song 

Congregation. 

Invocation 

Song — "The Earth Is the Lord's" .. 
Octet. 

Scripture reading 

Song 

Congregation. 
Offertory and announcements ••••• 

Solo — Selected 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermlne. 

Lecture — "Missions" 

Prof. C. B. Simpson, Moradabad, India. 
Doxology 



Residents In the vicinity of Twenty- 
sixth avenue west are complaining of 
vandalism of rowdies who destroyed 
the railing guarding the walk along 
Miller's creek Just above Second street. 
Four young men, said to have been In 
a drunken condition, tore the railing 
loose and threw it into the creek last 
night 

The railing protected pedestrians 
from the steep bank at this point lead- 
ing to the creek bottom. The sides 
are rocky and would, it is said, prob- 
ably cause serious injury to any one 



N 



OW Is the Time and This Is 
the Place to Purchase Your 
High-Grade Furniture at a Sav- 
ing of Nearly Vi the Usual Price 

We have a lot of real fine furniture and we can get anything you 
want on special order from the world's best factories, try us and be 
convinced. 

Our No. 923 Genuine Crotch Mahogany Davenport, exactly like picture, 
a most beautiful piece; regular price $150 to $175 — Saturday sale price 



i's'fif^tshT^ttm ■wti^mii'^mi^m 



•85 



^^\imm\\^^^ We will have this 

' ' — rnA^Jn upholstered in any 

covering you may 
desire. 

Our No. 3092 Davenport, with quartered Golden Oak ^O^ ^A 
frame; usually sold at $40 to $50 — our sale price 9^^«tlV 

Our Genuine Mahogany Frame Davenport — Covered in a beautiful rich 
tapestry; davenports of this style sell from ^^S AA 

$80 to $90— our sale price V * ©•" U 

FUMED OAK BED DAVENPORTS AND SETTEES AT BIG 
SAVING IN PRICE. Come in and allow us to show you. 



West End Briefs. 

Mies Bbba Sederholm of Ironwood, 
Mich., Is spendlner two weeks visiting 
friends and relatives In the West end. 

M. Kron, 2521 West Second street, re- 
turned yesterday from a week's busi- 
ness trip to Ironwood, Mich. 

Members of the Sunday school of the 
Second Presbyterian church. 1515 West 
Superior street, are spending the day 
picnicking at Fond du Lac. The party 
left this morning on the steamer Co- 
lumbia and will return home about 6 
o'clock. • 

Rev. and Mrs. Milton Fish, 502 North 
Twenty-fifth avenue west are enter- 
taining this afternoon ana evening at 
an "at home" for Mrs. Fish's parents 
and- her sister, Rev. and Mrs. James H. 
Karle and Miss Eva Earle of Pomona, 
Cal. 

Miss Maybelle Conroy of Morris, 
Minn., who has been visiting at the 
home of West end relatives for the 
past two weeks, left for her home yes- 
terday. 

Harold E. Frldholm of Moorehead Is 
.spending a few days In the West end 
visiting relatives. 

Misses Florence and Victoria L.ind- 
berg, 1822 West Michigan street, have 
returned from a visit to relatives at 
Iron River, Wis. 

OFFICIAL WASHINGTON 
PUZZLED BY REPORTS 
AS T O LINO 'S PLANS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



nlsh them transportation to the Unit- 
ed States. 



If interested in Rugrs don't fail to avail yourself of our Special Sale. 
Ail sizes included. 



Y»nr 

Credit la 

Good. 



"XJRJijmm^ 



Complet* 

Hoase 
Furni»hers. 



202 AND 204 EAST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 




BiiLn^'tBlHiliimiliiniK 

FALL SUITS 

jj^ are here in great variety. Every garment all 

mUiiM wool and made in our own Cleveland factory — sold 

direct to you. You save the middleman's profit of $5 to $8. 








THE RiCHMAN BROS. CO. 

20 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



<ll}iniiiffiiin»ii»unniuiU}^ 




statement by Gamboa. 

Mexico City. Aug. 29. — The an- 
nouncement of the return of John 
Lilnd to Mexico City brought from 
Senor Gamboa, minister of foreign af- 
fairs, the declaration that Mexico had 
agreed to nothing and that S'enor 
Gamboa's note of Aug. 26, to Mr. Lind. 
was the l^st communication he sent. 
It was suggested to the minister 
that President Wilson's representa- 
tive was coming to the capital to re- 
sume negotiations. Senor Gamboa re- 
plied that this appeared not unlikely, 
as he naturally expected a reply to 
his last note. He added that Mr. Llnd 
would be entirely welcome at the 
capital and that personally he would 
be glad to see him. 

It was reported late last night from 
Vera Cruz that Mr. LInd Intended to 
leave there Friday morning, adhering 
to the general instructions from Wash- 
ington to avoid night trains, but it Is 
considered possible that developments 
at Washington may cause postpone- 
ment or abandonment of his plan to 
revisit the capital. 

AKreenient Is Posnlble, 
It Is regarded here as possible that 
further conferences between Senor 
Gamboa and Mr. Lind may result in 
an agreement, unless Washington con- 
tinues to be a stickler for compliance 
to the letter of her demands for Gen. 
Huerta's non-candidacy. 

Senor Gamboa's last note appeared 
to make It clear that It would be im- 
possible for Oen. Huerta to be a can- 
didate for the presidency, under the 
laws. 

Commenting on this, a prominent 
Mexican explained the point In these 
words: 

"Mexico, In short does eliminate 
Huerta from the electroal contest, not 
because Washington demands It, but 
because It is demonstrated by the laws 
of the country." 

For the reason that the other pro- 
positions, Mr. Llnd's last note says, 
may be settled later, and since Senor 
Gamboa intimates in his last note 
conformity with this suggestion. It Is 
pointed out as probable that the 
negotiations will be reopened. Senor 
Gamboa Intimated that further nego- 
tiations along the direct line of the 
demands would be useless, although 
at the same time he expressed lively 
hope of a final settlement. 

Americans Anxloaa. 
The return of Mr. I^ind would do 
much to reassure some thousands of 
anxious Americans, many of whom are 
planning a speedy departure from the 
capital. 

The warning of President Wilson 
was telegraphed to all consuls who 
could be reached In this way, and ar- 
rangements have been made for 
couriers to points such as Durango, 
which are cut off from telegraphic 
communication. The warning con- 
tained the sentence: 

"You convey to the authorities the 
Indication that any maltreatment of 
Americans would be I'kely to raise the 
question of Intervention." 

Regardless of the assurance con- 
tained In President Wilson's message 
that the policy of the administration 
was one of non-intervention, many 
Americans in Mexico are skeptical re- 
garding the ability of the United 
States long to forestall this. The 
trains for Vera Cruz were crowded 
last night, and It Is believed that ad- 
ditional sections will be run unless 
more reassuring news Is received from 
Washington. 

Calls Wamlnsr ^Premature.** 
The Mexican foreign office has not 
been officially Informed of Washing- 
ton's warning, according to the for- 
eign minister, who said that if it was 
true, "We must, with all due respect 
to the president of the United States, 
say that we think he acted pre- 
maturely." 

Senor Gamboa continued: 
"Do they think we are 'boxers' In 
Mexico? Have you seen tnobs chasing 
Americans through the streets, or any 
unfriendly manifestations even by the 
people of the lower classes? We have 
four or five hundred thousand Mexi- 
cans In the United States. We have 
made no suggestion to them to return. 
In the belief that they might be 
lynched. 

"I am told that boats are coming to 
the ports to take off the Americans 
If the Americans were perishing 
throughout the country, I could see 
why boats would come to take away 
their bodies, but I see no reason for 
them to come now. Even In case of 
intervention. I think Americans would 
be safe. During French Intervention. 
Frenchmen came and went at will 
and were not molested." 

The afternoon newspapers In their 
editorials reflect laudatory opinion on 
the part of the Mexican republic for 
what Is regarded as the noble and 
patriotic attitude of the Mexican gov- 
ernment. 

News from points within the re- 
public, received at official quarters 
Indicates an uninterrupted series of 
victories on the part of the Federals 
It is announced that through train 
service between Mexico City and iLare- 
do will be re-estahllshed Immediately. 
» 

Report 3.500 Killed. 

Laredo. Tex.. Aug. 23. — Thirty-flve 
hundred men perished In the s«ven 



Constitutionalist attacTts on Torreon 
betweea July 17 and July 28 and sinoe 
that time fever has beoome epidemic, 
food is scarce and no relief has been 
able to reach the city, according to 
travelers from the vicinity o£ Tor- 
reon who have reached here. They 
received information by courier last 
Monday. Not more than twenty-flve 
Americans remained in the city and 
all are reported safe, • 

The Constitutionalists are declared 
to have lost 8,000 men, most of them 
in a disastrous attempt to flood the 
city by diverting the course of Nazas 
river from its head gates through the 
valley. They were caught In a cross- 
fire from fedeial machine guns. They 
later withdrew to Durango. The fed- 
eral loss was about 600. 

Miguel Garza Aldapo, brother of a 
member of Provisional President 
Huerta's cabinet, commaiids the fed- 
erals. 

Reuorts also received here were of 
the Durnlng of the La Belle Union 
cotton print factory, ten miles from 
Saltillo. Friday, by a band of rebels 
under Juan Muniz. It Is said Muniz 
first demanded a "loan of $300,000," 
which was refused. Muniz reduced his 
denands to 10,000 pesos and when this 
was ignored the plant, valued at $500,- 
000, was destroyed. Four hundred 
men are out of employment as a re- 
sult. William Purcell, an English 
banker, is .said to have been the prin- 
cipal owner of the factory. Other dep- 
redations also are charged to the 
band. 

Italy Approves Wilson's Action. 

Rome, Italy, Aug. 29. — The energetic 
but courteous attitude of the United 
States toward Mexico is favorably 
judged in Italy, according to Giornale 
d'ltalla In an article today comment- 
ing on the Mexican situation. It says: 
President Wilson has given proof 
of political and diplomatic capacity of 
the first order." 

London Papers Critical. 

London, Aug. 29. — The London morn- 
ing papers continue to find little rea- 
son for encouragement in the situa- 
tion between Mexico and the United 
States and express the strongest 
doubt as to the wisdom of President 
Wilson's policy mainly on the ground 
that Mexico is not yet fitted for dem- 
ocratic government. 

^ 

Berlin Comments Unfriendly. 

Berlin, Aug. 29. — The evening papers 
here paid little attention to Presi- 
dont Wilson's message on the Mexi- 
can situation. What little comment 
there was, as usual, was In an un- 
friendly spirit. 

The Tagliche Rundschau, in a lead- 
ing article entitled "Wilson tries his 
'prentice hand," says President Wil- 
son, by his mistaken Insistence on the 
non-recognition of Provisional Presi- 
dent Huerta, has made himself re- 
sponsible for the present situation. It 
i.s hard to understand why he so ob- 
stinately adheres to his old stand- 
point. President Wilson's assurances 
of sincere and unselfish sympathy 
toward Mexico are In sharpest contrast 
with the American government's pol- 
icy, says the paper. 
♦ 
CVencfaman Is Critic. 

Paris, Aug. 29. — Baron Robert De 
Calx, foreign editor of the Journal 
Des Debats. in an article praises the 
excellent intentions of President Wil- 
son, but declares that, in this case, 
the purest intentions have made of 
the Mexican crisis only a disquieting 
imbroglio. 

"In plain language," he says, "Presi- 
dt-nt Wilson asks the Mexican govern- 
ment to sign Its own death warrant, 
and Provisional President Huerta to 
decapitate himself." 

♦ 

Mexican Outbreak Explained. 

El Centre, Cal.. Aug. 29. — The recent 
rebellion near Mexlcall, Lower Call- 
fcrnla, was precipitated, according to 
statements published In a local news- 
paper, by the action of large land 
interests In suddenly discharging 
iiundreds of Mexican laborers and em- 
ploying Chinese In their places. Six- 
teen hundred Mexicans were thrown 
out of employment, it is declared, and 
a large number of these, deprived of 
all means of support, promptly took 
up arms. 

.Small rald« on ranches, horse steal- 
ing and petty thefts have marked the 
progress of the outbreak so far, al- 
though Governor Gomez at Mexlcall 
has made every preparation to repel 
an attack. It is not believed the reb- 
els now encamped at Black Butte will 
attempt to attack Mexican, naturally 
a strong position, but will endeavor 
to entice the Federals outside for a 
battle. 



IHas May Cancel Plana. 

London, Aug. 29. — Gen. Felix EHaz, 
immediately after his arrival in Lon- 
don from Canada yesterday, tele- 
graphed to Mexico City for information 
as to the latest developments. He de- 
clines to make any comment whatever 
on the situation until he receives direct 
advices from his own country, and his 
future movements also depend on the 
nature of the news which reaches him. 

Oen. Diaz said to the Associated 
Press today that he had not yet de- 
cided whether to proceed on his mis- 
sion to Japan or to return to Mexico, 
Should his friends in Mexico nominate 
him for the presidency at the October 
election, he would, he said, return. His 
trip to Japan was Interrupted, he ex- 
plained, becaiuse he was advised In 
(^anada that there was Illness in the 
Japanese emperor's family. 



Last Call Saturday 

DONT MISS IT, MEN I 

Yoar Last Opportunity to Buy 
This Season s Stock of Suits 

At Half Price 

"The best suit bargain I ever struck and a much better selection than I expected to find 
at this time," was the comment of a customer yesterday, who secured a $30 summer suit for $15. 
But don't delay, for with the closing of the door Saturday night these Great Half-Price days 
will be over ; so be on hand Saturday in the forenoon if possible, for Saturday will be a busy day 
at the old store. 

Save One-Half on Your Clothes ! 

OR BETTER YET, SECURE TWO SUITS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE. ' 

$ 1 5 Makes You the Owner of a $30 Suit 
$12.50 Makes You the Owner of a $25 Suit 

$10 Makes You the Owner of a $20 Suit 
$7.50 Makes You the Owner of a $15 Suit 

At these low prices every man and young man should buy for present and future needs. 

REMEMBER SATURDAY'S THE LAST DAY. ACT QUICKLY 

THE NEW FALL HATS ARE READY. 




WIL.I_IA.IVf SOISJ & IVIEIMDEIMHALL 



amendments yesterday. He denied 
there was a campalgrn on foot agr£Linst 
wealth, but declared there was a cam- 
pai-^n on foot against "unscrupulous 
watering of stocks." 

The Hitchcock amendment was de- 
feated 41 to 30. Senator Hitchcock 
WOB the only Democrat voting with 
the Republicans in support of ft. 

DIFFICULTIES OF 

B. & 0. ARE ADJUSTED 



Only Leading Schools 
Allowed io Teach Stenotypy 

The machine that writes short- 
hand three times as fast as it can 
be written with the human hand. 
The syMtent that has made tlie 
Mohnols teaching the old system 
envlouM, was learned hy a IC-year- 
old boy in 104 days. Bnter for the 
fall opening. Sept. 3nd, 1013. The 
New Era Business Colle8r«> Superior, 
Wis, 



Working Conditions in tiie 

Shops Are Especially 

Affected. 

Washington, Aug. 29. — Announcement 
was made here today of the amicable 
adjustment through the department of 
labor of difficulties between the Balti- 
more & Ohio railroad and machinists 
in all the shops on the system between 
Philadelphia. Chicago and St. Louis 
that have existed since December, 1910. 
The adjustment deals particularly with 
working conditions, although the mini- 
mum wage scale is increased 1 cent 
an hour and provision is made for a 
nine-hour workday. 

BRAINERD MAN IS 
DRUGGED IN MILL CITY 



The Herald.) — Charles Anderson, in 
charge of a threshing outfit near here, 
was thrown into the self-feeder device 
when attempting to remove the main 
drive belt. OnFy by his own agility In 
releasing himself from the spikes In 
the feeding device was he able to es- 
cape the fast revolving cylinder which 
would have dealt certain death had he 
not been able to avoid It. 

NEW CLASS IN THEOSOPHY. 



HITCHCO CK KIC KS OVER 

(Continued from page 1.) 



or doing a business of less than $10,- 
000,000 annually. 

Beaten in Caucus. 

Senator Hitchcock declared his 
amendment had been offered in the 
caucus and beaten 23 to 18, but he al- 
leged It had not been an open light 
there. 

"It was not even a fair test of cau- 
cus strength," said he, "for there was 
a caucus within a caucus. Caucus rule 
mak«s public debate In the senate 
farcical. Senators will not even re- 
main In their seats to hear them. Cau- 
cus rules kills the ve-ry spirit of legis- 
lation. 

"This income tax section ought to be 
a matter of living Interest. It is new 
legislation, with vast possibilities, af- 
fecting not only revenue but social 
conditions. Instead of being here a 
thing of life and Interest, it lies In this 
chamber a veritable corpse, and great 
debates that might occur If there were 
any real decision to be made here be- 
come farcical. 

"Amendments have been offered 
from the Republican side by senators 
who have made a study of the Income 
tax. They were not contrary to any 
Democratic doctrine; they would not 
endanger the bill. Why. then, must 
Democrats be required by caucus rules 
to vote against them? 

No Longer Bound. 

"With other Democratic senators, T 
have felt bound up to this time with 
these obnoxious caucus rules. Now, 
however we have reached a point 
where I feel free to take another 
course." 

Senator Hitchcock added In sup- 
port of his amendment, that the 
anti-trust laws had proved failures, 
so far as checking monopolies and 
trusts were concerned. lie declared 
his amendment would prove an effect- 
ual check upon the Illegitimate con- 
trol of the market by great trusts. 

Party dissension veered to the Re- 
publican side when Senator Cummins 
predicted that the Hitchcock amend- 
ment would probably be assailed as 
enother attack on the rich, as Sena- 
tor Liodge had assailed income tax 



Is Found Under Railway 

Bridge With $1,700 in 

His Pockets. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 

to The Herald.) — Drugged by some 

powerful medicine, Emil Nelson of 

Brainerd, Minn., was thrown Into the 

weeds beneath a railway bridge here, 
where he was found early today. It 
Is supposed the men Intended to rob 
Nelson, buT were frightened away, as 
$1,700 In currency was found In his 
pockets. 

He is In a local hospital in a serious 
condition, but may recover. The police 
are investigating. 

ST. PAUL GIRL BRIDE 
OF HER DYING LOVER 



Public Will Have Chance to Learn of 
Society's Work. 

The Duluth Theosophlcal society de- 
cided at the regular lodge meeting 
last night to start a public study class 
In theosophy for the benefit of those 
who wish to become familiar with 
theosophlc teachings without having 
to join the society for that purpose. 

This class win be conducted by one 
of the best informed students in the 
lodge, and anyone Interested in the 
study of occultism and theosophy, es- 
pecially with regard to the funda- 
mental teachings of karma and rein- 
carnation, will be welcome to attend, 
without any cost or obligation what- 
ever. Announcement of the subjects 
for each meeting will be made by the 
class leader, Air. Hall, through the 
papers. Following the exposition of 
the subject by the leader, opportunity 
will be given for discussion and 
questions. The meetings will be held 
In the lodgeroom at 10 West First 



street, Sunday afternoons at 3 o'clock- 
commencing Sept. 7. ^ 
The program committee also recom- 
mended the organization of an ad- 
vanced class for the older students of 
the lodge, open to members only, and 
following the lodge meeting, this was 
effected. The new class will hold its 
first meeting Sunday morning at th« 
lodgeroom, and will take as a text- 
book "A Study in Consciousness," by 
Annie Besant. 



PREPARES FOR 

G . A. R. MEETING. 

Bridgeport, Conn., Aug. 29.— Com. 
mander-in-Chlef Alfred B. Beers of 
the Grand Army of the Republic Is- 
sued orders here today announcing 
that national headquarters in this city 
will be changed to Hotel Hatten. Chat- 
tanooga, on Sept. 13. The Chattanoogm 
encampment parade will start at 10 
o'clock. Sept. 17. The first busines* 
session of the national encampment 
will open at 10 a. m.. Sept, 18. Office 
or thu day will be C. W. Baker Ten- 
nessee. George H. Meyers, Carson 
City, Nev., and G. D. Martin. Peters- 
burg, Ind., are appointed national 
aides /1e camp on the staff of the com- 
mander-in-chief. 



Subscribe for The Herald 



You'll Do Better at Kelly's 

Trade at the Heart of Duluth 



Bridegroom Becomes Un- 
conscious Shortly After 
the Ceremony. 

St. Paul. Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — With death staring him 
In the face and sO weak that he barely 
could repeat In whispers the words of 
the priest, Joseph Vltolone gratified 
the one desire of his life, to be married 
to Miss Minnie Fldo, the girl he loved. 
The ceremony was performed last night 
at the city hospital, where Vltolone Is 
suffering fronv what la believed to be 
an incurable disease. 

Vltolone yesterday told Miss Fldo he 
would be happy, even though he should 
die, If only for a few days he could 
call her his wife. The girl said she. 
too, would be happy, and then she se- 
cured the marriage license. Shortly 
after the ceremony Vltolone lapsed into 
unconsciousness and may never speak 
again to his wife. 

Vltolone became 111 a few days be- 
fore the time set for the marriage. 
« 

Thrown Into Feeder — Escapes. 

Grafton, N. D., Aug. 29.— (Special to 







, m III— pi 



lil l i» IW^ 1l 



12 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 




i.ne bJiC 1 es»iivj,i ' wuicu wiii i-ac 
place this evening at the Curling rink 
for the benefit of the Children's home, 
will undoubtedly be one of the most 
picturesque and brilliant affairs ever 
given by the society people of Duluth. 
Every member of the executive board 
of the Children 3 home has worked 
hard and faithfully to make the affair 
a success and their ceaseless efforts 
have already been rewarded. Every 
box has been sold and the seats, which 
have been reserved, are also taken. 
Those who have reserved boxes are: 
Mrs. James K. Granger, Mrs. Ward 
Ames, Sr., Mrs. Ward Ames, Jr., Mrs. 
Kufus H. Draper, Mrs. George W. Hart, 
Mrs. J. G. Ketvhum, Mrs. il. F. Wil- 
liamson. Mrs. A. C. Volk, Mrs. C. A- 
Marshall, Mrs. J. H. McLean, Mrs. G. 
Carlson. Mrs. F. E. Brooks, Mrs. K. A. 
Van Eoo. Mrs. fl. 11. Myers, Mrs. Steph- 
en U. Jones, Mrs. Marcus L. Fay, Mrs. 
\V. C. Winton, Mrs. H. B. Paull, Mis. 
Thomas J. Davis, Mrs. Coryate S. Wil- 
son. Mrs. C. H. Bagiey. Mrs. George H. 
Crosby. Mrs. D. C. Itood, Mrs. G. Her- 
bert Jones, Mrs. Gibson L. Douglass, 
Mrs. W. H. Cole, Mrs. F. L. Finken- 
Bladt, Mrs. D. B. McDonald, Mrs. P. S. 
Anneke, Mrs. W. W. Walker, Mrs. 
James W^ll. Mrs. A. B. Wolvin, Mrs. 
John A. Stephenson, Mrs. J. N. Mc- 
Kindley, Mrs. J. U. Sebenius, Mrs. F. A. 
Patrick, Mrs. Jomes Wanless, Mrs. A. 

C. Barthe, Miss Jane Listman, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Mendenhall, Mrs. William Harri- 
Bn, Mile. Mitchel, Mrs. George C. 
Stone. Mrs. J. H. Hearding, Mrs. Whit- 
ney Wall, Mrs. S. R. Holden. Mrs. Mllle 
Bunnell. Mrs. A. C. Weiss, Mrs. T. D. 
Merrill and Mrs. G. W. Welles. The 
sale of boxes has been In charge of 
Mrs. F. L. Coweu, assisted by Mrs. T. 

F. Cole, Mrs. W. C. Winton and Mrs. 
Gibson L. Douglass. Mrs. A. C. Volk 
and Mrs. J. H. Crowley have taken or- 
ders for reserved seats. 

The following society matrons have 
been appointed to assist the dancers 
In changing their costumes: Mesdames 

D. B. McDonald. Kufus H. Draper, 
James Wanless, Margaret G. Jeffry, F. 
L Finkenstaedt, Mark Baldwin. Mille 
Bunnell, E. P. Alexander. 

Human Garden. 

In the center of the rink a Roman 
garden will form the setting for a 
series of exquisite dances and poses 
before King Alexander (W. I. Prince) 
of Greece and his retinue. For the sec- 
ond part of the program the setting 
will be changed into the ball room uf 
the Rita-Carlton hotel In New York 
w^here the dances will be of modern 
day. The participants will dance the 
society one-step, tango, and Boston be- 
fore the court of Columbia (Barbara 
Rupley) and Uncle Sam (Harvey 
CIapp>. At the close of the program 
the floor will be turned over to the 
spectators for dancing. 

At the right of the main entrance a 
mcst exquisite little Dutch garden has 
been built and after the program sup- 

?er will be served by Dutch maids in 
heir garden. Mrs. H. B. Paull and 
her committee, Mrs. \V. C. Winton, Mrs. 
P. C. Rood, Miss ' Elizabeth Hoatson, 
Mrs Gibtion, Lk Douglass and Mrs. C. 
G. Traphagen have charge of the re- 
freshments. The Dutch maids are: 
Miss Frances Winton. Miss Louise 
Frick, Miss Virginia Moore, Miss Eliza- 
beth Wood, Miss Charlotte Wilson, Miss 
Marie Chrlstensen, Miss Maren Men- 
denhall, Miss Alexandria Van Bergen, 
Miss Myra Salyards, Miss Martha Wall, 
Miss Dorothy Moore, and Misa Mar- 
garet Craig. 

• • * 

Mrs. G. Herbert Jones Is general 
manager of arrangements for the fes- 
tival. Miss A. Irene Blair is In charge 
of the dancing and dancers costuming, 
Mrs. T. J. Davis has superintended the 
costuming and presentation of the 
ccurt of Alexander and Mrs. F. L. 
Cowen has directed the costuming and 
presentation of the court of Uncle Sam 
and Columbia. 

The executive board of the Chil- 
dren's home consists of Mrs. Thomas 
J. Davis, president; Mrs. R M. Hun- 
ter. Mrs. H. H, Myers. Mrs. K. A. Van 
Loo. Mrs. W C Winton. Mrs. Marcus L. 
Fay. Mrs. J. H Crowley. Mrs G. Her- 
bert Jones, Mrs. S. R. Holden. Mrs. F. 
L Cowen, Mrs. Thomag F. Cole. Mrs 
C: S. Wilson. Mrs A. C. Huhbell. Mr« 

G. G. Oliver, Mrs. D. C MacDonald, Mr& 
F. D. Day, Mrs. D. C Rood. Miss Eliza- 
beth Hoatson, Mrs. C. G. Traphagen, 
Mrs. Gibson L. Douglass and Mrs. H. B. 
Paull. 

The music for the 'Festival" Is un- 
der the direction of Mr. La Brosse. 
There will be seventeen pieces and they 
will play throughout the program and 
lor the dancing afterwards. 



ACTRESS WHO CAUSED 
PRINCE TO GIVE UP TITEE 




Third street. The hostesses will be 
Mesdames Austin Rowe, O. T. Strand 
and H. Spjotvold. 

Reception. 

There will be a reception at the Les- 
ter Park M. B. church this evening In 
honor of Miss Sui Wang of Chinklang, 
China, a Chinese woman educated at 
Albion college. The members of the 
woman's missionary society are giving 
the reception. Mrs^ E. U. Lund will 
sing. 

Events of Interest. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Turnbladh, 211 
Twelfth avenue east, entertained the 
members of St. John's English Lu- 
theran church and their friends at an 
informal social Tuesday evening. The 
following program was rendered. 

Orchestration 

U H. Copeland, Mrs. Copeland and 

Master George Copeland. 
Reading — •Jim Fenton's Wedding".. 
Miss Brynhild Murphy. 

Vocal solo — "A May Morning" 

Mrs. E. E. Fuller. 
Piano solo — "Valse Brilliant in A 

Flat" Chopin 

Mrs. J. L. Murphy. 

Heading — "After the Play" 

Miss Agnes Mae Johnson. 
Vocal solo — "'The Rosary" 



Miss Margaret Smollet. 

Dialect reading 

Miss Agnes Mae Johnson. 

Piano solo — "Mazurka' Hyllestad 

"FJelds Loot" • Grieg 

Mrs. J. L. Murphy. 
Refreshments were served and about 
100 were present. 

« « « 

The following young people enjoyed 
a picnic supper and marshmellow roa^ 
at Chester park Tuesday evening. 
Misses — 



Ermlna Benda, 
Helen Maggard, 
Germalne Benda- 



Herbert Krlsten- 

sen, 

William Mather. 



CAROLA RECHBERG. 

This charming Munich actress will 
soon be a princess. She Is now appear- 
ing In operetta at the Gartner-Platz 
theater. She is engaged to be married 
to Prlnce Nicholas of Thurn and Taxis. 
The prince's family objected to the 
marriage recently and the prince agreed 
to postpone It until he had begun to 
make his way In the world. So he has 
come to this country to get a start. He 
arrived in New York yesterday and 
will start soon for Texas, where he has 
arranged through agents to purchase 
a large farm. He has renounced his 
title and rank In the navy and part of 
his inheritance because he says he be- 
lieves in labor and prefers to make his 
own way in life. He has taken the title 
of Baron von Hochstadt. His brother, 
Prince Alfred, resigned his title and 
rank to marry an actress and another 
brother Is a wealthy farmer in South 
Africa. The prince's family founded the 
postal system of Germany. 



Motor Parties. 

Those who have motored to Island 
Lake inn during the week are: Mr. 
and Mrs. Watson S. Moore, Warren 
Moore, Irving Moore, E. H. "Tyler and 
Mrs. H. H. Myers, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Rupley, Miss Barbara Rupley, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Merrltt, A. L. 
Merrltt, Dr. and Mrs. F. A. Patton, 
Mrs. A. M. Miller, Mrs. D. H. Young, 
William R. McKenzie, Miss Barbara 
McKenzie, Miss Ruby M. Harris. Miss 
NeJlie L. Anderson, David Anderson, 
F. W. Young of Duluth and Dr. and 
Mrs. H. J. Orchard of Superior. 
^ 

Return From Lake Trip. 

Misses Dorothy and Elizabeth Olcott 
who have been entertaining a number 
of young girls on a lake trip have re- 
turned to their home. The members 
of the party were: Miss Frances Swift, 




TONIGHT! 

Dancing Festival 

Benefit of Children's Home 

CL'RLINO RI.NK, 

14th Ave. Ea-st and London Road. 
Under management uf Chil- 
dren'it Home OireetorM. 
AT 8 P. M. 

GE:\'KK.\L .\D.MISSiON $1.00 

(Kvery Seat Good.) 
Snpper and punch on tiale after 
performance. 



Miss Carolyn Swift and their guest. 
Miss Gertrude Lake of Evanston, 111., 
Miss Julia Morrow, Miss Marjorle 
Morrow and Miss Caroline Marshall. 
Mrs. George D. Swift acted as chap- 
eron. 



Picnic Party. 

Mi.'^s Florence McCormack. 110 Fifty- 
eighth avenue west, entertained at a 
picnic party at Fairmont park Wed- 
nesday in honor of Miss Gladys Nel- 
son who has been visiting here for 
the past week. Among those In the 
party were: 
Misses — 
Margaret Doyle, Syrllla Cashln, 
Loena Baker. Agnes McCor- 
Milflred Cashin, mack, 
Emma Eklund, Ingretta Scandon, 
Leona Cashin, Florence McCor- 
Ruth Eklund, mack, 
Juanlta Brunell, Gladys Nelson. 
^— 

Hostess at Bridge. 

Miss Marion Schmidt, 3 Chester 
Terrace, was hostess at bridge at hef 
home yesterday afternoon and again 
today for a number of her friends. 

. ♦ 

Engagement. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Erlckson of Clo- 
ciuet announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Tina, to George Cassldy of 
Chicago. The wedding will take place 
at the home of the bride's parents at 
Christmas time. 



COLLEGE TRUNKS 

r>ur own manufacture, neatly con- 
structed by .'»kill»-d workmen and 
from the best materials obtainable. 
Bny here, you get the best. 

DULUTH TRUNK CO 



Establivhod i^S 



.Manufacturers 



Aftenro Society. 

The regular meeting of the Aftenro 
society will take place next Wednes- 
day afternoon at 2:30 in the Forres- 
ters hall. Fourth avenue west and 



Florence Neff, 
Norma Backer, 
Barbara McDon- 
nell, 
Messrs. — 

Robert Cairns, 
Amos Corsan, 
John McDougall, 
James Webster, 

• • « 

The Llnneae society will meet Tues- 
day evening. Sept. 9, at the Foresters 
hall, after a vacation of three months. 
Each member Is requested to come 
and bring a friend to the meeting. 

* • • 

Miss Elizabeth O'Connor was the: 
guest of honor at an Informal party 
last evening given by Miss Eva Mc- 
Namara, 119 Tenth avenue west. In 
the dining room a large white basliet 
filled with pink and white sweet 
peas, baby's breath and maiden hair 
ferns formed the center piece. The 
parlor and living room were also dec- 
orated with sweet peas and ferns. 
Forty guests were present. Miss Mc- 
Namara was assisted by her sisters. 
Miss Emily McNamara and Mrs. Sadie 
McNamara Borgstrom. 
« • • 

Friends of Miss Lillian Brayton en- 
tertained at a farewell party for her 
yesterday afternoon at the ball in 
Duluth Heights. 

The guests were: 
Mesdames — 

W. M. Tolman, Herbert Har- 

J. D. Wilson, wood, 

W. A. Collins, G. Trentlege, 

William Jenkins, W. M. Fltzpat- 

John Brayton, rick, 

John Conklln, Ben Wood. 

« • * 
MiFses — 

Edith Krlsten- V 1 o 1 et Robert- 
son, son, 
Olive Watt, Mayme O'Connor, 
Jeanette Marion, Nettle Hogan, 
Lillian Perrotl, Flora iortal, 

Millie Fawcett. 
Miss Evodia Olson was the guest of 
honor at a linen shower last evening, 
in the parlor of Bethany Lutheran 
cliuich. Twenty-third avenue west 
and Third street, by members of the 
y< ung people's societies of the churcn. 
Garden flowers were effectively used 
in decorating. An Impromptu program 
formed a feature of the even'ng's en- 
tertainment. There were seventy-flve 
guests. 

The wedding of Miss Olson to Rev. 
Victor Swenson will take place Sept. 
10. Mr. Swenson Is a missionary to 
China and following the wedding he 
and his bride will leave for the for- 
eign field of service. 

• * * 

Miss Dorothy Meakin, 1412 East 
Third street, entertained at a five hun- 
dred party yesterday afternoon at her 
home. The rooms were prettily dec- 
orated with pretty garden flowers and 
the head prize was won by Mrs. Kath- 
erine Kenney. Those In the party 
were: 
Misses — 

Dorothy Gibson, Dorothy Jones, 
Alice Geraldin, Minneapolis, 

St. Louis, Pearl McCormlck, 

Dorothy Wachtel, Alice Holahan, 
Bertha Cox, Myrtle Hobbs, 

Alice Lang, Minneapolis, 

Gladys Duby, Adelaide Miller, 

Ruth Prosser, Doris Phelps, 

Florence Mars, Ivy Holgate, 

Marie McDonald, Dorothy Segog. 
Grace Vroman, 

« • • 

Miss Dorothy Gibson, 1509 East Sec- 
ond street, entertained at cards Tues- 
day evening In honor of Miss Alice 
Geraldin of St. Louis, who Is the guest 
of Miss Gibson. Those present were: 
Misses — 

Pearl McCormick, Ivy Holgate, 

Grace Vroman, Alice Geraldin. 

Dorothy Gibson, 
Messrs. — 

Donald Johnson, Kenneth Harris, 

Howard Lyons, Harold Bradley. 

Norman Johnson, 

• « * 

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Allan entertained 
the girls who belonged to the blue war 
canoe crew this summer at a dinner 



at the boat club last evening, follow- 
ed by a launcH rtde up the river. 

-J— ; — » 

Personal Mention. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Stilson and chil- 
dren of 1831 East Second street have 
returned from Yellowstone park. 
« « « 

Mrs. Frank M. Thomas and son, 
Morris, 1611 East Fourth street, are 
on their way to England, where they 
will visit for three months before 
touring the continent. They expect 
to be gone about a year. 

• • • 

Miss Hazek Wilson will leave today 
to attend the' county fair at Hibblng 
and will visit friends and relatives 
on the range, 

« * « 

Miss Julia Martin of 1005 East Su- 
perior street has returned from a visit 
at Detroit and Buffalo and will leave 
today for a visit with her mother at 
Brainerd. 

^ • « • 

George H. Brandt, 2827 Minnesota 
avenue, has returned to Chicago where 
he will resume his studies In the Chi- 
cago Art institute after spending sev- 
eral weeks with his parents. 

• * * 

Miss Ida Johnson. 2827 Minnesota 
avenue, has left for Chicago after 
spending her vacation with her par- 
ents. 

• • * 

Mies Elsie .«=!chweiger will leave to- 
morrow for Ely, Minn., where she will 
resume her work as a teacher In the 
Lincoln school. 

m * * 
Mrs. Thomas Keegan and son, Thom- 
as, 1622 Jefferson street, have returned 
to their home after spending the sum- 
mer months with Mr. and Mrs. C. Flan- 
nlgan of St. Paul at their summer 
home at Lake Elmo. 

« « * 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hall and chil- 
dren, 5613 Highland street, returned 
yesterday from a three months' visit 
with relatives in Glenn Falls, N. Y. 
Mrs. Comfort and family returned with 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall. 

• • • 

Miss Nan Brown of Seattle, Wash., 
formerly of Duluth, is the guest of 
Mrs. C. J. Hockln, 630 North Seven- 
teenth avenue east. 

• * * 

Miss Edna BJorge left yesterday for 

Spokane, Wash., where she will resume 
her duties In the schools of that city. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Hugo, 2407 East 
Third street, left today to visit their 
daughter, Mrs. Robert D. Smith, of 
Winnipeg. Mr. and Mrs. Hugo will 
motor there. 

Mrs. John Schulte, 627 West Third 
street, has ^een entertaining Miss 
Munroe of Port Arthur, Can., who 
stopped in the city on her return from 
a six months' visit in California. 

• * • 

Miss Alice Warren. St. Regis apart- 
ments, has as her guest Miss Lilian 
Warren of Des Moines, Iowa. 

• « * 

Miss Margaret Grogan, 1712 Jeffer- 
son street, left yesterday for Los An- 
geles, Cal., where she will teach this 
year. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Olund and chil- 
dren, Gladys and Earl, 721 West First 
street, are spending the week at Lake 
Nebagamon. 

• « • 

Miss Mary Gutman of St. Paul Is 
the guest of Mrs. Alexander Stewart, 
215 West First street. 

• * « 

Miss Byrd Johnson, 21 S'outh Seven- 
teenth avenue east, has as her guest 
Miss Edith Steckman of St. Paul. Miss 
Steckman will return to her home on 
Tuesday. 

• • • 

Miss Nell L. Woolman of the Spald- 
ing trio will return to her home in 
South Bend. Ind., by way of the lakes. 
Miss Woolman will leave" tonight on 
the Tionesta and will visit in Macki- 
nac and Petoskey, Mich. 

• • * 

Miss Margaret Besnab will return 
from a two weeks' visit In Milwaukee, 
Wis., Sunday, Aug. 31. 

• * • 

Miss Katherine Lawler, stepdaughter 
of Edmund Pennington, president of 
the Soo railroad, accompanied by Miss 
Hood, arrived In Duluth this morning 
from Minneapolis, en route to Isle 
Royale, where they will spend a few 

weeks. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Truss, who 
have been the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Ryan of Woodland, left today 
for their home in Birmingham, Ala. 

• • * 

Ray Johns, Earl Watterworth and 
Mr and Mrs. Harold Spink of St. Paul 
will arrive In the city tomorrow night 
to be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. 
W'atterworth, 2932 East Superior 
street, over Labor day. 

• • • 

Mrs. Marie K. Rlckter, 110 South 
Fourteenth avenueeast. Is In Chicago 
for two weeks. 

• * • 

Miss Mildred Chlsholm, 5113 London 
road, will leave Sunday for Meadow- 
lands, Minn., where she will teach this 
year. Her sister, Miss Flora Chlsholm. 
win teach In Virginia this winter and 
will leave Sunday also. 

• • • 

Miss Agnes D'^vyer of Hudson, Wis., 
Is the guest Of Mrs. A. V. Kelly, 1218 
East Second street. 

»■'■ ♦ • 

Mrs. William Rock, 426 Thirteenth 
avenue east, who has been visiting in 
Minneapolis and St. Paul for the past 
week, has returned home. 

• • * 

Mrs. C. B. Rowley. Miss lone Rowley 
and Miss Marie Canan of Brainerd, are 
the guests of Mrs. E. J. Donahue, 211 
East Third street. 

• ' * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Linqulst have as 
their guests. Charles Llnquist and Al- 
bert Peterson of Minneapolis, who are 
en route to Isle Royale for an outing. 



220 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

CUR ACADEMY OPENS 
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 

Afternoon and evening for the 
enrollment of pupils for the 
Fall Term beginning Sept. 8. 
Opening assembly will be given 
Tuesday Sept. 9. 

Collin's Dancing 
Academy 

8 West First Street. 

"Learn to dance correctly." 
Either Phone 203. 







By PEGGY PEABODY 



Some Thoughts on Helping the 
Blind Children. 

Recently there was a little blind girl 
in a large city, whose family was so 
poor that It could do nothing toward 
educating her, or help to put her in 
school. One of the 
newspapers discov- 
ered the case, and 
took It up, with tho 
result that it was 
not long until good 
hearted folks had 
opened up their 
purses and contrib- 
uted enough to send 
her away to school, 
where she could 
learn to make her- 
self as useful as 
might be, with her 
great handicap, and 
to be as happy as 
possible. 

In this city they do much for the 
blind. A regular library, with books 
and magazines and all sorts of period- 
icals printed In the blind language 
with raised letters, is maintained, and 
regular courses of lectures are given 



? 



YOliNG NOBLEMAN 

WILL WED HEIRESS 




for the benefit of the sightless. No 
efforts are spared to attempt to make 
up to them what they unfortunately 
lack — Nature's greatest gift of sight. 

In this connection, I recently learned 
of a pretty custom they have In Den- 
mark. When a baby girl or boy is 
born In that country, a brand new 
"lucky penny" Is given by the nurse 
to the father, and with it goes a money 
order blank, bearing this pledge: 

"I give to the needy blind, ac- 

knowleaging lecelpt of my child's 
lucky penny." Then there is this ex- 
planation: "A gift from one who sees 
the light for the first time to those 
who will never see it." 

This pretty and practical custom 
was started by a big-hearted man, 
who had the inspiration for It while 
he lay in a Danish hospital, threatened 
with the loss of his sight. It Soon 
took, and now, of course, nets a large 
sum for the blind each year. It has 
also spread to Norway, and even to 
Germany. 

Would not some little scheme like 
this go a long ways In this big United 
States toward helping the unfortunate 
blind? 




LORD ROCKSAVAGE. 

The Earl of Rocksavage, son and heir 
of the fourth Marquis or Cholmondeley 
is to marry Sybil Saspoon, daughter of 
the late Edward Sassoon. He is 30 
years old and heir to an important 
title as well as a historic castle. He 
is fond of hunting and shooting and is 
an enthusiastic polo player. Miss Sas- 
soon was a debutante of last season. 
She Is one of the wealthiest young 
women in England 





WIELAND SHOE CO 

222 WEST FIRST STREET 




Our Fall Footwear is ready and this House 
of Better Shoes is at the service of everybody 
that appreciates Good Footwear! 



WE'VE THE COUNTRY'S BEST SHOES 



For man, woman, boy, girl or infant, we've shoes that will be 
just right for every requirement. See our shoes, for it is then and 
only then that you can fully appreciate what we are able to do for 
you in the way of better shoes. 



Men's Shoes $3.00, $4.00 to $5.00 

Women's Shoes $2.50, $3.00, $3.50 to $5.00 



School Shoes for boys and girls 
$1.50, $2.00 to $3.50 

Shoes for very little feet — 
49c, 75c to $1.50. 




DAN CUPID TO 
THHESCUE 

Husband and Farm Found 

for Widow With Three 

Children. 



Life's drama took on a strange and 
romantic realism today for Mrs. Han- 
nah Johnson, 32, widowed mother of 
three children, who came to the court- 
house in quest of advice and financial 
aid and in less than an hour later 
walked out of the building arm in 
arm with a stranger who had pro- 
posed marriage to her after a two 
minutes' acquaintance. 

And if the plans of wily Dan Cupid, 
the little blind god of love, do not 
miscarry, Widow Johnson will no 
longer have to fight a losing battle 
to keep the wolf of want from her 
door. If the romance which had Its 
inception - this morning in the office 
of Charles Shogran, clerk of the poor 
commission, has a successful culmina- 
tion, the Johnson children wllj have 
a new daddy by the name of Macholdt 
and their mother will be holding down 
one end of a breakfast table in a com- 
fortably situated farmhouse. 

Max Macholdt, German, 38 years 
old, wants a wife. In last evenings 
edition of the Herald, he read an ac- 
count of the struggle against poverty 
which Mrs. Johnson and her children 
were making. This morning he came 
to the office of the poor commissioner 
to see if It could be fixed up with the 
Widow Johnson. He told Clerk Slo- 
gran that he felt sorry for the widow 
and that he thought he would like to 
make a home for her. 

Through a mere coincidence w^hile 
Max was casting about for the best 
plan of meeting the widow and put- 
ting in a proposal, Mrs. Johnson came 
to the office of the Associated Chari- 
ties, to make application for aid. Here 
is where the wily Dan woke up and 
started to get busy. Through some 
strange trick of fate in which the 
clerk of the poor commission, the hu- 
mane agent and a Herald reporter 
each tok a hand, an "accidental" 
meeting was arranged shortly after- 
wards in the office of the poor com- 
mission. 

"Sounding'' ihe li%'ldow. 

After a few preliminary questions, 
Mrs. Johnson was asked as to how she 
would like to be a farmer's wife and 
live on a farm where there are cows, 
pigs and chickens, plenty of good 
things to eat and lots of good milk 
and fresh air for the children. Of 
course she would, but what had that 
to do with her mission to his of- 
fice? 

The question however, broke the ice 
and the next move was to present Max 
Macholdt, the Industrious German 
farmer who was looking for a wife. 
"Well here is a man that is looking 
for a wife," explained Mr. Shogran. 
"He wants you to marry him and go 
and live with him on his farm." 

Mrs Johnson was thunderstruck. 
Then she blushed. "Well, I— I dont 

I really don't know what to say," 

she said. She looked at Macholdt and 
they both laughed. "I guess I will 
have to think it over." Max looked 
hintlngly at the small but interested 
crowd of spectators and the three va- 
cated Mr. Shogran 's private office. 
Through the open door. Max was seen 
to pull his chair up close to the one 
in which the widow was seated. 

After five minutes of more or less 
whispered conversation, they called 
in Mr Sliogran and told him that they 
might be able to fix things up. Max 
had told her about the farm where h*- 
was employed and she had consented 
to go with him tomorrow to look tii<: 
proposltlon over. It was also agreed 
that this afternoon Max should take 
a trip to the widow's home to size up 

her family. ^ v i-. t^>,« 

Macholdt is employed by Dr. John 
McKay of this city on the McKay 
farm two and one-half miles south of 
Zlm a station on the Duluth, Missabe 
& Northern railroad. There are ac- 
commodations on the farm he claims 
for her if she wants to spend a few 
days there looking things over before 
she accepts his offer for marriage. He 
told her that he wanted to be fair 
with her in the matter. 

Has Farm of His Own. 

After she had consented to go with 
him tomorrow morning to Zlm and 
spend a half a day looking over the 
farm, then he told her about a farm 
of his own that he was buying down 
in Wisconsin on which he hoped to 
make his home in the near future. 

'I have got a farm of eighty acres 
Just a half a mile from Rhinelander, 
Wis " he said, "It's fine land there 
and will make a fine place. If we 
get married, you get half and I get 
half If I die first, you get all, if you 
die first. I get all." 

Max came to this country from Ger- 



many in 1907 just two months after 
his wife had deserted him in the old 
country. "She run away with her 
first sweetheart," said Max, "and when 
I got over here I found that she had 
got a divorce from me and was living 
with him. I have two children but 
they wouldn't let me have them. They 
are living with her and her second 
husband at Florence, Wis." Max was 
married in 1899 and Is 88 years old. 
His wife divorced him in 1907. He 
has been employed on the McKay 
farm near Zlm since April. 

Mrs. Johnson Is 82 years old and lives 
with her three children at 1809»^ West 
First street. Her husband died three 
years ago, leaving the family in des- 
titute circumstances. Immediately 
after her husband's death she applied 
to the poor commission for aid, and 
since that time has been recei^ng ?4 
a month and fuel. Sympathizing neigh- 
bors have occasionally helped her out 
with clothes for herself and the chil- 
dren. The children are Frank, 8 years 
old; Carl, 5, and Elsie, 2%. 

To a newspaper man yesterday she 
stated that she was about ready to 
give up the battle against poverty, 
and that If she could have her children 
adopted out in some good home, where 
they would have plenty to eat, decent 
clothes and an opportunity to have an 
education, she would be a much happier 
woman. The story was published last 
evening. Macholdt read the article In 
The Herald last evening and made up 
his mind that he would seek the wom- 
an out as Tils wife. 

Macholdt and the widow left the 
courthouse shortly before noon on 
their way to the Johnson household, 
where Max will look over the children 
and talk over prospects. 

Note. — The Herald lays no claims to 
being a matrimonial bureau. 



INCREASED VALUATION 
ONPERSONALPROPERTY 



A valuation of J18, 382,098 has been 
placed on the personal property in St. 
L>ouis county subject to taxation this 
year, according to the abstract which 
was forwarded to the state tax com- 
mission at St. Paul yesterday by 
County Auditor Halden. 

The 1918 figure shows an increase 
of $1,515,273 over last year's figure, 
which was |16,86«,E25. 

In Duluth the taxable personal prop- 



erty valuation for 1913 Is $13,188,762. 
as compared with $11,343,211 for 1912, 
showing an increase of $1,845,551. 

The personal property tax exemp- 
tions for the county this year amount- 
ed to $1,348,900, or $100 each for 13,- 
489 persons. In Duluth 7,160 person* 
were exempt. 

This year 2,554 corporations in St. 
Louis county and Individuals will pav 
a .3 of a mill tax on $15,528,491 classed 
as money and credits. 

IRONWOOD COUPLE 

WED DED T HURSDAY. 

Ironwood, Mich., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — A very pretty wed- 
ding took place last evening at 5 whan 
Miss Myrtle Eplett, third daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Eplett, and George 
Walter Rasmussen, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Rasmussen, of Curry street, were 
married at the home of the bride's 
parents at the Aurora location. There 
were about fifty guests present. Tho 
bride wore blue crepe de chine and 
carried a shower bouquet of roses 
and sweet peas. She was attended by 
her sister. Miss Annie Eplett. who 
wore yellow silk. William Paul acted 
as groomsman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rasmussen left this 
morning for Ashland and other points 
west. 

They were the recipients of many 
presents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rasmussen will go to 
housekeeping on Curry street. 

DEPUTY STATE FIRE 
MARSHAL CLARK KILLED 



St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Deputy State PIre Mar- 
shal A. E. Clark, aged 70, was instant- 
ly killed today near Carver, Minn., 
when he was struck by an Omaha 
route train. He was walking along 
the line inspecting elevators ana 
warehouses and, being partially deaf, 
did net hear the train. The engine 
struck him in the back, killing him 
Instantly. 

The body will be returned to SL 
Paul. Capt. A. E. Clark, Jr., who is 
now at Camp Perry, Ohio, has been 
notified. 



^i 



r^^^^^PT 



^ur Bread for T&u 

It will save you all the hardship, all the heat, worry, 
uncertainty and expense of bakinc at hom«. It will 
give you more time for yourself, your family and your 
frlende. 

USE 

BUTTER-NUT 
BREAD 

and ba nish forever the care of home-baking. Tou will 
find BrTTER-NUT BREAD all you could desire it to be 
and beside you know it la clean because It is made in 
the cleanest bread plant in the N'orthwest. 

ORDER A LOAF FROM TOUR OROCBR TODAY. 
Bread plant open erery day except Saturday, and Sunday 

ZINSMASTER-SMITH BREAD COMPANY 

TWENTX-NINTH AVE. WEST AND SUPERIOR ST. 



I 



I, 

I 



mm 



SHS 



agg 



4-' 



Friday, 



ON THE IRON RANGES 




OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



COUNTY FAIR 
DRAWS 4,000 

Opening Day of St. Louis 

County Fair Brings Out 

Many People. 



Dulutti Day Saturday Ex- 
pected to Bring Out 
Banner Crowd. 



Hibblng, Minn.. Aug. 29 — (Special to 
The Herald.)— This ic Vermilion and 
Meaaba ran^e day at the St. Louis 
iounty fair, which began here yester- 
<lay and while the weather is a trifle 
cool there are already many on the 
lair grounds with the indications there 
AvllI be a big attendance before the day 
iinds. The Ely band is playing at the 
lair today and many from the Ver- 
milion range are in attendance. The 
Judging of the exhibits began today 
f.ad there is much interest in the out- 
tome as the agricultural exhibits are 
tspecialiy line, if anything better than 
those Of last year. The Nett Lake In- 
Ciians camped on the grounds, make up 
one of the novel teatures of the fair. 
Dulatta Day Saturday. 
Tomorrow Is Uuluth day and it Is 
expected there will be many visitors 
from the Head of the Lakes. Some 
good racing Is provided for tomor- 
row. The fair will close Sunday when 
there will also be good racing. 

The attendance yesterday was 4.000. 
It was Chlsholm and Hibbing day and 
both towns were well represented. The 
mining men also attended the fair. 
.J.bout 2:30 there was some rain which 
made the track very heavy. 

Major Kantz, an Iowa pacer won the 
free-for-all trot or pace taking three 
straight heats. Time 2:15 V*. 2:18 and 
2 16 Vs. Paderewski was second each 
t.me, while American Boy was third 
and Ldayhart, fourth. 

The 2:30 pace or trot was won by 
Jim Henderson in three straight heats. 
Time 2i'26^, 2:25 and 2:26^. Robert 
vas Second in two heats and third in 
t le other. Green Baricha was third 
once and twice fourth, while Lady Ad- 
rian was third once and fourth twice. 
The racing program for tomorrow 
lollows: 

Class No. 5. 2:25 trot or pace, 
three in five. |500 — Gordon W. 
S:ott. diiv^r. Hi Robert. Jr., Imw 
Ball. Klngaley. Jim Henderson, 
bay horse pacer by Pinline; Kohrt, 
b.iy mare pacer by Adron Hoku; Gi- 
st on, owner; Glston. driver. Miss Gal- 
leon, bay mare pacer by Cailoon C; 
Olston. owner; Glston, driver. Spooner 
Boy. Florttta Lockhart. bay mare 
pacer; Phelps, driver. Amy G, black 
mare trotter by Idolph; Smith, owner. 
Green Barlsh Chest, gelding pacer; 
Bradford. owner. Sadie Holmore, 
biown mare pacer; Bradford, owner. 

Class No. 8, 2:22 trot or pace, three 
in five, |400 — Spooner Boy. Floretta 
Lockhart, bay mare pacer. Lady 
A Irian, bay mare pacer by 
F azee, owner. Ben Butler, 
gelding pacer; Palmer, owner 
R'd. 



at VVashiiigton university. William 
Hooper goes to the South Dakota 
school of mines. Ben VVilk returns to 
the state "U ' to take a post graduate 
course and Hirry Wilk is a sophomore 
in the law department. Marie Butler 
goes to Visitation college in St. Paul. 
Hazen and Patrick Butler return to 
St. Thomas college. Hank Boyle, who 
has spent the summer in Virginia, will 
go back to the University of Michi- 
gan, where ho is taking an engineer- 
ing course, specializing on construc- 
tion work. Enid Wilcox commences the 
junior year, taking the academic 
course at the University of Minnesota. 
Leighton Simons is a senior In the law 
school. Dan Mahoney and Gerald Ros- 
kllly juniors in the medical school, 
Michael Bonner a junior in the den- 
tal school, Carl Hawkinson a junior 
in the forestry department and Harlan 
Johnson a sophomore In the forestry 
school, all at the state university. 
Harry G. Neff begins his second year 
In law at the University of Michigan 
and Sam Cohen his second year in the 
academic course In the Michigan 
school. Hulda Johnson Is a junior in 
the academic course at the University 
of Wisconsin. Stephen Quayle, who 
has been taking the engineering course 
at Wisconsin, will stay out of school 
for a year. Vernon Johnson returns 
to the University of Wisconsin to com- 
mence the sophomore year in the 
academic course. 

Thoae B«KlBiiiaic College 'Work. 
Among those who are commencing 
college work are Gertrude Simons, who 
goes to Macalester college, St. Paul; 
Ruth Butler to the University of Wis- 
consin, Ethel Whiting to the domestic 
science school of the Stout Training 
institute at Menomonle. Wis., Halvor 
Olson and Mllbiirn Carey to the den- 
tal school and Victor Larson and Ward 
Becker to the engineering school at 
the state *U." John Grande goes to 
commence the academic course at the 
University of Minnesota. 

TEACHERS CAN 

AHEND FAIR 



GHiSHOLM HAS 

MANY TEACHERS 



Dilton 
sorrel 
Grace 



TOWER MAN HAS 

BEEN INDICTED 



Opening of Grand Rapids 

Schools Delayed for 

One Week. 

Grand Rapids. Minn., Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The local public 
schools will open Sept. 8, the delay of 
one week being caused by the desire of 
the school board to allow those who 
wish to, to attend the state fair with- 
out losing time from school, and also 
for the benefit of those teachers who 
wish to attend the ^teachers' Institute! 
to be held here all 'next week. 

Superintendent E. A. Freeman an- 
nounces that the vacancies in the 
teacfiing force are filled and the full 
list of teachers as follows: 

High school — Principal, Miss Mary C. 
Strickler, Lanark. 111.; English, Miss 
Florence Burlin^ame of Grand Rap- 
ids; German, Mrs. Clarence B. Web- 
ster, Grand Rapids; Latin and mathe- 
matics. Miss Mary Ellis, Chicago; mu- 
sic and drawing. Miss Bessie Campbell, 
St. Cloud, Minn.; domestic science. 
Miss Grace Norton; commercial depart- 
ment, Miss Eva Cowles, Stevens Point, 
Wis.; manual training department, 
John Klug, Two Rivers, Wis.; assistant 
manual training department, Harry 
Vestal, Peoria, 111.; history and public 
speaking, Fred Carson. Grand Rapids; 
science, R. R. Turner, Springfield, III. ; i Josephine 



Large Force Ready to Open 

Schools on Next 

Tuesday. 

Chlsholm. Minn.. Aug. 29, — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The school board has 
confirmed the teachers' list for the 
coming year. School will open next 
Tuesday, and a meeting of the teach- 
ers will be held In the high school 
l)uildlng Saturday and the organization 
perfected. Supt. J. P. Vaughn recom- 
mended the appointment of the follow- 
ing list which the board confirmed: 

High school — A. Bess Clerk, Maquo- 
keta, Iowa, principal, history econo- 
mics; Mary L. Right, Rensselaer Ind., 
English; A. F. Drotning, Chlsholm, 
mathematics, science; Amelia Opper- 
man. Strawberry Point, Iowa. Latin. 
German; Jane H. Crow. Evansvllle, ! 
Wis., domestic science; R. W. Jackson, i 
Menomonle, Wis., manual training; j 
Robert M. Thompson. Menomonle, Wis., 
assistant manual training and physical \ 
training; Frank M Allworth. Buffalo. ' 
N. v., commercial work and penman- 
ship; Luclle Brandeburg. Minneapolis, 
music supervisor; Constance Whltten, 
Hayward, Wis., drawing supervisor; 
Leathe B. Wright, Rensselaer. Ind., 
grade supervisor; Dr. A. J. Ripper t. 
Chisholm. physical director and physl- 
can; Tressa Beatty. Duluth, school 
nurse; Lucy Gorman, Chlsholm. stenog- 
rapher and librarian; D. J. Harrington. 
Chlsholm. stock clerk; O. J. Iverson, 
Chlsholm, attendance officer 

High school building — Grace D. 
Chase, Chlsholm, principal A eighth 
grade; Ella Hanson, Ada. Minn.. B 
eighth grade; Alta Reynolds. St. Cloud, 
Mfnn.. A seventh grade; Wlnnlfred 
Gleason, Dalcota, Minn , B seventh 
grade; Olive Strand, Fergus Falls. 
Minn., sixth grade; Wllla Randall, 
GracevUIe, Minn, third grade; Maud 
Reynolds, St Cloud. Minn., second 
grade; Grace A Allen. Winona, Minn, 
second grade; Verena Hunn, lola. Wis., 
second grade; Elsie Ringletaube. 
Marshfield, Wis., first grade; Vera 
Dahlstrom, Minneapolis. flr.<»t grade; 
Fannie Strub, Winona, Minn., first 
grade: Erna O. Keuper, Plymouth. 
Wis., kindergarten; Annie Einswelller, 
Chlsholm. a.sslstant kindergarten. 

liinooln School — Bes.?le L. Donaldson. 
Chicago, principal, third grade; Bena 
Danlelson. Fergus Falls. Minn., sixth 
grade; Irene Keehan, Duluth, Minn., A. 
fifth grade; Minnie Carlson, Red Wing, 
Minn., B-fifth grade; Irene Davey, Eve- 
leth, Minn., A-fourth grade: Frances 
shortrldge. Spokane, Wash., B-fourth 
grade; Beatrice Smith.son, New London 
Minn.. C-fourth grad^^; Jessie Chase. 
Chlsholm. A-thlrd grade: Jessie Fair, 
Plattville, Wis., A-second grade; Ru- 
blna Kneebone Chlsholm, B-second 
grae: Emma Marth, Nelllsvllle, W"i.'=i., 
first and second grades; Agnes Ruhle, 
Minneapolis, Minn., first grade; Leonore 
King, Minneapolis, first grade: Clara 
R. Cook, Oe Pere, Wis., kindergarten 
director: Frances Pearson, Minneapo- 
lis, assistant kindergarten. 

Monroe .School — Edna R. Scrlbner. 
Racine, Minn., principal, grammer 
grades; Alecla Madden, Rochester, 
Mm., fifth grade; Olga Jerden, WMnona, 
Minn., third grade; Maud Talbovs. 
^-.hlsholm, second grade' Barbara 
Guentz. Winona. Minn., first grade; 
Weber, Minneapolis, fir.«!t 




FOREM^AST TILL 7 P, 
.SATIJRD.W 

For Duluth. .Superior and rldnlty, 
Itieludmg the Mesai)a and Venntllou 
iron Miiges: Fair weather tonight 
and Saturday; warmer Saturday; 
muderate winds, mostly wentcrly. 

ObterrttiOM taken at S a. m., sfvomy-lillli meridian time. 
paw through poiat* of equal Icmpviatiil'o; drawn onl 
tho wind. Fitjl figure*, temporaluro, second, precipi 



WISTD SCALE. 

Mllea 
Per Hour. 

Calm to 5 

Light S to 15 

Moderat* 15 to 23 

Bdsk 23 to 33 

Bigh S3 tu 50 

Gale so to 65 

Hurricane 65 and abOTO 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 
UtMl FoTMUtar. 



EXPLANATORY NOTE& 



il t^' ""T"* "**««?* '"^•tllS"''- J^'*"* (ewtiioous line") P»M thfoa^h poinU ofeqnal »ir prewuit, Isothcmii (dotted Um 
ly for «7. fr«"'nif, »0° and 100°. Q clear; © partly cloudy: « cloudy; R rain; S inow; M report miuing. A^owT fly\ri 
itatioa of .01 inch or more for ptat 24 hours; tbirJ, maximum iriod velocity. . • , m ^ <■ -.mg. arrowi oy wi 



Ml) 

with 



I FAIlt 




blew from the 
Northwest all day 
intensified the cool- 
ness in Duluth yes- 
terday. The tem- 
perature r e o o rddd 
for the day was 68 
deg. and the tern- 
perature dropped to 
52 deg. last night. 
Today is gray and 
cool, but ^air and 
warmer weather is 
predicted for tonight and Saturday. 
Pair weather prevailed a year ago to- 
day. 

The sun rose this morning at 5:24 
and it will set at 6:54 this evening, 
giving tWrteen hours and thirty min- 
utes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

••Light to copious showers fell during 
Thur.sday or last night In the lake re- 
gion. Central and Eastern Canada, New 
England, South Atlantic, East Gulf and 
Pacific states. Hot weather continued 
Thursday in most of the Middle and 
Southern states, temperatures of 100 
deg. occurring Iji Missouri and Arizona. 
Indications favor fair weather in St. 
Louis and Douglas counties during the 
ensuing thlrty-slx hours." 



A chill wind that I east portion tonight. 



to Stevens Point, Wis., for interment 
Mrs. Herbrechter had been a resident.* 
of Gilbert for some time, living at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. C. O. Welch, 
and during her residence here had 
made many friends who will mourn 
her loss. The remains were accom- 
panied to Stevens Point by Mr. and 
Mrs. Welch, Mr. and Mrs. Barber. Fred 
Barber and Mrs. Davis, all the relatives 
of the deceased living In Gilbert. 



DAVID LAWRENCE 

IS BEING TRIED 



Upper lakes — Brisk west and north- 
west winds; generally fair tonight and 
Saturday preceded by showers on Supe- 
rior tonight; small craft warning indi- 
cated. 



The Temperatures. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for twenty-four hours and the 
lowest for twelve, ending at 7 a. m. 
today. 



agriculture. W C. Corwin, Sherburn, grade; Julia C. Sullivan. Ironwood 
Minn.; normal instructor. Miss Minnie Mlchr., kindergarten" Clara ScMller Du ' 
Ashton, Boone. Iowa; eighth grade, luth, aa.«(i3tant klnderearten " ' ^"- 

MLss Leila Bush. Dover, Minn.; seventh' - - Kinaergarten. 



Grand Jury Finds That He 

Caused Death of Louis 

Furnie. 

Virginia, Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
Tlie Herald). — The grand Jury which 
completed its labors last evening and 
was discharged reported many indict- 
ments some of which have been madf 
pi blic. A true bill for murder In 
the first degree was returned against 
H')mer Le Quire of Tower, for caus- 
ing the death of Louis S. Furnie of 
Fjirgo. N. D., alleged to have been 
killed in a tent near Tower and the 
tent fired. Robbery was the alleged 
motive. 

ChiAholm Pair Tndieted. 

Among others indicted were An- 
drew Zedrick and Domltian Zedrich, 
charged with assault in the second 
degree. The victim was Tony Rotta 
who at Chlsholm was cut in twenty- 
one places with a broken bottle. Paul 
P*ccIanno was Indicted for carnal 
knowledge of a child. This was the 
E\<^leth case In which Mary MuHch 
wj.s the victim. Louis Mattanlch and 
Matt Perkovlch are Indicted for as- 
aajlt In the second degree. This Is 
a Gilbert case In which John Jupin 
wfis beaten up. Alex Doblenski of 
Cusson, Is indicted for assault in the 
second degree the chief witness and 
thi victim being Thomas Cross. Both 
nitn are woodsmen. 



Crade, Miss Rosalie Huderle, Hutchin- 
son, Minn. 

Central school — Principal, Miss Sadie 
Garrett. Mankato; fifth grade, Mi.ss 
Alice Grendahl; fourth grade. Miss Ru^s 
Beatty, Clinton; third grade. Miss Alida 
Holmes; second grade. Miss Mabel 
Nordstrom, Fairmont; first grade, Mrs. 
Clara Grove; kindergarten. Miss Dor- 
othy Ely; assistant In the kindergarten, 
Miss Ma^ Benton. 

Forest Lake school — Principal, Miss 
Margaret Aiton; sixth grade, MLsa La- 
vina Guthrie; fifth grade. Miss Anna 
Knudson; fourth grade. Miss Meta 
Erickson; third grade. Miss Margaret 
Alton; second grade. MI^s Clara Thomp- 
son; first grade. Miss Florence Thoirs 

Cohasset school — High school and 
eighth grade, Henry Baldwin, princi- 
pal; sixth and seventh grade. Miss May 
Virginia Wildes; fourth and fifth 
grades. Miss Phoebe Smith; second and 
third grade.s. Miss Lillian Johnson; 
first grade. Miss Jessie Aiken. 

Mr. Klug, the new head of the man- 
ual training department, will supervise 
the work in the local schools only this 
year, and his assistant, Harry Vf>stal 
will take charge of the work at Co- 
hasset and Blackberry schools, which 
In past years has fallen to the lot of 
the supervisor of the department, the 
assistant being a new venture this 
year. 



Meyer'i, Kohool — A. Laura Little 
K.^^kfor'l Minn , principal, grammer 
grades; Ida Thompson, Curtiss, Wis 
'^.^w'"!"^'*'**^ grades; Marie KUlorln' 
Hibbing, Minn., second grade: Irma 
Krell, Lake City, Minn., first grade. 

Shenaiuro School —. Grace Rowell 
North Branch. Minn., principal, first 



General ForecattM. 

Chicago, Aug. 29. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Saturday: 

Upper Michi^ran — Fair In west; show- 
ers in east portion tonight or Saturday. 

Wisconsin — Fair tonight and Satur- 
day; rising temperature Saturday. 

Minnesota and Iowa — Fair tonight 
and Saturday; somewhat w^armer Sat- 
urday and In west portion tonight. 

Nortli Dakota and South Dakota — 
Fair tonight and Saturday; warmer to- 
night. 

Montana — Generally fair weather to- 
night and Saturday; warmer In south- 



Alpena 

AHantlo City T8 

Baltimore 84 

BaUleford 80 

Blamaidc T8 

Boiaa 98 

Boston 7* 

Buffalo 70 

Calgary 82 

Charleston 82 

Chicago 80 

Corpus ChrlBtl. . ..88 

Denver 76 

D«s MoiiiM 32 

Devils I,aka 74 

DodgD 94 

Dubuque 80 

DULUTH 68 

Durango 84 

I-::astport 6S 

Edmonton 



Hlffh jMVt 
..96 72 



Ericanaba . . . 
Galveston . . . 
Grand Fortes 
O rand Haven 
Orewi Bay . . 
Ilatteraa .... 

Havre 

Helena 90 

noughton 

Huron 82 

Jactcsonville 
Kamloovs 
Kan»;i8 City 
KnoxvUla 
La Croase . 
I.ouisvlUo . . 
Madison . . . 

Marquette 72 

Medicine Hat. ...90 

Meraphla 92 

Miami 

Miles CiUr 81 



..74 
..88 
..76 
..72 
..78 
..84 
.88 



..86 
.80 
..91 



..94 
.76 



72 
74 
46 
44 
68 
66 
64 
54 
T2 
60 
78 
54 
54 
48 

56 
52 
58 
52 
48 
52 

;8 

43 
62 
34 
78 
54 
62 
56 
43 
70 

B2 
70 
54 
72 
5« 
56 
62 
76 
80 



Hi«h Low 

Milwaukee 80 53 

Mimiedosa 70 48 

Modena 83 62 

Montgomenr .... 94 72 

Montreal 64 58 

Moorhead 78 50 

New Orleans 88 76 

New York 82 68 

North Platte 86 52 

Oklahoma sj 70 

Omaha 84 58 

Parry Sound ... 68 54 

Plioe/ilr 100 

Pierre 82 52 

Plttaburg 86 H 

Port Arthur 70 52 

Portland. Or 86 (i& 

Prlnf* Albert 50 

Qu'Appelle 72 50 

Raleigh 90 72 

lUpid City 82 54 

Roseburg 80 66 

Roawell 90 64 

.St. Louis 102 70 

St. Paul 74 59 

Salt Lake City... 88 70 

San Diego 78 68 

San Francisco. . .74 60 

Sauit Sto. Marie. 68 52 

SeatUe 78 64 

Siieridan 84 44 

Shreveport 94. 74 

Sioux City 82 56 

Sp.>kane 90 86 

Swift Current.... 82 4| 

Tampa 83 72 

Tnledo 38 60 

Valentine 42 

Wa.HlUngton 88 74 

WlllUtoa 82 52 

Wiuiemucca 92 59 

Winnipeg 88 48 

Yellowstone 84 52 



to The Herald). — The l^avy rails for 
the line of the Canadian Northern 
road, between Virginia and the bor- 
der are arriving and the work of in- 
stalling the eighty-pound steel will 
go ahead as fast a3 the labor situa- 
tion will allow. The heavier steel 
will conform with that laid on the 
new section of the line between Vir- 
ginia and Duluth and will eventually 
give the heavy rail equipment all the 
way from Duluth to "Winnipeg. 

MAY GARRY MAIL 
ON TROLLEY LINE 



Two Harbors Attorney Fac- 
ing Jury in District 
Court. 

Two Harbors. Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The trial of Da- 
vid H. Lawrence a well known local 
attorney and former judge of probate 
indicted several months ago on several 
charges involving money in his posses- 
sion began before Judge Cant and the 
following jury in district court today: 
Nick Schultz of Knife River; Joseph 
McGregor, Albert Blackman, Andrew J. 
Ncrlen, Andrew Casper of Knife River; 
Erlck Erickson, Martin Lanniark, Nick 
Wickstrom, Oscar Erickson, John Mar- 
shall, Ed C. Peterson and John Berg- 
man. 

Duluth Lawyer DefendJngr. 

Attorney Richards of Duluth is de- 
fending Lawrence while Assistant At- 
torney General A. J. Edgerton and 
County Attorney J. Gilbert Jelle are 
piosecuting. The Barrett charge was 
the first to be taken up and occupied 
the time of the court ajl this morning. 

The following witnesses appeared for 
the state: Mrs. Barrett of Winton, 
Minn.; and Joseph Orcokoskl. Lawrence 
is charged with misappropriating funds 
which were intrutsed to his care to be 
used in a business transaction between 
Mrs. Barrett and Mr. Orcokoskl. B. F. 
Fowler, who was county attorney at 
the time also appeared on the witness 
stand. 



ODD FELLOWS' EXCURSION 

ON LAKE VERMILION. 



Mesaba Range Towns Hope 

to Get Mail Quicker 

Thereby. 

Chisholm, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Postmaster Q. L 
Train has been advised that the post- 
office department's representative will 
be sent here to make final arrange- 
ments for free delivery. 

A movement has been started which 
will likely be taken up by the Com- 
mercial club with other Commercial 
clubs of the range towns along the 
trolley line to agitate for mall service 
on the street car. The Mesaba electric 
railway carries express and it seems 
natural that a ma'l service should fol- 
low. 



Tower. Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A number of Odd Pel- 
lows and their guests, accompanied by 
a brass band, arrived at an early hour 
Thursday morning In a sp«( -al train of 
four coaches from Virginia and Eve- 
leth. The steamers May Bell and Alice 
had been chartered for the day and 
took the party up the lake. The day 
was marred by several showers and a 
very rough sea. The excursionists left 
for their homes at late hour. 



AMBER CONV ICTED. 

Two Harbor.s, Minn., Aug 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — After deliberat- 
ing six hours the district court jury 
that heard the case against John Am- 
ber, aged 70, charged with manslaugh- 
ter in the first degree, in causing the 
death of Gust Peterson, returned a ver- 
dict of guilty last night. It Is not 
expected sentence will be passed until 
after the conclusion of the Lawrence 
case. 



Ishpeming, Mic; 



1., 



MANY VIRGINIANS 
GOING TO COLLEGE 



Boys and Girls Will Soon Be 

Leaving for Their 

Studies. 

Virginia. Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— This fall Virginia 
will be well represented with students 
In the various colleges and universi- 
tlej. The greater number go to the 
Mi.inesota state university. 

VLxel Dahl Is a sophomore at the law 
school at Chicago university. Edward 
Be:-K is a senior In mining engineering 



FRECKLES 



Now Is the Time to Get Rid of These 
Ugly Spots. 

ITiere's no longer the slightest need 

of feeling ashamed of your freckles, 

as the prescription othine — double 

etnsngth — is guaranteed to remove 
these homely spots. 

Simply get an ounce of othine — dou- 
ble strength — from Boyce Drug Store 
and apply a little of it night and morn- 
ing and you should soon see that even 
the worst freckles have begun to dis- 
apjear, while the lighter ones have 
varished entirely. It Is seldom that 
more than an ounce is needed to com- 
ple ely clear the skin and gain a beau- 
tiful clear complexion. 

lie sure to ask for the double 
strength othine as this is sold under 
guarantee of money back if It fails 
to remove freckles. 



MINING MEN ARE 

HAVING BIG TIME 

Seeing Many of the Great 

Mines of the Mesaba 

Range. 

Hibbing, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— After being entertained 
here last night at the Oliver club and 
with vaudeville stunts at the Armory, 
members of the Lake Superior Mining 
Institute and friends who are doing 
the Mesaba range towns resumed their 
Inspection of mines this morning vis- 
iting the Hull-Rust. Burt-Sellers" and 
other local properties, then going on 
the Great Northern to Nashwauk and 
other Western Mesaba points. Th. 
special stops at the St Paul, Bray 
Hawkins, Hill. Holman and other mines 
of the Canlsteo district and Is due at 
Coleraine at 5 p. m. today. There 
will be an entertainment at the Cole- 
raine village hall tonight. 

All members of the party express 
themselves as greatly pleased with 
with the trlpi 



grade: Eva Parks, 
second primary. 

A teacher for the rural .school has 
not been definitely decided upon as y<»t 
and the school may not open on Sept 2 
with the balance of the schools. 

diphtherTTdelays 
opening of school 

Disease in Village of Aurora 

Interferes With Plans 

to Open Tuesday. 

Aurora. Minn., Aug. 29— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The local schools will 
not open Sept. 2, as originally planned 
owing to the prevalence of diphtheria 
in the village. The location and Me- 
saba schools will open at tliat time, 
however. 

At the Mohawk, Misses Boaste and 
Mattson will be In charge, at the 
Stevens, Miss Wilcox; at the Adriatic, 
Misses Katzenberg and Creer. and at 
Mesaba, Misses Frledhelm and Keough 

It Is expected that the village 
schools will open one week later. 

EVELEf H BOYS' 

CLUB PROGRAM 



are being held on the first and third 
Friday evenings of the month in the 
homes of the members and others. 

A number of business and profes- 
sional men have consented to address 
the club on subjects that are of prac- 
tical value to the boys. 

Among those who have promised to 
speak are: R. L. Eddy of the high 
school faculty. J. H. Heardlng of Du- 
luth. City Clerk D. P. Mclntyre, Supt. 
B. O. Greening, A. E. Pfremmer, 
Bernhard Silberstein of Duluth, Sen- 
ator James P. Boyle, William E. 
Haemke of Wolf, Mr. McLeod, super- 
intendent of the Boys' department of 
the Duluth Y. M. C. A., Dr. C. W. 
More and George A. Whitman. The 
club Is also meeting every Monday 
evening for one hour In the city au- 
ditorium and Capt. J. C. Hartness of 
Company F. is putting the boys 
through a course of military tactics. 

Rev. P. A. Schwarz, leader of the 
club, is receiving gratifying encour- 
agement from the parents of the boys, 
also many of the business men, who 
realize the good to be derived In pro- 
viding good and wholesome environ- 
ments for boys of the tender age. 



LAKE COUNTY TO 

HAVE FINE FAIR 



Many Interesting Subjects 

Are to Be Considered 

By Members. 

Eveleth, Minn., Aug. 29.— (Speciffl 
to The Herald).— An interesting and 
Instructive program of study-meet- 
ings has been arranged for the Boys' 
Study and Recreation club of the 
Presbyterian church. These meetings 



BLIND WOMAN DIES. 

Mrs. Newton, Who Lived on Farm 
Near Cohasset, Is Called. 

Cohasset, Minn., Aug. 29— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Mrs. D. C. Newton. 
53 years old, died Wednesday evening 
at her home, three miles north of this 
village, near Bass Lake, after a long 
illness. 

The Newtons came to this county 
from Iowa, two years ago, and settlcu 
on the land which they are still mak- 
ing their home. Mrs. Newton, had ever 
since sch'ldhood been blind, but she 
was an exceptionally good musician 
and thoroughly enjoyed her music 
During the past few months she had 
suffered from heart trouble, which 
was the Immediate cause of death 

She leaves beside her husband one 
daughter. Miss Jessie, and a ' son 
Harry, both at home. The funeral was 
held yesterday afternoon from th" 
fiimily home with burial in the Co- 
hasset cemetery. 



New E^eletk Rector. 

Eveleth. Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald).— Rev. D. F. Thomp- 
son, recently from Moorhead, has ac- 
cepted the rectorship of the local 
Episcopal church, and will occupy the 
pulpit for the first time next Sunday 
morning, service beginning at 10 45 



RESINOL STOPS 
BABY'S ECZEMA 



Relieve* Itchlna: lantantiy and Soon 
Clears Away .411 Eruption. 

There would be fewer babies tortured 
and disfigured by eczema, fewer moth- 
ers worn out by constant worry and 
loss of sleep, and fewer lives made mis- 
erable by skin troubles that have per- 
sisted since infancy, if every woman 
only knew about Reslnol Ointment and 
Resinol Soap. 

Simple baths with Resinol Soap and 
a little Reslnol Ointment spread on the 
tortured skin, stop the itching Instant- 
ly, and quickly and permanently clear 
away the eruption. And the Resinol 
treatment is so pure, gentle and abso- 
lutely harmless, that It can be used 
with perfect safety on baby's tender 
skin. Doctors have prescribed Reslnoi 
regularly for eighteen years, and thoui 
sands of babies owe their skin health 
to It. Every druggist sells Resinol 
Ointment and Resinol Soap Trial free^ 
Dept. 13-P, Resinol, Baltimore, Md. ' 



Annual Show During Next 

Month Will Be Better 

Than Ever. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Arrangements 
are still going forward to make the 
seventh annual exhibition to be given 
by the Lake County Agricultural so- 
ciety, Sept. 18, 19 and 20, bigger and 
better in every way than any previous 
similar undertakings. 

Another building 30 by 60 feet will 
be erected. This building will be used 
exclusively for stock. In past years It 
has been that many farmers who owned 
fine stock would not bring it to the 
fair on account of the poor housing, 
or lack of the proper kind of shelter. 
It is the aim of the officials to pay 
more attention to the stock exhibitions 
this year than ever before and the pre- 
miums offered this year have been in- 
creased 100 per cent. The new stock 
building will be built on the same gen- 
eral plan of the other buildings erect- 
ed on the fair grounds. It will be 
fitted with proper stalls for the accom- 
modation of horses, sheep, hogs cattle 
and other domestic animals. Besides 
the new building an addition Is to be 
constructed on Building No. 1, which 
will be used for an office arid a retir- 
ing room for the ladles. Heretofore 
all the fair business has been trans- 
acted In one corner of the building, and 
during afternoon.s and evenings this 
has been very Inconvenient and at times 
almost Impossible. The office will be 
a great help to the officers In charge 
of the business of the fair, as well as 
making more room In Building No. 1 
that can be devoted to other purposes 
The retiring room for the ladles will be 
a great convenience for the ladies who 
look after the women's department, as 
well as for the wives of farmers who 
visit the fair. 

Railroad Off era Prise. 
As usual the Duluth & Iron Range 
Railroad company will contribute |ldO 
to be distributed as speciiti prizes. 

Better accommodations will be made 
this year for those who exhibit poul- 
try. Heretofore the poultrx has been 
practically exposed to the weather and 
has required a great deal of time and 
attention on the part of the own- 
ers and others to properly care for 
the birds. 

The general rules and regulations 
governing things In general are about 
the same as they were last year. All 
entries must be filed with the sec- 
retary not later than Sept, 17. 

The premium list was given out to 
the public this week. The depart- 
ment of livestock In general has been 



Increased considerably over any pre- 
vious year. Premiums for horses and 
cattle alone amount to over $300. The 
department of poultry and eggs, which 
is under the supervision of Robert J. 
Tubman, has been much Improved. The 
premiums are such that they ought 
to induce the owners of fine birds to 
put them on exhibition. The women's 
department will be given more atten- 
tion this year than In the past. The 
total amount of premiums offered in 
this department is nearly $300. Art 
and needle work will be given particu- 
lar attention as will the department 
of pantry and kitchen. 

Manual training will be exhibited 
from each grade and high school. 
School gardening, which Is a new fea- 
ture, will be given much attention. 
Besides the regular prizes for school 
gardening. Supt. H. E. Flynn of the 
city schools has offered two special 
prizes of $5 each to the boy or girl 
receiving the largest number of 
prizes in flowers and vegetables. 

Following are the superintendents 
who will be In charge of the various 
departments: George Munford, Thomas 
Owens. Theodore G. Johnson, Robert J. 
Tubman. Mrs. Dan D. Lilly, A. A. Mc- 
Pheeters, Mrs. L. Stube, *Mrs. William 
R. Irwin, Mrs. J. M. Elliot, Mrs. George 
Munford, Mrs. J. R. Shea. Mrs. Warren 
Hastings. Mrs. E. "W^ Conllff and Mrs 
Theodore G. Johnson. 



LEAVE F OR NE W YORK. 

Chisholm Pair to Attend Interna- 
tiona! Fire Chiefs' Meet. 

Chisholm. Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Village Recorder 
Mlnty Tramontin and Fire Chief 
Thomas O'Connor left Thursday after- 
noon for Duluth to Join the excursion 
party from Minnesota who are attend- 
ing the International Fire Chiefs' con- 
vention in New York city. While in 
the East they will Inspect motor- 
driven tire apparatus, a truck of which 
kind the village anticipates purchas- 
ing in the near future. 

CANADIAN NORTHERN 

LAYS HEAVY RAILS. 

Virginia, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special 



WIFE PREFERS NORWAY. 

Virginian Seel(s Divorce From Woman 
Who Will Not Come West. 

Virginia, Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald).— Peter Grinde of this 
city has commenced action for di- 
vorce from his wife, Josephine Grmde, 
who never has been In America, al- 
though the husband has been here for 
eight years. She resides in Norway 
and, he says, declines to come to this 
country. He states that he has fur- 
nished his wife with the means by 
which she has acquired a home In 
Trondjhem, Norway, and that he also 
has a residence ready for her In Vir- 
ginia. Mr. GrInde asserts he has been 
back t(5 the town In which his wife 
resides three times and has en- 
deavored to induce her to return with 
him but she prefers to remain where 
she is. The Grindes have several 
children at the old country home. 

MAY SUE RAILROAD. 

Owner of Gravel Pit Wants More Than 
$1,000 Tendered. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Aug. 29. — 
(Special to The Herald.)— Archie 
Hutlzler Is engaged in litigation with 
the Great Northern railway, for the 
settlement of a claim which he holds 
for gravel alleged to have been taken 
from his gravel pit near Zim station, 
between Kelly Lake and Brookston. 

The tract is located on the main 
line of both the MLssabe and the 
Great Northern railways, and the lat- 
ter has found it most convenient to 
use. A settlement of $1,000 was of- 
fered Mr. Hutzler for the gravel al- 
ready appropriated, but he has re- 
futed to accept this sum, and intends 
to hold out for a fair amount, if it 
is necessary to take the matter into 
the courts to do It. 



"SOON^Fr_FINED. 

Partridge Hunter Mulcted $10 at 
Two Harbors. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Edward Pepper, 
a saloon man at Kramer, a station on 
the Alger line, was arrested by Deputy 
Game Warden August Tabor, brought 
before Judge Oscar Beckman and 
pleaded guilty to shooting a partridge 
out of season. He was fined $10 and 
costs and given his freedom. Pepper 
was caught with the goods. Game 
Warden Tabor says that there is con- 
siderable Illegal hunting still going on 
around here, and that he is doing 
everything in his power to bring the 
law-breakers to justice. Mr. Tabor 
claims that the bird hunting will bo 
better this year than It has been for 
years. He also states that there is 
plenty of the larger game. 



BAND WILL PLAY. 

Two Harbors Organization to Cele- 
brate Labor Day. 

Two Harbors. Minn., Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— H. H. Hammil, 
secretary of the Marine bank, an- 
nounced that the band will make things 
hum here Labor day. There will be 
a parade in the morning. The band 
boys do not wish to make known their 
plans as they wish to spring something 
new and novel on the public. In the 
afternoon there will be a dance in the 
park followed by a short concert by 
the band. Most of the live business 
men will get out some sort of a float 
as was requested by the band. 

BOXIN G BOH fOFF. 

Contest Planned at Hibbing Not Given 
Thursday Night. 

Hibbing, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Because of counter at- 
tractions, the boxing contest planned 
to have been given In the Power the- 
ater last night between Danny Graham 
and Young Thomas was called off. 



TRICKS DOCTOR 
TO SAVE 




J. D. Byrne, a San Francisco business 
man, for a long time President of the 
California Fig Products Co., heard that 
a friend, a young physician, was fad- 
ing under a hard case of Bright's Dis- 
ease. The doctor becoming thorough- 
ly discouraged, Byrne induced him to 
consent to use something he would tako 
to him. 

Byrne went to the nearest drug store, 
bought a bottle of Fulton's Renal Com- 
pound, soaked the label off and took it 
to the patient. He began to mend and 
Byrne got him another bottle and still 
another. 

W^hen recovery was In sight he was 
told It was Fulton's Renal Compound. 
And this is not the first case of this 
kind. A number of cases have been re- 
ported In which the patients were so 
certain nothing could be done that they 
too had to be deceived to put them In 
the way of recovery. 

There Is no escape whatever from the 
fact that Bright's Disease Is being 
cured by Fulton's Renal Com- 
pound. If you have Bright's Disease 
you owe it to yourself and family to 
try Fulton's Renal Compound before 
giving up. 

Druggists supplied by Leithhead 
Drug company. 

Ask for pamphlet on our Investiga- 
tion into the curability of Bright's Dis- 
ease or write John J. Fulton Co., San 
Francisco, 



FIREMEN^S BANQUET. 

Gilbert Organization Is Host to Vil- 
lage Council. 

Gilbert, Minn., Aug. 29.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Gilbert fire depart- 
ment held a banquet at the Commer- 
cial hotel Tuesday evening and invited 
the members of the village council to 
be present. The menu provided by 
Mrs. Grange is said by those present to 
have been the best ever served in Gil- 
bert. 

Speeches were made by Chief A R 
Anderson, Capt. W. H. Radermacher" 
Mayor Barrett, Clerk MacInnIs, Coun- 
cillors Korpi, Kohler and Bordeau 
also various members of the depart- 
ment. The members were all well 
pleased with the work done by the de- 
partment and all thought that the 
tournament recently held was a hum- 
mer, and the sentiment was that the 
team that represents Gilbert at Buhl 
next year will make the best of them 
go to hold up their end. 

In order to keep the interest in 
athletics alive during the winter It 
was decided to go in for basket ball 
and W. J. Luke was elected manager 
of the team with authority to arrange 
for a schedule of games. In view of 
the fact that the Buhl boys are al- 
ready at work making arrangements 
for the tournament next year, it is 
probable that a .series of inter-city 
games will be" arranged between the 
two teams. The Schley boys and 
Genoa and Elba mines will also prob- 
ably have strong teams so that with 
the interest shown at present the 
basket ball season coming should be a 
success from the start. Coach Perry 
S. Pray of the high school team, who 
is also a member of the fire depart- 
ment promises to have a lively bunch 
of youngsters in the field ready to try 
conclusions with the best the town af- 
fords. 



l>aves For Hlbblas Work. 

Negaunee. Mich., Aug. 29. — MIsa 
Norene Reidy left last evening for 
Hibbing, where she will resume her 
Cuties as school teacher in that city. 

• 

Go to Dayton, Ohio. 

Deer River, Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Spe* 
clal to The Herald.) — Mr. and Mrs J 
Relgelsperger and family have left to 
visit Mr. Relgelsperger's mother at 
Dayton, Ohio. 



Mother of Three Committed. 

Grafton. N. D.. Aug. 29— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The mother of three 
children, and a widow, Mrs. J. Egas- 
dahl, aged 28, of Adams was yesterday 
committed to the asylum for the in- 
sane, and was taken to the Jamestown 
institution. 



Gilbert Womaa's Funeral. 

Gilbert, Minn.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Funeral services were 
held Thursday morning in the Metho- 
dist church for Mrs. Herbrechter. who 
died Monday .evening. Rev. T. B. Shorts 
officiating. The remains were taken I 



St.Pavl , 

Minneapolis 

^ and 

Chicago 
Milwaukee 



r- SPLENDID TRAINS 



Electric Lighted 
Vacuum Cleaned 



Ticket Offices: 

DULUTH— J. P. Q«hr«y. 0. P. A. City* 

offlM, Soaldlng Hotel block. Dopot. 

oorner Superior St. and Sixth An. W. 
SUPERIOR— J. D. MorritMy. 0. A. City 

of Am. 823 Tower Av*. Depot, comer 

Winter St. and Ofdea Ave. 






^r 



.•-' ,3t-w '3:r- >•> t 





Friday, 



THE DULTfTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



QPnnT> THE CUB 

OK/\J\JSr reporte: 



The Boss Prefers Insects to Snakes 



By "HOF' 



1R£AI> SOM£.WHtR^^ 





FINE SHOWING 
BY BELTRAMI 

Splendid Variety of Exhibits 

to Be Made at State 

Fair. 



Remarkable Products of 

Soil of County Gathered 

for Big Stiow. 



Bemidji, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Features of the Beltrami 
county exhibit at the Minnesota state 
fair are: 

Yellow Flint corn that will yield 60 
bushels' to the acre; Northwestern Dent 
corn that will yield from 80 to 90 
bushfls to the acre; six rutabagas any 
ol which would hardly fit in a peck 
measure and weighing on an average 
of twenty-two pounds each; second and 
third cuttings of alfalfa; Itree of Klon- 
dike water melons; also clover that will 
yield 2'i to 3 tons to the acre; Amber 
sugar cane 9^ feet high: fodder corn 
11 feet and b inches high; stock beets 
weighing 22 pound."? each; sweet clever 
S feet high; Montana and Siberian al- 
falfa; New Discovery cabbages weigh- 
ing 22 pounds and Early Wakeflelds, 
Weighing 18 pounds each; celery; sev- 
en varieties plums, wild and tame 
grapes; Kchl Rabi; tobacco f»ve feet 
high; cherries; egg plant; twenty-sev- 
en varieties of grasses. 

The exhibit also includes threshed 
grains and grain in sheaf, timothy, 
wild grasses of many varieties, pota- 
toes, pumpkins, squashes, onions, 
borage, savory, marjoram and catnip, 
field peas, carrots, mangles, tomatoes, 
cucumbers. 

Rained Fine Com. 
John Col burn of the town of Frohn 
raised the Northwestern Dent corn that 
will yield on an average of 80 or 90 
bushels to the acre and J. H. French 
of Bemidjl township raised the Yellow- 
Flint that will yield 60 bushels per 
acre. 

"The display of corn from Beltrami 
county Is especially fine this year. We 
have samples of corn right here," said 
F. S Arnuld who is a.sslsting Charles 
P. i>chroeder, in charge of the exhibit, 
"that are better than any I saw last 
year at the state fair, from any part 
of Minnesota." Henry Beckwith of tho 
town of Summit i« showing fodder 
corn nearly twelve feet high. He also 
has some fine red clover nearly five 
feet high and sugar cane seven and 
one-half feet high. He is a member of 
the Summit Farmers' club. 

A. P. Ritchie has a fine lot of grass- 
es both wild and tame, Klondike water 
melons and some No. 23 corn. 

An excellent sample of timothy with 
well filled and large heads was con- 
tributed by Charles Olson of the town 
of Summit. 

Charles H. Johnson of Hinea brought 
in samples of Alsike clover and Bro- 
mus Inermis. a tame grass, that will 
each yield from two and one-half to 
three tons to the acre. Also, goud 
showing of red clover. 

Charles Olson of Summit and Her- 
man Eickfctadt of Frohn were close 
competitors for timothy honors. Mr. 
Eickstadt has a fine display of na- 
tive grasses, including Turkey Foot, 
five feet high. 

J. E. Patterson of BemidjI has a 
unique display consisting of Kohl 
Rabj, wild grapes. Carmen No. 2 and 
Early Ohif. potatoes, oats and barley. 
Peter Larson of Bemidji succeeded 
in getting his rye to reach the height 
of five and one-half feet. 

Sheaft oats. Silver Mine, were con- 
tributid by John W. Berg of Sum- 
mit. 

Meven Plam VnrirtieM. 
A. P. Chancier of Lavinia has seven 
varieties of plums, (-ne of cherries and 
one of Early tame grapes, raised from 
vines only two years old. 

Carl Opsata, Bemidjl's champion 
honey raiser, has a box of pure white 
comb honey that should bring home at 
least one blue rihbon. 

George Miller of Grant Valley con- 
tributed Early Flat red Yellow Dan- 
vers and Minnesota Red Globe onions, 
Blue Steam wheat. Sensation oats, 
barley and Lincoln oata 

An exhibit out of the ordinary is 
that of L«e Hiltz of Bemidji which 
consistefi of borage, savory, marjoram 
and catnip besides vegetables and 
grains. 

H. F. Bowers had the best showing 
of sugar cane. 

The exhibit, which Is under the di- 
rection of i'harles F. Schroeder. was 
taken to St. Paul Thursday night but 
thf- display room, which is In charge 
of Mrs W. N. "Webber is open todav for 
any exhibits that may come in, which 
will be sent down tonight. Mr. Schroeder 
will be assisted by F. S. Arnold, E. H. 
^Inter. Prof. B. M. Glle and G. G. 
Winter. F. M. Malzahn and family 
went to the cities bv automobile yes- 
terday and Mr. Miilzahn expects to ar- 
rive in time to assist in placing the 
exhibit. 



NORTH DAKOTA BANKER 
IS NOW BANK EXAMINER 




roses. Her maid wore yellow char- 
meu.se silk and carried sweet peas. The 
rooms were beautifully decorated with 
sweet peas. Dinner was served at 5 
o'clock, after which the bridal couple 
were taken . in an auto to Carlton, 
where they iook the train for Duluth 
and the Twin Cities on a short wedding 
trip. Mr. Koch has purchased the 
Kopp residence on Chestnut street, and 
later will be at home with his bride 
in this city. 



FOUR SUSPECTS 
ARE UNDER ARREST 



F. S. GRAHAM. 

Oakes, N. D., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — F. S. Graham, president 
of the Oakes National bank and the 
Cayuga .'^tate Bank of Cayuga, has 
been appointed national bank examiner 
for North Dakota, along with C. H. An- 
heler of Fargo. 

Mr. Graham has been a resident of 
North Dakota ten years and during 
that time he has gained a wide ac- 
quaintance throughout the Second con- 
gressional district, where he resides. 

Mr. Graham has resigned the presi- 
dency of both banks. 



of Polk County at Crookston, which 
was given a charter to do business 
yesterday, by Kelsey Chase, state bank 
superintendent. The bank has a cap- 
ital of $40,000. 

• 

* TKAMPS B.\THE IN 

STOL.E.\ MINOT SUITS 

^ 

^ Mlnot, N. D., Auk. 29. — 4 Special ^ 
to The Herald.) — About lUO bath- ^ 



I 



InK NultM were Ntoten by profew- ^ 
^- i»ional frampN who eujoyed a two- ^ 
^ hour plunixe in the MouHe river ^ 
^ here. Martin Holt, owner of the ^ 

S bathing; MUitH, made eoinpiaint ^ 
agaiuRt the trampM. ^ 

•tje Holt witneNttetl the water car- ^ 
« nival and thought It waM great ^ 
M sport, and while he wondered at ^ 
^ the action of real tranipM getting ^ 
■^ into real water — and with bath- ■# 
^ Ing MultM on — he didn't Huspidon ^ 
^ that it waH bljt own tttock of bath- ^ 
^ ing MultM that waM belug iiMed. ^ 

^ The trampM broke into hlM pa- ^ 
^ vilioa In Wildood park here and ^ 
* Mole the bathing MuitN. ^ 

FARGOlHURGiJES 
ALSO Y. TAXABLE 



May Have to Pay If Attor- 
ney General's Ruling 
Holds. 

Fargo. N. D., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Some of the Fargo 
churches and the Y. M. C. A. are sub- 
ject to taxation, if the courts uphold 
the opinion of Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral Carmody that hospitals and 
churches used for profit are subject to 
taxation. Some of the local churches 

have large auditoriums, and it has been 
the custom of two or three to permit 
the use of the church for lectures and 
concerts for which admission has been 
charged, the churches receiving a share 
of the proceeds. Some of them have 
also rented buildings formerly used for 
parsonages to private individuals. 

The Y. M. C. A. rents a large number 
of rooms to young men In direct com- 
petition wjth taxpayers who run hotels 
and rooming houses. It is contended 
locally that this feature makes the 
association subject to taxation. 



Men Believed to Have 

Robbed Bemidji Jewelry 

Store Caught, 

Bemidji, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — W^hile stopping at a 
hotel in the village of Tenstrike about 
twenty miles north of Bemidji, with 
part of their boot yin thfir possession, 
four men giving their names as Clif- 
ford Ebner, Torn! Moschik, Walter L. 
Barth and Otto Hermstorf were ar- 
rested on the charge of having robbed 
the Jewelry store of George T. Baker 
& Co. of Bemidji last Tuesday nigiit. 

They were brought here and given a 
hearing before Court Commissioner D. 
H. Fisk yesterday. The county attor- 
ney, G. M. Torrance, asked for an ad- 
journment of one week which was 
granted and the men were committed 
to the county jail. Evidence is so 
strong against the men that they will 
prolably be held to the grand jury 
which meets here Sept. 10. 

Hotel Man to Get flOO. 

Henry Stechman, hotel keeper, where 
the men were stopping, will receive 
the $100 reward offered for the 
capture of the thieves, the robbers hav- 
ing attempted to sell him a $45 gold 
watch for $3, which aroused his suspi- 
cions. Mr. Stechman had read of the 
robbery and as soon as the men had re- 
tired, called up Mr. Baker, who Identi- 
fied the watch by telepnone and, by tiie 
use of automobiles the chief of police 
and deputy sheriff were soon on thair 
way to Tenstrike. They returned the 
same night with their prisoners. Barth 
Is recognized in Bemidji as a man who 
had canva.<3sed the city on Tuesday, 
asking for work and claiming to be a 
professional sign painter. 

THREE GIRLS DROWN. 

lowans Lose Their Lives in Lal<e 
Geneva, Wis. 

Lake Geneva, Wis., Aug. 29. — Three 
young women, college students, were 
drowned and a fourth narrowly es- 
caped death at the Y. W. C. A. camp 
here yesterday. 
Tho dead: 

GERTRUDE GAZELL. 
CORNELIA DE GUES. 
DELLA M. KING. 

A sister of Miss King, Lucy King, 
was saved by clinging to their over- 
turned boat. 

young women lived in 
and represented the Cen- 
of that city at the Y. W. 
here. They started for a 
the early evening and the 



far proved futile. Proprletor.s of the 
labor agencies of the city viewed the 
body but were not able to recall hav- 
ing seen the man. 

Bismarck, N. D. — Miss Elsie Carl- 
son, aged 17 living with her sister, 
Mrs. John Eliason, commlttted suicide 
by shooting. She had been very de- 
spondent for several days, insisting on 
being alone. 

Carrington, N. D. — Arrowwood lake 
is to have a dam placed at Us south 
end by the state'-and the water thereby 
raised several feet. 

Okaton, S. D. — To be thrown from 
a horse almost directly under a mon- 
ster rattlesnake and escape being 
struck by Its deadly fangs was the 
experience of Mrs. Henry Skinrood, 
wife of a rancher living in this vicin- 
ity. Catching her horse, she took the 
bridle reins, and with them as a 
weapon, attacked the rattlesnake and 
killed it. 

Lisbon, N. IX — The famous stock 
farm established here by Andrew 
Loughlin is for sale. Mr. Loughlin 
was one of the first commissioners of 
agriculture In this state. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



La Crosse — Unable to withstand an 
operation for a cancerous growth on 
the side of hla face, Arthur Schlabach, 
aged 20, died at a. Winona hospitaL 
"!;am Grovtr received 
word of the death of his sister, Mrs. 
Clfira YounK. at Eugene, Or. 

Eau Claire — The residence of Mrs. 
Jolin Duhig, 115 Mappa street, was 
entered Tuesday afternoon by some 
sn(ak thief and $5 was extracted from 
a mesh bag In a front room. 

"Waukesha — John E. Maugrhan, Mc 
call street, died suddenly Wednesday 
morning. Mr. Maughan was apparently 
in good health and took a long auto- 
mobile ride on Tuesday afternoon. He 
retired as usual Tuesday night and his 
death was a complete surprise. 

Florence — Hiram Damon Fisher, 
the founder of Florence, quietly cele- 
brated the 81st anniversary of his 
birth here on Wednesdaj'. Mr. Fisher 
is active, hale and hearty and is seen 
on the streets of the town he founded 
every day. 

Beloit — This year's statement of as- 
sessment for the city of Beloit shows 
an Increase of $1,333,525 or a total of 
$13,422,607 as compared with $12,089,- 
525 for last year. 

Madison — Dr. A. J. Provost of Osh- 
kosh, a member of the Panama-Pacific 
exposition commission of Wisconsin, 
may, under an opinion given him by the 
attorney general, lawfully use free 
transportation issued to him by the Soo 
Railroad company only in the perform- 
ance of his duties as oculist of the 
company antl not otherwise. 

Evansville — ■ Archbishop S. G. Mess- 
mer of Milwaukee was present here at 
the dedication exercises of the new St. 
Paul's Catholic church. 

Fond du Lac — An anonymous dona- 
tion has made possible the awarding of 
the contract for a marble chapel in St. 
Paul's cathedral. 

Grand Rapids — L. B. Smith of Pltts- 
ville, who weighs 270 pounds, is enter- 
taining his sLsters. Mrs. C. E. Hewett 
of Marshfield and Mrs. George Shepard 
of Beaver Dam. The combined weight 
of the three Is 770 pounds. 

Madison — Detective Henry Maugher 
of Milwaukee on Wednesday received 
requisition papers for Pearl V. Goodale 
and Franklin C. Goodale from the Dis- 
trict of Columbia to Milwaukee, where 
they are wanted on charges of securing 
monfy under false pretenses. 



Electric Light company has complet- 
ed the new light and power line to 
Superior, which has been in course 
of construction for some weeks past. 

Hancock — Mr. and Mrs. James Fish- 
er, Sr., left Wednesday for a visit 
with relatives and friends in Duluth 
and Winnipeg. 

Marquette — Miss Amelia Lindblad, 
the 22-year-old daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gustave Lindblad, farmers in the 
town of Sandia, Wednesday was com- 
mitted to the hospital at Newberry 
for treatment. The young woman has 
been confined at the St. Mary's hos- 
pital for some time, following a case 
of melancholy, in which she tried to 
do violence to herself. 

Escanaba — W. D. Hughes, district 
passengei- agent for the Soo line, has 
purch.'ised a registered prize-winning 
shorthorn bull for his stock farm at 
Fairport. 

Ishpeming — Paul A. Leonhardt has 
tendered his resignation as physical 
director of the Y. M. C. A., to take ef- 
fect Oct. 1. He will leave next Mon- 
day for Chicago. Mr. Leonard has of- 
fers of several good positions under 
consideration. 

Negaunee — Joseph Murphy left 

Wednesday evening for Hurley, Wis., 
where he will resume his duties as 
principal of the Hurley schools. 

Ishpeming — Clyde T. Boase, who has 
for the past two and a half years or 
so. filled the position of cashier at the 
Ishpeming office of I. E. Swift & Co., 
has been promoted and left for Chi- 
cago, where he will work in the com- 
pany's main offices. 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



International Falls — Mrs. Andrew 
Dahl has gone to Cloquet to attend the 
marriage of her daughter. Miss Jennie, 
to Joseph Koch, superintendent of a 
sawmill at that place. Mrs. Dahl was 
accompanied by her daughters, the 
Misses Clara and Clemmle. 

Mankato — Blue Earth County branch 



of the Minnesota Rural Letter Car- 
riers' association will be represented 
at the eleventh annual convention of 
the Minnesota Rural Leter Carriers' as- 
sociation at Duluth on Aug. 29 and 30 
by George J. Rose and Frank E. 
Watts. 

Moorhead — The county board has es- 
tablished ditch No. 31 in the Barnes- 
vllle district. The proposed ditch 
starts on the south line of the south- 
west quarter of section 12 In Barnes- 
ville township and runs In a north- 
westerly direction a distance of four 
miles, terminating at the coulee In 
section 5 in the same township. 

Big Falls — State ditch No. 92, be- 
tween Big Falls and Calewell brook, 
had been accepted under the forest de- 
partment. L. A. Ogard and Gust 
Peterson were appointed viewers and 
commenced their work last Monday. 
The contract for construction was let 
some three years ago, but no money 
has been available for the work. 

Bemidji — A big fan has been placed 
at the base of the big shaving pile at 
the Crookston Lumber company plant 
and v.lll be used for the purpose of 
blowing all the shavings in a small 
lake nearby. The shaving pile has 
been more or less of a nuisance for the 
past year and since the new burner has 
been erected it was thought best to 
get rid of the pile. 

East Grand Forks — Fifty-one bushels 
per acre on a tract of land of fifty 
acres was the record made at the 
Leslie Sullivan farm. In Western, near 
here, the threshing of which was 
completed Tuesday afternoon. This 
was on unfertilized land and without 
tested seed wheat. On fertilized land, 
with tested seed, he secured a yield 
of thirty-five bushels an acre. 

Crookston — Miss Ida Hagen of this 
city, returned Saturday from a trip to 
the Scandinavian Peninsula, with the 
St. Olaf's choir, from the St. Olafs col- 
lege, at Northfield. 

Little Falls — Rev. Benjamin Croft, 
formerly a local minister and now a 
resident of New York City, is in the 



city renewing old acquaintances. Mr. 
Croft has been visiting a brother In 
Minneapolis. 

Stillwater — J. N. Searles, who has 
been preparing a draft for a proposed 
new city charter under the direction of 
a sub-committee of the charter com- 
mission, held a conference with city 
officials Tuesday night at the city hall. 
Some of the chapters, along a com- 
mission plan, were discussed informal- 
ly and suggestions made, but no formal 
action was taken. 

St. Cloud — The Farmers' Produce 
company, is the name of the new com- 
mission house which will soon begin 
business in the Carter block. The 
members of the new firm are John W. 
Carter and Henry Halvorson of the 
firm of Halvorson Bros. 

Brainerd — There has Just been rec- 
orded a ground lease from A. L. Hoff- 
man to the Northern Trustee com- 
pany of Minneapolis, covering the 
southwest corner of Laurel and Sixth 
streets. It provides for a rental of $80 
a month for five years and $100 a 
month for forty-five years. 

Ada — In the fire which destroyed the 
barn and contents on G. L. Thorpe'* 
farm in section 25, Winchester, S. A. 
Garness and his father, who occupied 
the place as tenants, lest ail their 
personal property the value of which is 
estimated at $2,500 and included ten 
head of horses, five calves, oati^ hay 
and small tools with no insurance. 

Stillwater — The city board of educa- 
tion has raised its budget $5,000 over 
last year. The ruise is on account of 
more pay for teachers and for repairs 
to buildings, besides the purchase of a 
stone church building for a manual 
training department. The new amount 
will be $40,000, the same as two years 
ago. 

Minneapolis — Charles W. Seaman, 
immigration inspector In the North- 
west, left Minneapolis Wednesday 
night with nine foreigners to be de- 
ported. Detective Ohman was as- 
signed to accompany him as attendant 
and May F. Seaman is nnatron of the 
party. 



k 



1 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



The four 
Pella, Iowa, 
tral college 
C. A. camp 
boat ride in 



boat capsized. 



MODEL R URAL SCHOOL. 

Mayville Normal to Run Fine Con- 
solidated SchooL 

Mayville. N. D., Aug. 29.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — A model consolidat- 
ed rural school will be conducted by 
the Mayville normal. While It will do 
some work along the line of the one- 
room rural school its chief aim will be 
to create a model for the new con- 
."solldated rurals that can be patterned 
after by the rural schools of the state. 
It is the first to be established In 
North Dakota and there are only six 
or eight of that kind in the entire 
United States. 



RINGDAL IS NOW 

CROO KSTON BANKER. 

St. Paul. Minn., Aug. 29. — P. M. Ring- 
day, former member of the state 
board of control and Democratic can- 
didate last year for governor, hag gone 
Into the banking business. 

He is president of the State Bank 



CLOQU ET WE DDING. 

John Koch Becomes Husband of Inter- 
national Falls Girt. 

Cloquet, Minn., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Jennie Dahl, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Dahl of In- 
ternational Falls, was married here 

yesterday afternoon to John Koch, 
eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony 
Koch, old residents of Cloquet. Rev. T. 
T. Roan performed the marriage cere- 
mony at i o'clock at the Koch home 
on Chestnut street, only relatives and 
a few intimate friends being present. 
The bridal party stood beneath a 
canopy of sweet peas. Miss Jennie 
Dahl. a sister of the bride, was her 
maid, and the groom's brother, Harvey 
Koch, best man. The bride looked very 
charming In a gown of shadow lace 
over white silk and carried brldu'a 



FARGO SEMINARY 

LOSE S GOO D FRIEND. 

Fargo, N. D.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Ladles' Lutheran 
seminary of Fargo lost one of Its most 
ardent supporters and financial back- 
ers in the death of Finger Enger, who 
was one of the originators of the 
school. Mr. Enger once served a term 
as state senato^^from Steele county. 
He owned abour thirty sections of 
land, coming to this state forty years 
ago with a yoke of oxen and an old 
' team. Some years ago he presented 
each of his eight sons and his daugh- 
ter with a section of land. 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Devils Lake. N. D. — At the meeting 
of the city commission it was decided 
to extend the payments for the whito 
way over a period of ten years. The 
special assessment commission will de- 
cide the benefits and fix the assess- 
ment. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — John McLugh- 
lln, district agent for the Bankers' Mu- 
tual Accident & Health Insurance com- 
pany of Minneapolis, arrived in Grand 
Forks Tuesday from Duluth and an- 
nounces that he will take up his res- 
idence here soon. 

Fargo, N. D. — Efforts to locate rela- 
tives or friends of the stranger found 
unconscious near Tower City, who died 
in a local hospital Saturday, have so 



Marquette — So far no criminal 
cases liave been entered in the docket 
for the September term of United States 
court, to convene in this city Sept. 9. 
F. J. Schultheis, deputy clerk, has the 
calender ready to publish and is await- 
ing the order to have the work done. 

Negaunee — The work of sinking the 
shaft at the Athens property, which 
Is owned jointly by the Clevelands- 
Cllffs Iron company and the Breitung 
Interests, Is progressing rapidly and a 
hole has been put down several feet 
Into the ledge which was reached about 
a week ago at a depth of approxi- 
mately forty feet. The men are now 
working at a depth of from forty- 
five to fifty feet. 

Gladstone — Gladstone will not issue 
bonds to the amount of $7,000 for the 
extension of its sewage system. A two- 
thirds majority was required to indorse 
the proposition and but ninety votes 
were cast at the special election in fa- 
vor of the issue. Of these fifty-three 
votes were cast against the Issue. 

Menominee — Joseph Maihofer of Me- 
nominee ha.s. through his lawyer. City 
Attorney J. J. O'Hara, entered suit in 
the circuit court against Raymond 
Reed of Oconto for $5,000 damages, 
this action being the outcome of a 
recent accident at Main street and Og- 
den avenue In which the plaintiff was 
run down by the defendant's car while 
he was going to work on his bicycle. 

Ishpeming — Negaunee and Ishpem- 
ing barbers have decided not to raise 
the charge for hair cuts from 25 to 35 
cents, as was urged. However, 35 cents 
will be charged on Saturday as has 
been the custom. 

Marquette — Frank Daly submitted 
to a serious operation for the cure 
of stomach trouble Wednesday at St. 
Mary's hospital. He Is reported re- 
cuperating excellently. 

Calumet — The funeral of Mrs. John 
B. Chayer, who died Tuesday, aged 54, 
will be held Friday. Besides the hus- 
band the following children survive: 
Ebal of Calumet, ^trs. F. Galerneau of 
Lake Linden, Joseph of Milwaukee, 
Mrs. P. Dlssearo of Boston, Albert 
and Rebecca of Calumet, John of Mon- 
terey, Ctxl., and William and Rosanna 
at home. 

Houghton — The new boiler for the 
East Houghton school will be put in 
place in a feW days. The school's 
heating system is to be greatly 
changed. » 

Hancock — Dr. J. C Abrams, member 
of the state board of health, has issued 
circular letters to physicians of the 
Copper coantry calling attention to 
new laws created by the last legisla- 
ture, notably the requirement of local 
physicians to file reports of contagious 
diseases with the state board of 
health. 1 

Houghton— The Houghton County 




m 



i » 




The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 




BASEBALL 




EDITED 
BY BRUCE 



FOOTBALL TRAINING IS 

HA RD ON COL LEGE HERO 

Papa Stagg Asks Team Candidates to Stop 

Smoking Cigarettes and Forego Pleasures 

of Fudge and Cake. 

Sheehan Training Hard for Bout With Kelly- 
Fred Coburn Is Here---Umpires Taken 
Out When Wild. 




The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is Reliable 




TWO GREAT PITCHERS 
OF NEW YORK GIANTS 




BY BRUCE. 

APA STAGG has returned 
from the romp with nature 
and has issued the edict, the 
ukase, the ultimatum, or 
what you will. And friends, 
it is that this kindly bouI and curly- 
headed mentor of the midway has for- 
bidden the inhale of the pernicious 
pill or an orgy with the succulent 
chocolate cream. Thus do we see 
that those who would win honors on 
the broadly striped gridiron must 
forebear and forego the little pleasures 
of life. 

Take it from us, this training of the 
college athlete is one of the grim 
trials and trj'ing tribulations of the 
coach. The river back at Minnesota 
ttsed to be in the days of old, one of 
the favorite places for the languorous 
atlilete to lazily puff a cigarette. Not 
that they all did it; heavens forbid 
that this belief should spread; it was 
only the occasional violator of the 
rigid rules that after the consumption 
of oeef that was red and a pudding 
that was pale and harmless, sought 
the sheltered nook and produced 
makin's and took silent and solitary 
delight in company of the noxious 
weed. 

On Sunday some of the members 
of college squads have been wont to 
confess that they smoked one cigar. 
The bass ale in the old days used to 
be brought forth on the Saturday eve- 
ning, and all hands joyfully took 
tome of the edge off the grind of the 
training spell. 

But Papa Stagg has gone further — 
he declares that the brave athlete 
must drop fudge, chocolate eclairs and 
frosted cake. Suppose one of the 
eo-eds, one of the pretty ones with 
•oft eyes with a peculiarly appealing 
op turned gaze, should meet one of 
the hesweatered heroes on the cam- 

Ims and make envy do a violent Sa- 
ome in the breasts of less prominent 
members of the college, by offering 
said large shouldered hero a bite or 
two of fudge, said fudge being as- 
■ 




^ 



HUNTER'S 
NOTICE! 

You can now secure your 
Bird H anting Licenseatthe 

mmmmt m. 

14 and 16 West Superior St. 
Duluth 

$1.00 FOR RESIDEHTS 
ION-RESIDENTS S25 



sembled over the individual oil cook- 
ing stove by the fair hands of said 
pretty co-ed. It would be a bloomin' 
shame and a rude set back of a gen- 
erous impulse, should the college hero 
refuse to partake of one or two pieces 
of the fudge, despite rules and regu- 
lations to the contrary. 

And so we say, friends, that Papa 
Stagg is up against a very stiff line 
of opposition in thus promulgating 
all the way down the line. He should 
have a care and permit his boys to 
partake occasionally of fudge, if for 
no other reason than to promote col- 
lege spirit and keep alive the love of 
heroes, which is struggling feebly ip 
this intensely modern and material- 
istic age for breath of life. 
* « * 

Sheehan Training Hard. 

|OMMY SHEEHAN is training 

ior his scrap of Monday night at 

Lake Minnetonka. The Chicago 
Heights lad is in the camp of Lafe 
Safro, according to the reports from 
Minneapolis, and will leave tomorrow 
for Superior and will do some light 
training on the other side of the bay. 

"Spike" Kelly is at the present time 
putting in the final touches to his 
work. The Gilmore protege is in 
grand condition for the mill, accord- 
ing to the statements that have been 
received by the directors of the Bad- 
ger Athletic club. The man who put 
the kibosh on sailor Billy Waters is 
considered one of the best boys in 
the welter weight division and the 
members of the new club across the 
ferry path are congratulating them- 
selves upon securing his royal spike- 
lets for the initial engagement under 
the auspices of the new club. 

Johnny Tillman is in the city at 
the present time and will put the fin- 
ishing touches on his training on this 
side of the dividing waters. With 
Tillman, Kelly, Sheehan and McGov- 
ern on the same bill, the first bout 
under the new law looms very like- 
ly. Bill, and sounds in the offing like 
about the best that they have secured 
for entertainment of the followers of 
the fistic sport. 

« * • 

nAU Stars and Proctor. 
ACK DESMOND, a real hustler 
and one of the most popular base- 
ball men who ever handled teams at 
the Head of the Lakes, has arranged 
for the coming of the crack Proctor 
team on next Sunday. This really 
star team will be aligned against the 
all star aggregation that will be 
placed in the field. The game will 
be played Sunday at Desmond park, 
the picturesque ball ground that was 
built on piling driven into the waters 
of the bay. 

According to several very fair ac- 
counts of the game, Proctor was in 




BASEBAU SfTANDINGS 



National L^gue. 

StaadinK of dke Cluba. 

Won. Lost. 



New York bi! 

Philadelphia C8 

Chicago 65 

Pittsburg: 63 

Brooklyn 52 

Boston 60 

Cincinnati 49 

St. Louis 44 



38 
4g 
56 
64 
64 
66 
75 
77 



Pet. 

.683 
.602 
.542 
.638 
.448 
.431 
.895 
.364 



Yefiterda> 'm Renulta. 

Philadelphia, 7; N«w York, 2. 
Brooklyn, 5; Bo-ston,,^ 1. 

GameH Today^. 

Chicagro at Piltsburg. 
i?t. Louis at Cincinnati. 
Boston at Brooklyn. 
Kew York at Philadelphia, 



American League. 



standing of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Philadelphia 81 89 .675 

Cleveland 72 49 .695 

Washington 67 52 .663 

Chicago 65 59 .524 

Boston 69 69 .600 

Detroit 52 71 .423 

St. Loulg 48 78 .881 

New York 39 77 .836 



of the mark set last season by Johnson 
and Wood, the latter of Boston. Score: 

R. H \^ 
Washington. ..0000000000 — " 6* 1 

Boston 0000000000 — 1 3 3 

Batteries — Johnson and Ainsmith; 
Collins and Carrigan. Umpires — Con- 
nolly and Eagan. 

Yanl(ees Lose Opener. 

Now York, Aug. 29. — The local Amer- 
ican leaguers returned yesterday from 
a disastrous Western trip, and were 
beaten by the Athletics, 9 to 3. Schulz 
pitched well for the New Yorks, but 
the visitors ran wild on the paths, 
stealing seven bases. After Caldwell 
had batted for Schulz, the Athletics 
pounded Warhop for six runs In the 
laat two innings. The New Yorks got 
men on bases In every Inning, but 
could score only In the eighth. Zelder 
got a fluke hit with the bases full, and 
when Walsh fumbled, three runs came 
in. Bender was effective in the pinches, 
eleven of the locale being left. Score: 

T> TJ Tn 

Philadelphia ...002 01003 3 — 9 12' i 

New York 00000003 — 3 7 2 

Batteries — Bender and Lapp; Schulz, 
Warhop and Sweeney. Umpires — 
O'Loughlln and Sheridan. 



AUTO RACE IFIELD CLEAR 



ON AT ELGIN 

Joe Dawson, in a Deltal, Is 

First to Leave 

Mark. 



m*mmI 



MATHEWSON AND TESREAU. 



emporium by many of the followers 
of baseball. 

* • • 

Fred's Married Now. 

BRED COBURN, one of the best 
known of the sport writers of the 
Twin Cities, and at the present time 
on the Minneapolis Tribune, is with 
us today. And with Fred is a little 
lady who but recently came into the 
same league with Frederick and now 
shares the name of the baseball writ- 
er. Fred's gone and done it. 

After all it's the very best, Fred, 
old scout, and have courage, and 
don't listen to the kidders. Its a 
good game. Welcome to our city 
and all of that stuff, and also, Fred, 
let us drop you the info line — you 
have selected the best place on the 
map for the enjoying of the blissful 

period called by some the honeymoon. 

• • • 

This Is a Very Good Way. 

BOWN Owatonna way an umpire 
by the name of Wallace was 
taken out of the game for being wild. 
Wallace gave six men bases on balls 
and then he was taken out and a new 
umpire put in, the fans declaring that 
Brother Wallace was very wild and 
unable to get his orbs on the plate. 

This opens up the baseball woods 
for a new line of thought. Let them 
keep an umpire on the bench in the 
future and when the galoot calling 
them can't see the nlate and is erratic 
in the calling of the balls and strikes, 
he will be taken out and the relief 
umpire sent to the field. 

If this system was in vogrue there 
would have been some removals in 
the Northern during the season that 
has but recently come to a close. 
Some of the umpires in these parts 
upon sad and particular days were 
wild like the rabbit in early and chill 
March. 

• * • 

The Aboriginal Costume. 

KiEVERAL pictures have been 



Yesterday'* Reanlta. 

Philadelphia, 9; New York, 3. 
Boston, 1; Washington, 0. 

Games Today. 

Cleveland at St. Louis. 
Washington at Boston. 
Philadelphia at New York. 

♦ 

American Association. 

StandinsT of the Cluba. 

Won. Lost. 

Milwaukee 79 54 

Louisville 76 57 

Minneapolis 76 57 

Columbus 74 60 

St. Paul 60 70 

Toledo 58 72 

Indianapolis 48 82 

Kansas City 48 84 

Yesterday's Resnlts. 

Milwaukee, 8: Kansas City, 3 
St Paul, 8; Minneapolis, 4. 
Louisville, 4; Columbus, 8. 
Indianapolis, 12; Toledo, 3. 

Games Today. 

Milwaukee at Kansas Citv. 
Minneapolis at St. Paul. 
Toledo at Indianapolis. 
Louls\-llle at Columbus. 



Pet. 

.594 
.671 
.571 
.552 
.462 
.446 
.870 
.864 



AMERICAN ASSN. 



Easy for Indians. 



NATIONAL LEAGUri 



Braves Lose Out. 

Brooklyn. N. Y., Aug. 29.— Brooklyn 
averted a drop to a tie for fifth place 
with Boston yesterday, by defeating 
the Brave.s, 5 to 1. Two passes, two 
errors, i -as ana two hits, the 

latter a to deep left by J. 

Smith, ^. -uklyn a four-run lead 

at the suw i. x' isher scored the fifth and 
last run in the fourth on his triple 
and Miller's single. 

The visitors drove Allen from the 
box In the second when Zlnn, Whaling 
and Perdue singled and Maranville 
was hit. Rucker came on the scene 
one run across, one out and the basoa 
full The first of a series of five fast 
double plays cut off the rally here 
and Rucker was never In danger 
thereafter. Cutshaw was the hero of 
the Brooklvn defense, accepting 13 
chances without a slip. Score: R. H. B. 

Boston 10000000 — 1 9 2 

Brookl j-n 40010000 x — B 8 1 

Batteries — Perdue and Whaling; 
Kucker. Allen and Miller. Umpires — 
O Day and Emslle. 



a good way to put the bee on Cloquet 
in the game of last Sunday; but let 
this go for Sweeney, the fact remains 
that the railroaders have some real 
baseball team, if the record hung up 
during this season is the criterion to 
hang the quilt of final judgment up- 
on, and the appearance of the tie 
pounders here, now that the regular 
season has passed, should be the oc- 
casion of a generous out pouring of 
the fans. 

Brother Desmond has labored long 
and arduously at his new park. This 
will be the first big game played 
there and will no doubt be maae the 
occasion of the first visit to Jawn's 



called to our attention of the 
Igorottes playing baseball. It was 
the costume, or the lack of one, that 
commanded attention. There is some- 
thing around the waist, perhaps a 
siring of beads, and otherwise the 
players are clothed with a catching 
glove and a radiant smile of deep 
pleasure. It occurred to us that in 
the Igorotte league ladies day would 
either prove to be a frost or would 
draw to capacity, depending greatly 
upon the customs and precedents of 
the Philippines. It would prove pre- 
carious for the Igorottes to play upon 
some of the cinder diamonds that 

abound in these parts. 

' « 

^ ARMY-NAVY GAMB 

IS CALLED OFF. 



WrNCHJsnk 

RMe and Pistol Cartridges 

It's the careful and scientific manner In which 
Winchester cartridges are made and loaded which 
has earned for them a reputation for accuracy 
reliability and uniformity which no other brands 
eryoy. Winchester cartridge sheUs are care- 
fully inspected before loading for size, length 
and conformity. AU Winchester buUets are 
swaged by machinery which makes them 
exact in size, contour and density. Then the 
loading is done by automatic machinery 
which not only insures a uniform charge, 
but seats the ballet in the sheU so that its 
axis coincides with that of the shell; hence 
with that of the barrel of the arm. These 
are a few of the many reasons why 
Chester cartridges in all caj 
satisfactory on the market. 

They Shoot Straight 



Phillies Defeat Giants. 

Philadelphia, Aug. 29. — Hard hitting 
on the part of Philadelphia won tho 
opening game of the final series here 
with New York yesterday, by 7 to 2. 
Marquard was driven out of the box 
in the fourth Inning a,nd Crandall, 
who succeeded him, was also -lit hard, 
although Magee played a prominent 
part In Philadelphia's victory. In four 
times at bat, he hit for a home run 
and two doubles, hitting for the circle 
in the first Inning with two on, th«8 
giving the Phillies a lead they never 
relinquished. Seaton pitched master- 
ly ball, holding the Giants to six 
scattered hits. Doolan's fielding and 
catchers by Magee, Murray and Burns 
featured. Score: R. H. B 

New York 10 10 — 2 6 

Philadelphia ...80020200 x — 7 9 X 

Batteries — Crandall. Marquard and 
McLean; Seaton and Klillfer. Umpires 
— Brennan and Eason. 



Indianapolis, Aug. 29. — Three pitch- 
ers could not stop Indianapolis bat- 
ting bee yesterday, and the locals won 
the first game of the series with 
Toledo, 12 to 3. Wetzel allowed ten 
Mts, but kept them well scattered. 
>iar.ager Kelley received a telegram 
yesterday stating that the Peoria 
Three-I league club accepted his price 
for Outfielder Slack. Slack has been 
playing professional ball two years 
and Is batting around ^SSO this season. 
The score: R. H. E. 

Toledo 10001010 0—3 10 5 

Indianapolis ..0000 103 8x — 12 15 4 

Batteries — George, Brenton, Benn 
and Devogt; Wetzel and Casey. Um- 
pires — Johnstone and O'Brien. 

Colonels Win Out. 

Columbus, Ohio. Aug. 29. — All the 
scoring In yesterday's game that L#ou- 
Isvllle won, 4 to 3, was done while 
Powell and Cook were pitching. Toney. 
successor to Powell, worked out of 
two dangerous places. In the ninth, 
by singles, Shelton and Hinchman oc- 
cupied third and first with none out. 
Eayres, Miller and Kommers could not 
hit beyond the infield. Turner, who 
relieved Cook, held Louisville to one 
infield single. The score: R. H. E. 

Columbus 12000000 — 3 10 1 

Louisville 02011000 0—4 9 1 

Batteries — Cook. Turner and Smith; 
Powell, Toney and demons. Umpires 
— Westervelt and Handiboe. 
• • 

Millers Are Beaten. 

St Paul, Aug. 29. — St. Paul defeated 
Minneapolis, 8 to 4, yesterday in a 
free-hitting game In which the two 
teams made twenty-five hits for a 
total of thirty-four bases. St. Paul 
won through bunching hits in the sev- 
enth inning when four runs were 
scored on a pass to O'Rourke, Hinch- 
man's single. Booe's double, and Aut- 
rey's sacrifice fly. Altlzer and 
Schreiber made spectacular running 
catches. The score: R. H. E. 

Minneapolis 100000120 — 4 13 8 

St. Paul 10001042X — 8 12 1 

Batteries — Burns and Owens; Rieger 
and James. Umpires — Murray and 
Connolly. 

Kaws Lose to Brewers. 

Kansas City. Aug. 29. — Milwaukee 
easily defeated Kansas City yesterday, 
8 to 8. The visitors outhlt and out- 
fielded the local.s. Manager Clark of 
Milwaukee changed his pitchers when- 
ever the locals began hitting and as a 
result three Milwaukee twlrlers were 
used. The score: R H E 

Milwaukee 1 2 2 3— 8 'is' 

Kansas City 10 2 0—3 7 2 

Batteries — Young. Dougherty, Cut- 
ting and Marshall; Rhoades and Moore. 
O Connor. Umpires— C hill and Irwin. 

TENNIS FINALS 



Elgin, 111., Aug. 29.— With the roar of 
his engine drowned by the cheers of 
the thousands of spectators. Joe Daw- 
son, driving a Deltal car, shot past the 
grandstand this morning and the an- 
nual 302-mile race for the Chicago Au- 
tomobile club trophy was on. The blur 
of dust he left in his wake had not 
cleared before the first of seven pur- 
suing cars, released at Intervals of a 
half minute, went scooting by. The 
other entries, in the order of their ap- 
pearance, follow; 
Car. Driver. 

Mercer , Ed. PuUen 

Mason ,. . Ed Rlckenbacher 

Mercer g. Wishart 

Mason ,. . William Chandler 

Nyberg Harry Endicott 

Mason r. K. Mulford 

Mercer ; c. W. Luttreii 

Despite the condition of the course, 
which is rough in spots, favorable 
weather and the fact that two danger- 
ous curves have been straightened, led 
the speed enthusiasts to expect the rec- 
ord for the course of sixty-eight miles 
an hour to at least be equalled. The 
course measures eight miles and 2.020 
feet and the drivers were to cover it 
thirty-six times. Wishart in a Mercer 
attained a speed of seventy-two miles 
an hour in practice, but the consistent 
showing made by Dawson in the trial 
spins, and his advantage In the start, 
made him a general favorite with the 
crowd. 

The spectators, numbering more than 
10.000, overran the grandstand and 
spread for hundreds of yards on either 
side. Militiamen with fixed bayonets, 
who guarded the course for its entire 
length, kept the eager ones inside the 
palings. Time and again they were 
called to points where the timbers 
creaked beneath the pressure of hu- 
manity which surged forward as the 
racing car whizzed by ■with motors 
rattling like machine guns. 

FAST POWERBOAT 

SI NKS AT KEOKUK. 

Keokuk, Iowa, Aug. 29. — The Van 
Blerck, owned by S. T. Black of Port- 
land. Dr., sank on the north leg of the 
regatta course on Lake Cooper yester- 
day afternoon. The craft sank slowly, 
and A. L. Klingbell and A. L. Crowley, 
both of Portland, who composed the 
crew, perched on the bow until it 
disappeared. 

The sea proved too high for armall 
boats, and at the finish of the race, 
which was cut from twenty to ten 
miles, Oregon Kid had a hole In the 
bow and Hydro Bullet also was dam- 
aged. Ttie judges then postponed the 
races until today when the Webb 
trophy mfTe dash against time, and the 
finish in all classes, will be run, pro- 
vided the lake calms. 

Oregon Kid, owned by S. T. Black. 
won tho heat and Class B race. Time 
for the ten miles was 15:07 3-6. 

The Mississippi Valley Power Boat 
association elected as an executive com- 
mittee the following: 

J. R. Kelso of Bellville, 111.; J. W. 
Dickson of Burlington and F. C. Smith 
of Keokuk. The selection of the loca- 
tion of the next regatta was left to 
this committee. 



FORJILRICH 

Badger Athletic Club Re- 
fused Permit for Labor 
Day Bout. 



AT LONGVIEW 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



I 




W w* 



^ West Point, W. Y., Aniar. 29 — Of- ^ 
^ ficlal announcement wan made by ^ 
^ tbe army athletic council tbis aft- MH 
^ ernnon that there vroiild be no ^ 
¥>t Arniy-Xavy football srame thin ^ 
4^ year. The Army will piny the ^ 
^ CarllHle Indian ncbool Instcaid of ^ 
^ the navy at West Point on Xo\. -k 

FEW MATCHES PLAYED 
IN T ENNIS TOURNEY. 

Niagara on the Lake. Ont., Aug. 29. 
— Wet courts stopped play Thursday 
afternoon n the international tennis 
tournament with but few matches 
played off. In the ladies' singles. Miss 
Mary Browne of Los Angeles, national 
woman champion, defeated Miss Edith 
Roch of Boston, 6-2, 6-3. Mrs. Rob- 
ert Williams of Philadelphia beat Mrs 
C. M. Beard of New York, 6-3, 6-0. 
Mrs. Williams and Miss Browne jvlll 
meet in the finals. 

In the men's singles Griffin of New 
York beat Regan of Cleveland, 6-2. 
6-3. GrlfCln plays Baird, the Canadian 
champion, today. 

HALF-MILE TRACK 

REC ORD IS BROKEN. 

Des Malnes, Iowa, Aug. 29. — ^Aqulll 
set a new state trotting record for 
half-mile tracks yesterday afternoon- 
making a mile In 2:10Vi. Two events 
of the closing day's card In the Great 
Western circuit races took five heats- 
to decide. In the free-for-all pace 
Kewanee Queen took first two heats 
in 2:08 Vi each, but slowed up In the 
next three and came In second to Co- 
lumbia In all of them. The heats 
were the fastest ever paced in Iowa. 

' -J' - - — r— • 

Meet Abandoned. 

Mineral Springs, Ind., Aug. 29. — 
With two companies of state mllltla 
in camp on the grounds of the Min- 
eral Springs Jockey club here yester- 
day the management of the races an- 
nounced the complete abandonment of 
the remainder of the fifteen days' 
schedule. Owners are taking their I 
horses away and promoters are leav- 1 
Ing. The soldiers were sent on com- 1 
plaint that there was open betting on I 
ih« race& 1 



Boston Stops Johnson. 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 29. — Walter John- 
son's second attempt of the present 
season to set up a new pitchers' rec- 
ord for successive victories, failed yes- 
terday, when Boston won an 11-lnnlng 
contest from Washington, 1 to 0. 

For ten Innings Johnson had disposed 
of Boston batsmen in a procession that 
was monotonous except for the inter- 
est which his performance developed. 
Only in the second inning was the one, 
two. three order of Boston's going our 
Interrupted, this by Yerkes' hit over 
short, until the eleventh inning. Then 
Yerkes slammed the second hit off 
Johnson Into center field. Milan 
fumbled. Moeller got in the way of his 
recovery and Yerkeg was safe on third. 
Wagner's infield hit resulted In Yerkes 
being put out of the way to home, but 
not until Wagner had reached second. 
Manager Carrigan was at bat. John- 
son had sped over three balls for a 
count of two strikes, one ball, when 
Carrigan met the fourth for a hit be- 
tween the left and center fielders and 
Wagner raced home, and Walter John- 
sons winning streak had been stopped 
Up to yesterday the league's leading 
pUcher had twirled Washington to 
fourteen victories, without defeat, be- 
ginning on June 27. when Washington 
shut out Philadelphia. 2 to 0. This 
stands as the American league record 
for this season, but is two games short 



The finals in the tennis tournament 
at Longvlew will be played Monday 
afternoon. There were some interest- 
ing matches yesterday, after a rest 
of one day on account of bad weather. 

In the third round of the singles 
J. E Gardner defeated H. J. Labreo 
6-1. 6-8 and P. Chlnnick won from C. 
Fraker 6-2, 6-2. Mac Washburn and 
R. A. Blssonnette were victors in the 
frurth round, defeating N. Davis and 
and t-'s^'e^r"' '■^^P^'^'^vely, 6-2, 7-B 

f-.^w^'"^^^^ ^^^ "^^ I'Ynam defaulted 
JS^^U Kr^^^'^m,?"** C- Dickerman In 
In tMo^'.^t , ^^^ °"^y "^atch played 
f« J^.^ ^'/li^'^" resulted In a victory 
for Dinwiddle and Washburn who de- 
feated the Amundsen brothers, 6-1, 

Today's draw— 4 p. m., Blssonnette 
VB. C. Dinwiddle, semi-finals; 4:30, J. 
E. Gardner vs. L. Kennedy; 5 p. m 
Ingalls and Thompson vs. Kennedy 
and Blssonnette. "icuj. 



THROWS TILLMAN 

FROM THE RING 




emRFOLK£)^ 

R 



tow IN FRONT afor25^ 

Cluett, Peabody A Co., Inc., Moken 



CLEM BEACHY DIES 

AT LEXINGTOM. 

Lexington. Ky., Aug. 29.- Clem 
Beachy. Jr., one of the most widelv 
known trotting horse drivers and 
trainers in America, died at a local 
hospital here today, aged 63 years 
Beachy. for the last several years, had 
charge of the stable of Miss Kather- 
ine L. Wilkes of Gait. Ont ^^'-^^r 

*J^ ^H'i?*^*''"' ,^^f^ Beachy, Is one of 
the editors of the American Horse 
Breeder of Boston. The body will be 
taken to Lebanon. Ohio, his former 
home, for burial. 

swims7rom battery 
to san dy hook. 

New York. Aug. 29. — After many un- 
successful attempts by swimmers to 
swim the twenty-two miles from the 
Battery to Sandy Hook. Capt. Alfred 
Brown of the Flushing Bay life saving 
station, accomplished the feat yester- 
day. Diving off the Battery wall at 
5:16 o'clock yesterday morning, he 
landed at Sandy Hook at 6:53 p m 
having been In the water 13 hours &n'A 
38 minutes. 

Numerous swimmers in former years 
have reached a point within a few hun- 
dred yards of the beach and had to 
give up, owing to the power of the in- 
rushing tide which met them. 

JUNEAUlfASllUcTEUS 
FOR A STRONG TEAM. 

Madison, Wis.. Aug. 29.— Although 
losing three of his backfleld men in- 
eluding the Badger stars. Van Riper 
and Glllett. and Capt. Hoffel and 
Samp from the line, Coach Juneau of 
Wisconsin has Capt. Tanberg. full- 
back, all but two of the regular line 
and fourteen "W" men with which to 
develop a Cardinal team to retain the 
Western championship. Five of the 
men who Will be candidates this fall 
\f^j:p picked by the critics for the All- 
Western and one. Butler, was selected 
by Walter Camp for the All-Ameri- 
can. V 



After being thrown out of the ring 
by Johnnie Salvator of St. Paul, John- 
nie Tillman of Minneapolis, was giv- 
en the decision over Salvator in the 
eighth round of a ten-round bout on 
the range last night. 

Salvator declared Tillman had struck 
a foul blow and the St. Paul fighter 
picked his opponent up and threw him 
over the ropes. Tillman had out boxed 
and out generaled Salvator in every 
round and Referee McNulty gave him 
the decision. 

Abe Azlne of Duluth wase given the 
decision over Kid O'Neal of Duluth In 
a ten-round bout. The boys weighed 
119 pounds. 

ENGLISH GOLF STARS 

PL AY AT KENOSHA. 

Kenosha, Wis. Aug. 29. — Harry Var- 
don and Edward Ray, former English 
open golf champions, played their first 
match in the Middle West nere yes- 
terday on the links of the Kenosha 
Country *club, their best ball defeating 
that of fouT crack local players head- 
ed by Ned AlUs, runner-up in the 
Western championship. Ray got a 69 
Vardon a 70, while the local men's 
best score was made by Allls with 76. 

"Vardon and Ray will play again 
here today. 

AUSTRALIANS DEFEAT 
CHICAGO CRICKETERS. 

Chicago, Aug. 29. — Jack Crawford, 
former Surrey star, hammered out the 
first century fcr the Australian crick- 
eters here yesterday. His 111 runs 
were enough to beat the 110 Chicago 
rolled up for fifteen wickets. The 
visitors hung up a total of 373 scores. 
Crawford rapped half a dozen of the 
drives into the stands and bleachers 
before he was out. 

The Australians will play here again 
today and then go to Winnipeg. 

DULUTH all" STARS 
WILL PLAY CLOQUET. 

Cloquet, Minn., Aug. 29. — ("Special to 
The Herald). — The All Stars of Du- 
luth %vlli play the City ball team here 
Sunday. This will be the last game 
of the season for Cloquet. A number 
of Northern League players are in the 
line-up of the AU Stars, Hanschu. 
Brackett, McQraw and Menlece. 
• 

Athlete Dies. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Aug. 29. — Glendon 
Welshons. 22 years old, for the last two 
years prominent In athletics at Mac- 
alester college, died yesterday after a 
short Illness. He was the popular se- 
lection of Macalester men for captain 
of the 1913 football team, and was the] 
son of Gordon S. Welshons. the lumber- 
man. The body was taken to his home 
In Stillwater. 



It looks as if Curley Ulrich has won 
the first round in the battle between 
the Superior Athletic club and the 
Badger Athletic club, rivals for the 
favor of sport fans across the bay. 

The Wisconsin state boxing commli- 
slon has refused a license to the Badger 
club to stage bouts Labor day, leaving 
the field clear for Ulrich's club. 

There has been much strife between 
the rivals clubs in Superior and each 
started out to arrange the best pro- 
gram for Labor day. Both clubs signed 
up lively boxers and placarded the 
town with posters advertising the 

event of the exhibition of the so-called 
manly art. 

But it so happened that Curley Ulrich 
beat his rival to it when It came to get- 
.1"^^*^"*' necessary little permit from 
the fight czars in Milwaukee. Ulrich 
got the state license and permit tucked 
Into hia kick and went sailing on his 

When Jimmy Glynn, representing the 
Badger club, called on the commission 
in Milwaukee he was given a cordial 
reception by Manning Vaughn, secre- 
tary, but Manning told Jlmmle there 
was nothing stirring" in the way of a 
license. 

Jlmmle pleaded and told all about the 
elaborate plans made for the Labor 
day peace conference, but Manning 
couldn t see him. There is a little rule 
of the commission forbidding compet- 
ing cluba to stage bouts in the same 
city on the same any, and that's all 
i^^W^ ^?y ^h V^"" Badger club stands 
to lose all the iron men it rolled out 

:,Z\ ^^fi^""? ^"<* °^^^^ advertisements 
unless the bout can be staged after mid- 
night, thus technically getting around 
the law It may also be postponed a 
r^^^^- ^ ^^^. "managers had not made 
their decision this morning. 

INFANTRY TEAM LEADS 

I N RIFL E MATCH. 

Camp Perrjr Ohio. Aug. 29.— With the 
close of the first day's shooting of the 
national rifle team match, the United 
States infantry team was still in the 
lead, with the position it obtained In 
\^^ 'VnAA^"^ 1^°°^ having made 547 on 
the 1,000-yard stage, 567 on the sur- 
prise force and 570 on the 600-yard 
stage, making a total of 1,884. 

The marine corps, which held third 
place yesterday morning, was second 

i*u ® ^i°f®. °' ^^^ «*»oot yesterday, 
with a total of 1.650. The United 
States cavalry team moved from sec- 
l?^ *°J.^[''^ ^^^^ l'**^. while Wiscon- 

r/u T^o'^i* ^'^^ ^^^^' t« now- fourth 
with 1.620. Iowa, which was sixth at 
noon, moved ahead one, with a total of 

The last stage of the national team 

^^r./i" "^"^ ^® ■*'<** O" *-^« skirmish 
Friday morning. 

fi,?"J^ practice shooting was done on 
the revolver ranges yesterday 

After the accidental shooting of 
Francisco Zegarra Ballon of Peru by 
Juan E Zegarra. also of the Peruvian 
team, at noon yesterday, there was no 
more work on the ranges by the South 
American teams. Dr. C. B Hulck. 
ooroner of Ottawa county, was called! 
and after an Inquest, announced thai 
the shooting was purely accidental. The 
entire camp ig in mourning and all 
flags at half-mast. 



RULES ANNOUNCED 

FOR YACHT RACES. 

New York Aug. 29.— The New York 
Yacht club has made public the condi- 
tions agreed upon between it and the 
Royal Ulster Yacht club, representing 
Sir Thomas Llpton. to govern the races 
that are to be sailed In September of 
next year between an American defen- 
der and Sir Thomas' Shamrock IV 

No statement was made as to the 
probable dimensions of the defending 
craft, and G. A. Cormack. secretary of 
the New York Yacht club, said the 
measurements of the two vessels are 
not likely to be announced until next 
summer. 

The rules as announced do not differ 
materially from those under which the 
last races for the America's cup were 
sailed. 

Starting Thursday, Sept 10, 1914 the 
races will be sailed on Thurs<iay«' 
Saturdays and Tuesdays until a winner 
of the cup is determined. 




Refuse to Compete. 

Paris, Aug. 29. — The number of aero- 
plane constructors who have refused to 
compete In the international cup avi- 
ation races, Is Increasing. Theor ac- 
tion is the result of the decision of the 
Aero club to hold the contests on 
Leperdussln's aerodrome at Rhelms. 
The nine firms which have now an- 
nounced their Intention not to take 
part In the race, aire Bathlat, Blerlot, 
Borel, Breguet, Clement-Bayard, Far- 
man, Morane-Saulnler, Neupert and 
Volsln. 



HAVING ENGINE 
TROUBLE? 

MR. AUTO OWNER 

Have you found out the 
cause? 

Poor oil, isn't it? That's 
generally the reason for a 
large part of engine trou- 
ble. 

IISIST!-DEMAID!- 

BUY 

MONOGRAM 
OIL 



Your engine troubles 
will cease, you'll get more 
power and you'll be a hap- 
py man again. 



'^^^^. 



'^a^masmasFi 



iiUo wisnumdn sr. pvumuSiB 



I 



1 



r1 






=1^* 



le 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



cl.ose:d all day iviopw day- labor day 

m PUBLIC MEAT MARKET 

6 Lake Avenue South, Near Corner Superior Street. 

OUR meatT^ease~p£ople on 

ACCOUNT OF PRICES AND QUALITY 

We kave built our reputation and oar buHlnrati as meat dealera upon 
the policy of olTerlne only tiuch meatw am we i'an iniarantee and Ruarantee 
to tke extent uf cheerfully Kivlns your money back if not natlHlted. We 
want your patronaKe but we do not aMk you to pay an Increaited price 
for the advautaKc of the hl^h quality we offer you. 



Porterhouse. 



SIrlein. 



Steak 20< 



Only at, per lb 

SUGAR CIRED COHMiID BEEF — 

The kind yo*i will en- "| Oi, 

Joy. per lb -1-^/2' 

POT ROAST BEEF — Cut from I f^<* 
prime native steers; per lb. .-■-*'V 

The Bent Butter Subtttltute 

Oleomar- 
Kerine. 



■4 

'V 



RIB ROAST— 

Boned, rolled, ready for 
the oven, per lb., »5c, *^ 



2a 



"MARIGOLD" 



Try a pound at 
at only, per lb. 



our risk, 



25<^ 



You are not paying for any waste. 

EXTRA CHOICE BEEF f Ol/ 

STEW — Only, per lb... 

FRESH-MADE HAMBURG- 
ER STEAK — Per lb 

The RreakfaHt SauHaice that NatlMticN 

"MANCHESTER" 

Pure Pork llreakfaHt Saunase. 



15<* 



N E W HOLLAND #^ 
HEKKINGt tOtf^ « 
Ptr lb AV^ 

FRESH SL I < E D ^ , -^ 

LIVER — 1 Arf4 I '■'■*■ 

per lb . AU^ f OF.. 

POTATO SAU- f Your 
per link. . ^"\ ^^ 

BROILERS- 



EXTRA SPECIAL EXTRA | 

MUTTON 1C, I 

Choice, per pound... A%M f 



SMALL PORK 
LOi\s— By -|Q/* 

whole, lb.-"-*-'T 
PORK CHOPS — 
Loin or rib, "I Qg>» 

lb. 20c and-*-^V 
Little PIG PORK 
HOAST, 121/2^ 



Extra choice; per lb 

BITTER QUALITY 
EL(il> BRA^D CREAMERY 

BITTER — Cnly. per lb... 
ESTHER FARM EGGS — 

Always fresh; per doz.... 
FRESH DRIED HEXS— 

Per lb., 23e and 



25^ 
20< 



SMALL LEGS — Spring 

per lb 

LAMB STEW — 

Per lb 

SHOULDER ROAST — 

Per lb 

FRESH DRESSED SPRING 

DUCKS — Only per lb 

BE SURE TO PROVIDE FOR LABOR DAY— MONDAY 



per lb. 

MILK-FED LAMB 

1913; 20^ 

25^ 



BEST GROCERS SELL IT 




LOOK FOR THE PURPLE AND GOLD CAN 




Cook In One-third the Time. More Tender— More Delicious 
MOTHERS MACAROM CO., MINNEAPOLIS 




"SOMETHING FOR NOTHING" 

You don't pay any more for a sack of our flour than you 
do for other brands. BUT you get a PURER FLOUR 

BETTER QUALITY AND MORE BREAD. 

DULUTH UNIVERSAL FLOUR 



"THE GREAT BREAD MAKER." 

We also make a genuine, pure, whole wheat flour. Try it. 

DULUTH UNIVERSAL MILLING CO. 



k 



r f '■ 1 




IVIisa Kt. Wellep 



Mrs. M. Tfiomai 



THOMAS-WEILER CO 

GROCERS AND BAKERS 

830 WEST FIRST STREET. 

Melro.se 1060— PHONES — Grand 1020-1858. 

A BIG SRAP FOR SATURDAY, TUESDAY, WEDIESDAY 



Extra Sifted Peaa— 
Per doaen cana 

R aapberriea — Retnilar 
30e eant duxen cans. . . 

Fancy Preserves— Regular O^O 
3ftc Jarsi each AUV 

Imported Sanllnes — Reg- 
ularly S6c; each 

Imported Sardines— Res- 
ularly 4Rc| each 

Globe Milk — 6 cans 

for 

See us for special prices on all 
of Fresh Fruits and VeKetables. 



$1.00 
$1.80 



.28c 
38c 
50c 



Rolled Oats — 3 pack- 25<* 

ages for •ivv 

Corn Flakes — i pack- O^g* 

ase. for ^^^ 

Corn— 4 can* S')^ 

for .......•.••••••.. 

Home-made Jelly— 'tSo 

per Klass * ^ 

Fancy Assorted Canned ttO S%B 
Fruit — per doxen VA«*iW 

Quart Jar PIcklei 
each 

Fancy Canned Goods. Full line 



— «0c 



ONE REASON 

LUXURY BREAD 

IS DIFFERENT! 

LUXUR Y BREAD represents qualify. It is a 
work of Art from the blending of the flour to the 
finished loaf LUXURY BREAD is recognized 
as the standard. The bread is untouched by 
human hands from mixing to baking. 

YOUR GROCER SELLS IT— MADE BY 

CRESCENT BAKERY 

DULUTH, MINN. 



East End Orocery, 

Goo. H. Paddock. Prop. 
1829 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 

Elberta Peaches, OHp 

per basket «VV 

Lone Green Cucumbers, Rn 

2 for ^^ 

Golden Heart Celery, Ra 

per stalk *'*' 

Tomatoes, very fancy, 1 Rf^ 

per basket 1 vv 

Lufkin Green Corn, 1 Rp 

per dozen * v v 

Lufkin Selected Green OHp 

Corn, per dozen u\J\j 

6 bars Flake White ORn 

Soap for QOXj 

6 bars Ben Hur Soap ORp 

7 bars Lenox Soap OR A 

for U\3\j 

Jersey Sweet Potatoes, ORn 

4 lbs. for qOIj 

25c package Bird's-eye Qflo 

Matches for u\3\j 

50c can Royal Baking AQo 

Powder for TUV 

King Oscar Sardines, 1 1 P 

per can Ilv 

1-lb. can Salmon i tigi 

for lUC 

2 lbs. Asparagus Tips ORif» 

1 \h. Richelieu Tea; 60c J. On 

grade for ^u\j 

Richelieu Crab Meat; 30c f Qg^ 

tin for 101/ 

50c bottle Richelieu Salad Qf||\ 
Dressing for OvU 

Vou must have heard of our Home 
li.nklntc. All of the East End laiUes 
are talkiuK about its merits. Ask 
your nelKhbor, then telephone us. 

PROMPT DELIVERIES. 



A COMPANY 
CALL 





naturally calls for some kind of re- 
freshment, and nothing can be more 
welcome or more sensible than a 
dainty cup of Tea or Coffee. We 
have both in the best qualities, 
pure, frajrrant, of fine flavor, and 
perfect taste. For entertaining com- 
pany there are no better brands at 
any price, yet ours are priced ex- 
tremely low. 

Prompt delivery to all parts of 
the city. Special attention given 
to mail orders. 



DULUTH SAUSAGE CO. 

32 West First Street. 



Prices and quality speak for 
themselves here! 

Pork Roast— lb 12c 

Pork Butts — lb 15c 

Rib Boiling — lb 10c 

Pot Roast — lb. . .16c and 12^c 

Rib Roast— lb 18c and 20c 

Family Steak— lb 17c 

Mutton Stew — lb 9c 

Mutton Roast — lb 12i/^c 

Mutton Chops — lb 18c, 20c 

Leg Mutton — lb 16c 

Leg Lamb — lb 20c 

Veal Stew— lb 123^c 

Veal Chops— lb 20c 

Veal Roast— lb 15c 

Bacon, by the strip — lb .... 17c 

Ham— lb 17c 

California Ham — lb 14c \ 

5 lb pail Lard 65c 

Leaf Lard— lb 12i^c 

Chkkcnts of nil kinds at the ripnt 
price. All kinds of gaui^aKC. 

STEVE. 



MINNESOTA 
TEA CO., 

1908 AND 1910 WEST 
SITPERIOR STREET. 

'Phones— Lincoln 452; Mel. 3918. 



WEST END 
CASH GROCERY 

The Store That Is 
Different 



New stock, fresh and clean; 
new arrangements, sample and 
showroom; new prices — lower 
than anybody's. It Is not a little 
"peanut stand" — It is not a 
cheap store. I carry a full line 
and I am going to make this 
store as big as the blgge«it in the 
West End and better than the 
best. 

Delicious Nectar Coffee and 
Sunshine Biscuitn served all day 
today and tomorrow. May we 
have the pleasure of serving 
you? 

Telephone orders promptly de- 
livered. 

EMIL KJALL -^ 

2005 WEST FIRST STREET. 

Phones — Lincoln 654; Mel. 977. 



'>AivM^ 



For Instance, In renting rooms the answers willfbe better and more 
numerous If you tell the size, price, direction. locaUty.j accessible car lines. 
etc than If you merely give tne street address. Tell the whole story, and 
reaiera will be Interesied. Think before you write. Word your ad carefully. 



Lundmark-Franson Co. 

1002 and 1004 East Second St. 
Phones: Melrose 2300; Grand 97. 

Apples — Fancy Dutch, 10 OAa 
pounds for OUv 

Peaches — California, per OAi^ 
basket oUU 

Canteloupe — Colorado ORa 

Rockyford, 3 for oJw 

Oranges — Honduras, thin Rflp 
skin and juicy, per dozen.... wUv 

Grapes — Concords, large Q0|\ 
basket Ou\j 

Green Corn — Selected, OHp 

per dozen «Uv 

Cucumbers — Long Green, (^^ 

3 for WV 

Tomatoes — Extra choice, | f^p 
per basket 1 vU 

Vinegar — Best cider, per QHl^ 

gallon OUv 

Flour— Best patent, 49 01 1 OR 

pounds ipI"VV 

Granulated Sugar — | 4 A 

Cane, 25-lb. sack iP i .*XU 

Salmon Steak — J/^-lb. can ORo 

15c; 1-lb. can fiUw 

Sardines— King Oscar, | A* 

per can 1 W v 

Asparagus Tips — Best OQa 
grade, per can mOv 

Pineapple — Sliced, large ORa 
cans «vU 

Brooms — Regular 50c AH A 

grade *Vl; 

Matches — 2Sc package, | Qg^ 

each lOv 

Soap — Lenox, 10 bars Q9a 

Old butch cleanser— 3 ORa 

cans «vv 

Woodland delivery 3 p. m. daily. 



DUGGAN 

BEEF&PROVISIONCO 

505 EAST FOURTH ST. 



PICNIC HAMS, lb., 

13c 

SPRING LAMB LEGS, lb., 

20c 

SPRING LAMB FORE- 
QUARTERS— lb— 

15c 

SPRING CHICKEN, lb.. 



BOILING BEEF, lb., 

lOc 

RIB ROAST, lb., 

15c to 20c 

MUTTON LEGS, lb., 

I5c 



LONDON CASH 
MARKET 

Corner 15th Ave. East& London Road 

FRESH MEATS 

AT LOWEST CASH PRICES 

Leg of Lamb, lb 20c 

Rib Roast, lb. 20c-18c 

Pot Roast, lb 15c-12V2C 

Bacon, lb 20c 

Pork Steak, lb 18c 

Pork Roast, lb.. 12^20 

Pure Lard, lb 15c 

All kinds of Home-made Sau- 
sage. Fresh Dressed Chicken. 



City Cash Market 

12 WEST FIRST STREET. 

Only for Cash and No 
Delivery, 

Low Prices-That's All! 

Pork Roast, lb lie 

Shoulder Pork, lb 13c 

Small Pork Loin, whole, lb. 15c 

Pot Roast, lb 10c 

Mutton Stew, lb 8c 

Shoulder of Mutton, lb 10c 

Leg of Mutton, lb 15-12^c 

Hindquarter of Veal, lb... 16c 

Roast Veal, lb 15c 

Veal Chops, lb 20-15c 

Family Steak, lb 15-12y2C 

Hamburger Steak, 2 lbs... 26c 
500 lbs. Smoked Picnic . 

Hams, lb 12^/^0 

Fresh Hams, lb 20c 

Potato mnunnKf, and nil kinds of 
smoked meatM for plculc purposes 
and cold lunches. 

Fowls, - Roastlns Chickens and 
Broilers. 



BOTH PHONES 874 

lEARY 

GROCERY CO., 

131 East Superior Street 



Monday being Labor Day, this 
store will be closed. Tuossday we 
open at our new location, 607 
KAST THIRD STREET, where we 
hope to retain the patronage of 
our friends. 

SPECIALS FOR 
SATURDAY'S TRADE 

Choice Tomatoes — 
per basket 

Fancy Peaches-— 
per basket 

Delicious Plums — 
per basket 

Rather than move our large stock 
of Bottled Goods, consisting of 
everything imaginable in our line, 
we will give special prices for Sat- 
urday. 

Special Prices on All Canned 
Fruits. Bring your money here and 
save on all your purchases. 

Home-grown Potatoes — 15 lb . . 15c 



lOc 
20c 
25c 



DULUTH PROVISION CO 

17 FIRST AVENUE WEST. 

Little Pig Pork Roast 12c 

Pork Steak 15c 

Spareribs 12^c 

Salt Pork, dry or pickled .. 14c, 15c 

Sugar-Cured Corned Beef 

15c, UYiC, 10c 

Leg of Mutton 15c 

Mutton Shoulders 10c 

Mutton Chops 12^20 

Mutton Stew 8c 

Fancy Pot Roasts 121^0 

Family Steak 17c 

Rib Roasts 16c. 

Beef Stew 10c 

Picnic Hams 14c 

Bacon — by the strip 20c 

Fresh Killed Springs and Broil- 
ers at 24c 

Fresh Killed Hens 20c 

Strictly Fresh Eggs 24c 

A full line of Home-made Sau- 
sage always on hand . 



L. A. PADDOCK CO. 

117 East Superior Street. 
Melrose 234-254. Grand 234-48. 



TOMATOES— Per <€ || 

DaSKcX •••ss*«**s« ^B^^^F 

CUCUMBERS— r^ 

3 for DC 

WAX BEANS— Per r 

quart vv 

GREEN CORN_ 0l\O 

2 dozen for £«lv 

POTATOES— 15 lbs., OA^^ 

per peck fcUv 

PLUMS, PEACHES i%r 
and PEARS, basket Z9C 

GRAPES— Per | jT^ 

basket Xvv 

ROLLED OATS— ^r 

4 packages iLvv 

4 Cans GOOD CORN Or^ 
for :..ZDC 

APPLES— (Duchess), OF-^ 

per basket Ov v 



DULUTH MARINE 
SUPPIY CO. 

Foot of Fifth Ave. West 

DULUTH. 

We close at 5 p. m. Orders 
for delivery received until 3 
p. m. Saturdays. 

SATURDAY SPECIALS: 

Delicious, S.weet, Pink Meat 
Colorado Melons — Best of 
the season, per case... $1.25 

Half Bushel Baskets, Pink 
Meat Hordoo Melons, per 
basket 80c 

Wild Plums— The .best .kind 
for jelly, per basket 25c 

8-lb. Baskets Large Malaga 
Grapes, per basket 45c 

Duluth Grown Cauliflower, ex- 
tra large white heads. 2 
for 25c 

Jersey Sweet Potatoes, 4 lbs., 
25c. 

Hubbard Squash, each .... 15c 

Florida Valencia Oranges, ex- 
tra fancy, large, juicy fruit, 
per dozen 60c 

Bartlett Pears, per basket. .25c 

Fancy Apples from Wh.ite 
Bear lake, per peck S5c 

Cooking Apples, extra good 
value, per bushel 75c 

Duluth Grown Celery, 4 heack, 
10c. 

Fancy Blue and Red Plums, 
large baskets, per basket. 45c 

Duluth Marine Supply Co. 




Good Things for Your 
Picnic Basket 

White Fruit Cake, Genuine Pound 
Cake, Beat of K«t Loaf Cake. De- 
lleiouH MarakmaUow and Pine- 
apple Cakek 
Let nt» prepare your basket. All 

home baking;. The eo*t in trifling. 
Wedding cakes, decorated and 

made to your order. Home-made 

confections of every kind. 

Shoppers Will Alwaya Find a Dell- 

ciouH Cup of Coffee and Lunch Here. 

BON TON 

25 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 
'Phones I Melroae 1729: Grand 1166 




Serve Them in Summer- 
Time or Anytime 

GRAND UNION TEAS, 
COCOAS OR COFFEES 

They are the most healthful and 
refreshing. (Avoid the many so- 
called Bummer drinks, they are In- 
jurious to health, retarding diges- 
tion and causing stomach troubles.) 

GRAND UNION TEA CO 

214 WEST FIRST STREET. 

Next Door to Electric Light Office. 



FARMERS' 
STORES CO. 

121 WEST FIRST STREET. 

(Melrose 3926.) 

We will hold a free demonstra- 
tion of Sunshine Crackers and 
Cookies and Fancy Cakes, free to 
patrons of this store Saturday. 

Watermelons, Saturday special . . 

. . each 25c and 30c 

Fresh Dressed Hens 19c 

Fresh Dressed Springs 21c 

Tomatoes, per basket 10c 

Fancy Peaches, basket 25c 

Fancy Bartlett Pears, basket . . 25c 
Usual fresh supplies of Fresh 
Vegetables and Fruits. 



^^S^ 




Refreshing^ 

Invigorating, 

Appetizing, 

Always 

Satisfies 



On Draught- 
Bottled for Home 
Consumption 



Duluth Brewing 
and Malting Co. 






f 



i 



i! 



* 




1 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



17 




SATURDAY! 
BARGAINS I 

IM OUR BASEMENT 




Economy Fruit Presses 

This tool combines a presser and 
colander in one. and is consid- 
ered by all the best fruit ftO^^ 
prt^ss on the market; 5f rlC 
reer. price $1.85; apecial 



Tourist's Wash 
Boards 

These boards ara very handy for 
t «e when traveling or for thosa 
In furnished rooms; if.s small 
I ut very strons; nickel- iB#V 
rlated finish — rtg u 1 a r 4» ji«» 
price 60c; special ^m^'^^ 




Radiator 
Brushes 

This is the only 
brush that can be 
used to properly 
clean the radia- 
tor; regular price 
45c; special — 




Feather Dusters 

Made of good quality feathers; 
Bfimethtng always needed afv)ut 






the house, especially this 
for house cleaning 
price 35c; speoial . 



fall for house cleaning; ^50 



If Alnmi 




Alaminnm Pans 




1%-qt. size Wear-Ever Alumi- 
num Sauce Pans — this size pan 
always is handy in the jm |> 
kitchen; regular priceC#Af^ 
60c; special ^•^^i* 




iPaprus Picnic Plates 



Picnic Plates in package; ^50 
Saturday 3 pkgs. for...*""^' 




Silver-Kleen Pans 



The new way to clean silver- 
ware, just put the silverware 
Into this pan and it is in- 
stantlj- cleaned; regular 
price 11.25; Saturday.. 



75c 




IFIour, Bread, Sugar 
Cans 

Here Is a set of 3 cans, one for 
flOTir,,one for bread, and one for 
8u§ar — all nicely enameled and 
lettered; this 3-plece 
set, regular price 
$2.(i0; Saturday. 




LADIES: 



These special 
bargains can 
b e found in 
our big base- 
ment department. One visit to 
this new up-to-date department 
will convince you that here is 
the place to get the proper equip- 
ment for the kitchen. 

COME IN SATURDAY. 




MUST SPEU 
CLEANANYWAY 



City Health Inspectors Re- 
quired to Know How 
to Write Word. 



And City Stenographers Will 

Be Able to Spell 

Amanuensis. 



was stricken while at lunch Thursday. 
Mr. Townsend entered the brokerage 
business In 1889. forming the present 
firm of J. J. Townsend & Co. In poli- 
tics he was identified with the regular 
faction of the Democratic organization. 
He recently announced his candidacy 
for county treasurer. Mr. Townsend 
was born at Lima. Ohio, and was 61 
years old. 



W. L. Prrklna, Sr^ head of the ijrm 
of W. L. Perkins & Co.. and a resident 
of St. Paul, Minn., forty years, died 
Thursday at a sanitarium in Milwau- 
kee after an illness of more than a 
year. The body probably will be 
taken to St. Paul for burial. Mr. Per- 
kins was well known in business circle;? 
of St. Paul. He was a Mason and a 
member of the St. Paul lodge of ElUs. 
He was 84 years old. 



Jamea Wall Flaa. an American dec- 
crative painter, died at Glvry, France, 
Aug. 28. 



Can you spell clean? If you can't 
you cant be a health inspector for the 
city. Neither can you be a stenogra- 
pher for the city if you cant spell 
amanuensis and verbatim. 

Civil service examinations to fill 
various positions in the city depart- 
ments are being held today at the 
Central hig^h school under the direc- 
tion of Ruben Johnson, secretary of 
the civil service board. 

This morning six applicants were 
examined for health inspector, two for 
bookkeeper, two for clerk and stenog- 
rapher and two for telephone operator. 
There are fourteen applicants being 
examined this afternoon for the posi- 
tions of clerk and assistant librarian. 

Each applicant is te.sted on writing, 
spelling and explaining various fea- 
tures of the city government. There 
wore thirty questions asked each ap- 
plicant. Sevtial simple mathematical 
problems were also included. 

At thi.<» morningps examination the 
applicants for cierk and stenographer 
were given the following words, some 
of whicli are misspelled, and told to 
write them all correctly: Seperate, 
infallable. fulfill, travelled, criticise, 
receipt, memorandum, skedule, prom- 
missory. pamtlet. agregate, calandar. 
pquitible, applicible, miscelaneous, col- 
lission, acknowlege, atorney, amen- 
uen.si3 and verbatem. 

The candidates for health inspector 
were told to spell the following words 
correctly: Refuse, garbage, notlse. 
celar, kloan, nusance. maneure. notifl, 
inspect, tubercolosis. diptheria. insin- 
erator, sewerage, physlcion, nurses, 
hospltol. sanitary, collection, disposal 
and munisipal. 



New Cutter at Morrison. 

D. G. McKenzle arrived In Duluth 
yesterday from Chicago and will take 
immediate charge of the cutting and 
designing of men's and ladies' gar- 
mf^nts at D. M. Morrison's In the Hotel 
McKay building. Mr. McKenzie is re- 
garded as one of the ablest young cut- 
ters in the International Custom Cut- 
ters' Association of America. His ex- 
hibits at the custom cutters' conven- 
tions at Philade^lphia and Toronto in 
1912 have been widely commented on 
by the trade, and Mr. Morrison Is to be 
congratulated on securing the services 
of a man of Mr. McKenzie's ability. 



company in a mine near Mansfield, i building, beginning Sept. 1 and will 



Mich., Aug. 12, 1912. .Jl^hnson brought 
two suits against the &nipany. In one, 
he asked for 110,000 Jguc the benefit 
of the boy and |2.500 <dr himself for 
loss of tne boy's services. 



Do Von Ktn>«r 

That you can buy from one-fourth of 
an acre to two acres la thib very heart 
of Duluth's bast residential section 
with water, gas and sewer available 
and street car line right through the 
property? Ask Uttle & Nolte com- 
pany about Mount Royal division. 

m 

Yon Can Help Daliith 

To grow by a.sking for "ailche Qamee" 
and * Northern Maid" sft^en tor men and 
women. The Northern Shoe company 
guarantees full value for your money 
—this company, a DuLmu institution, 
is making stylish, itotfortable and 
serviceable shoes, second^o none. Ask 
for Duluth-made shoes. 



Enrollment Week 

The office and room.s of the Duluth 
Business University will be open from 
9 a. m. to 9 p. m. all this week for vis- 
itors and the enrollment of students 
for day and night school, which will 
begin on Tuesday. Sept. 2. LKScatlon — 
118 and 120 Fourth avenue west, Chris- 
tie building. W. C. McCarter, principal 



Returned From tCaatem Trip. 

P. H. Hultgren of Hultgren & Bow- 
den, tailors. Board of Trade building, 
has returned from a visit to several 
of the large Eastern cities and woolen 
markets and is now prepared to give 
you the very latest ideas in men's gar- 
men t.s. While in the East Mr. Hult- 
gren purchased a very select line of 
imported woolens which have now ar- 
rived and are ready for inspection. 

<luiet Day for Police. 

Not a single arrest was made at po- 
lice headquarters up to noon today 
This Is the first time since July 4 that 
no one was taken in custody during 
the morning. 

Liooklngr for Fnaitlve. 

Joseph Mass. 22 years old, is wanted 
by the local police for having stolen 
some clothes, four watches and a 
woman's ring from North Sixth ave- 
nue west on the night of Aug. 22 A 
request for his apprehension is n'lade 
in yesterday's issue of the police bul- 
letin. 



have a housewarming Sept. 10 to cele 
brate the event. The initiatory cere- 
monies at which about forty candidates 
will be initiated will take place at 8 
o'clock sharp and will be disposed of 
by 9:30 p. m.. after which there will 
be cards and dancing. The new candi- 
dates will be the guests of the eve- 
ning. The sister organization. Zenith 
Qrove. No. 10, Woodmen Circle, have 
the use of the hall for their meeting 
the first and third Wednesdays of each 
month at present. 



Elmore Farm, Cedar Lake. Minn., 
where they spent the summer. 

J. B, Allen of Minneapolis is visiting 
in Duluth. 

F. W. Martin, traveling; freight and 
passenger agent, and G. M. Sargent. 
general agent of the San Pedro, Ijos 
Angeles & Salt Lake railroad, are in 



Duluth looking after the interests 
the road. 



of 



F«mitera €(olns t« Frlseo. 

Atlantic City. N. J.. Aug. 29. — Forest- 
ers of America In national convention 
here today decided to hold their I!M5 
biennial convection In San Francisco. 



Will Deal In Farm Products. 

Articles of incorporation were filed 
this morning with tlie register of 
deeds by Woodward & Co.. a concern 
organized to engage in the buying and 
selling of farm products. The home 
office will be in this city. The con- 
cern Is capitalized at $25,000 and the 
Incorporators are: Austin M. Wood- 
ward, Minneapolis; Ernest A. Wood- 
ward, Winnipeg; Morris H. Woodward, 
Minneapolis; EarJ Raymond Wood- 
ward. Minneapolis; Herbert S. Wood- 
ward, Hobson, Mont., and George S. 
Wilson of Minneapolis. 



OBITUARY 



Janaca J. Townsend, former president 
oi' tiie Chicago stock exchange and 
prominent In Democratic politics, died 
in Chicago, Aug. 29. of apoplexy. He 



CITY BRIEFS 



Looiic Leaf .\ccountlnK Syatema. 

M, I. Stewart Company, 'phones 114. 



Damage Suits Settled. 

Evert Jacobdon has accepted J600 
from the Oliver Iron Mining company 
In full settlement of the claim for 
damages in two personal Injury ac- 
tions arising from an accident In which 
his 17-year-old son. Carl Jacobson. re- 
ceived injuries while employed by the 



The Store for Service. 

113-115-117-110 Went Superior St. 

Duluth. Minn. 




ATURDAY 
FECIALS 



The tliiiiic.s you need for the 
house are always best bought in 
our bright, fresh-air Basement 
Store — atul lomorrow's specials are 
extremely attractive! 



Brooms at special prices, 
well-made, regular price 
25c — special price Sat- 
urday — 




TOO LATE 
jmCLASSIFY 

One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

FOR REN1^^^^^TW0''^LIGHT\ WELL 
furnished rooms, with piano and fire- 
place; will rent single room or suite; 
use of phone.«», laundry and gas range 
8 IMunger terrace, Melrose 1299. or 
Melrose 116. 

WANTED— ELEVATOR 
Albenberg Company. 



Escaped From Jail. 

In yesterdays issue of the i>olice 
bulletin a request is made for the ar- 
rest of George Harrison, who escaped 
from the county jail on Aug. 14 whle 
being held for the grand jury on .a 
charge of swindling. 



SayM He Is Bankrupt. 

Henri Cools of Duluth this morning 
filed a voluntary petition in banlt- 
ruptcy with the clerk of the United 
States court. He gives his assets as 
$50 and liabilities as $175. 

DcllKhtful Kntertalnen 

at the New .St. Louis hotel. Miss 
Mildred Bogart. pianist, aiwJ Miss 
Georgia Howard, violinist, are making 
a great hit with the music-loving 
people who are visitors of the New 
St. Louis hotel. L^st evening many 
were entertained in the beautiful wood- 
land cafe by these two artists. 



All city and county of- 
fices, state and national 
banks will be dosed all 
day Monday — Labor 
Day. 



BOY. THE 



WANTED — BARBER. 805 ALWORTH 

building. 



Waffle Irons, with pat- 
ented revolving hinge; 
regular price 95c; spe- 
cial price 

Family Scales; guaran- 
teed kind; weighs to 24 
pounds — regular price 
$1.25; special- — 

95c 



68 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

John E. Hanson and Annie Gustafson. 

Andrew Kivlnen and Elvira Grang- 
ruth. 

William Tillack and Margaret Sather. 

Edward Julius Ronning and Eliza- 
beth Turner Bomier. 

William Millar of Ontario, Can., and 
Edith Agnes Jennings of Buchanen 
county, Iowa. 

Harold L. Manhke of Carliou and 
Bertha C. .loiinson of Superior. 



.„ ^■"** Damflgcdi for Injuries. 

Mcolal Jokinson has started suit in 
district court against the Republic 
Iron & Steel company, by whom he 
was employed at the Monica mihe last 
tall, when he was crushed under a 
load of logs which rolled from a car 
Jokinson claims that he was directed 
to cut the wires attached to stakes 
on the car and that when he did so 
several of them rolled on him Ha 
wants $2,999 damages. 



JUST O NE MO RE DAY. 

You Have Just One More Day to Take 

Advantage of the Tremendous 

Reductions on Furs. 

The Benkman fur factory at 16 East 
Superior street will close one of the 
most successful August fur sales ever 
known tomorrow. Hundreds have 
taken advantage of the big discounts 
offered. What makes this big reduc- 
tion sale all the more remarkable Is 
the fact that this is not an "end of the 
season" sale, when lines are more or 
less broken. It is an offering of an 
absolutely complete line of the new 
1913-1914 styles at the "end of the sea- 
son" prices, and to relieve the rush of- 
buying which the first cold snap will 
bring to this store. 



District 



Quiets Title. 

»,„^ ^ ^- ,.J"<iS« En.s-gn yesterday 
s gned findings in favor of John Gon- 
ska in his suit to quiet title to a 40- 
acre tract in section 30. 52-14 The 
court orders the title vested in Mr 
Gonska, notwithstanding the claims of 
Feliks Badurskl and other unknown 
persons to the contrary. 

^ 

One Mall Delivery Monday. 
Monday Sept 1, Labor day, being a 
leg.al Tioliday. there will be one cai?ier 
delivery of mail all over the city In 
the morning. The stamp and general 
delivery windows will be open from 
9:30 to 10:30 a. m. . 



SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to ordei at Henrlcksen's. 



BIRTHS. 

RUSCIAK — A daughter was born Aug. 
27 to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rusciak, 
2611 Railroad street. 

WERNER — A son was bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Werner, 425 Sixth ave- 
nue west, on Aug. 26. 



Deaths and Funerals 




D 



6-quart Aluminum 
Berlin Kettles with 
aluminum covers — 
regular price $1.75; 

special — 






$1 



.19 



No. 7 Enameled Tea 
Kettles, blue outside, 
white lined 
— regular 
nric'^95c; 
special prlce- 



HESNESS — Mrs. Theodora Hesness, 53 
years old, wife of Gabriel Hesness, 
415 North Twenty-second avenue 
west, died this morning following a 
short Illness. She leaves six children. 
The funeral arrangements will be 
made this afternoon. 

ARCONAULT— The body of Edward 
Arconault, 40 years old. who died at 
the St. Mary's hospital yesterday, 
will be taken to Nashwauk tomor- 
row for interment. He came hftre 
for treatment several weeks ago. 
His family lives at Nashwauk. 

LA POINT — The funeral of Alberta La 
Point, 5-year-old daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert La Point, who died 
yesterday following an illness of a 
week, will be held at 9 o'clock to- 
morrow morning from the residence. 
Interment will be at Calvary. 



MONUMENTS. 



You cannot afford to overlook our big 
display of monuments. Located op- 
posite Y. M. C. A. Bldg. We can save 
you money and guarantee the very 
best quality. Come and be convinced 
N. W. Monument Co. 231 W. 2nd St 



Fined for Asttault. 

For striking Johu B. Luker when he 
applied for a Job on the''3teamer Alfred 
P. Wright. Albert H. Kusel, cook on 
the boat, was yesterday afternoon fined 
$0 and cost.s, after pleading guilty to 
the charge before Judge Cutting. 

♦ 

Sheriff's Sale of Maeliiaerr. 

District Judge Feslef yesterday 
signed an order confirming the sheriff's 
sale of all the machinery. Implements 
and other personal property of the 
New York State Steel company on the 
leased mining tract In section 4, 58-17. 
William H. Yawkey, one of the execu- 
tors of William C. Yawkey, fee owner 
of the property, bid it in for 12,533.05. 
The decree of sale followed entry of a 
judgment for $2,500 against the steel 
company and Its sub-lessees in favor 
of the Yawkey estate. The claim on 
which judgment was taken was based 
on a balance due for the lease of the 
property, the lease having been aban- 
doned last April without notice. 

^'111 Divide Estate. 

Oct. 25 is the date which has been set 
by District Judge Fesler for a hearing 
on the petition for distribution of the 
funds of the estate of Peter Smolclch. 
The amount of $1,458 haa beeA collect- 
ed by the administrator, Peter Rada- 
kovich from the Oliver Iron Mining 
company In settlement of a claim for 
wrongful death. The heirs are par- 
ents residing in BrenjQ, Croatia. 
* 
Addition to Virginia. 

The plat of Canadian Northern Sec- 
ond addition to Virginia, was filed this 
morning with Charles Calllgan, regis- 
ter of deeds. The plat consists of the 
west half of the northwest quarter of 
the northeast quarter of section 13, 
58-18, and the owners are Andrew Pe- 
terson and wife. 



C. E. Butters of Virginia is registered 
at the Spalding hotel. 

Miss Margaret Gilman of Gilbert is 
visiting in Duluth. 

W. S. Chadwick, traveling passenger 
agent of the Great Northern railroad, 
is in Duluth today. 

Mrs. L. K. Myers has returned to her 
home in Ashland after a two weeks' 
visit with her daughter, Mrs. James 
Bryant of 221 East Seventh street 

Mrs. S. H. Boyer and children of 219 
Second avenue east have returned from 



Is Your Milk 
Pure? 

The only way you can insure 
purity of milk is to use only — 

Pasteurized 




LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH GRADE 
monuments in the Northwest; call 
and Inspect before buying elsewhere 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co.. 230 E. Sup 



Triangle Electric Irons; guaranteed 
for all time — reg- ^ ^^ • ^x 
ular price $3.00; m *J I «J 
special for Sat- ▼ ,^^ * * ^ 
urday WW 

Extra Specials 
Saturday 

No phone or C. O. D. orders taken. 

4 cans Dutch 
Cleanser for 



25 Paper Picnic 
Plates 



25c Lunch Basket 
for only 

100 White Crepe Paper 
Napkins 




CARD OF THANKS. 

WE''wi[3irT0'^XTEND'0UR'^^HA^ 
to the many friends and neighbors 
for their sympathy and kindness 
shown us during our late bereave- 
ment In the loss of our beloved child 
and brother and nephew. 

MR. AND MRS DEVANET. 

EARL DEVANEY, 

MARY KUNTSON, 

ANNA KUNTSON. 



Lodgre Chanires Q,Bartera. 

Zenith City camp. No. 6, Woodmen 
of the World, having outgrown its 
present quarters in ttte old Masonic 
building, has arranged to take up 
quarters In the large hall in the same 



PRIMUS 
BUHER 

Is made from Pasteurized 
Cream and is made under the 
most sanitary conditions. 

Insist on the best and be sure 
you get it, by ordering of 



BRIDGEMAN- 
RUSSELL CO. 

13 EAST SUPERIOR ST. or 
16 WEST FIRST STREET. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Anna M. Carlson, addition. 
West Eighth street, between 
Forty-fifth and Forty-sixth 
avenues | 1,200 

To M. J. Riback, concrete base- 
ment. East Tenth street, be- 
tween Eleventh and Twelfth 
avenues 250 

To J. P. Rossman. galvanized 
Iron garage. East Second 
street, between Eighteenth 
and Nineteenth avenues . . , 140 

To C. G. Carlson, frame paint 
shop, Twenty-sixth avenue 
west between Second and 
Third streets 300 

To M. Doyle, frame barber 
shop, Raleigh street. be- 
tween Fifty-fifth and Fifty- 
sixth avenues west 1 000 

To C. W. Chrlstianson. addi- 
tion, Piedmont avenue lOO 

To N. Backstrom. frame dwell- 
ing, West Sixth street, be- 
tween Twenty-first and 
Twenty-second avenues .... 2,000 

To E. W. Mossberg. frame 
dwelling, West Sixth street, 
between Thirty-ninth and 
Fortieth avenues 1.000 

To W. Gie^rojc, addition, Gary 
street, between Ninety-sev- 
enth and Ninety-eighth ave- 
nues 100 

To C. Roberts, frame bam. 
Sixtieth avenue ea#t, be- 
tween Wyoming and Juniata 
streets 200 



Smaller 

Winter 

Quarters 

Demand Folding 
Beds — Sanitary 
Couches, Bed Dav- 
enports, Divanettes 
and Cots. 

Be sure to see our 
large display of these. 



Bivanelfe^Bed 



ATOUCHOFTHEFOOT 

TRANSFORMS INTO A 

LUXURIOUS BED. 





THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 
113-115-117-119 West Superior Street. Duluth, Minn. 

Monday Will Be Labor Day and Our 
Store Will Remain Closed. 



Shop Before Six Tomorrow 
I We Close at Six Tomorrow 

I Plan to shop early. You will be well repaid by the 
many special bargains to be had here, and only here. 
Tuesday and Wednesday will also be red letter days 
to those who appreciate saving money. Goods of high- 
est worth will be offered at the lowest 

prices of the season. The little lots and 
ends of this season's goods must go 
quickly to make way for fall stocks rap- 
idly rolling in. Hence prices that pay 
you well for prompt attendance. 



School Shoes Are Better 
Bought Here 

Uncommonly Good Shoes at Common Prices 




Store 

Closed 

Labor 

Day 



You save money in buying 
school shoes here because you get 
>^ more for your money — more serv- 
ice — more style — more comfort — 
/more satisfaction. 
J One reason for this is that we 
|V pay a little more than most stores 
seem to think worth while for 
shoes to sell at given prices. 
Moreover we sell only shoes 
which ^v^ll give satisfaction to 
their wearer. 

We will take time to fit the lit- 
tle ones. If you haven't time to 
come yourself, send the children, 
and we will do as well as if you 
yoursel.^ were with them. 
Natural Foot-form Shoes 
for growing feet — $1.50 
to $3.00 the pair. 



One Good Look at This 

Wooltex Motor Coat 

Made iJt Buy It 

When the makers of Wooltex first 
showed us this coat wc bought it. 

We saw in it the distinc- 
tive and exclusive Wooltex 
style lines — recognized the 
influence of the Paris Wool- 
tex Style Bureau in its de- 
sign, and felt at once that 
some of our best trade would 
be glad we secured it for Z 
them. 

As to the quality, that is all 
taken care of by the Wool- 
tex guarantee of two full 
season's satisfactory wear. 

It surprised us when we 
were told we could get the 
coat to sell to you at Twen- 
ty-five Dollars. 



See this and the other 
Wooltex Coats and Suits de- 
signed by Madame Savarie. 




SS19 



Copjrrictit 1912 by The H. Back Giw 



AS A SETTEE 



WE ABSOLUTE- 
LY GUARANTEE 
OUR TERMS THE 
EASIEST AND 
OUR PRICES THE 
LOWEST. 



FRY OUR EASY PAYMENT PLAN. 



We Pack, 

Ship and 

Pay the 

Freight 



flpiKT CoaipMe ■•vtctaralikcn ^pH^ 

RffmAftg 

Wtt^ 8wM4A*t.W.aa«flntSL ^|^ 



IVsa 

pleasure to 

show you 

around 



Have You Bid on the Rug 

That 103211 People 

Walked Over? 

You may have it at your own price if yours is the 
highest bid received before Sept. 6. 

See the rug in our arcade window ! 




Fall Haberdashery 

THE NEW STYLES ARE EXCEEDINGLY ATTRACTIVE 

Extra Quality. 

Golf and Auto Traveling 
Caps, $1.00 up; Vests, $5.00 up; 
Jackets, $6.00 up. 
Rain Coats $10.00 up 

Dunlap Derbies $6.00 ti. 

c: L o • 1 r. u- *X /w. The new 

Sicwert Special Derbies $3.00 styles met 

Stetson Hats $4.00 up with instant 

Tweeds and Homespuns $1.50 up favor. 



Shirts $1.50 up 

Night Shirts and Pajamas $1 up 

Bath Robes $5.00 up 

Cravats, all kinds 60c up 



Fall 
Hats 

ji, ^» Si'eweri 6c Co* 

304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



I 



k 
S 






^r*-.*.- -^c^- . 



fwfm^g 



hftmmmmmmti^ 



m 



18 



Friday, 



THE DULUTIf HERALD 



August 29, 1918. 



WILL DEFEND 
HOUSING LAW 



Mayor Prince Will Appear 

Before Real Estate 

Exchange. 



Says 



Code as Whole 
in Interest of 
Public. 



Is 



Mayor W. I. I'rince will appear be- 
fore the Real Estate exchange at its 
regular monthly meeting Tuesday 
noon at the Commercial club to dis- 
cuss the housing and building ordi- 
nances. 

At a meeting early in June the real 
estate men passed a resolution asking 
a suspension of the housing ordi- 
nance, the consolidation of the build- 
ing Inspector's department with the 
assessor's office, and the drafting of 
a complete new building code to cover 
the entire field. 

Mayor Prince will ask the co-oper- 
atinn of the real estate dealers in se- 
curing the results desired to be ob- 
tained through the housing and build- 
ing codfs. He declares that the pro- 
tection of the public interests and the 
general welfare prohibit any 'Suspen- 



sion of the housing ordinance. He 
agrees that It may contain some fea- 
tures which ought to be« changed but 
he believes that this can be done 
through amendments to the present 
ordinance. In any event he states that 
should a new code be drafted, the 
present ordinances would remain in 
effect until the other had been passed 
and become operative. 

He pointed out that it is now planned 
to shift the making of all assessments 
to the office of the assessor, which 
would give him so much to do that It 
might not be advisable to also place 
the building Inspector In bis depart- 
ment. 

The mayor stated that a plan Is 
now being formulated whereby the 
assessor will come Into possession of 
all Information from other city 
branches which would aid him in de- 
termining the value of buildings. Un- 
der such a plan the assessor will re- 
ceive reports from the building in- 
spector the plumbing Inspector, the 
electrical inspector and any others 
who have data which would aid In 
determining building values. By this 
method the mayor Is of the opinion 
that the assessor will derive all the 
benefits which would come of having 
the building inspection under his di- 



rection. 



ADMITS P ERHA M THEFT 

Grand Forks, N, D., Aug. 29.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Phillip Burton of 
Detroit, Minn., arrested here yesterday, 
confessed that he was guilty of a re- 
cent robbery at Perham, Minn., and he 
returned to Detroit in custody of Sheriff 
Glaum without making a fight against 
extradition. 

Burton, under the charge, robbed an- 
other man af $70 two weeks ago. 
» 

Another Exceti* BuKK»m* Hearing. 

Grand Forks. N. D., Aug. ;;9.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — To resume its 
Investigation of complaints against the 
excess baggage regulations of railroads 
in North Dakota, the state railroad 
commission will meet here Oct. 7, con- 
tinuing in session tiiree days. 




\>, 



Gopynglw, 191A. 



4 We Are 
Ahead 

of the clothing procession as 
we always have been since the 
time we began selling men's 
clothes. 

You Will Be 
Ahead 

if you get your next suit and 
overcoat here because our 
clothes have more snap and 
ginger, combined with real 
wearing quality, than any 
other clothes you can buy — and 
they cost no more. 

SEE THE NEW 
STYLES 



FLOAN&LEVEROOS 



'<\. 



225 and 227 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



"I am the man who put the wear in tailor-made clothes." 



K. 




STIFF FINE FOR 
DRUGGISTS 



Seven Prisoners Are Found 

Guilty and Assessed 

$100 Apiece. 



r 



? 



Another Screw Put in the 

Lid That Covers 

Duluth. 



Every one of the seven druggists 
who were arrested In the raid on the 
drug stores of the city last Monday 
and Tuesday on a charge of selling 
liquor without a license, and without 
having a prescription, either pleaded 
guilty or were convicted before Judge 
Cutting this morning. They were each 
fined |100 or sixty days in the county 
Jail. 

The courtroom was packed long be- 
fore Judge Cutting appeared, the cases 
of the druggists having excited con- 
siderable interest throughout the city. 
Tliere was an array of legal talent 
rarely seen In the local police court, 
each defendant having a lawyer to 
handle his case. 

The men tried this morning were: 
Oscar K. Weinman, proprietor at 1502 
East Superior street; Benton B. Byers, 
one of the proprietors of the Byers 
Bros.' drug stores at 1831 East Supe- 
rior street and 928 East Fourth street; 
William H. Bodfish, clerk at 405 East 
Fourth street; Frank M. Toonen, pro- 

Srletor at 529 West Superior street; R. 
r. Scott, clerk at 2904 West Third 
street; George A. Eklund, clerk at 101 
West Fourth street, and Harold I. 
Shaw, clerk at Byers Bros.' store, 928 
East Fourth street. 

Weinman Case Flmt. 

The case of Mr. Weinman was tried 
first, the others being tried in the or- 
der named above. William Boland, a 
new police officer wiio secured the evi- 
dence against most of the druggists by 
having purchased whisky from them, 
was the first witness called by City 
Prosecutor Gurnee. He told the court 
that he called at the drug store and 
told Mr. Weinman that he wanted a 
pint of whisky. The defendant sold it 
to him. he said, without question. 

After Officer Boland had finished, O. 
W. Andersen, attorney for Mr. Wein- 
man, stepped up to the stand and en- 
tered a plea of guilty In behalf of liis 
client. The judge then fined Mr. Wein- 
man $100 or sixty days in the county 
Jail. 

In pleading for his client Mr. Ander- 
sen declared that the liquor laws have 
been lax and that the druggists were 
never Informed as to the exact situa- 
tion and conditions. When the Ud was 
put on, he said, the saloon keepers 
were all told so and they were thus 
given an opportunity to stop violating 
the law. But the druggists were never 
so Informed, he said. He asked that 
the court suspend sentence, but this 
Judge Cutting refused to do. 

Following Mr. Weinman's case, Mr. 
Byers and Mr. Bodfish stepped up to 
the stand and changed their pleas to 
guilty. They were represented by E. 
M. Morgan and James A. Wharton. 
They were also fined |100 each or 
sixty days. 

ARk« For TrUil. 

Ray M. Hughes, attorney for Mr. 
Scott, asked for a trial and Officer 
Boland was again called to the stand. 
He told how he was sold a pint of 
whisky without any questions having 
been asked. At this Juncture Mr. 
Hughes entered a plea of guilty in be- 
half of his client, the judge then fined 
Mr. Scott $100 or sixty days. 

The only case really fought by the 
defendants was the one of Frank M. 
Toonen, who was represented by Capt. 
C. C. Teare. The defense introduced 
W. S. Rider, a friend of Mr. Toonen, 
who happened to be In the store last 
Sunday and heard the conversation 
between Officer Clarence Cavanaugh, 
who bought the whisky, and the de- 
fendant, and Sammy Popkin, a 10- 
year-old boy who works In the drug 
store. The two witnesses declared that 
Officer Cavanaugh told Mr. Toonen 
that he was sick and In need of a tonic 
of some sort. This Officer Cavanaugh 
denied, declaring that all he told the 
defendant was that he wanted to buy 
a pint of whisky. 

"The defense tried to prove that the 
substance sold the officer was not 
whisky nor brandy, but that it was a 
mixture of brandy and ginger, such as 
Is used for medicinal purposes. It was 
sold in a small bottle, unlike the reg- 
ular bottles used by the other drug- 
gists. 

Capt. Teare In defending his client 
following the Introduction of the tes- 
timony, declared that the officer had 
deliberately lied In securing the evi- 
dence. Mr. Toonen took compassion on 
the man, he said, and gave him the 
brandy. He asked that the defendant 
be discharged, but this the court de- 
nied and Mr Toonen was also fined 
$100 or sixty' days. At the request of 
Capt. Teare, Mr. Toonen was granted 
a stay of twenty days and was allowed 
lo go on his own recognizance. 
L.le Not Unusual. 

In summing up the case of Mr. Toon- 
en, Judge Cutting declared that it was 
usual for a person to lie in securing 
whisky when It Is against the law 
to sell It. This Is the only procedure, 
the court declared, and It is not at all 
out of the ordinary. 

Down in the dry states. Judge Cut- 
ting said. It Is customary to feign Ill- 
ness just to secure some whisky. It 
is not at all out of the ordinary for 
a druggl.st to sell one drop of pepper- 
mint, one drop of lemon and a quart of 
whisky for medicinal purposes In the 
dry states, concluded the Judge. 

Officer Boland testified also In the 
rases of George A. Boland and Harold 
1 Shaw, the defendants being repre- 
sented by Mr. Wharton and Mr. Mor- 
gan respectively. Mr. Shaw changed 
his 'plea of guilty, while Mr. Eklund 
was found guilty after a hearing. They 
were each fined $100 or sixty days. 
Mr. Eklund was allowed a stay of ten 
days and was permitted to go on his 
own recognizance. 

The complaint In each case was made 
by Chief Trover, who declared that the 
druggists had sold whisky to either 
Officer Boland or Officer Cavanaugh 
without the officers having presented 
a prescription from a physician, or the 
druggist having obtained a license 
from the city council to sell liquor. 

IN PRISON; FACES 
TWO MORE CHARGES 



J 




The Home of New Books— Coming in Every Day 

EDWARD M. STONE 



THE BOOKMAN 



221 WEST SUPERIOR ST., DULUTH 



Manitowoc, Wis., Aug. 29. — George 
Hartman, aged 27, a confessed deserter 
from the United States revenue cutter 
Tuscarora, located at Milwaukee, to- 
day was sentenced to eighteen months 
In the state prison at Waupun on a 
statutory charge preferred by a 22- 
ycar-old Milwaukee woman, whose 
name the court refused to divulge. 
Upon Hartman's release from prison 
he may be prosecuted as a deserter, 
and also under the Mann act. 

The woman claimed that Hartman 
paid her fare from Savannah, 111., and 
that they had been living together 

since June 30. 

• 

Grafton Company Wins. 

Grafton, N. D.. Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Company C of Grafton 
won the national defense trophy In 
competition with the other companies 
of the state mlUtla. Under the terms 
of the contest at least forty members 
of a company must engage In work on 
the company range, and the company 
that qualifies the greatest number of 
mftrkgmen wina the trpphy. 



ScHqoI Ribbons 

300 bolts of Children's Hair Ribbotis 
on sptciat sale tomorrow. All 25c 
and 29c hair ribbons spe- ^ S^r* 
cial at, per yard -^ \J\^ 




"WHERK VALUES RBION SUPREMr* 
2i and 23 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



15c Pillow Cases — Spe- -g f\ 

cial at J[l/C 

MViZ Russia Crash — Ex- 5il/Lg* 

tra special at 0/2C 

10-4 Unbleached Sheet- ^ ^ 

ing — Special at ^^C 

15c big Linen Finished 1 fkr* 

Towels at lUC 



New Fall Merchandise 

At Special Advance Prices 



Big Notion Values 

75c Stamped Pillow Cases ff /lx» 
special, per pair Ov/C/ 

95c Worked Table Runners, with 
fringe — special /^O/* 

7Sc Embroidered Burlap •ff'/^>^ 
Centerpieces, at only Ov/C' 

50c Embroidered Pillow ■^ l^r* 
Tops — special at ^OC 

35c Ruffled Pillow Tops 
and Backs — special at... 

25c Mennen's Talcum ^ O/^ 

Powder — special at -M. zfL/ 

5c and 10c Soaps — odds ^/^ 

and ends — special, 2 for OO 

95c Alarm Clocks— ^0/» 

Special at O jft/ 

10c 1.000-sheet rolls Toilet Paper; 
special — 6 ^ ^r* 

for J&OC 

25c boxes Lava Oil Soap; ^ Qr* 
special, box of 3 cakes for J. zf%^ 

25c bars Cuticura Soap; ^ O/^ 
special, bar X >rC/ 

10c Fedora Hair Nets; ^ ^^ 

2 for X OC 



f?'t.l , Tailored Suits 



Women's 

50 Strictly High-grade Suits in navy, black and brown serges — 
the new novelty weaves, in suitings and a splendid variety of 
handsome new mixtures. These come in all the desirable 
lengths. We offer these splendid values 
tomorrow at 



$17.50 



Corset Sale tomorrow 

$1.50 Corsets for Only $1.00 

W. B. and Royal Worcester Corsets, long and medium hip and 
high, medium and low bust — your choice ^ "t if\f\ 

for only %p J. •!/" 

$2.00 W. B. Corsets, medium bust and long hip ^ -J ff /^ 
— an exceptional high-grade corset ^% JL •t3f^ 

Clearing of All Waists 

Women's Waists in Lawns, Marquisettes and White Novelty 
Materials and Voiles, worth up to $2.00 — your choice f\ Q^^ 
of a splendid assortment at ifOC 

Children's School Dresses 

New lines of Children's Wash and Wool Dresses for school wear 
— a great variety of styles and colors on display ^ 1 Off 
— extra special values at from $5.50 down to ^ J. ^i^O 



Durable Hosiery 

for Boys^ and Girls' 

School Wear 

Boys' 19c Heavy Ribbed Black 
Hose — Fast dye; sizes from Syi to 
10 — Special, per "t 4T/% 

pair JL OC^ 

Bo3rs' Black Cat and Pony Hose — 

Medium and heavy ribbed, rein- 
forced in all the impor- 0/^/% 
tant parts; per pair tuiiJ^ 

Girls' Black Cat Iron Clad and 
Pony Hose — Fine lisle ribbed; none 
better made; at, per 9 ^£* 

pair StI OC 

Boys* Pants 

Knickerbocker style, in dark fall 
mixtures and plain /?/^y« 

serges, at $1, 75c and 0"CJ 

Boys' Waists — In sateens, ging- 
hams, madras, etc.; light 0/!j/» 
and dark colors, at 50c ^OC 

Special in Men's Shirts 

$1.50 Soft Front Dress Shirts, in 
plain colors and stripes, with one 
detached soft collar; splendid ma- 
terials — special ^ ■« /)/) 



Special Sale of Laces 

5c Torchon Laces — 1 to 2 inches 
wide; neat patterns; Ol/i/^ 

sale price ^ /^C/ 

10c Laces, up to 4 inches wide, in 
fine cotton and linen, ^/^ 

10c Valenciennes Laces, up to 2 
inches wide; insertion ^l/*/» 

to match, at m /^w 

Cluny and Imitation Filet Laces, 
up to 4 inches wide, insertion to 
match; big variety ^ ^/^ 

Shadow Laces, up to 4 inches wide, 
pretty patterns, with insertion to 

"ard'-.^'r. 12V2C 

Imitation Cluny Lace, looks like 
the genuine; up to 6 inches wide; 
regular 25c value, ^ ^/* 

special at J. K^xy 

Linen Cluny Lace, in white and 
ecru; a very pretty as- -t Q^ 

sortment at 25< and X Z^C 

35c All-over Shadow Lace — Your 
pick of some splendid ^ O/^ 

patterns, at only jf >^C 

39c All-over Shadow Laces — Lace 
and fancy nets, in cream ^ O/^ 
and white, at Jml >r C 



sauT"""'^ Blankets and Comforts 
at Extraordinary Price Savings 

35c Baby Blankets, with fancy pink and blue borders, f Q^% 
sale price, each J, 2^0 

59c Fancy Crib Blankets, wool finished, 9d^% 

sale price, each f3 ^30 

Gra;y, White and Tan Cotton Blankets, 60x72 inches OQ^^ 
in size ; slightly imperfect £l%fC 

59c Wool Finished Blankets, your choice O C^^% 

for only t3t3CJ 

78x80 Wool Finished Blankets— a big /JflT^* 

special at .OOC 

$1.25 extra size Gray. White and Tan QQ 

Blankets, special 2^0C«> 

68x80 Beautiful Gray and White Wool Finished ^1 Off 
Blankets, sold at $1.95, special sale price .^ X •OO 

$2.25 Plain Wool Finished Bankets, in a beautiful £jj "* ^ff 
quality — a large size for ^ J. • # O 

11-4 large size Plaid and Plain Gray Blankets, in £^ Q QQ 
wool, sale price ^%J%%J%f 

$6.00 Fine All-wool Plaid Blankets, in an extra ^f /} /SO 
fine quality and big sizes for. , ^prmrmOif 



Summer Close-Ou ts 
in Wash Goods 

\2y2C Fancy Lawns, in a good as- 
sortment of patterns, real ^\L^^ 
bargain offerings at, yd ^ /^w 

10c Percales, in a good assortment 
of styles, at, per ^^^^C 

8Hc Apron Ginghams, in CZ\L^^ 
all size checks, yd., only O /2C 

MYiC Everett Shirtings and A. F. 
C. Dress Ginghams, in a big as- 
sortment of short 5^\L%r* 
lengths, yard Cf/ZC/ 

3Sc Fancy Striped Ratines, in a 
nice assortment of colors, ^ O/^ 
to close, only, yard -* J^C^ 

S9c 36-inch Tub Silks — close-out 
price tomorrow at, ^O/^ 

45c Striped Voiles, 42 
inches wide; to close, yd. 

Remnant Bargains 

Over 2,500 yards of odds and ends 
of Summer Goods marked in the 
Remnant Counter at H Price. 




WILL BEGIN 
FAU^WORK 

Public Affairs Committee 
Will Hold Meeting Fri- 
day Evening. 



Membership Campaign Will 
Be Waged By Com- 
mercial Club. 



The public affairs committee of the 
Commercial club will hold a meeting 
next Friday evening, ^pt. 6. During 
the week efforts will be made to 
arouse enthusiasm that will bring to 
the meeting the full membership of 
the committee and any other mem- 
bers of the club to start the work of 
the fall and winter season. 

The energies of the club members 
will first be directed to a membership 
campaign, the detailed arrangements 
for which will be announced at the 
meeting Friday evening. The mem- 
bers of the membership committee are 
now laying their plans for a rousing 
campaign that they hope will mater- 
ially increase the list of club mem- 
bers. The campaign will open Mon- 
day, Sept. 8, and continue for one 
week. , ^. ,, 

The city directory and other guides 
to prospects have been carefully 
checked over and a list of about 600 
men, who by their position In the 
city's business life should be members 
of the CommereJal club has been ob- 
tained. The city will be divided into 
districts and every prospect will be 

BppTl 

The membership hustlers will num- 
ber forty-five, divided into fifteen 
teams of three members each. Each 
team will elect its own captain. Be- 
fore the campaign opens every mem- 
ber of the club will be furnished with 
a button showing the club emblem 
and he will be expected to wear it 
during the week. Every additional 
member secured Will be similarly des- 
ignated, so that all may know the 
men who are making possible the 
civic work being done by the club. 

Daily meetings will be held during 
the campaign and the teams wijl re- 
port progress. Results will be bul- 
letined each day, and there is expected 
to be keen rivalry between the teams. 

The membership committee of the 
club consists of A. C. Klenly, chair- 
man; R. R. Forward, Edward Savage, 
C. H Mol^ennan, C. W. Kieewetter, El- 
mer F. Blu, C. D. Folke, A. Laird 
Goodman and H. S. Sleepack. 

1 • — ■ 

HoHpital Addition Soon Ready. 

Grand Forks. N. D.. Aug. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The addition to 
St. Michael's hospital In this city, 
which has been in course of construc- 
tion for some time, will be completed 
and ready for occupancy by Nov. 1. 
Th^ atTuoturfl GOAta About liO.OOO. 



DELAYED ROAD 
WORUEGUN 

Substitute Highway Near 

Steel Plant Is Being 

Constructed. 



Eliminates Doubt as to 

Route for Steel Railway 

Extension. 



Work on the substitute road which 
was promised the city at the time the 
council vacated a portion of the pres- 
ent highway to New Duluth and Fond 
du Lac, Is once more under way, ac- 
cording to Mayor Prince. 

The mayor accompanied other offi- 
cials to the western suburbs to view 
sanitary conditions two days ago and 
In passing he observed that the sub- 
stitute roadway is being gravelled. 

The resolution vacating a part of the 
present road, which is opposite the 
holdings of the Steel company, was 
passed three years ago largely at the 
behest of private property owners. The 
substitute was surveyed and cut 
through the brush and undergrwoth, 
but was not finished. Gravel is noM 
being hauled and spread and It is ex- 
pected that the long-delayed Job will be 
complete In a reasonably short time. 

The officials also noticed that the 
Steel corporation is preparaing to erect 
a high fence to Inclose Its property. 
Concrete posts are being put down, and 
when the fence is run it will cut out a 
piece of road which Is now being used. 
Partially for that reason it Is deemed 
essential that the new road be put in 
shape for travel without further loss of 
time. 

Way Open for Extension. 

With the substitute road in condi- 
tion and being used there will be no 
further doubt as to which will be the 
route to New Duluth, eliminating an- 
other possible obstacle to the construe- 
tlon of the street car extension to that 
suburb. The substitute route Is esti- 
mated to be half a mile longer than th© 
present, but the grade is easier. 

Rumor still has It that efforts may 
be made to compromise the pending 
suit of the city against the street 
car company to annul its franchise. 
Although they cannot be positively 
traced they appear to be fairly well 
defined. Both sides state that they are 
proceeding with their preparations for 
the trial, but naturally officials will 
not make any public statements tha\. 
they are anticipating a compromise or 
efforts to that end. And neither could 
afford to cease preparations for the 
trial as there could be no assurance 
that a compromise could be reached 
which would be satisfactory to all con- 
cerned. 

It in aot jimp^gsible ttiAt 0omeUihiu< 



has been done to sound out the situa- 
tion, but quite likely. Nothing of a 
positive nature may grow out of the 
situation, but on the other hand the 
future may bring important develop- 
ments along that line. 



IRON RIVER MAN 



DROWNS IN LAKE 



Iron River, Wis., Aug. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Dan Mcintosh, 66 
years old, and a resident of Iron 
River for the past twenty years, was 

drowned In Half Moon lake this morn- 
ing about 7 o'clock by falling off a 
boom. 



NATIVE OF MICHIGAN 
DIES AT HUR LEY, WIS. 

Hurley, Wis., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Daniel Smith, son of 
Edward Smith, died at the family 
heme here Thursday evening, after an 
Illness of about eight months from 
tuberculosis He was born in Norway, 
Mich., Aug. 27, 1883. Excepting a few 
years spent In Massachusetts, practi- 



cally all of his life has been spent In 
Hurley. He Is survived by his father, 
two sisters, Mrs. E. St. Peter and Mlsa 
Alice, and one brother, William. 
Funeral services were held at St. 
Mary's church. Interment was made 
In Riverside cemetery at Ironwood. 




FURS 




ELECT Y@y ^ 






Let us give you an estimate on 
your repairing, remodeling or mak- 
ing of new furs. 

Duluth Fur Parlors 

25 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 

Melrose 5525— Grand 1769-Y. 



Look Here Boys! 

If you could buy meat 
direct from the slaughter 
house wouldn't it cost you 
less? Sure! You'd put the 
middleman's profit in your 
pocket. That's why you 
can buy Glasgow Woolen 
Mills 

SUITS and 
OVERCOATS 




Made -To -Order 

We are really wholesaler^ 
selling direct through our 
117 stores. You save $10 
on every suit or overcoat 




Geo. H. Mills, Mgr. 

333 W. Superior St, 



kV* 



d 



<i 



J 





<f » 



HEDGING PULLS 
WHEAT^DOWN 

Selling Orders Thick and 

Market Shows Effect By 

Lower Levels. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, AUGUST 29, 1913. 



Flax Closes Lower on Lack 

of Demand — 

Oats Up. 



Dalnth Board of Trade. Auk. 29. — 
Tke deoilne of the earlier period of the 
market eoatlaued good to the clo«e. 
September piosed ^ (^ V^c off and De- 



eember closed H @ ^e 
durum eIo«ed <Hte aad 
l\4e under at the eloae. 

Oata eleaed h^c up and rye 
oS. Barley was unehansed. 



off. September 
Deceaaber vraa 



Sept. — Open 

Duluth 86%a 

Minneapolis ... .83Ti-84% 

Chicaifo 86%-H 

Winnipeg (Oct) .87^ 

December— 

Duluth 88^ 

AUnneapolla ... .87%-% 

Chicago 89Vi-V4 

Winnipeg- 85^ 



High. 
.86^ 
.849i 
.86 
.87% 

.88%. 

.87% 
.89% 
.S5%b 



DULUTH 

Open. High. 

September 85% .85% 

December 94 %a 84 



Low. 
.8& 

.83%- 

.85% 

.86% 

% .87% 
.87 
.89 

.84% 

DURUM 

Low. 
.84% 
.83% 



Close. 



.86%-ti6b 
.33%-% 
.85%-%a 
.86% 



Aug. 



.S7% 
.87%. 
.89%- 
■ 84% 



% 
%a 



•86% 
.84%-%a 
.85%b 
.87 

.88%-%& 
.87%-%b 
.8'J%b 
.85%-%b 



Y'r ago. 
.93% 
.91% 
.93% 
.93% 

.92%-% 
.92% 
.94% 
.89% 



MARKET. 

Close. Aug. 28. 
• 84% .85 %a 



Y'r ago. 
.96 



Open- 
September 1.45 %a 

October 1.47a 

November 1.46% 

December 1.45% 



DULUTH LINSEED 

High. Low. 

1.45% 1.44% 

1.47% 1.45% 

1.47% 1.46 

1.45% 1.44%a 



VIARK 

Close. 


ET. 

Aug. 28. 


Y'r ago 


1.44% 


1.46%a 


1.88 


1.45% 


1.47 %b 


1.73% 


1.46b 


1.47%b 


1.71% 


1.44% 


1.45%a 


1.67% 



Duluth close: Wheat— On track: No. 

^Pl "iV^'^*''"". S4%®85%c; No. 1 northern 

Mav '9?7°"A*qif^ ^P^ ^ ?," track. 84%c; September. 85%'^) SsVbidrb^ce'm'berrsV^c! 

84\^i- D^c^mber 82 Ji"','ik±'^"T V"*'^^^^ ^' '^''^^^ ^''- ^' ^*'^''- September 
o* /ic, December, 83%c asked. Linseed — On track S1451A- 

September Jl.44% bid; October. 11.45 Vi: November, '$1 46 bid' 

nats-^n track. 39%c: to arrive. 39 %c. Rye— On track 

63c. Barley — On track. 55® 70c. 

-,-♦ ^i'^y^c^'^w receipts of domestic grain— Wheat. 62.333 bu: 
oats 9.105 bu; last year. 2.078 bu; barl - - 

13.624 bu; last year. 16,401 bu; 

•» ft'>A®K'^'"®"'^o'i»„*^'^"'^^''*' grain— wneai. zsi.ooo bu; last year 61421 bu- oata 
3,020 bu; rye. 2.669 bu' ^"■•f oa ocs u... «»» 1_ . ««» ^a.^\. jr:ai, qx.^^x ou, oats. 

Elevator receipts 



1 hard, 87%c; No 1 northern. 86%c: 
to arrive. 86Tic; Montana No. 2 hard. 



to arrive. $1.45%; 
December. $1.44 %. 
60@63c; to arrive, 60@ 



^y. 60.678 bu; last 
flax, 14.937 bu; last vear, 
grain — Wheat. 281,000 bu; last 
; Hax, 89,865 bu; last year, 1,000 bu 
of bonded grain — Oats, 1,805 bu. 



last year, 125,127 bu; 
year, 51.518 bu; rye. 
8.057 bu. 



rrwut le 



The weakness In wheat continues 
today and made itself apparent Im- 
mediately upon the opening of the 
market this morning. The selling 
orders still continue to pile Into the 
Duluth board and hedging orders are 
coming In fast This is the cause of 
the decline and it will probably con- 
tinue until the wind-up of the ses- 
sion. However, about the middle of 
the session the selling pressure weak- 
ened to some extent, for reports from 
the harvest fields, where threshing is 
In full swing, do nut seem to warrant 
the anxiety to sell as much as some 
seem to think, and those who are 
trying to throw old wheat overboard 
seem to be checking their Impetus 
now. 

September opened %c off, fejl off 
another %c and then recovered 'a 
trifle. In the last hour September 
was off %c. December opened K<^\t 
%c off dropped Immediately to % © 
%c off ard In the last hour was ^i® 
%c off. September durum is %c low- 
er than ysterday's close and Decem- 
ber has lost mc. 

>o Demand; Flax Off. 

Flax is off again today, there belne; 
no demand for the seed. Each option 
opentd fractionally lower and then 
weakened to a lower level. November 
recovered to yesterday's closing price 
but again weakened and the close came 
•with September l%c off, October l%c 
off. and November and December each 
l%c down. 



Shipments of bonded grain — Wheat. 14,113 'bu. 



EARLY GAINS 
OBLIttRATED 



Stocks Have Upward Move- 
ment But Weaken at 
the llose. 



Advances Wiped Out and 

Good Sprinkling of 

Losses Caused. 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Na 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No 

Mont 

Mont. 

Flu. 

Nv>. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Mixed 

B*r!ey. 

Hartey. 

Barley. 

Tl.-irlepy, 

Bmr)«;. 

Barley, 

Barley. 

Barley. 

Barley. 

Barley. 

Barley. 

Barloy. 

Oats. 1 

mu, 

Oata. 

Oal9. 

Oate. 

Data. 

Rj». 

Ry*. 

Rye. 

By*. 

Ryo. 

Kye. 



Sales Friday. 



bu. 
19 L-ar* . 
5 cars . . . 
14.1.50,bti. 
.'..400 bu. 
25 cars .. 
1 car» . . . 
2,*)t> bu. 
5 can . .. 

1 car 

car 

car 

car 

car 



to arrtre. 



to arrive. 



to arrlTV. 



CsMh 

hard. 3 can 

norlhsm. 4:!,'>00 

noT*heni. 

udTthtfra. 

nurthem. 

tiortliem, 

northern. 

nortbeni, 

northern. 

nonh^rn. 

I nonJwm, 

3 wheat, I 

3 wheat. 1 

3 wheat. 1 

3 wheat. 1 

zrade. 3 cars 

whdat. 1 car. Ni. 2. 
wheat. 2 cars. .No. 1 
1.4J0 bu. ti arrUe. . . 
durum, IT.OOt) bu. to 

1 car 

1.000 bu. to arrlye 

1.000 bu. to arrtre 

7.000 bu. to arrtve .Sept. 

1 car 

1 car 

1 car 



.88 

.87 
.97 
.8^' 



arrlTW. 



no smd*. 



durum, 
dunm. 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
ilurum, 
dtinim. 

7 cars 

il oars 

1 car 
3 cars. 

2 cars 

12 cifB 

2.00) bu. to arrlT9. 
"i cars 

1 car 

5 cars 

2 cara 

2 cam 

car. Nr>. 3 

3.000 bu, 3-W. 

1.2i)0 bu. 3-W, 

1 car. 3-W 

1 car. 4-W 

I car. 4-W 

2 cars, to arrlTe. . 
2.80i) bu, to arrtw. 

1 car 

*00 bu 

1.300 bu. to arrtTe. 
4 cars 



10.. 



to 
to 



to ani»e 87i>4 

.8G>si 

.87'-» 
.86% 
.8«\ 
.85 
.85Vj 
.84S 
M\ 
.84 4 
.83*, 
.81 
.84 
.84^ 
1.4)>S 

.r<\ 

.80% 

.86 

.8«H 

.85^ 

.84% 

.87H 

.se\ 

.84 

.6.5 

.70 

.57 

.97 

.93 

.85 

.82 

.81 

.36 

.63 

.63^ 

.3814 

.SU 

.9»>A 

.38>4 

.39 

.64 

.63 

.63S 

.64 

.64 

.64 



the crop will be no larger than pre- 
viously estimated as Indicated on 
Aug. 12. Snow places the crop at 
about 2,350.000,000 bushels, 
a • • 
Broomhall estimates wheat ship- 
ments this week, exclusive of North 
America, at 5,200.000 bushels against 
4.280.000 bushels last week, of which 
Europe will take about 4,000,000. Ar- 
rivals Into United Kingdom are about 
4,400.000. Total shipments last week. 
12.iJ80,000 bushels against 16.456,000 
bushels last year. He predicts a mod 
erate Increase on passage. India 
wheat shipments. 1.968,000; he esti- 
mates next week. 312.000 bushels. 
Australia shipments, 904.000 bushels. 
« • • 

Le Count wires from Reglna. Sask.: 
"Weather clear and warm and ideal 
for harve.stlng. Believe frost danger 
past for some days. A few more days 
and most of this crop will be In shock 
and safe. This country has another 
!jig crop of good quality." 

• * • 
Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No 1 
northern. 32; No. 2 northern, 8; re- 
jected. 1: no grade, 3: durum, 19; win- 
ter, 2: mixed, 4; total wheat, 69, last 
year. 82; flax, 11; oats. 11; rye, 1, last 
year. 9; barley, 36. last year, 30; total 

128, last year, 123; on 



then went up to 68% @ 



a dip to 
opening quo- 



at 89^ 



)f all 

track. 



grains, 
250. 



is in 

has, 
been local manager for 
on the board of trade. 



E. J. TV'enzel 
.^elf now. He 
years, 
.Stone 



business for hlm- 

for the past Ave 

Atwood- 

but has 



begun doing business "on hla own 
hook," and has an office at 628 Board 
of Trade building. Mr. Wenzel Is one 
of the best-known members of the 
board of trade. 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Wheat 



Under 



Minneapolis 
ing sales 



Sinks Yet Further 
Hedging Sales. 

Aug. 29. — Hedg- 



Mlnn. 



were Increasing and wheat 
prices went to further lows. Liquida- 
tion made near contracts weaker than 
deferred months. September closed %c 
lower than yesterday, December %c 
lower and May %c lower. Local ele- 
vator stocks decreased 340,000 bu for 
the week. 

.September opened i4%c to 83 %c. 
high 84%c. low 83^'fJ83%c. closed 85% 
fl'So^c. December opened 87 %c to 
S7%c, high 37*4C, low 87c, closed 87 ^ 
fi;87»4c. May opened 92»4o, high 92%® 
!)2»ic. low 92»^c. closed 92 He 

Closing cash prices: No. 1 hard, 86aic: 
No. 1 



to 68(g;68Hc. 
C- '■' % o. 

September closed weak and %c low- 
^'^ ^y 72 %c and December strong and 
>P^1^^ *«* ^(g'Vic up. at 68%c to 68% 
4P 6 S *4 c. 

Wiieat after opening weak on low- 
er cables, the same thing that af- 
fected corn at first, firmed on commls- 
sion house buying. First prices on all 
options were Vfcc to ^40 off with De 
crmber at 89V&/g»89Vic. After 
89c December rallied to 
tatlons. 

Prices later hardened with corn. 
L.ater there was a reaction and the 

^ o«®.T** ^^^^ ^^^^ December 
<B'89^4c, a net loss of %®%c 

Oats strengthened on buying by 

?^^li^°H-^/^- P,fc«^niber opened a shade 

to ^iv°A'.fi *^^ ^° 43@43%c and rose 
to 43V4@43^8C. 

MnnfTnl^*"*"^ ""1 ^""^^ packing house 
suptort, scored a substantial rise 

f. ITo'T;,.*"^^"^" opening, 2Vs@5c off 
to 5c up. Fust prices for 
options were; Pork SIS 5 
*10.90; ribs, |io.32i^ ' ' 

Cash: Wheat— No. 2 red, 89^@89^4c; 
^a''- 3 red. 88 la 5* 899c; No. 2 hlfd, 87 # 
«?.^' ^°^L^*''5 86V4@87c: No. 1 north- 
ern, 9 J @93c; No. 2 northern, goagi^c- 
Qrt**^oi "''^V^*^'","' 88@90c; No. 2 spring, 
u®^H'.,^°- 3 spring. 88® 90c; velvet 
chaff, 86%® 90c; durum. 87® 91c 
,.^<VJ»— ^'o- 2' "•»^@75c; No. 2* white, 
75@7o^4C; No. 2 yellow, 74%® 75 Vic; 
No. 3, 74Vi@75c; No. 3 whiti. 74^* 
No. 3 yellow, 74%® 75c. 

Oats— No. 2, 39 %c; No. 2 white. 



New York, Aug. 29. — Speculators 
who were disposed to continue opera- 
tions on the long side were aided In 
their efforts by improvement in com- 
mission houses. This demand was es- 
pecially noticeable In the broader mar- 
ket for numerous specialties which 
are not often dealt In. While stocks 
showed a hesilatlng tone at times, 
there was no serious interruption to 
progress upward during the morning 
and traders who attempted to depress 
the market roun<l It too strong for 
The rise was accelerated by 
from traders who finally went 
market after holding out for 
hope of reaction. Short 



.00 
.00. 



shorn ewes, 



Chicago Ltveiitock. 

Chicago, Aug. 29 —Hogs— Receipts, 19,000; steady 
to Bo lower than yesterday'i average; bulk of aalos. 
$7.96(^8.50: iUrtit, $».S.5(^».10; mUed, ♦7.60(»9.05; 
heavy, |7.45{»8.00; rougti. |7.45@7.75; plg». |4.00 
@8.78. 

CatU»-R«ec»li>U. 1,500; atroaf to sLuule iip; 
b«fne», W.90@9.25; Texaa steera, $6.76(97.70; west- 
ern. $6.10(98.00; stocken and feedew, $5.50(^7.90; 
COW8 and heifets, $3.65c*8.50; calWB, $9.00@li.2a. 

Sheep— ReceliiU, 10,000; steady; native, $3.9«@ 
5. 00; weotwn. $4.15@4.90; yeartln», '^5A09$.\i; 
lambs, native. $5.85(98.10; western, $0.60(38.15. 



Steadfastly in the face, with only the 
width of the aisle between the two 
tables separating them. The girl 
turned her head and looked away. 

Midway between the two tables 
stood Dlggs, who after adjournment 
haa Joined his wife. He looked non- 
chalantly first at one woman and 
then to the other, talking the mean- 
time with Camlnettl. 



PRODUCE MARKET. 



Cklpaco. 

Chlcaco, Aug. 29.— Butter— Steady; recelttts. 
tubs; cwameiT extra*, 28Hc; extra firsts, 27& 
t'Mts and cheese unchanged. 
Eggs — Ueeeli>t8, 8.158 cases. 
Potatoes — Uuchaiiged. Receipts, S3 caa. 
PlkU try — Unchanged . 



MIS 



them 
orders 
Into the 
a time 



In 



January 
•i>5; lard. 



ic; 



(®42c; 
41%c: 

Range of 
Wheat— 

Sept 

Doc 

Com— 

Sept 

Dec 



No. 3, 39%cVNo.'3 whiteV^40%® 
standard, 4H4®41%c. 

prices: 

Open. Hlgli. Low. 

.85S-H .8^ .83-% 

■89H-k .88H .89 



Close. 

.85H-^a 
.89>«->4a 



.68^ 



.72% 

.68v4 



89 



.08-% 



.72Hb 

.68%-% 



„ New York Grain. 

^ New York, Aug. 29.— Close: Wheat— 
||Ptember. 95%c; December. 98%® 



, Liverpool Cirala. 

Liverpool, Aug. 29.— Wheat— Spot 
?t.*3^' ^*'- } ^r^nltoba. 7s 8d; NoTt 7s 
bi^ '-^^tJ' "t^ ^'^- ?"t'^'-«3 easy; Octo- 
-» • ,'^ 4^**' December, 7s %d; March, 
<s Id. Corn— Spot firm; American 
?^'*,?^ "^^' '*''" dried, tis 9%d; do old, 
Pio^**- F'^\yj'^ ateady; September, La 
Plata. 5s %d; October, La Plata 5s 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS. 



-- .-. „ Closing quotations lurnished by Gay 
northern. 85%@86>4c; to arrfve, f * ^^^''K'a. ^-6 West Superior street 
choice to arrive, 86%c; No 



arrive, 
arrive. 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



stocks, giving changes 



Duluth grain 
In five days: 

Wheat — Western and winter, 29.000 
bu. Increase. 10,000 bu; spring. 3,432,000 
bu. decrease. 57T.».>0 bu; durum 49,000 
bu. increase, 19,000; bonded, 79.000 bu 
decrease, 14,000 bu; total wheat. 3.589.- 
000 bu. net decrease. 562,000 bu 

Coarse graln.s — Oats. 573.000 bu, de- 
crease. 128,000 bu; rye. 105,000 bu, in- 
crea.se. 15.000 bu; barley 724.000 bu 
increase, 130,000 bu; flax, domestic, 
1.440.000 bu; bonded, 143.000 bu; total 
flax. 1,583.000 bu, decrease, net, 95,000 
bu. 

Total all grains, 6,574.000 bu; net de- 
crease, 640,000 bu 

• " ♦ * 

Clearances reported: Wheat, 400,000 
bu; flour, 56,000 bbl.; together they 
equal 652,000 bu; corn, 3.000 bu; oats 
10,000 bu. . . . 

• • • 

Primary markets report the follow- 
ing receipts and .shipments today: 

Wheat — Receipts. 960.000 bu, last 
year, 1,627.000 bu ; shipments 827,000 
bu, last year, 802,000 bu. 

Corn — Receipts, 612,000 bu, last year 
614.000 bu: shipments. 303.000 bu, last 
year, 442,000 bu. 

• • * 

Thurs- 
Cars of wheat received: day. 

Duluth 69 

Minneapolis 283 



2 northern, 53»4t?S4«4c; No. 2 hard 
Montana, 82*ic; No. 3 wheat. SO'^iSic. 

Flax — Fiecelpts. 8 oars; year ago, 4; 
shipments. 1. Demand fair. Closing 
price. >1.43®1.46. 

Barley — Receipts, 111 cars; year ago, 
143; shipments. 79. Demand very lim- 
ited and the market had an easier 
undertone. Closing range, 54'^69c. 

Market active and prices unchanged. 
Bran — Prices unchanged. 



Listeil Stoolti 



Bid, I Asked, 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin 



For the twenty-four 
•lay. Aug. 29: 



hours ending at 8 a. m., Frl- 



8TATI0N3. 



fsnate Of 
(weather. 



Winnipeg 
Chlcas<o . . . . 
Kansas City 
St. Louis . . . 



Year 

ago. 

82 

506 
25 
147 
320 
254 



Cars 
Duluth 
Minneapolis 
Winnipeg . 



Year 
ago. 

' "4 

5 



33 

■ •• • •••••• • .16<J 

129 

Thurs- 
of linseed received: day. 

....••. ••.*•.., Xl 

• .."...*....•.. o 

9 

• • • 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 
Wheat, %®%d lower; corn, unchanged 
to >4d lower. Paris — Wheat %@«4c 
lower: flour, unchanged to 2*ic lower 
Berlin — Wheat, Ic lower. Budapest—^ 
Wheat. Tgc lower. Antwerp — Wheat, 
7%c lower. 

* • • 

B. W. Snow is out with a special re- 
port on corn conditions In which he 
says that the crop has suffered further 
losses in Nebraska, Ohio, Illinois an* 
Kansas since his report of Aug. 12 and 
that re.Dorta indicate Imperfect earing 
In many sections. He says losses In 
Southern Iowa are heavy and that that 
•tate has a prospect for about 300,000,- 
OeO bushels. Other states than those 
mentioned have barely held their own 
since Aug. 12 and indications are that 



MluiieapoUa Cleiirl 

fampjjell Clearl 

Crookstoo Clear' 

Detroit City ! !ciearj 

New triin cie„ 

Park Rapids CIe*r 

Rnfhester Clear 

Winnebago City IcSear 

WortlUngton Ctoar 

.VbtTdeen Clear 

Mitchell Clear! 

Poll.>'k Clear 

KedlteJd ciearl 

.Sioux Falla Clear' 

U'atortawn Clear! 

Yankton ci««r 

Anienla Clear 

Houlnewj Pt'cioudyl 

R<'"ben» OeMrl 

1>1. kJnaon pt. aourtyl 

I' c!ss«ndea Clearf 

Grafton ',',', cVar 

Jamestowa Clear' 

I<angUon '....Clear' 

Urtmore ciear| 

[;«f^n Clear* 

^°i Clear 

.Napoleon aear 

Pembina Clear 

WahpetoD 

JS^u'fi iPLCioudy 

!M' orhead Clear 

S3t Paul Clear 

!La Cruaso clear 

SH'iron clear 

jPleire ..,,.. . Oear 

IRapld City !'.".croudy, 

JBiamarck Clcarl 

JOovll. Lak« ".!aear 

!(jrand Forks Clear 

SWillUtoo Pt Cloudy 

'Havre Pt. Cloudy 

Milea CMy ' 

ii.Mlanedosa Clear 

SiWinnlpeg !. Clear 

§tQuAppeUe Clear 



Teiapi 


erat 


lira 


Baln- 






faU. 


1 




< 


-? 
§•2* 


a 
B 




i 


if 
Si 


74 


38 


.02 


78 


44 





72 


50 





71 


44 





80 


50 





70 


48 


.03 


78 


90 





88 


58 





74 


50 





83 


48 





81 


48 





82 


S8 





82 


48 





80 


40 





75 


42 





32 


34 


a 


-8 


48 





78 


41 





78 


48 


t 


78 


40 





SO 


43 


9 


74 


48 





74 


44 





70 


i% 


ft 


78 


48 


• 


78 


46 





78 


44 





78 


43 





70 


44 





78 






68 


■53 


M 


76 


50 





74 


M 


.01 




54 


.04 


82 


49 





82 


93 


• 


82 


54 





78 


44 





74 


48 


« 


76 


48 





76 


93 





86 


34 





88 






70 


44 


« 


68 


48 


.03 


7J 


St 


! 






A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD -LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We give all shipments our 
personal attention. 



REMARKS— OetieraJly fair weather prevailed 
weather was Uie rule exceirt In the Northwwt. 

H. W. RICHAHD.SON. 
I^Bcal Forecaster. 



hot 



in the dl:itrl<Tt aTeragea, 
ywterday. oUiitmum of last night. 

eodlnc at 3 a. OL, 



J— Not Included 

t — Maxlmtim ■:t 

•—Highest yesterday. 

t — Lowest for twenty-four huua, 
se«eiitT-8fth meridian Um«. 

Note--Th» avenge highest and lowest tempwatupw 
i»r» made up at each center from the actual number 
(>r reports received, and the average precipltatlana 
from the number of sUtlons reiwrtlng 10 Inch or 
more. The "state of weather" U that 
tta»e of obMrratlon. 



preraUing 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



DULLTH. 



WIXNEAPOLIS. 



Buying By Shorts Gives Firmness to 
Corn Prices. 

Chicago, Aug. 29.— Corn firmed 
up today on large purchases by shorts 
1 he opening was weak, unchanged to 
-,c lower with September leading thci 
kcline. Starting at 72c to 7^ 
September dipped to 71^c, then 
to 7-'%c. Dtcember opened 
to %(S>^c off at 68^c to 



:^c 

rose 

unchanged 

68>4c eased 



SHIR TO 



«i POEHLER CO. 

Established 1851. 

GRA.IN COMMISSION 

MIIfNKAPOLIS. DULUTH 



Adventure 

Ahmeek 

Allouez 

Amalgamated 

American Zinc 

Arizona Commercial 
butt & Ballaklava. 
Butte & Superior. . 

Ciilno 

Calumet & Arizona. 
Calumet St Hecla... 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

East Butte 

Franklin 

^T^s^nby 

Grenfe-Cananea .. . 

Hancock 

Indiana '.'..,. 

Inspiration ,'.'.' 

Islt Royale 

Keweenaw 

f-ake 

La Salle , 

MasrH Copper , 

Mayflower 

Miami 

Mohawk [',, 

Nevada Consolidated 

Nipissing 

North Butte 

North Lake 

Old Colony 

Old Dominion 

Osceola 

Pond Creek 

<4uincy 

Ray Consolidated ... 

Shannon , 

Shattuok 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior & Boston . . , 

Superior Copper , 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Mining common 

United Fruit 

Utah Con 

Utah Copper 

Winona 

Wolverine 

UBllAted Stockn — 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

Calaveras 

Chief Con 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Dobie 

Dome Extension 

Ely Consolidated 

First National 

Goldfleld Consolidated. 

Holllnger 

Houghton 

La Rose 

Mines Co. of America 

Montana 

New Baltlo 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Porcupine Gold 
Preston 

**■« » Csl •••••••■ ••••••• 

South Lake 

Southwestern Miami . . . 

Superior & Olobe^ 

Temlskamlng 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension . . . 
United Verde Extension 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 



IVi 


275 


36V4 


76 


22 


2 13-16 


1\ 


zo% 


41V4 


65 


410 


13^ 


40 


12 


4% 



■ I 



• • • • • < 



•' 



67^ 
35V4 
18 

5% 
15 >4 
19^ 

I'/i 

7Vi 

3\ 

2^ 

8% 
22% 
43^ 
16 

9 
2SV4 

1^ 

4% 
60 ^ 
8U 
20 
60 
19% 

6\ 
27 
49% 

251* 
70 
.•?6'^b 
168V4 
9% 
53 

1% 
44% 

I 

m 

50c 
Ic 
36c 
2 
1 5-16 

1 
20c 
[ 9-16 
L 15-16 
10c 
5c 
5c 
2% 
L 9-l« 11 
15H 
i\ 
2% 
2 

m 

50c 
37o 
80c 

6c 

2c 
13c 

4 

2 

60 
23c 
13-16 

6% 
15-16 
50o 
1 3-16 
I60 

2 



2 
2S3 
37 
76 V4 
22% 

3 

2 
31 

41% 
65% 
420 
14 

40% 
12% 

5 
68 
36 

18% 

6 

15% 

19% 

2 

7% 

4% 

3% 

8% 

23 

43% 

I6V4 

„*^ 
28% 

2 

4% 
51 
82 

20% 
61 
19% 

7 
28 
50Vj 

2% 
25>^ 
72 



coverings continued to play an im- 
portant part In the rise, but there 
was enough buying for the long ac- 
count to give more confidence In the 
speculative position of the market. 
Bends were steady. 

Opening transactions in the lead- 
ing stocks were on a large 
scale today, but the market lacked 
the strong tone which charac- 
terized it yesterday. The most active 
issues was Steel, transactions in which 
amounted to about 10,000 shares in the 
first few minutes. The price advanced 
a small fraction as did the quotations 
for Reading and Amalgamated which 
also were active. Union Pacific waa 
under some pressure and receded frac- 
tionally. American Snuff rose 4 points. 

After selling orders had been filled 
prices started up vigorously with an 
active Inquiry for Steel, Amalgainated, 
Union Pacific and Ihe coalers. Read- 
ing and Lehigh Valley gained a point 
and some specialties rose briskly. 
American Malting preferred jumped 3 
points. Execution of a small buying 
order for Toledo, St, Louis and West- 
ern 4'8, involving eleven bond.s, sent 
up the price from 55 to 60 in short or- 
der. 

Profit-taking on the eve of the pro- 
longed holiday became more in evi- 
dence after the advance had brought 
up the average level to the highest yet 
attained. The selling, combined with 
displays of weakness at various points, 
caused the whole market to slide off 
In the early afternoon. Missouri Pa- 
cific was notably weak, falling 1% 
under yesterday's close. St. Paul and 
New York Central also showed unmis- 
takable heaviness. 

A vigorous buying movement was 
started In Smelting, which sent It up 
2% and stopped the general decline. 
Other stocks crept up again to near 
the previous high point, but the de- 
mand was not maintained and specula- 
tion lapsed into a rut. Toledo, St. 
Louis and Western 4'3 lost Its early 
advance of 5 points. 

The market closed easy. After some 
slight Irregularity, prices turned def- 
initely downward, with activity and 
weakness Increasing in the last few 
oUnutes. Previous gains were mostly 
obliterated and there was good sprink- 
ling of losses. American Ice fell 2 and 
Wolla-Fargo Express 3 poin.t9. 



New York. 

New York, Aug. 28.— Butter— Firm; recslpts. 7.365 
tubs; creamery extras, 29%(»30c; flt«ts. 2r\4@20c- 
seconds. 25Vs®26c; thirds. 2S14(a24c; state daily lin- 
esl, 28Hc; gcod to prime. 2«C328c; common to 
fair, 23(^24 ^ic; process extras, 26c; firsts 
nMng25c; secon.ls 22@23c; Imitation creamery 
firsts. 24V4(»25c; factory, June make, flrsU 24i<« 
24 Vic; factory, current maice flrsU, rJhi®Hc; aeconda 
22(^22 He; packing stock, June make. No. 1 22 Hm 
23c; packing stock, currant make. No. 2 22c- Nn 
3, 20(a:2lc. * ^' •""• 

Cheese— Firm; recdpU. 575 boxes; state whole 
milk, white and colored, fresh specials. 15V4c- aver- 
*se tuacy. I&(ai5^c; fresh, imder grades, 'n%@ 

Kegs— Steady; receipts, 17.027 cases; fresh gath- 
ered extras. 28®30c; eattra firsts, 26@27e- fireta 24 
(^25c; seconds. 20@23c; thirds and poorer lOSp'^c- 
fr«h gatltered dirties. No. 1, 1 8(3- 19c; No. S and 
poorer, 10@l7Hc; fresh gati-.ered, checks, good to 
cliolce, drj'. I8(al7c; clieck>!. under grades, (2@ 
4.50; refrlgerato- specials, :arks fancy, charges 
paid, 24@25c; aecood*. 22i3i;i*»c; stat«. Peiinbyl- 
Taiila and naarb-' hennerj- wliit.'s. 2S(a36c; gaOiered 
whites, 23@24c; western gaUierod. whitest 22@2i)c* 
state, Peonaylvanut and nearliy hennery browns, 30^' 
34c; do, gathe.-ed, browns. 23@30c 

STRONGER TONE 

TO THE COPPERS 



The close of the copper market was 
the strongest that has graced the 
boards for many weeks. The market 
showed strength from the beginning 
of the day to the end Granby was a 
feature, making a gain of three points 
during the session, and finishing strong. 
Butte & Superior and the other lead- 
ers all gained well. But at that the 
trading was not brisk except In one or 
two stocks. 

• • • 

Hayden Stone & Co. In their weekly 
letter, say: 

"The copper situation Is one of much 
greater strength than has been appre- 
ciated. Whether desirable or not, It Is 
altogether likely that a further sub- 
stantial shrinkage In stocks will be 
followed by a further advance In the 
price of the metal. As the better class 
of copper stocks have not vet reflected 
fully, even the Improvement that has 
taken place, the outlook for this class 
of securities seems to be particularly 
promising." 

* • * 



STOCKS — 



Bid. 



Asked. 



Closing 
& Sturgis, 



quotaitlons 
326 West 



furnished by Gay 
Superior street: 



American Saginaw 

Butte Alex Scott , 

Cactus , 

Calumet & Montana.., 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonora.... 

Carman 

Chief Consolidated .... 

Cliff Mining 

Copper Queen 

Denn Arizona ., 

Duluth Moctezuma ... 

Keating 

Elenita 

Mowltza 

Rainbow Development. 

Red Warrior 

San Antonio 

Savanna 

St. Mary 

sierra . • . .. .. ..•..•..« 

Summit Copper ....... 

Warren 

Warrior Dev 



9.50 

7.25 

.05 



9. 

7, 



.90 

.38 

1.50 

.80 



6.60 

'i!i2 



•••••• 



,88 



.60 

.05 

6.50 

.75 



.75 

.50 

.07 

.05 

.05 

1.50 

.45 

1.62 

.83 

.07 

6.75 

1.00 

1.25 

1.00 

.25 

S.60 

1.00 

2.00 

1.50 

.08 

.70 

.07 

6.75 

.90 



.STOCKS— 



^Igh. I Low. I Close. 



Amal. Copper 



Am. 

Am, 

Am. 

-Am. 

Am. 

Am. 

•Am, 

Am. 

Am. 



Sugar. 



Beet 
Can 

Can. pfd 

Car and Fdry. 

Cotton OU 

Locomotive . . . 
Smelting .... 

Sugar 

Tel. & Tel 

Copper . . 



169 
9% 
53% 

1% 
45 

2 

1% 
55c 

5c 
38c 

2% 

1% 

1% 
3.JC 
11-16 

2 
35c 
120 
lOc 

2% 
11-16 
16 

5-1* 
2% 

5-lS 

80c 

40o 

95o 

12c 
6c 

17c 
4% 
3% 

15c 

27c 
5 1-16 

7% 
2 3-16 

60c 

1% 
20c 
2% 



Anaconda 

Atchison 

Baltimore & Ohio . 

Brooklyn Rp. Tr. . . ., 

•Canadian Pacific . . 

Chesapeake & Ohio. 

C. M. & St. P ... 

Chlno Copper 

Col. Fuel & Iron. . ., 

Erie «... 

Erie first , 

General Electric .... 

Granby Con 

Gt. North, fpd 

Gt. Nth. Ore eta 

Guggen. Ex 

Inter.-Met . ^. 

Inter.-Met. pfd.. 

Lehigh Valley 

Miami Copper ...... 

Missouri Pacific 

Nevada Cons ,, 

New Haven Ry 

N. Y. Central 

•Norfolk & West 

Northern Pacific .... 

Pennsylvania 

People's Gas 

Reading , ... 

Rep. Iron & Steel. . . . 

Ray Cons 

Rock Island 

•Southern Pacific , . . , 

Southern Ry 

Tenn. Copper 



76%( 

%1 



26 

35% 
97% 
46% 
44 
36 
69% 
111 
130% 
37% 
96% 
97 
89% 

215 
59% 

107% 
41% 
32% I 
29 
47 

144 
68 

127% 
35% 
47 

16% 
64 

156% 
23% 
31 

16% 
93% 
97% 

105 

113 

113% 

118-% 

163% 
24% 
19% 
18% 
90% 
24% 
32% 



The Texas Co 125% 



Union Pacific 

U. S Rubber 

U. a. Steel 

U. 3. Steel pfd. 
Utah Copper . . 
Westlnghouse . 
Woolworth . . . . 



155% 
62 
65% 

108% 
5.3% 
73% 
94% 



75% 
26% 
35 

97% 
46% 
44 
35 
67% 
110% 
130% 
37% 
96% 
97 

89% 
218% 
59% 
107 
I 41% 
I 32% 
28% 
47 
144 

64% 
127% 
35 
47 

16% 
63% 
156 
23 
30 
16% 
92% 
96% 
105 
111% 
113 
118% 
162% 
24% 
19% 
18 
89% 
24% 
32 
125 
154% 
61% 
65 
108% 
52% 
73% 
94% 



76 

26% 
35 V4 
97% 
46% 
44 
36 
69 
110% 
130% 
37% 
96% 
97 

89% 

218% 

59% 

107% 

41% 

32% 

28% 

47 

144 

67% 
127% 
35 
47 

16% 
63% 
156 
23 

30% 
16% 
93 
97% 
105 
111% 
113% 
118% 
162% 
24% 
19% 
18 

89% 

24% 

32 

125% 

165 

61% 

65% 

108% 

53% 

73% 

94% 



DECEIVED BY 
CAMINEHI 

Father of Marsha Warring- 
ton Testifies in White 
Slave Case. 



WORLD PEACE 
UP TO KAISER 



The Hague, Aug. 29. — Andrew Car- 
negie was the chief speaker today at 
the unveiling In the Palace of Peace 
of a bust of the late Sir William 
Randal Cremer, originator of the In- 
terparliamentary peace conference, and 
for thirty-seven years secretary of 
the International Arbitration league. 

Cremer, a carpenter by trade, rose 
through his efforts toward Interna-, 
tional peace to be a member of parlia- 
ment. He was knighted by King Ed- 
ward VII and received the Nobel peact> 
prize. 

Mr. Carnegie spoke of Cremer as 
"the pioneer in the greatest of all 
causes — the abolition of war." He then 
rtfcrrfed to the interdependence of 
nations, remarking that their annual 
exchanges In the normal course of 
trade now amounted to $33,500,000,000 
and were rapidly increasing. 

ElBiarland and Germany. 

Giving statistics of Anglo-German 
trade, Mr. Carnegie said; 

"Why should these two Teutonic 
nations, mother and daughter, quar- 
rel? Why should they not agree to 
demand peace on the seae, which is 
essential for this nelgrtiborly and en- 
riching exchange? Why not invite our 
American republic, the granddaughter 
of Germany, as a Teutonic nation, to 
cooperate? 

"The only thing required for a world 
peace agreement is the cooperation of 
three or four of the leading civilized 
powers against disturbers." 

After paying a tribute to the Rus- 
sian emperor for calling the first 
peace conference. Mr. Carnegie said. 

"Surveying the world today, the 
most striking figure to be seen Is that 
of another emperor — the German em- 
peror — who recently celebrated his 
twenty-fifth year of a peaceful reign. 
His hands are unstained with human 
blood — a unique record. Hence Ger- 
many's astounding progress, educa- 
tionally. Industrially and commercially, 
proving that the greatest of all na- 
tional blessings Is peace. 

"If the German emperor were to Irj.- 
vite the chief nations to confer upon 
the best methods for securing and in- 
suring the world's peace, success woula 
certainly follow." 

Praise for White. 

Mr. Carnegie then reviewed how- 
Andrew D. White, former ambassador 
at St. Petersburg and Berlin, had left 
the first conference at The Hague 
when the German delegation was about 
to withdraw, and by an appeal to the 
German emperor has secured Its con- 
tinued attendance. He suggested a 
repetition of the pilgrimage and an 
appeal to the German emperor to call 
another conference, adding: 

"Men killing each other like wild 
beasts In civilized lands would no long- 
er disgrace humanity! Civilization 
would have supplanted barbarism! God 
speed that day, which I am certain 
will come, and come soon! 

"Man was created to ascend, and by 
the law of his being he must maci;h 
upiward and onward to perfection. Bp 
of good cheer, soldiers of peace! ^11 
goes well In this most holy of holy cru- 
.=;ades. There can be no such word as 
'failure!'" 



DE PALMA AND 
DAWSON LEAD 



}- 



. Aug. 29. — At the end of 
miles the leaders in the 
race were: First, De Pal- 
thlrd. Daw- 
was first; 
practically 



Elgin. Ill 
sixty-seven 
Elgin auto 

ma; second. Rlchenbaclier; 
son. Others were trailing. 

At 75 miles De Palma 
Dawson second. They had 
lapped the others. 

Mulford went out of the race at 83 
miles, hopelessly disabled. Rlchen- 
bacher and Chandler lost many miles at 
the pits. 

Wlsliart threw a tire almost Into the 
grandstand. Mulford was credited with. 
the fastest lap before he quit with a 
broken crankshaft, 7:01. 

The timers announced that at 100 
miles Wisliart led by ten seconds over 
Dawson. 

The timers were in hopeless confu- 
sion for the first 90 miles of the race. 

At 125 miles seven cars were run- 
ning, led by De Palma, Dawson and 
Wishart, according to official an- 
nouncement. The leaders' average waa 
67% miles an hour. 

At 150 miles, half the race. De Palma 
vas first, 132 minutes. 4 seconds; Daw- 
son second. 134 minutes, 24 seconds 
(unofficial). 

They were two and tliree laps ahead 
of the others. 

At 167 miles the race still lay be- 
tween De Palma and Dawson, the lat- 
ter being six minutes behind. The oth- 
were laps behind. 



era 



***S 






THE DAY IN CONGRESS 



SENATE. 
<■ Met «t 11 a. m. 

Tariff bill coRHlderatlon wan re- 
5«uiued, vrKh Senator Httohcoek 
denouncing Democratic caueufi as 
"political machine'* and reopen- 
ing fight over income tax provi- 
sions. 

liObhy committee continued Its 
hearings. 



J. C. R. IMPR OVING. 

a>i?\x^*"f'. ^^""- ^"8^- 29.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— That J. C. R.. the man of 
mystery at the state hospital lor the 
Insane at Rochester, gradually is Im- 
proving and soon may be able to Iden- 
tify himself. Is the belief of Charles 
E. Vasaly, chairman of the state board 
of control, who returned today from 
Rochester. 

According to Mr. Vasaly tests have 
been performed which tend to shotw 
that J. C. R. probably was a petit offi- 
cer on Admiral Sampsons flagship at 
the battle of .Santiago. When shown 
a picture of Admiral .Sampson, "Roe" 
IS said to have Indicated that he rec- 
ognized the officer and also a picture 
of the flagship. Officers of the Insti- 
tution pointed toa picture of the crew 
and then to -Roe," who shook his head 
and pointed to the bridge and then to 
himself. 

The authorities have sent to Wash- 
ington for a a complete roster of Ad- 
miral Sampson's Oagship and hope this 
to discover "Roe's" Identity. 

BURNED TRYING 

TO RESC UE CHILD. 

Robblnsdale, Minn.. Aup. 29. — Tha 
Infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Fltzer is dead and Mrs. Fitzer is seri- 
ously Injured as the result of a fire 
which destroyed their home near here. 
When Mrs. Fitzer returned to the house 
after doing some chores, she found the 
house In flames, and in a vain attempt 
to save the Infant, which had been left 
in the house, was badly burned about 
the face. 



Southern Pacific. 1% 
& West. 1% per cent; 
1 per cent; (Jan. Pac, 



•Ex-dlvldend 
per cent; Nor. 
Am. Smelters, 
2% per cent. 

Money — Sliver, 59%c. 

New York hourly sales: 

11 a. m 127.120 

Noon 190,980 

X. p. in • •• •••■••••••••• • • • • • ■ •■ >^ul,Tc>0 

2 p. m 257.780 



Total 293.400 



Cotton. 

New York. Aug. 29.— Cotton: 
quiet; middling uplands, 12.50- 
12.75; sales. 26,000 bales. 

Futures closed steady. Closing 
September, 12.17; October, 12.27- 
vtmber, 12.18; December, 12.20- 



uarv, 
12.18; 



12.09; 
April, 



February, 
12.23; Mai, 



12.10; 
12.13. 



Spot 
golf, 

bids: 

No- 

Jan- 



W»*r York Moner. 

New York, Aug. 29. — Money on call 
steady, 2%@2%; ruling rate, 2%@2%; 
closing bid 2%@2%. Time loans easier; 
60 days 3% and 90 days, 4%@4%; six 
months, 5 per cent. 

Criose: Prime mercantile paper. 5% 
®6% per cent; sterling exchange weak. 
14.82.75 for 60 day bills, and at 14.85.90 
for demand. Commercial bills, $4. 82% 
Bar stiver, 69 %c; Mexican dollars. 48c. 
Ocvernment bonds steady; railroad 
bonds irregular. 



March, 



London Stocks. 

London. Aug. 29. — American securi- 
ties, were quiet and featureless during 
the forenoon. Prices held within a 
of parity until late In 



small fraction 
the session 
advanced values 
i firm. 



Midway Horse Market. 

Minnesota. Transfer. St. PmiI. Minn., Aug. ».— 
BArrett & Zirammnaii report: Tfioro vmn m. niim- 
btt of lookers on Uio maxtet who eocpect to t>Iace 
orders for horses betw<»*n now and the cIqm of 
atate fair week. Doalera plan t« ha.T« their uaoal 
lajge display of draft horae« at the fair. Llgttt re- 
tail demand. Kaoelois aomewhat limited. 

Drafters, extra llSSWa.lO 

rh-afters. choice 140@irs 

Drafters, common to good.. »0#1S5 

Farm mares and horsea, extra 1S.1@180 

Farm marea and liorsea. oholc© 110(^135 

Farm horMg. common to ODod., T0f*100 

Dellvenr horsea •,•••»••' e6(3>2(>3 

Drivers and eaddlen ....'.'...;. 8.'i(i?220 

Mules, according to size. ..,...• 110@^'>5 



Sonth St. Pawl Mrenfock. 

South St. Paul. Minn., Aug. 29. — Cat- 
tle—Receipts. l.OOrt; killers steady- 
steers, $6.50 to $8.40; eows and heifers' 
$4.50 to $7.25; calves strong to 25c 
higher, $6.00 to $10.75; feeders steady 
to weak, $4.30 to $7.25. ^ 

wh*.n WoiiQf..^ ♦ — Hogs- Receipts, 2,800; weak; range 

when ^afl Street support |7.00 to $8.25; bulk. $7.25 to $8 75 ' 

made the closing Sheep— Receipts, «.900; steady; shorn 

I lambs. $5.00 to $7;»6; shorn wethers 



and 



San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 29. — The 
surprise of the Caminetti trial came 
today when Thomas H. Warrington of 
Sacramento, father of Marsha Warring- 
ton, took the stand in place of his 
daughter. White-haired, clean shaven, 
kindly faced, he testified that F. Drew 
Caminetti, the defendant, charged with 
violating the Mann white slave traffic 
act, called frequently at his house for 
his daughter, under the name of Mr. 
Whitman. 

Mr. Warrington supposed "Whitman" 
was an honorable suitor for his daugh- 
ter's hand, and did not suspect him or 
being an emissary for Maury Dlggs. 

The government was permitted to 
Interrupt the narration of Marsha 
Warrington, begun yesterday, by Ifi- 
troducing her father's testimony. 
Amuilled Girl's Character. 
There was a return, In the cross- 
examination of Mr. Warrington by 
Marshall Woodworth, to the earlier 
tactics of the Diggs trial. A disposi- 
tion to attack the girl's character be- 
gan to show. 

M. J. Sullivan, probation officer of 
.'^.acramento county, testified there had 
pecn nc complaint made to hlni about 
either Lola Norrls nor Marsha War- 
rington previous to their filght on 
March 10. 

Ccmplalnts about both Dlggs and 
Caminetti had been brought to Sulli- 
van about a week before the elope- 
ment to Reno. Two young girls, It was 
said were Involved, and one of them 
W8U5 now in St Catherine's home in 
this city. An attempt to draw out 
their names was rebuked by Judge 
Van Fleet. 

Heard off Haabaad's Acts. 
For the first time since the story of 
her husband's Infidelity became pub- 
lic. Mrs. Maury L DlggB heard it yes- 
terday from the lips of Marsha War- 
rington. '*the other woman." Marsha 
told the same story that branded 
Dlggs a white slaver, and told It more 
firmly, more audibly, though in leas 
detail. 

In the case of F. Drew Caminetti, 
on trial for alleged violation of the 
Mann white slave act, as In that of 
Dlggs, she remains the chief witness 
for the government, although the 
name of Lola Noirts ta the one 
coupled with that of Caminetti In the 
indictment 

Mrs. Dlggs listened «ntentlr, rig- 
Idly, wincing at passages of the tes- 
timony. 

"Hew often did ycu meet him?" 
ai ked Theodore Roche, conducting the 
dliect examination. 

"About every other night," an- 
swered Marsha Warrington. 

Mrs. Dlggs flinched and her brows 
t'ghtened. Beside her sat one of her 
husband's aunts, stroking her clenched 
hands soothingly. Diggs himself was 
at the rear of the courtroom, among 
the spectators. 

Many Spectators Women. 
Many of the spectators were women. 
WTien the testimony and the exhibits 
became salacious — so much so that 
the policeman testifying hesitated and 
looked about him nervouslv before 
asking the court if he should plunge 
Into specific details — Judge Van Fleet 
warned that no woman could remain 
and hear what was about to be 
spoken except at the expense of her 
delicacy. Not one stirred. 

Concluding her testlmonv for the 
day, Marsha Warrington walked to a 
seat at the table of counsel for the 
government. Facing her. as she drew 
near, stood Mrs. Dlggs, at the table 
of counsel for the defense, atarinff her ' 



HOU9E3. 

Met at Booa. 

Speaker Clark designated Rep> 
rescntatlve Hay as acting npeaker 
during his absence In Maine. 

CouHlderation of Hetch Hetchy 
reservoir bill resumed. 

Representative Brltton Intro- 
duced bill to appropriate $7,000,- 
000 for government armor factory. 

Administration currency bill re- 
Introduced by Chairman Glass of 
banking committee. 

Passed Joint resolution to re- 
Instate Adolph linger of Ohio as 
military cadet, and agreed to 
resolution to authorise appoint- 
ment of Thomas G. Peyton, Ala- 
bama, as cadet. 

Representative McDermott, be- 
fore lobby Investigating contaalt- 
tee, catrgorleally denied charges 
against him by M. M. Mulhall and 
1. H. McMichaels. 



GAY & STURGIS 

326 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Members of the New York and Bos- 

ton Stock Exchanges. 

Listed Securltlea IncladingFRAC- 

TIOXAL LOTS bouipht and sold on 

both exchanges. 

Special AnenHoR t% Local SecurlHii. 

DIRECT PRIVATE WIRE TO 
Boston, New York. Detroit, Chi- 
cago, Uoagbtua »m* Calumet. 
\\ e have a full aad complete Sta 
tistlcal Departmeat, which !■ ■« 
your ser>lee at all times. Corres- 
poudenee aoiiolted. 
R. T. GOODELL. Resident Manairer 
W. J. NORTH. Assistant M^EJ* 
BOTH PHONES, 2210 



MONEY IN WHEAT 

bushels of wheat. No Further Rlsk- 

A movement of 5c from price gives yon 
chance to take $500.00; 4c $400 00- 
$300.00, etc. Write fo^ pirtlculara 
THE CENTRAL STOCK & GRAI " 
Park Bldg., Cleveland. Ohio, 



3a. 
CO. 






SAYS LIND ASSURED 
HUERTA'S ELECTION 



Court In the Matter of the 
Holbrook Hawkea, 



Mexico City, Aug. 29. — "John Lind 
thought to come, to see and to con- 
quer." according to El Dlaro • today, 
"but Frederlco Qamboa was able to 
counter and to dominate him. In the 
first encounter the Collosus of the 
North was turned from Its course, dis- 
concerted. In the second encounter It 
abandoned the field. 

"John Lind has come to Mexico to as- 
sure the election of VIctorJano Huerta. 
All ambitions, all rancor and all In- 
trigues have dissolved in front of the 
diplomatic triumph which we have 
gained. There la not an honest Mexi- 
can soul who will not vote for Vic- 
torlano Huerta. because the president 
of the United States of America at- 
tempts foolishly to exclude him from 
the contest 

"As for the revolutionists' candi- 
dates, they may be considered defeated 
in advance, precisely for the reason 
that they appear as the candidates of 
the American White House." 

The article concludes by likening 
Frederic Oamboa to David, "conquer- 
ing the Ooliath of American diplo- 
macy." 



Oarransa's Brother Pleased. 

Eagle Pass, Tex.. Aug. 29. — General 
satisfaction with President Wilson's 
Mexican message was expressed to- 
day in a statement by Gen. Jesus Car- 
ranza. acting head of the Constitut<on- 
alists at their orovislonal capital. Pied, 
ras Negras. He spoke In the absence 
of his brother. Governor Carranza. who 
la fiffhting at Torreon. 

Constitutionalists, Gen. Carranza 
said, appreciate the fairness of the 
message. He predicted, however, that 
war would confnue because Huerta 
T^ould be unable to comply with 
An erlcan suggestions and that Huer- 
ta would have to be "driven from the 
ocuntry" before peace could be 
stored. 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

In Probate 

Estate of Theron 
Decedent. 

w -^ certain Instrument purporting to 
be the last will and testament of The- 
ron Holbrook Hawkes. having be2i 
ffnTn}% '° this court and tife peS 
dnlv fli J^''„''^"^^ ^"'■"^ Hawkes belnff 
Y^^ ^}tf herein, representing, among 
otlier things that said decedent thef 
being a resident of the county 'of St 
Louis, State of Minnesota, died testate 
in the county of St Louis. States of 
Minnesota, on the 22nd day of Auiriist 
1913. and that said peutfoner Is*"hi 
widow of said decedent and that she 
is named In said purported will as sole 
^^olT^ ^S**. legatee thereunder, and 
praying that said Instrument be al- 
\^Z^^ m •* admitted to probate as the 
last will and testament of said dece- 
with' ^tH** '^»^t letters of administration 
with the win annexed be Issued to 
Florence Curtis Hawkes, Wm. M. Prln^ 
die and A. W. Frick. thereon. It Is or- 
dered -That said petlUon be heard be- 
rore this court at the Probate Court 
Rooms in the Court House, in Duluth. 
In said County on Monday the 2Xnd 
day of September. 1913, at ten o'clock 
\.ii *^*^ *'' persons interested in 
?a'<l hearing and In said matter, are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause, If any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. Ordered further. That this 
order be served by publication In The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. and 
that a copy of this order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St Louis 
Countv not less than ten days prior to 
said day of hearing, and by malllni 
a copy of this order to each heir an< 
interested party at least fourteen days 
before the said date of hearing 

Dated at Duluth, Minn.. Aug. 28, 191$ 
By the Court,' 
a W. GILPIN. 
Judge of Probate 
Attest: A. R. MORTON. Clerk of Pro- 
bate, 
Seal. Probate Court. St. Louis Co., Minn. 
BALDWIN A BALDWIN 
Attorneys for Petitioner 
Duluth, Minn. 
D. H., Aug. 29, Sept 5. 12. 1913. 



re- 



MINERAL RANGE ROAD 
TO C HARGE 2 CENTS. 

Calumet Mloh., Aug. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Mineral Range rail- 
road, a subsidiary of the Duluth, South 
Shore & Atlantic, announced today 
that after Sept. 1 It will come under 
the 2-cent rate law. meeting the rates 
of the Copper Range road, this not to 
affect Interstate business, however. 
The Mineral Range has been more or 
less drawn into litigation of the South 
Shore with the state In the parent 
road's fighting the order to come un- 
der the 2-c«nt law. 



CITY NOTICES. 

CONTRACT^ WORK— 

Office of the Commissioner of Publto 

Utilities. City of Duluth, Minnesota. 

Aug. 29. 1913. ^ 

Sealed proposals will be received at 
the office of the manager of the water 
and light department until three 
o'clock P. M. Sept 8. 1913, for laying 
of gas and water mains In various 
streets and alleys of the city. 

A certified check for ten per cent 
of the amount bid, certified by some 
bank authorized to do business in 
the State of Minnesota, and made 
payable to the order of the Treasurer 
of the City of the City of Duluth 
must accompany each proposal. 

Proposals must be addressed to the 
Manager, Water and Light Depart- 
ment. City of Duluth, and Indorsed 
•Bid for Laying Gas and Water 
Mains." 

The City reserves the right to re- 
ject any or all bids. 

CITY OF DULUTH, 
By C. S. PALMER. 

_ Clerk. 

LEONIDAS MERRITT. 

Commissioner. 
D. H.. Aug. 2^. SO. 1913. D 8»8. 



m 



( 



T 



^Ub 



ft »i 





Friday, 



THE DULUTI^ HERALD 



August 29, 1913. 



WEST DULUTH 

HKRALD BKAIVCU OPFICKSi 
A. Jenncn. 330 Xorlh STth Av«. W. J. J. IMomn. aiOV^ North Central Ave. 

Herald's West Duluth reporter may be reached after 
hour of goin^ to press at Calumot 173-M and Cole 247. 



ESCAPE WAS 
MIRACULOUS 

Steel Plant Workman Falls 

Sixty-Five Feet and 

Lives. 



Broken Thigh and Broken 

Arm His Only 

Injuries. 



Charles Johnson, 27 years old, sus- 
tained a compound fracture of the 
thigh, a broken right arm and severe 
scratches of the face In a fall of sixty- 
five feet from the steel frame over the 
stock pit at the steel plant at 9:20 
o'clock this morning. He was brought 
to the Duluth hospital at 10 o'clock and 
his chances of complete recovery are 
very good. 

His escape from instant death Is be- 
lleveil to be nothing short of a miracle. 
He slipped from tlie end of a large 
bt-am and went straight through a net 
work of steel beams to the bottom 
where he landed on the sloping sides of 
a sand bank. Employes who saw him 
tail saw that he missed striking a 
monster beam by bart-ly an inch. This 
would have caused his Instant death. 

In tailing he struck on his right side. 
He carried in his clothes and belt on 
this side a large wrench and several 
rivets. These are believed to have been 
instrumental in causing the compound 
fracture of the thigh. 

Workmen rushed almost instantly to 
the man after his fall expecting to find 
only his mangled remains. He was 
conscious and able to talk when picked 
up. They took him to the Northern 
I'aciflc train and were able to gel him 
quickly to the hospital. He is reported 
to be resting easily and hospital at- 
tendants believe that he will fully re- 
cover. 

Johnson was employed by the West- 
ern Steel construction company which 
has the contract for the erection of 
the frame work for the stock pit. He 
made his home in a West Duluth board- 
ing house. He has a brother residing 
in the West end. 



VACANT HOUSES 

ARE VERY SCARCE 



West Duluth Has Serious 

Housing Problem on 

Its Hands. 

The housing problem In West Du- 
luth is said to be becoming serious. 
Families coming to the city the heads 
of which are employed at the steel 
plant and other new industries in this 
end of the city, are finding difficulty 
in securing homes. 

Rtsidents and business men of West 
Duluth are looking to the real estate 
Interests to get these men located in 
West Duluth. They want flat build- 
injrs or other houses for their accom- 
modation. 

Most of the houses now offered for 
rf-nt are said to be in dilapidated con- 
dition and very few of them with 
modern conveniences. Something will 
have to be done soon to provide more 
homes, they say, or these people will 
be locating In other sections of the 
city or possibly be compelled to leave 
the city entirely. 



WILL HEAR REPORT 

ON EX TENSION. 

Members of the West Duluth 
Commercial club will listen to a re- 
port of Its committee on street rail- 
way extension this evening. John J. 
Frey, chairman of the committee 
stated this morning that he had fig- 
ures showing that the city could build 
the f.xtension and equip the line with 
r.^lllng stock for $180,000. 

He said that he would suggest that 
the city issue bonds for this purpose 
which would he offered to the Du- 
luth public for Investment. He maln- 
fain**d that this line would be a pay- 
ing Investment from the start and 
that to show his faith in the project 
he would Invf-st In the bonds to the 
e.xtenl of fS.OOO. 



WIDOW ASKS TO BE 
NAMED A DMINIS TRATRIX. 

Mary O'Brien, widow of Frances 
H^nry O'Brien, who died, aged 57, at 
iw* h >me, 32R South Fifty-seventh ave- 
nue west, on April 21 last, yesterday 
petiti'.ned the probate court for let- 
ters of admir istratlon in his estate. 
Mr. O'Brien left property valued at 
about |4,'>00. Besides his widow he 
is survived by two daughters and one 
son. 



FORMER WEST DUIUTH 

PASTOR VISITS CITY 




REV. C. W. SCHEVENIUS. 

Rev. C. W. Schevenius, former pastor 
of the Bethany Norwegian Danisii M. 
E. church. Sixty-fifth avenue west and 
Polk street, now professor at the Nor- 
wegian Theological seminary at Evans- 
ton, 111., is visiting members of his for- 
mer congregation in West Duluth. He 
will preach to members of his former 
flock on Sunday evening. 

Rev. Mr. Schevenius was pastor of 
the West Duluth church for about two 
years. He left here a year ago to ac- 
cept a position as instructor in the 
theological seminary. 



of Mr. and Mrs. John Deutch, 4722 
West Sixth street. Mr. Hanson Is a 
member of the firm which has the 
contract for the construction of the 
new R. E. Denfield high school. 

Mrs. Hulda Soderberg and children, 
327 North Sixty-third avenue west, has 
returned from a two months' visit to 
relatives In the Twin Cities and 
Southern Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Llnd, 216 South 
Sixty-third avenue west, left yester- 
day for New York Mills, Minn., where 
they will spend two weeks visiting 
relatives. 

Miss Ethelyeen Le Clear of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., who has been spending 
the past six weeks visiting at the 
home of her aunt, Mrs. John Clover, 
23 North Fifty-fourth avenue west, 
left la.st evening for Chicago, en route 
for her home. 

Miss Sarah Clark, 123 North Fifty- 
seventh avenue west, who has been 
spending a week camping with friends 
at Solon Springs, returned home yes- 
terday. 

Mrs. P. Le Fave. 518 South Sixtieth 
avenue west, is spending a few days 
visiting relatUes at Bralnerd. 

Em;l Franks of Eveleth is a guest 
of a few days of West Duluth rela- 
tives. 

Mrs. T. F. Olson, 512 North Fifty- 
ninth avenue west, who was called to 
the Twin Cities on account of the 111- 
n«ss of relatives, and daughter, Ber- 
nlce, are expected to arrive home this 
evening. 

Miss Baibara Janoskl, 6025 Rocse- 
velt street. Is spending a week vlslt- 
1ns; relatives In Virginia. 
Watch repairing. Hurst. W. Duluth. Adv 

The Citizens' State bank Is open for 
all banking business from 6 to 8 p. m. 
Saturday evening. 

ALL ABOARTfOR 



HIBBiNG FAIR 



Duluth Special Will Leave 

Union Station at 8:15 

Saturday. 

On to Hlbblng! 

Promptly at 8:15 tomorrow morning 
a special train to the range city will 
leave the union station, for the benefit 
of Duluth people anxious to assist 
In the celebration of Duluth day at 
the St. Louis county fair. 

Members of the trade extension com- 
mittee of the Duluth Commercial club 
arc busy today rounding up prospec- 
tive excursionists. Chairman Frank 
Gravel and other members of the com- 
mittee are eager that a representa- 
tive crowd of Duluth people make the 
trip. Many tickets have already been 
sold and many more will be disposed 
of before the train leaves tomorrow 
morning. 

The Third Regiment band, which has 
been engaged and paid for by private 
subscription, will accompany the party. 
The tickets being ' sold by the com- 
mittee carry no extra charge, cover- 
ing only the transportation and admis- 
sion to the fair grounds. 

Duluth people will make Duluth day 
one of the big days at the fair. Last 
year about 250 Duluth people made the 
trip on a special train. Many more 
are expected to go tomorrow in order 
that Duluth's interest in the fair may 
be properly shown. 



AUTO SERVICE WILL 

BEG IN WE DNESDAY. 

The automobile service between the 
end of the Grand avenue street car line 
and the New Duluth postofflce will 
start Wednesday morning Instead of 
Monday morning as announced. The 
car to be used in the traffic will not be 
ready in time to have It equipped on 
the former date, according to an- 
nouncement made today. 



Picnic at Grassy Point. 

The Young People's societies of the 
Norwegian Lutheran churches of the 
city will hold a picnic Sunday after- 
noon at Grassy Point. They will take 
the street cars to Seventy-first avenue 
and walk to the picnic grounds. A 
picnic luncheon will be served at 5 
o'clock. 

The church societies which will be 
represented will be Our Savior's Nor- 
wegian of West Duluth, the Zion of the 
West end and the First Norwegian 
Lutheran from uptown. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

The Ladies' Aid society of the St. 
Jameii Catholic church will be enter- 
tained Thursday afternoon at GlUey's 
hall, 322 North Central avenue. The 
hostesses for the afternoon will be 
Mrs. M. Burns, Mrs. Thomas Trudeau, 
Mrs. Jacob Glum and Mrs. Mary Mc- 
Nulty. 

TIr.«. M. C. Murray, 419 North Fifty- 
fourth avenue west, was pleasantly 
surprised in honor of her birthday last 
evening. About thirty-five friends of 
the family attended the celebration. 

Misses "Delia and laabelle Fellb, 8 
.V'irth Fifty-ninth avenue west, are 
f>xpected to return home tomorrow 
from Aitkin where they have been 
sp> nding a week visiting relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hanson, of Chip- 
pewa Falls, are visiting at the home 



Superior 



inarlne 



AIR TO RAISE 
SUNKEN BOAT 



Compressed Air System Will 

Be Used on Great 

Lakes. 



Steamer Keystorm Will Be 

Brought to the 

Surface. 



Work of raising the steamer Key- 
storm, which lies In deep water near 
Kingston In the St. Lawrence river, 
will be started at once with an equip- 
ment closely resembling in principle 
the compressed air systems used in 
constructing tunnels under water. 

The Keystorm lies on her starboard 
side on a sloping bottom with a 
pocket beneath the center of the ship. 
At her bow the water is seventy feel 
deep and at her stern 122 feet. About 
lO'^ feet of the middle of the 
vtssel has ten feet of water under it. 
She has a hole thirty feet long and 

four feet wide on her starboard side. 

A. J. Lee of Montreal, representing 
the Compressed Air Salvage company, 
which has the contract from the un- 
derwriters, explained the plan his 
company intends to follow. The en- 
tire vessel win be hatched with half- 
Inch steel plating with airlocks for 
entering over each hold. Kach hold 
also will have valves for air to entei 
and for air to escape. 

When the hatches have been cov- 
ered by divers, men, experienced in 
working under air pressure will en- 
ter the air locks and repair the breaks 
in the ship's hull from the inside. As 
each break is repaired the water will 
be forced out until each hold is free 
from water. As soon as repairs are 
completed the holds will be reiilled 
with water to prevent the ship ris- 
ing too rapidly, which might cause tho 
hatches to give way under the heavy 
air pressure. 

Should the air in the holds prove 
to be of insufficient buoyancy air 
pontoons will be placed over the 
places where additional lifting power 
Is needed. 

The Keystorm has only two water- 
tight bulkiieads, one between the fore- 
peak and No. 1 hold and one between 
the engine room and No. 3 hold. Holds 
Nos. 1, 2 and 3 are common and the 
wreckers say this Is to their disad- 
vantage as air must be pumped Into 
all three holds at the same time to 
prevent bulkheads from weakening. 

Although not a new plan of opera- 
tion the compressed air system Is said 
never to have been used on a lake 
boat It is said to have been used 
successfully on the coast where deep 
water prevented the ordinary methods 
of wrecking being employed. 

holidaTwill 
delay boats 



Ore Shipments Will Be Seri- 
ously Delayed Next 
Week. 



Howard, Hanna, ll^D; P. Mlnch, 11:50. 
Down: Van VT|>tJ?, Foster, Mitchell, 
noon, Thursday r*«'3S4mndotte, 12:30 p. 
m.; Saunders, Clement, 12:45; Farrell, 
2; Munro, Veronica, Athens, 2:45; Al- 
legheny. 3:50; Stanton. 4:15; C. K. 
Warner. 4:25; H,W. Smith, 5; Aurora, 
5:10; Gilbert. 6:30; McWilllams. 6:85; 
Lyman Smith, 6:40; Palmer, 6:45; Wil- 
liam Livingstone, 7:05; Matthews, 
10:15; Wlssachlckoru 10:40; Sylvania, 
12:40 a. m., Friday; Ball Bros., 1:10; 
Wisconsin, 2:30; RenKselaer. Manda, 3; 
Viking, 4; Saxona, 4:20; Maritana, 4:30; 
Kenora, 5; Ashley, 6:30; W. G. Mather, 
6:50; Wells. $7.60; : Penobscot. 9:50; 
Glen Ellah, 10;]B; EJ^jfls, 10:50. 

Port efT^lutli. 

Arrivals — H. A. Seswind. Christopher, 
James Wood, Agassiz, coal; Superior, 
merchandise; Reglna, Plummer, light 
for grain; Mohegan, light for lumber; 
Harvester, F. C. Ball, P Reiss, W. J. 
Olcott. Baker, Mavtham, Alex Thomp- 
Bon. J. J. Hill, Waldo, Odanah, Filbert, 
Block, Berry, Roberts, Jr., light for ore. 
Departures — L. L. Barth, coal for 
Knife River; A. M. Norrls, G. W. French, 
light; Mariposa. M. A. Hanna, W. J. 
Olcott, J. P. Walsh, Baker, A. W. 
Thompson, Berrv. Roberts, Jr.; J. J. 
Hill, Thomas Maytham, Shenango, 
Princeton, Krupp Maricopa, Kopp, W. 
L. Brown, ore; Lakeport, North Sea, 
merchandise: Canadian, Fitch. Conesto- 

a, grain: Kalkaska. Fryer, Slrus, lum- 

er. 



i 



Banquet to New Citizens. 

state Senator Victor Lindley and H. 
F. Burt, superintendent of the Lake 
Superior mission will be the principal 
speakers this evening at the new citi- 
zens' banquet to be held at the Supe- 
rior hotel. Besides those who recently 
passed examination for citizenship a 
number of the court attaches will at- 
tend the banquet. 

• 

New Warehouse. 

The Galena Signal OH company will 
erect a $10,000 warehouse and boiler 
room on Winter street, near the 
Northern Pacific railroad tracks. The 
contract was let yesterday to W. F. 
Hill. The building will be constructed 
of brick and will be 38x60 feet. The 
boiler room will be 20x30 feet. It it 
to be completed late this fall. 

Will Attend Conference. 

A party of S\iperlor "Bull Moosers" 
will leave tomorrow evening for Chi- 
cago to attend a conference of the 
party which will be held there Sun- 
day. Among the local men who will 
attend the meeting are: Martin Pat- 
tlson. Dr. A. S. Andrews and Dr. R. 
C. Ogllvie. 



Fleet Has l.oat Torpedoca. 

Norfolk, Va., Aug 29. — Uncle Sam 
will pay $20 each for the return of 
several torpedoes lost by battleships 
during the target practice now being 
held on the southern drill grounds. 

"It win be perfectly safe," said Rear 
Admiral Badger, "to handle these tor- 
edoes upon the beach or to tow them 
y the nose." 



& 



Vessel owners predict a shortage of 
ore to load next week on account of 
the holiday Monday. That will take 
Sunday and Monday out of the week 
and the ore Is not being handled any 
too fast under normal conditions, the 
Bliippers say. 

The Mlssabe docks will be a little 
shy on ore because of the layoff of 
the men for the big labor holiday 
and It is probable that the Allouez 
docks will also be idle Monday. The 
Great Northern docks are still a little 
under normal in handling ore. There 
are enough men but the men are not 

experienced In the work. Shippers 
predict It will be several weeks before 
the docks are going as well as they 
were before the strike. 

New grain, mo.stly rye and flax. Is 
arriving at the Head of the Lakes in 
small quantities. The heavy ship- 
ments will net come In until about 
the middle of September. It is the 
opinion of shippers that the grain 
movement will not start until that 
time and that the movement will be 
regulated by the demands for elevator 
space in the upper lake ports. 

Stocks of grain in store In the Du- 
luth-Supcrlor elevators are heavier 
than they have been for some years. 
The grain shipping, after It starts, is 
expected to be heavy until navigation 

closes. 

« 

Sault Passages. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Aug. 29. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up: Boston, 
noon Thursday; Huronic, Sonoma, 1 
p. m.; Normanla. 1:30; Cornelius, Paris, 
Gary, 2; Calumet, 2:30; Walters, 3; 
Congdon, Ontario. Turret Crown, 4; 
liriton and whaleback, Marlska, Rees, 
Victory, Trimble, Hydrus, 6; Chill, 6:30; 
John Relss, 7; Gates, Fritz. 8; Willis 
King. 8:30; Manitoba Oliver. 9; Mid- 
land Prince, 10; Helen C. Widener. 
10:30; Sheldon, Parks. 11:30; Thomas 
Barium, midnight: Riddle. 12:30 a. m. 
Friday; Ishpeming, 1; Cherokee, 
Goshawk. Nelson, Holland, 2; Morgan, 
Jr., Samuel Morse, 4; Moll. Pontiac, 5; 
Dustin, 7; Booth, 9:30; Morgan, 10; 
Zimmerman, 10:30; Cowl, 11. 

Down: Brazil, Lakewood. 1 p. m. 
Thursday; Charles Hutchinson, 1:30; 
Falrbairn, 2:30; Cuddy, 3; Samuel 
Mather (l.irge), 3:30: Black, 4:30; Ma- 
taafa, 5:30; Major, Choctaw, 6; Qulncy, 
Shaw, 6:30; Crete, 7; Burnham, 7:30: 
Ohl. Neepawah, 8; Nettleton, 8:30; Cole, 
9:30; Crawford, 10:30; Paine, 11:30; 
Mary Elphlcke. 12:30 a. m. Friday; Sul- 
livan. 1; Wolvln, 2; Stebrenner, 3: 
Agnew, 3:30; Reed. Craig, 4; Lakeland 
(steel). Wolf, 5; Amasa Stone, Sacra- 
mento, Chieftain, 6; Republic, 7:30; 
Orinoco, Grampian, Paisley, 9; Ranney, 
11. 

Detroit Passages. 

Detroit, Mich., Aug. 29.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Up: Saranac, 12 15 
p. m. Thursday; Nye, 1; Howe, Marl- 
tana, 1:15; Matoa, 2; L. B. Miller, J. E. 
Upson, 2:30; Slnaloa, 2.40; Keefe, 
James Brown. 3:15; Shenandoah. 
Montezuma, 3:35; steamer Lilly, 4:20; 
Nottingham, 4:50; Corrigan, 5:40; 
Taurus, 6:10; Colonel, 10:50; Empress, 
Fort William, 1:20 a. m., Friday; tug 
Maytham, Clint, 1:30; Zenith City, 
Stearn. Nyanza. 1:40; Owfego. 3; J. E. 
Davidson, 8:80; Townsend, 4; Den- 
mark, 4:15; Lumbermen, barge, 4:30; 
Morrow, 4:40; Fordbnlan, 6:10; Ken- 
nedy, 6:20; Colgate, Mala, 6:30; Jones, 
6:60; Saxon, Jenney, 8:60; Parent, 9:30; 
Bangor, 10; Bunsen, 10:16; Coralla, 
10:30; Norton. 10:60; Caldera, ll:80i 



LBGAIi NOTICBS. 

BlDSl/ANTEO 



Sealed bids will be received by the 
Recorder of the Village of Proctor- 
knott up to four o'clock on the 2nd day 
of Sept., 1913, for the grading of cer- 
tain streets and highways in the Vil- 
lage of Proctorknott, such street grad- 
ing to be done according to plans and 
specifications now on file In the of- 
fice of said Village Recorder. The 
names of the streets to be so graded, 
together with all Information con- 
cerning such street grading, will be 
furnished bidders by said Village Re- 
corder upon application therefor. All 
bids must be accompanied by a draft 
or certified check in the sum of ten 
per cent of the bid to insure the sign- 
ing of contract and the furnishing of 
the proper and suitable bond. The Vil- 
lage Council of said Village reserves 
the right to reject any and all bids. 

By Order of the Village Council of 
the Village of Proctorknott. Dated at 
Proctorknott, St. Louis County, Min- 
nesota, this 27th day of August 1913. 

WM. CHISHOLM, 
Attest: Village President. 

R. G. WOMBACHER, 
Village Recorder. 
D. H., Aug. 28, 29 aijd 30. 



BIDS WANTED 



Sealed bids will be received by the 
Recorder of the Village of Proctor- 
knott up to four o'clock on the Second 
day of Sept. 1913, for the construction 
of certain cement sidewalks upon cer- 
tain streets In the Village of Proctor- 
knott, such cement sidewalks to be 
built according to plans and specifica- 
tions now on file in the office of said 
Village Recorder. The names of the 
streets upon which sidewalks are to be 
built together with all Information 
concerning such construction work 
will be furnished bidders by said Vil- 
lage Recorder upon application there- 
for. All bids must be accompanied by 
a draft or certlflced ch«ck In the sum 
of ten per cent of the bid to Insure 
the signing of contract and the fur- 
nishing or the proper and suitable 
bond. The Village Council of said Vil- 
lage reserves the right to reject any 
and all bids. 

By Order of the Village Council of 
the Village of Proctorknott. Dated at 
Proctorknott. St. Louis County, Min- 
nesota, this 27th day of August, 1913. 

WM. CHISHOLM. 
Attest: Village President. 

R. G. WOMBACHER, 
Village Recorder. 
D. H.. Aug. 28, 29 and 30. 

NOTICE OF SEALED BIDS 

Notice Is hereby given. That sealed 
bids will be received by the Village 
Council of the Village of Keewatin, 
Minnesota, on Tuesday, September 9th, 
1913, up to the hour of eight (8) o'clock 
P M., for the furnishing and installa- 
tion of the following: 

One <1) Reciprocating Engine, One 
(1) Generator, One CI) Exciter, One (1) 
Switchboard and Equipment; all ac- 
cording to the specifications on file in 
the office of the Village Clerk. 

Each bill must be accompanied by a 
certified check for ten per cent of the 
amount of such bid. 

The Council reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids. 

Dated at Keewatin, Minnesota, Au- 
gust 20th, 1913. ^ 
* J. J. ROBfiRTS, 

Village Clerk. 
D. H., Aug. 23, 1913. 



ADDIXIOPSIAL WAIMXS 

FROIVI PA.GE:S 21 A.IVD 22. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— SINGLE MAN, 
age 26; speaks German and English, 
In store; clothing store preferred; 
card writer, window trimmer and 
six years' experience as a clerk. 
Al references. Address W. D., Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — LICENSED 
chauffeur, two years' experience, 
desires position, at present em- 
ployed, but wishes to better him- 
self; private residence preferred. 
V 86, Herald. 



AUTOS & MOTORCYCLES. HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 



SITUATION WANTED — SINGLE 
man, age 27, good habits, wishes po- 
sition as traveling salesman for 
wholesale, retail or specialty firm; 
best of references. Address C 411, 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — MAN, 23 
years, seven years' experience in 
general store, can speak Finnish and 
English, sober and reliable; can fur- 
nish references. T 340, Herald. 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — BS. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Moses 

Gibeau. Decedent, 

A certain Instruntent purporting to 
be the last will and testament of Moses 
Gibeau, having been presented to this 
court and the petition of Napoleon 
Gibeau, being duly filed herein, rep- 
resenting, among other things, that 
said decedent, then being a resident of 
the county of St. Louis, State of Min- 
nesota, died testate in the county of 
St Louis, State of Minnesota, on the 
nth day of July, 1913. and that said 
petitioner is a son of said decedent and 
that Bridget Gibeau is named In said 
purported will as executrix thereof, 
and praying that said Instrument be al- 
lowed and admitted to probate as the 
last will and testament of said de- 
cedent, and that letters testamentary 
be issued to Bridget Gibeau thereon. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard before this court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms In the Court House, 
in Duluth. In said County on Monday, 
the 15th day of September, 1913, at 
ten o'clock A. M., and all persons In- 
terested In said hearing and In said 
matter, are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause, 
if any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law, and 
that a copy of this order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior 
to said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., Aug. 21, 1913. 

By the Court, 

8. W. GILPIN, 
Attest: Judge of Probate. 

A. R MORTON. 
Clerk of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County. 

Minn.) 
HUGH J. McCLEARN. 

Attorney for Petitioner. 
D. H., Aug. 22, 29 and Sept. 5, 1913. 

ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETI- 
TI*.)N FOR ADMINISTRATION — 
State of Minnesota, 

County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Helen W. Slmonds, De- 
cedent. 

The petition of Carlotta L. Slmonds 
having been filed In this Court, repre- 
senting among other things, that 
Helen W. Slmonds, then being a resi- 
dent of tho County of St. Louis, State 
of Minnesota, died Intestate, in the 
County of St. Louis, State of Mlnne^ 
Bota. on the 3rd day of March, 1912; 
Uavlng estate In the County of St. 
Louis, State of Minnesota, and that 
said petitioner Is the daughter of said 
decedent and praying that letters of 
administration of the state of said de- 
cedent be granted to the said peti- 
tioner. 
It ia ordered. Tbat:Mild petition b« 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAR- 
ried man of 24, would like to got 
work in grocery store or some other 
kind of work. Can give best of ref- 
erences. Melrose, fi845. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY FIRST- 
class practical plumber and steam 
fitter, capable of estimating, laying 
out work and handling men. L 370, 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS HOUSE- 
man or Janitor by respectable man; 
good references; milk garden, etc.; 
reasonable wages. Apply W 187, Her- 
ald. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
barkeeper by a German; willing 
worker; Just arrived. Address L. S., 
room 137, Lenox hotel, Duluth, Minn. 



SITUATION WANTED — RESPECTA- 
ble young man of good habits 
wants work in city. T 366, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY FIRST- 
class stenographer, eight years' ex- 
perience; position as private secre- 
tary, or one of considerable respon- 
sibility; best of references fur- 
nished. K 1060, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— A WOMAN OF 
refinement, good appearance, capa- 
ble, desires a position as housekeeper 
in some nice home; will leave city; 
no triflers need apply. Address G 
365, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — GIRL vV^ITH 
few weeks experience wishes posi- 
tion as stenographer and book- 
keeper, willing to start at low sal- 
ary. W 183, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — AMERICAN 
woman with daughter, wants posi- 
tion as housekeeper for widower, 
good rtferences. Address, A. D., 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG LADY 
desires place to work for room and 
board, within walking distance from 
high school. Call Lincoln 224-D. 



SITUATION W^ ANTED — EXTRA 
work to do by competent stenogra- 
pher, during leisure time at office. 
Grand 2043. Melrose 2443. 



# FOR SALE. * 

# One 4-passengfr Buick, over- ^ 
•» hauled. (226. # 

* # 

* One 1913 Regal 5-passenger 40- fif 



horse power touring, $700. 



* 

*. One 1912 Ford touring. |375. 

* 

* One 1913 Bulck 5-passenger, $750. 
^ 

* One 1912 Buick roadster, $425. 

* 

if. KLEYN AUTO COMPANY, 

'X' 627 East Superior St. 



* 
* 






SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady bookkeeper, five years' experi- 
ence, good references. W 189, Her- 
ald. 

SITUATION WANTED — SOME MORi!! 
washing and Ironing to do at home. 
Address 508 East Ninth street. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY STE- 
nographer; high school graduate; ex- 
perienced. Call 651-X Grand. 



SITUATION WANTED — LADIES' 
tailoring and fine dressmaking. Mel- 
rose 1177. 



WANTED TO BUY — LAW BOOKS; 
Dunnell's Minnesota Practice; Dun- 
nell'B Minnesota Digest; Minnesota 
Revised Laws of 1905. C 349, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — GROWERS AND 
shippers of potatoes will do well to 
correspond with us, D. E. Ryan com- 
pany, Minneapolis, Minn. 

IF YOU WANT 
TO SELL YOUR BUSINESS SEE THF 
Duluth Business Exchange, 509 Tor- 
rey Bldg. 

WANTED TO BUY— GOOD DELIVERY 
horse. Singer Sewing Machine com- 
pany, 31 East Superior street. 

Second-hand furniture and stoves. Joe 
Popkin, 29 W. First St Grand 253-X. 

Wanted to Buy — Second-hand furniture 
and stoves. Hagstrom & Lundquist, 
2012 W. Sup. St. Lincoln 447 -A. 

Wanted to Buy — Second-hand stoves, 
ranges, old clothes, furniture. Lltman 
Bros. 332 E. Sup. St. Both 'phones. 

WANTED TO BUY— AN IMPROVED 
farm with stock and machinery; 
must be bargain. 301, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY- -GOOD DELIVERY 
horse. Singer Sewing Machine Co. 
31 East Superior street. 

WANTED TO BUY — GOOD COClCER 
spaniel pup; must be reasonable. 
Address H, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for investment. 
I 69. Herald. 



H. POPKIN BUYS STOVES AND FUR- 
nlture. Grand 2337-A: Mt-lrose 1482. 



M'^anted to Buy — Second-hand stoves 
and furniture. Grand 1665-A 



heard before this Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House 
in Duluth. in said County, on Monday, 
the 8th day of September, 1913, at ten 
o'clock A.M., and ail persons inter- 
ested in said hearing and in said mat- 
ter are hereby cited and required at 
said time and place to show cause. If 
any there be, why said petition should 
not be granted. 

Ordered further. That this order be 
served by publication in The Duluth 
Herald, according to law, and that 
a copy of this order be served on the 
County Treasurer of St. Louis County 
not less than ten days prior to said 
day of hearing, and by mailing a copy 
of this order to each heir and Inter- 
ested party at least fourteen days 
before the said xiate of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., August 15, 
1913. 

Bv the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, Judge of Probate. 
Attest: A. R. MORTON, Clerk of Pro- 
bate. 
Seal Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., Aug. 15, 22, 29. 1913. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 

COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — ss. In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate of James 

B. Walker, decedent. 

The petition of J. O, Walker, as 
representative of the above named de- 
cedent, together with his final account 
of the administration of said estate, 
having been filed in this court, repre- 
senting, among other things, that he 
has fully administered said estate, and 
praying that said final account of said 
administration be examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, and that the 
Court make and enter its final decree 
of distribution of the residue of the 
estate of said decedent to the persons 
entitled thereto, and for the discharge 
of the representative and the sureties 
on his bond. It Is ordered. That said 
petition be heard, and said final ac- 
count examined, adjusted, and if cor- 
rect, allowed by the Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms In the Court House, 
I In the City of DuluUa In said County, 



«- FOR SALE. * 

* * 

* AUTOMOBILE, 1912 MODEL * 

* BUICK, * 
« * 
i^ In first-class condition; cheap. -Sf 

i& Address 621 Manhattan Bldg. # 

Indian Motorcycles win first 
five places In Elgin road race, 
i'rompt deliveries on all spring 
frame Indians, Indian oil and 
I £ repair parts. Walter Holm- 
' * berg, agent, 109 East First St. 




FOR RENT— GRAND AVENUE GAR- 
age, corner Grand and Fifty-sixth 
avenues west, best location In this 
end of city. Apply at Grand avenue 
agency. Phone Calumet 246-L; Cole 
123-A. 



A JOB LOT OF SECOND-HAND TIRES 
for sale cheap. The Duluth Auto 
Supply Co., tire repairing experts, 
412-14 E. Superior St. Zenith 2163; 
Melrose 4102. F. W. Newman, Mgr. 

FOR SALE — TWIN YALE, ALMOST 
new; also second-hand Excelsior; 
repairs on all makes of motorcycles. 
Motorcycle Repair Shop. 312 West 
T'lrst street. 

FOR SALE — ALL KINDS OF TIRES. 
G. & J.. Marathon. U. S., Goodyear and 
Mlcheli 1. Duluth Auto Tire Repair Co., 
828 E. Sup. St. Mel. 776; Grand 939. 



PXDR SALE — ANYONE INTENDING 
to buy a 1914 Overland can save 
about %10 if taken at once. Never 
been run. Address, V 157, Herald. 



Motorcycle repairing and storage. 
Also agents for Harley Davidson 
motorcycles, rear entrance, 312 West 
First street. Melrose 4359. 



FOR SALE— TWO BUICKS IN GOOD 
condition, overhauled; price $250 and 
$300. Kleyn Auto company, 527 East 
Superior street. 

Automobile and carriage upholstering — 
Best work; reasonable prices; work 
guaranteed. M. USEN, 128 E. Mich. St. 



FOR SALE — ONE 1910 MODEL HUD- 
son, five passenger automobile, 
cheap, or wUl trade- for property. 
Call 1926 -A Grand, 

FOR SALE— WINTON 6-CYLINDER, 
7-passenger car; fine condition; a 
bargain; easy terms. Apply 1811 
East Second street. 



FOR SALE— FIRST-CLASS BICYCLE 
with complete repair outfit; willing 
to sell cheap. Inquire 25 East Su- 
perior street. 



FOR SALE— FIVE-PASSENGER CAR: 
in good' running condition; reason- 
able. 509 East Superior street. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 

# WHEN YOU WANT # 

# TO BORROW $10 OR MORE, * 

# # 

^ you naturally want It quickly, con- ji- 

# fidentially and at the most reason- # 
•Jg- able cost. You want to feel that ^ 
■^ you are dealing with a company # 

# who will consider your Interests, # 

# give you every advantage and ex- i^ 
i^ tend the utmost courtesy and con- * 
■jf sideratlon at all times. This service -;)& 

# has pleased many others and is ^ 
^ sure to please you. ^ 
it i^ 
i^ DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, # 

# 307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W, Sup. St. * 

# Open all day and Wednesday and ^ 
^ Saturday evenings. # 

# * 



SALARY AND FURNITURE LOANS. 

SPECIAL VACATION RATES. 

You can pay weekly, semi-weekly or 

monthly. 

Can 3'ou beat these rates 

Borrow $10.00, you pay back $11.00. 

Borrow $20.00. you pay back $21.75. 

Borrow $30.00, you pay back $32.50. 

Borrow $40.00. you pay back $43.25. 

Borrow $50.00, you pay back $54.00. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO., 
301 Palladio Bldg. 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us, 450 Manhattan Bldg., and g*>t 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co.. W. 
Horkan. New 1598-D: Melrose 3733. 

MONEY TO LOAN — HUNTERS— WE 
loan money on rifles, shotguns, re- 
volvers; will hold till next season 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co.. 22 
West Superior street. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
diamonds, furs, watches, all goods of 
value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rates In 
city. Keystone Loan Co., 22 W. Sup. St. 



MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon their own names; cheap 
rates; easy payments; confidential 
H. R. Carr, 5()9 Lyceum building. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE, 
$500. $1,000. $1,500. S. S. Williamson. 
Both 'phones. 515 Torrey building. 

WANTED TO BORROW $700 ON 
$1,700 property at Gary. Address R 
864, Herald. 



MONEY TO LOAN AT 6 PER CENT 
Interest. Write W 78, Herald. 



DRESSMAKING. 

NEW DRESSMAKING PARLORS; 
prices very reasonable. Call Mel- 
rose 4561. 

NEW DRESSMAJ-CING PARLORS AT 25 
East Superior street. Melrose 5525. 

DRE.SSMA KING— 313 WEST FOURTH 
street. Grand 2318-A. 



UPHOLSTERING^ ^ 

Furniture, Autcmoblles, Carriages; rea- 
sonable prices. E. Ott, 112 Ist Ave. W. 



WATCHES REPAIRED^^ 

Guaranteed main springs, $1; watch 
cleaned, $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. 1st. 



on Monday the 22nd day of September, 
1913, at ten o'clock A. M., and all per- 
sons interested In said hearing and in 
said matter are hereby cited and re- 
quired at said time and place to show 
cause. If any there be. why said peti- 
tion should not be granted. Ordered 
further. That this order be served by 
publication in The Duluth Herald, ac- 
cording to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., Aug. 28, 1913. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, Judge of Probate. 
Attest: _ 

A. R. MORTON", Clerk of Probate. 
Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
C E. ADAMS, 

Attorney for Petitioner. 
D. H.. Aug. 29. Sept. 6, 12, l»lt. 



HORSES! HORSE^SI HORSES! 
A HORSE FOR EVERY JOB. 

If you need draft horses, farm mares, 
delivery horses, big mules, driving 
horses or saddlers, we can fill your 
order; 500 to 800 head constantly on 
hand to select from; private sales 
daily; part time given If desired; every 
horse sold guaranteed to be as repre- 
sented. 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET. 



# FOR SALE. 
« # 

a- Two horses, one a 1.900 pound # 

# black mare, 10 years old; other a ^ 

# 1,500 pound bay mare, 8 years old; # 

# will take $300 cash for quick sale. # 

# Call Melrose 113 or Grand 642. # 
« # 



WAGONS. WAGONS. WAGONS. 

A complete line of Studebaker and 
other makes always on hand, includ- 
ing dump, farm, dray, light and heavy 
delivery wagons; bargains In slight- 
ly used vebicles. Write for catalogue. 
L. Hammell Company, Duluth. 



FOR SALE — HORSE. BUGGY, DE- 
livery wagon, delivery sleigh, one 
delivery harness, one buggy harness; 
bay horse weighs about 1,100 pounds, 
will sell separate. 826 East Fifth 
street. 



HORSES — GOOD— HORSES. 
Large selection to choose from; buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding stable, 524 
West First street. 



FOR SALE — HORSE, HARNESS AND 
buggy; horse weighs about 1,100 
pounds; will sell separate. Inquire 826 
East Fifth street. 2096 Grand or 
4856, Melrose. 



FOR SALE — ONE PAIR OF HORSES, 
weight 3,200 pounds, harness and 
wagon, cheap. Call evfninjrs. 29 
West Orange street, Duluth Heights. 
Melrose 6059. 



FOR SALE — 5-YEAR-OLD HORSE, 
weighs about 1,400 lbs.; perfectly 
sound; will sell reasonable If taken 
at once. S. M. Kaner, 1217 East Sev- 
enth street. 



FOR SALE— FIVE HORSES, FROM 4 
to 6 years old, weight from 1,300 to 
1,600 pounds. Inquire Zenith City 
Boiler works. 1523 West Michigan 
street. 



FOR SALE— HORSE, WEIGHT ABOUT 
1,200 pounds; a good horse on light 
delivery wagon. Call at 603 North 
Forty-ninth avenue west. West Du- 
luth. 



FOR SALE — NICE BAY HORSE; IS 
in good condition and good record. 
Apply R. Payne, R. F. D. No. 4, 
Woodland. 



For Sale — Horses of all kinds at lowest 
prices. Runquist stables. 2116 E. 
Water St. Melro se 1127; Grand 1648. 

FOR SALE — TWO SECOND-HAND 
wide tire wagons, cheap; must bo 
sold at once. Call Calumet 24-L. 

FOR SALE— GRAY MARE. WEIGHT 
1,500, 4 years old. Call at 820 Fourth 
avenue east, or Grand 2195. 

FOR SALE — A HORSE; WEIGHT 
1,200 pounds; price $125. Call 120 
First avenue west. 

FOR SALE — 4-YEAR-OLD MARE, 
weight 1,100 pounds. Zenith Broom 
factory. 

FOR .SALE — HORSE, W/GON AND 
harness at 213 Four^ avenue 
west. 

FOR SALF — Forty horsts, all sizes. 28 
E. First St. Western Sales Stable Co. 



_JUSINESS^HANCES^ 

# * 

^ MOVING THEATER OUTFIT, * 
« # 

I t 

# Including incline floor, stage and ^ 
^ scenery, special ticket booth and % 
H- front, 320 opera chairs and latest -JB- 

# Powers 6-A machine; cost $1,700, # 

# will sell half or entire interest # 
■^ at a bargain. jt- 

# * 

I J 

-^ We also have a complete theater ^ 

^ in a good Minnesota town that is i^ 

■Jg. running every day. Will rent en- i^ 

•Ji tire outfit to reliable party. Here ^ 

•^ is a chance to get Into the busi- # 

iir ness without buying a thing. # 

*. NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT CO., # 
ii. 417 West Michigan Street. # 



BUSINESS CHANCES — CAPITAL OF 
$350 will put you Into a self sup- 
porting business, $75 per month net; 
a new strictly high-class proposi- 
tion, best paying investments ever 
put on market; $4,J00 will net you 
$9,000 per year; worthy of your 
closest investigation. C. H. TU ton- 
McKay hotel 

BUSINESS CHANCES — CAN YOU 
beat it. $4,500 for store and flat 
building: rents for $60 per month; 
figure out what this will net i«ju, 
with a mortgage on the property for 
$2,000. St. Louis County Realty com- 
pany 710 Torrey building. Grand, 
1946. 

BU.^INESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Confectionery store and twenty 
furnished rooms in connection ne"<» 
Union depot: best stand in city. 1!»08 
Broadway, Superior, Wis. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE- 
Good hotel, doing goo<j business; 
22 sleeping rooms; feed barn in 
connection. For particulars, write to 
Box 336, Mlnto, N. D. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Laundry clearing over $200 a week; 
old established trade; all new and 
up-to-date machinery; owner's health 
falling. Z 364. Herald. 



FOR SALE— GOOD STOCK OF GEN- 
eral merchandise; located In a new 
Minnesota town; about seventy miles 
from Duluth. W 180. Herald. 



FOR SALE — 54 -ROOM HOTEU COM- 
pletely furnished; central location; 
rent reasonable. 321 W. First street 

FOR RENT— THE WINDSOR TUrT 
klsh bath equipped complete. Inquire 
501 West Michigan street. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Confectionery store, 3101 West Third 
street; good stand. 



^POULTRY AND EG^. _ 

FOR SALE-^FINE WHITE ORPING- 
ton cockerels and fine choice fries. 
Call Melrose 2186. 



DYE W/OIRKS^_^ _ 

Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co.. 
19 Lake Ave. N. Grand 1516; Mel. 1.127. 



SOLESLOBiES 



fAIR 1MM«Ce-PCM4ANCNT POSITIONS 

F.W. WOOLWORTH OtS'tO^SIOM j 
lot -1 04 wesr supfRioR sr. 




■< " '■ " '> " 



i 



m i 





One Cent a Word Each Insertion, 
No Advertl.senifut Loss Than lo Cents. 



FIVE-ROOM HOUSE ON 

DULUTII HEIGHTS. 

ICOO.OO. 



,. Lot 50 by 100; water, barn and 
# chicken house; one-half block 
from carUnt-. found ition new last 
fall. Very reasonable terms. 



CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO. 
•Phones 408. Sellwood Bldg. 



a- 

if- 
it- 

* 

if 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Adrerti.setnent Less Than 13 Cents. 

fWsale^oUsesT' 

(Continued.) 

FOR SALE — EIOHT^^0Om'''h0USe1 
can be used for two families If 
necessary; water, bath, gas and elec- 
tric light; good reason for selUns. 
1620 East Sixth street. 



Jl'OO CASH. 
•With balance on easy payments (like 
rent), buys nice, neat, 4-room cottage 
and three lots, one block from Ely 
school; price 12.000. 

^ ^ .,«v 'S'^*^ CASH 

Mnd JIO.OO per month buys nice six- 
room house on Sixty-fourth avenue 
west; large lot. price |1.000. 

NICE SIX-ROOM HOUSE 
*nd full lot on Fifty-ninth avenue 
west; price ?1.;!0«; can be bought on 
easy terms. 



FOR SALE— SKVEN-ROOM HOUSE AT 
Lakeside: modern except heat; cor- 
ner lot worth 1900 alone; price $2,650 
easy terms. J. H. Howard & Co.. 
I'rovidence building. 



FOI'. SALE— TEN-ROOM CENTRAL 
house, arranged Into two flats; steam 
heat; price $4,200; house could not be I 
built for $5,000. J. D. Howard & Co.. ' 
Providen ce building. 

FOR SALE— THREE FIXE RESI- i 
dences, located In West Duluth, can 
be bought at reasonable prices, part 
cash, balance on time. A 3 27, Herald. 

FOR SALE — $2,800; EIGHT-ROOM 
house at 5022 East Superior street. 
Lakeside: on car Une; lot 50 by 140; ' 
easy terms; phone Lakeside S31-L. 



five-room house with 66-ft. frontage: 
WAter, electric lit?ht, full basement; 
price $2,100, on easy terms. 

GRAND -WKNUE AGENCY. 
Corner Fifty-sixth and Grand avenue 

West. 
Cole 123-A — Phones — Calumet 246-L. 

For sale — for $io per month 

a!',. I small payment down; five-room 
h;>^4Se with some conveniences and 
40-ft. lot. n"ar Thirtieth avenue 
west; your rent money vyill bring re- 
sults If you purchase this. Price 
$1,150. Offer good for short time only. 

An exceptional bargain In new six- 
room house with all conveniences and 
large corner lot, in central west end. 
Property worth $3,200; our price 
|2.t>50. About $1,400 cash required. I 

C. L. RAKOWSKY & CO., 
201 Exchange Bldg. 



FOR SALE— NEW SIX-ROOM HOUSE; 
all conveniences, Including hot wa- 
ter heat; reasonable price. 914 Elev- 
enth avenue east. Gra nd 1859.X. 

FOR SALE — SMALL LAKESIDE 
houses; $1,000 to $2,500 each; on very 
easy terms. Greenfield Realty com- 
Pany, 310-11 Columbia b uilding. 

FOR SALE — TEN-ROOM MODERN 
house and lot; everytlUng in flrst- 
class condition; reasonable with good 
terms. Address C 354. Herald. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE 



LOTS ! LOTS I 



From $175 to $200 each: pay- 
ments $1 to $1.50 per week; no 
Interest* 3 blocks from street 
car, 2 tnocks from new $40,000 
school, 1 block from city water 
and gas mains, at Woodland, 
Just grading the streets and 
opening thig block for salo. 
A snap. 




A READY REFERENCE 

FOR YOUR DAILY NEEDS 

This directoiy is intended for the convenience of anyone 
desiring something a little out of the ordinary in theif 
daily needs and requiring it in a hurry. The firms repre- 
sented below make a specialty of immediate service and 
will gladly furnish any information that is necessary. Re- 
member, satisfaction is guaranteed by every advertiser. 

Just Use Your Telephonel 

SEE IT 11 THE HERALD EVERY DAY 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TBNt'X'aWNTNG^Co7"4T3 
East Superior street. Both phones. 

DULUTH TENT & AWNING COMPANY. 
Get prices. 1608 W. Superior street. 



FURNITURE. 




ACCOUNTANT. 



WHITNEY WALL CO. 



For Sale — Nice cottage, very central; 
must be sold; make us an offer; very 
easy terms, 577 



Eli;ht-room house, gas, sewer and 
water, near lake in East end; very 
nice home on your own terms. 206 

WHITNEY WALL CO., 
301 To rrey Bldg. 

koR SALE— $500 CASH AND $25 PER 
month buys a fine new, strictlv 
modern 8-room home In Woodland, 
laige lot, fine view, convenient to 
car and school. Price $5,000. 

(New Cobb-Woodland school now 
nearly completed.) 



W. B. ROE. 412 Pro vidence Bldg. 

FOR SALE— ONE ACRE AND FOUR- 
room house; about one-quarter now 
In garden, currants, etc.; twenty lay- 
ing hens, poultry house and fence; 
one rnile from street car on good 
road. Price %>iK)\) on easy terms. 

N J. UPHAM CO., 
714 Providt-nce Bldg. 

For sale— EIGHT- room HOUSE, 
707 East Third street, with bath, hot 
■water heat, fine cellar, extra rooms, 
now rented for $34; price $4,750; 
(less than cost; owner leaving). Ex- 
clusive sale. Fleld-Frey Co., Ex- 
ch.uige B ldg. 

5xm SALE — CHEAP. SIX-ROOM 
house ror Jl.ioo; electric lights, 
hardwood floor in kltcneii, s<i,rdcn, 
chiL'ken coop. Call forenoons or 
evenings. 801 W est Ninth street 

¥oK SALE — EIGHT-ROOM HOUSI^ 
all modern Including heat. East 
Third street, only $2,100. (598) 

WHITNEY WALL CO., 
Third floor Torrey Bldg. 



C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 
421 Manhattan Bldg. 
Both 'phones. 



# LOT BARGAINS. * 
^ Three nice level lots, near Pled- * 
if- mont avenue and boulevard; fine # 

# lake view; need the money; must * 

# sell quick; will sacrifice; lots actu- * 
^ ally worth $800. will take $600; * 

# only $200 down, balance at your -j^ 

# convenience. See J. Larson, 507 # 

# Torrey building, or 'phone Lincoln * 

# 200-A after 6 p. m. S 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 



LAKE VERMILION SHORE SUMMER 
RESORT PROPERTY. 
31 acres on the southwest shore, an 
old homestead, same buildings on It, 
and a little cleared. Better get In on 
this 4Krhlle It can be bought cheap. An 
opportunity for a poor sport to have a 
place for a little recreation with a 
little expense; $450, and can be bought 
on any plan, $10 down and $10 per 
month. Another 57 acres at $700; same 
terms. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
ON PAGES 20 AND 22 






Dozens more to be had around other 
lakes at the same terms, Bear Island, 
Birch, Long lake, on the D. & L rail- 
road. 



FOR SALE— A CLIENT OF MINE 
desires to sell quick, lots 9 and 10, 
block 35, Endlon division, 100-foot 
corner. London road and Twentieth 
avenue east, cheap. Make me an 

Z^^^.l; ^- ^- Agatin. 1107 Alworth 
building. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES IN THE WEST 
end on terms of from $100 to $500 
down and payments of from $15 to 
|C0 per month. J. F. McNaughton, 
2022 W est Superior street. 

FOR .SALE— A FIVE-ROOM HOUSE 
in New Duluth for sale on easy 
terms. Apply to Victor Sundqulst. 
41i» Columbia building. 

i'OR SALE — OR WILL J^ENT CHEAP 
for the winter; 8-room house, al- 
most new. 631 South Twenty-third 
avenue east. 

FOR SALE — HOUSE AND 1% ACRES 
of land, barn, chicken house, 30 
chickens. Address, J. J. Allle, Proc- 
tor. Minn. 



FOR SALE — 90 LOTS IN NEMADJI 
Park addition to Superior; cheap If 
taken at once or will consider part 
trade. For Information apply 109 
Manhattan buildi ng, Duluth. 

FOR SALE— BBAUTIFTJL 50 BY 140 
foot corner lot In Chester Park di- 
vision, one block from Ninth street 
car line- big bargain. For partlcu- 
lar.q, address, V 182, Herald. 



ACRE TRACTS. 

Live upon the acres — work 
downtown. Colmans Third 
Acre Tract addition Is within 
15 minutes' walk from end of 
car line at Woodland; beauti- 
fully woodod, flno ooll, loto at 

neighbors, either 'phone. Easy 
terms, from $5 to $8 per month. 

C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 
421 Manhattan Bldg. 
Both 'phones. 



40 acres Pike Lake road, quarter 
mile from Kenose postoffice; has log 
shanty, some timber; $20 per acre, $10 
down and $10 per month. 

J. F. McNAUGHTON, 
2022 West Superior Street. 



BUT ACRES 



Near the car line, where you 
have lots of neighbors, either 
'phone, dally deliveries of gro- 
ceries, etc. Colman's Third 
Acre Tract addition at Wood- 
land. Easy terms, $5 to $8 
per month. 



C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 
421 Manhattan Bldg. 
Both 'phones. 



FOR SALE— LOT FOR BUSINESS AT 
Commonwealth avenue. In Gary size 
50 by 100; also large corner lot at 
Gary street, size 60 by 100. H 357 
Herald. 



SOUTH SHORE EXCURSIONS. 
Our boats leave Wednesdays, 9 
o'clock; Fridays, 5 o'clock. A delight- 
ful trip for vacation days. Stop off 
and see the orchards at Cornucopia. 

Ask KNIPPENBERG about 

BAYFIELD ORCHARD LANDS. 
Commercial Club Bldg. ' Phones 697, 



a- 

* 
* 

# 

* 



UPHOLSTERING ESTI- 
MATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN. 

STELROSE 6800; GRAND 517. 

HAIR MATTRESSES TO 

ORDER. 

BOtX SPRINGS TO ORDER. 



Our new upholstering de- 
partment is A large, clean, 
Bunllghted room on the second 
floor, where sanitation la the 
password. 

Every artlclaf received by us 
for repair I3 thioroughly fumi- 
gated. All uphiolstering work 
Is hand-tied. We reupholster 
and finish your furniture so 
that It looks like new. Our 
charges are very moderate. 
We renovate hair mattresses 
and box springs. Every stitch 
of work is guaranteed. 

THE F. S. KELLY FURNI- 
TURE COMPANY, 
Kelly Building, 
17 and 19 West Superior St. 



* 

* 

* 

* 



FOR SALE— THE FURNITURE FAC- 
tory distributers' salesroom, 2110- 
2112 West Superior street have 
thousands of pieces high-grade fur- 
niture right here In our Duluth 
stock. Priced to save purchasers, 
35 to 40 per cent of the retail shops' 
profits. Y'our credit O. K. Cameron- 
Johnson-Horgan company, furniture 
distributers. 



MATTESON & MACGREGOR. 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systematlzers. 

700-701 Alworth Bldg 

Phones: Melrose, 4700; Grand, 71. 




F. D. HARLOWB, 804 EXCHANGE 
building. Telephone, Melrose, 3654. 



ADVERTISING NOVELTIES. 

Duluth Badge & Novelty (^0^202^^^ 
Superior St. Badges, ' banners, but- 
tons, flags, pennants, souvenirs, etc. 



^^^rJ^^"^ ^AY RETAIL PRICES 

WHEN YOU BUY GOOD FURNI. 

TURE FROM 

CAMERON-JOHNSON-HORGAN, 

FACTORY DISTRIBUTERS 

SALESROOMS: 

2110-2112 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

YOUR CREDIT O. K. 



ARCHITECT. 



W. B. Roe, architect and builder, 412 
Providence building. Grand, 862. 



FOR SALE — HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
ture, cheap; all new; Kohler-Camp- 
bell piano, Stewart range, heater, 
bed, mattress, spring, dresser, chairs, 
rugs, etc.; will sell on cash pay- 
ment, rest on time, to responsible 
party. Call at Duluth Van & Storage 
warehouse. Fifth avenue east and 
Superior street. 'Phone 1202 Mel- 
rose. 

FOR SALE— NEW HIGH-GRADE MOV- 
Ing picture machines, or will ex- 
change for old machine and allow top 
price. We also have used Powers and 
Edison machines. Gas machines, film, 
song and lecture sets at half price. 
Send for bargain list. National Em- 
ployment Co., 417 West Michigan 
street. 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 

IF YOU HAVE^ARPErffEiPwORK 
to be done by day or contract, re- 
pairing or new, cal l Park, 10-A. 

Remodeling, new work and repairing. 
A. S. Page, Lin. 185-D. Estimates free. 

Work done neatly. O, Pearson 207 W~ 
First St. Zenith, 1274-^4 or Park. 97! 



GRADING AND SODDING. 

^OR SALE _ DIRT AND^^RAVEl!" 
dirt is loam, suitable for lawns and 
rower beds; gravel is mixed with 
Clay, packs hard and does not wash 
out; unsurpassed for filling and road 
work; down hill haul; location cen- 
tral. H. W. Richardson, U. S. weather 
bureau. 



GRADING, SODDING AND SEEDING. 
Trees, shrubs and plants. We sell 
and move large trees. Have trees 
trimmed now. Call Mercer, Mel. 6460. 



ALL KINDS OF CARPENTER WORK. 
Estimates free. Calumet, 150-L. 



* WANTED. # 

* '^ 
ic- A good, comfortable home for fg. 

* three children, one boy of 13 one k- 
^ of 6 and a little grirl of 10 years; •^ 

* must be reasonable. Address G A. * 

* L., care of Herald. * 

* * 



FOR SALE OWNKK MUST SELL 40 
or 80 acres timber land six miles 
north from end of Woodland car line; 
nice growing timber, on good road, 
close to school; fine farm across the 
road. Call Grand 382 or E. H. 
Caulklns & Co., 810 Alworth Bldg. 



HOTELS. 



fcHE ONLY AVD SimE CURB FOR HAT FEVER 
PATIENTS IS TO STOP AT THE 



:T 



:L 



FOR SALE— 50 BY 140-FOOT LOT ON 
Jefferson street, cementwalk and 
paved street: for quick sale $1,600. 
Whitney Wall com pany. (304) 

FOR SALE— LOT ON THIRTEENTH 
avenue east with all conveniences- 
price $550. Small monthly payments 
required. Address A 293, H erald. 

FOR SALE— MAKE ME CASH OF- 
fer for lots 1836- 7 or 1848-9, Crosley 
Park. Address box 918, Two Har- 
bors, Minn. 



FOR SALE OB EXCHANGE — MY 
large 10-room house and 100xl40-ft 
lot for 6-room house. X. Y Z 
Herald. x. .£.., 



FOR SALE — 400 ACRES IN CTUYUNA 
range, $16 per acre; half cash; no 
reservations. Also 2,500 acres good 
land enblock, Cass county; no reserva- 
tions, $7.50 per acre; 9,000 acres. 
Cook county, $2 per acre. Address 
T. P. Hanna, St. Paul, Minn. 

FOR SALE— WISCONSIN, THE BEST 
dairy and general crop state In the 
Union; settlera wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them; ask for 
booklet about Wisconsin Central land 
grant. Address Land Dept., Soo Line, 
Minneapolis. Minn. 



Personal — Ladles — Ask vour druggist 
for Chichester Pills, "the Diamond 
Brand. For 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other. Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists ev erywhere. 

PERSONAL NOTICE— The practice of 
Dr. E. H. Lower, chiropodist, has 
been taken over by Dr. B. E. Kentson 
and wife. Dr. Kentson has been in 
the profession for the past sixteen 
years, coming from Minneapolis here. 



PER.«!ONALn-$1.60 FRENCH SERGE. 
95c; $2 storm serge. $1.25; all colors. 
Crystal Bros., lobbers of woolens, 
dress goods and silks; we retail at 
wholesale prices. 30 Lake Ave. N. 



FURNITURE EXCHANGE. 
Our exchange department, in the base- 
ment. Is a money saver for you; we 
take your used furniture, allowing 
you good value and apply this as 
part payment on the purchase of new 
goods. R. R. Forward & Co.. Second 
avenue east and Superior street. 



FOR SALE— FIRST CHECK $20 GETS 
female bullterrier of sti*alght pit 
Colby - Deloyea strain; absolutely 
perfect; whelped Christmas; weighs 
30 now; blue brindle white; even 
mouth; fine tail; big head; smart. 
W^. B. M., care H erald, Duluth. 

FOR SALE— EVERYTHING IN A 
nicely furnished four-room flat, <n 
good condition, Including McPhail 
piano; splendid opportunity for two 
people. Cash only. C«li nny timp 
except Saturday. 622 East Fourth 
street. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANING CoT 
L. Sinotte, Prop., compressed air and 
vaccum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1928 West Michigan St. Both phones. 

Carpet and rug cleaning; naphtha pro- 
cess. Zenith Dye house. Phones, 188S. 



LAWN MOWERS SHARPENED. 



AT STEWART'S REPAIR SHOP. KEY 

A°,? w"?r,u*'^ ^'^^^- 18 North Third 
Av. W. Phone Mel. 6386, Grand 991-A. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. Patt^i^ 
Mgr., 613 Palladio bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 




A. Haakonsen. dealer 
and expert repairer 
at J. W. Nelson's, 6 
East S"uperior St. 



BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MElT 
chandise, 18 Lake avenue north. 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST. 

MRS. ANNA, in Bryant & Co.'s halr^ 
growing parlors, grows a head of 
hair or no pay. 18-A Lake av. Mel. 1145 



For Sale— Typewriters— Smith Premier. 
IIV HV^' '12; Oliver, $20; Emerson. 
$20; Underwood, $25; Royal. $35; 
Blick. with leather carrying case, $15. 
AH makes of slightly used machines. 
Duluth Typewriter (Jo., 319 W. Istst. 



FOR SALE — CONCRETE BLOCKS 
for foundations, farm buildings and 
other structures; prices on appUca- 
tlon. West Duluth Cement Block 
Works company, Fifty-sixth and 
Grand avenues west. West Duluth. 



CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 

ED MCCARTHY. CHIMNEt'sWEER 
furiitice Cleaner. uau l-'arK, 39- Y. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS. 

L. A. BERG, SURVEYOR AND CIVIL 

engineer, 407 Columbia bldg. Any work 

In surveying and engineering Com. 

petent and correct work guaranteed 

Rates very reasonable. Grand, 1768-x! 



NICKEL PLATING. 

ANYTHING rOullAVE"THAT^NEED3 
noVd"^,,**'' '"^finishing send It to ua. 
Gold, silver, nickel, brass, copper and 
bronze plating, electro galvanlzine 
Duluth Plating & Metallizing Co.unyi 
E. Sup. St. Grand. 242; Melrose, 1519. 



PATENTS. 

PATEN-rS -^ALL'^BOuTRrTENTa 
See Stevens, 716 Fidelity building. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. 

WJS DO A1.L, IUNDs'^f'p^CintiNo' 
paperhanging and ralclmlning. John- 
Bon & betin. New 'phone. Park 28. 



FOR PAINTING AND DECORATING see 
Youngdahl & Dlers. 223 W. 2nd St 



9S2 Lake Are. 8. K»erythlng Homeltke and Up-to-date. 



'TSFDuumT&TRON range 

RAILROAD COMPANY. 



DrT.imi— 



Knife R!?er. Two Hartors. 

ttower. EI7. Winton 

Aunjia. Blwablk. McKtn- 

ley. Sparta. Kv«i«tli, QU- 

bert. Virginia. 



Lea»9. 



* 7:00 a.m. 
•• 3:J5p.«. 
♦••MdOp.ai. 



ArrlT*. 



•♦II JO*.m. 

• 5:35 p.m. 

••* 10 :30 p.m. 



•— Ually. •*— DaJlj except Sunday. •••—Mixed 
train leavea and arrirea dailj Fifteenth avenua east 

•tat ton. 



DULUTH, MISSABE <& NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Office: 42« West Superior St. 
Phone, im9. 



Vtuv. 



AttlfO 



f Uibblng. Chlsholm. Virginia. E»e- 1 

•7.40am i leth. Coieraine. Sbafon. tJioua- y '3 21 

L Uln Iron. Sparta. Biwabik. J 

Uibbing. fliisliolm. Sharon. 1 

•S.S0pm< VlrgliU*, Eveleth. 

Culeralue. 

/ Virginia, Chiahulm, Hib- 

•7.58pni i Ung. KfeieUi, 

. BiwabiJi. 



pm 



FOR SALE— SPLENDID LOT IN CHES- 
i^*" P?-/^' about 50 by 140; will sell 
for 1400. on easy terms. D 187. Her- 
ald. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. FLATS. LOTS 
and land by the L. A. Larsen com- 
pany. 213-14-15 Providenc e building. 

For Sale — 2% -acre wooded lot near 
Woodland. $200. Whitney Wall Co. 



RENT— STORE^^ 

* 1 

* FOR RENT. ^ 

*. Two very fine stores In the Astoria * 

* block. First avenue east and Su- ^ 
^ perlor street; rents reasonable. fg 

^ i^ 

*• One store. Twenty-eighth avenue j^ 



ACRE TRACTS, 

With city water and gas. I 
can give you one acre tract 
with water and gas In front, or 
two tracts with water and gas 
100 feet away, 6 blocks from 
street car, with sidewalk to car 
line, near new $40,000 school, 
at Woodland. Either 'phone 
and electric lights. Fine soil. 
Terms. 



C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 
421 Manhattan Bldg. 
Both 'phones. 



PERSONAL— THEY MAKE 'EM. THEY 
repair 'em. Trunks, bags, cases. 
They save you money. Twin Ports 
Trunk company, 21 Lake avenue 
north. Don't for get — sale on now. 

PERSONAL — WHY BREAK YOUR 
back sweeping, when we will rent 
you a vacuum cleaner from 50 cents 
to $1 a day. We sell the best. R, 
R. Forwar d & Co. 

PERSONAL — WANTED INFORMA- 
tion concerning Charles B. Rlchter, 
hypnotic subject, reward. Address, 
A. Budde, 2029 Minnesota avenue, 
Duluth. 

PER.SONAL — Get away from washdav 
troubles by sending your family wash 
to us; 5c per pound. Lutes' laundry, 
808 East Second street. Both 'phones. 



FOR SALE— ONE BURROUGHS ADD- 
ING MACHINE. NO. 4, IN EXCEL- 
LENT CONDITION; A BARGAIN 
TELEPHONE OR WRITE E M. 
WORDEN. LADYSMITH, WIS.. OR 
BOX Z 364. DULUTH HERA LD. 

FOR SALE — ONE HAMILTON; USED 
only two months; regular price »400, 
now $220; one Whitney piano, like 
new price |160. J. F. Weismllier, 
wholesale piano department, 26 Lake 
avenue north. 



Personal — Will your widow and or- 
phans be as well off as your wife 
and (Jhlldren? See C. D. Or«ckovsky 
ot the Equitable. 800 Alworth Bldg. 



FOR SALE— IVERS & POND PIANO" 
walnut case; very good condition. If 
1 can Bell this piano before Aug 29 
am willing to dispose of it for $100 
on terms. Address A 328. Herald. 



NICHOLS & FARRELL. 418 MANHAT^ 
tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co 
Barker & Orr, Props.. 14 4th Ave. w! 



CORSETS. 



PLASTERING. 



DONE BY PIERSON BROS.. PLASTER- 
Ing contractors, 507 Torrey buildine 
Grand, 248-Y; Park. 100-X "'^•"*' 



PLUMBING. 

THE SANITARY PLUM^INcPco'^Tr 
W. First St., plumbing and heating. 



Spirella corsets, 7 W. Superior St A 
M. Osborne. Mel. 4479; Grand 2197.Y. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN— 25 Lake avenue north. Either 
phone. Open afternoon and evening. 



FOR QUICK SALE — ONE ACRE, 
house 18x26, chicken coop, growing 
crop, garden tools; twenty minutes' 
walk from car; good soil; cheap If 
taken at once, for cash. H 414, Her. 
aid. 



^ west and Third street 



* Two fine offices at 220 West Su- •* 



perlor street 



ZENITH REALTY COMPANY, 

104 East Superior Street 

•Phone, Grand 2156. 



^•10.311 



• — Daily. 

Bltvaiiijc. 



t*tSA$pi 



t— i>aUj eicejt Sunday. t— Except 



Cafe Observation Car. Misisabe Ranee 
I^oints. Solid Vestibuled Train. 



OULUTH 4 NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAv' 
Of fleet. 510 Loasdale Bldg., Ouluth 

Trains coiuidct U Kuife lliver Uailj teiceot Sun 
Oui wUh D. ii L H. tralnj iearlng Uulu'U at 7^0 
■k ui., arriving at Dulutii at S:.15 i,. m. Cunaect at 
Cramer with Uraad Uarais 8ta«9 when running 






^^?, ^r^^I— J^"^^ CORNER STORE, 
201 North Central avenue; In best 
business district in West Duluth- size 
25 by 80; steel celling; full cement 
basement; also large warehouse In 
rear; newly decorated throughout; 
rent very reasonable W. C Sher- 
wood & Co.. 118 Manhattan Bldg 



— No matter what kind — 

— Where, or how much — 

— Land you want to buy — 

— See the Land Specialists — 

— Ebert Walker & McKnight Co. — 

— 315 and 316 Torrey building. — 

WILL TRADE AN IMPROVED FARM 
of 23 acres Including stock and ma- 
chinery for city property and will 
pay the difference of price In cash. 
A. F. Kreager, 406-407 Torrey Bldg. 



Personal — Latest treatment In the de- 
veloping of bust and neck, at the 
Comfort Beauty Parlors, chiropody 
work also, 20 W, Superior street 



PERSONAL — MADAM ROSCOE GIVES 
readings and makes appointments by 
mail. Address General Delivery. Su- 
perior. 



PERSONAI^-4-YEAR-OLD BOY FOR 
adoption In good home. Address 
Pete Peterson, Scanlon, Minn., Box 
233. 



PER,SONAL— L. NELSON, HIGH-CLASS 
tailor. Room 1, second floor. SO E. 
Sup, street New fall goods now In. 



^u..^^^^, — 3EWING MACHINE, 
r.,, ^ make; only used short while; 
will sell cheap; my wife has left me 

^^^^^'^ ^^K selling. If interested, 
address V 156. H erald. 

FOR SALE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes tor steam 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach. Co* 



Hotel Men. Restaurant Men. Attention 
kJ!^T® ^^^ money In your linen and 
bedding needs. Valentine Nordstrom 
Linen Co. 410 Torrey buildin g. 

FOR SALE— BLACK WALNUT BED 
and dresser made to order at Grand 
Rapids Mich.; will sell It at a bar- 
galn. Address W 21. Herold 



Lynn Dancing academy, lady Instructor. 
18A Lake av N. Hall for rent Mel. 1145 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING. 
334 E. Superior street. Both phones. 



REAL ESTATE. 



^r^i LARSEN CO.. 213 Providence Bldg 
City property, lands, loans, fire Ins! 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 



^^^^'^^'^^ MASSEUSE, 305 E \ST 
First street. 'Phone Grand 1215-X. 



For bath and Swedish massage call up 
Lincoln 184-A. Graduate masseur. 



FLORIST AND NURSERYMEN. 

Duluth Floral Co.. wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



FOR SALE — HOUSEHOLD PURNI- 
ture for four rooms, almost new; 
cheap for quick sale. 29 West Orarfke 
street Duluth Heights ^'^»"Ke 



Duiuth, South Shore ^ Atlantic. 



Leave. 



SIATIONS. 



t7.4jam *6.l5p« 

(Soo 

t8. I2aai •6.45pai 

(Soj 

t8.2tlam *S.3a«M 

Arrive. 

t7.55v"i 5.4Dai« 

tit 5jpm 6.30am 

t7.U5iim «4.20aM 

t7.4jpni *5.C0ajii 

•I a. 20am 

•S.OOam 

•8.20p« 

Leave. 

tB.O.am «8. ISpm. 

p0.08piii*t0.20am. 

t— Oaiiy except 



Arrive. 



Duluth '(o 

Line Uulun Station. 
. .. Superior ...•!(( 

Une Uni<;u Station. 
, . . Siit>erior ... '8 

(Uuiou Ltepot.) 
. .. Uougbtou ...fll 
. ... Caluaaet ....flO. lOpni 

. . lalipemln* ...*l2.2aain 
. .. Ma;i4Utttt« .•■*ll.30pm 
.Sault .sie. Marie. *5.25ptn 
... Montreal ... »8.a0pin 
• •.. Bostoa *IO.0Oani 



3«am t5.40pia 
«»«« tS.IOpM 

50«m tS.OOpoi 

l«av«. 

OOPRt 



ts.zoam 

*8.20piii 
*8.30am 



Montreal 
New York 



FOR RENT— FLATIRON BUILDING, 
Thirteenth avenue west and Superior 
street; modern; adapted for boarding 
house; will rent stores separately j 
p. Howard & Co., Providence build^ 
Ing. 



SNAP— 15 ACRES 1% MILES FROM 
steel plant, to close quickly at |175 
per acre. Care of Electric Service & 
Repair company, 922 East Superior 
street. Both 'phones 543. 



F()R RENT — SPACE ON SECOND 
tloor of No. 24 West Superior street; 
fine location for dressmaker, mil- 
liner or similar business. See N J 
Upham Co.. 714 Providence Bl dg. 

FOR RENT— THE GRAND AVENUE 
garage, best location In West Duluth 
on Grand and Fifty-sixth avenues 
west. See Grand Avenue agency 
next door. 



FOR RENT— STORE, 309 WEST SU- 
perior street; will include rooms on 
second floor. J. D. Howard & Co 
Providence building. '' 



FOR SALE — TWENTY ACRES AT 
Woodland; timber, very good soil; 
only $750; new cabin; big bargain. 
For particulars address W 178, Her- 
ald. 

FOR SALE— FIFTEEN ACRES; ALL 
cleared, fine land, near car line, Du- 
luth Heights; terms to suit you. 
Whitney Wall company. 

FOR SALE— 3.600 ACRES NEAR LAKE 
Nebagamon at $8 per acre; easy 
terms. C. L. Rakowsky & Co.. 201 
Exchange Bldg. 



Reduced Freight Rates to Seattle, Port- 
land, Los Angeles and all coast points. 
Dul. Van & Storage Co ., 18 4th av. W. 

Personal— Bat at the Gem Restaurant 
you will be pleased wtlh 'unch or 
dinner. 518 West Superior -Jtreet 

MASSAGE— MARGARET NELSON, 218 
W. Superior St, room 8, third floor. 
Also appointments at your home. 



Wealth cannot be enjoyed without 
health. Dr. Rlesland. Palladio bldg., 
supplies the means of enjoyment. 



FOR SALE— GOODRICH SEWING MA- 

^An?®'^*^^^ household furniture at 

I?rf^» w"*** ^^?".H? ^"'^ SevenUeth 
street. West Duluth. 



For quick service, funeral and wedding 
designs, try Seeklns, 302 E. Sup. St, 



HATS cleaned] 

Old hats made like new, Panamas 50c 
to 75c; felt and derby. 50c; straw, 25c 
Work guaranteed. 210 W. Superior St' 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENEOT^ 

Safety razor blades all klndTThl^^^^^ 
and put in first class condition. 30c 
der dozen. Quayle-Larsen Co 



^^^.^'^^^-^^^^P' RADIANT HOME 
range. No. 9, bedroom stove for 
wood or coal and Iron bed. 1907 Jef- 
terson street. 



FOR SALE — 6,000 FEET OF BIRCH 
and 6,000 feet of pine lumber. Call 



PERSONAL— LACE CURTAINS TAKEN 
home and done up 25c a pair; also 
dyeing done. Melrose 6636. 



Personal — Combings and cut hair made 
Into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 



WE WILL TRADE YOU A FARM FOR 
your city property; Income property 
preferred. Whitney Wall company. 



Farm Lands at wholesale prices. L, A, 
Larsen Co.. 214 Providence building. 



Sundaj-. ♦ — Dally 



•lO.OOamflO oopm 
*7.l5pm tS.Maw 



ANCHOR LINE SAILINGS 

From Dulutli for Hougnton. Marquette. Soo Mac- 
Idnac Uiand, Detroit. Cleveland and BuJIaloV 



Month — 



.September. 



OCTORARAi TIOWESTA I JUkTata" 



5. 16 



». *0 I 1. 1^. 23 

X«aTei Noitbem Fadflc Dock 4 at 8 p. bT *~" 



FOR RENT — MICHIGAN STREET 
floor, 100 by 100 feet; basement same 

?i?^'.^^.^u^y^°" Paper company. 4 
^^ f-nt Michig an street 

FOR RENT— OFFICES, |10, $15, |17 50 
per month; also room for light manu- 
facturing. Apply Christie building 
fireproof. "' 



FOR R E NT _ CONFECTIONERY 
store; doing fine business; good lo- 
cution. V 181, Herald. 



^R^ENT— CmTAGES. 

FOR RENT— PARK POINT COTTAGE 
with grounds 85 by 200 feet on bay 
side at Twenty-seventh street, or 
will sell at a bargain on easy terms; 
owner lives In Boston and wants to 
dispose of cottage and four lots or 
rent. Apply to G. S. Richards, on lake 
side of track at Twenty-seventh St 



MANICURING, 25c, AT MRS. VOGT'S 
halrdressing parlors. 17 E. Sup. St 

OUR WORD FOR IT— BARKER'S FOR 
coughs and colds. Boyce's. 



BOARD & ROOM OFFERED. 

ROOM AND BOARD FOR TWO OR 
three girls In private family; n'c 
room with heat and bath, $4 per, 
breakfast and dinner at night Call 
Baldwin fiats 3, 717 West .Second 
street. Melrose, 4922 



^^^,^^i^^^.— ^^<^<^NI5-HAND HOUSE- 
hold furniture in good condition In- 
quire 115 Minneapolis avenue. Hunt- 



Read The 
HeraldWants 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE. 



SPECIAL SALE ON TYPE- 
writers for the balance of 
this month. 

EDMONT. 
18 Third avenue west 




TREE PRUNING. 



HAVE TREES PRUNED NOW. WB 
sell, plant and move trees and shrubs 
ofall kinds. Old phone Mel. 6730. 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 



CHRIST HAUG, manufacturing Jeweler 
and watchmaker. 319 W. First St. 



WANTED TO RENT. 



^9.^«.^^^^— ^^^^"'SER, CHIFFONIER 
buffet parlor table and three rock- 
ers. Call at 822 East Fifth street 



BIRDS. 
Fine singers for sale. 120 East Supe- 
rlor street 'Phone Melrose 4 554 

FOR SALE— HOUSEHOLD PURNI- 
tiire and stoves cheap. Inquire 220 
East Second street, upstairs. 

FOli SALE— A NEW $16 REFRIGER- 

?i ?n' ^^^^ S'*''^ • *' *^^^" at once. 
-130 East Superior street. 



WANTED TO RENT — ROOM AND 
board at moderate rates for about 
100 young men and women who will 
enroll at the Duluth Business univer- 
sity Sept. 2, also places to work for 
room and board for a number of 
young men and women. Write or 
call at the college at once, giving 
address, rates and the number you 
can accommodate. Duluth Business 
university, 118-120 Fourth avenue 
west Christie building. 



a 



WANTED TO RENT— WE HAVE IN- 
quirers every day for all classes of 
residence property, flats and houses. 
Let us rent yours for- you. Whitney 
Wall company, 301 Torrey building. 
'Phones. Melrose 1368; Grand 810. 



ROOM AND BOARD OFFERED — 
Rooms at $1.50 and up per week- 
board. $4.50 and up per week, at 

. Hotel Grand. West Duluth. 



_ AGENTS WANTED. 

WANTED AGENTS— TO SELl'^LOTS 
In a new townslte on Mesaba range- 
good commission. Apply to 410 
Columbia building. 



UOARD AND ROOM— NORMAL STU- 
dent or teacher preferred to room 
and board. 1819 Greysolon road. 



BOARD AND ROOM — PLEASANT 
rooms with board. Lakeside 59-L. 



GOOD HOME COOKING. 122 EAST 
First street. Latona h otel. 

WANTED — NORMAL STUDENT TO 
board. V l&fi. H*r*ld. ^ 



FOR SALE— LARGE DIEBOLD SAFE 

^no* «^ "'^^^!?'',^ ^i ^y 24 by 13 Inches! 
302 Board of Trade. 



FOR QUICK SALE— NEW MAHOGANY 
piano; cheap, if taken at once. 3301 
Lake avenue south. 



FOR SALE— HOUSEHOLD PURNI- 
ture at a bargain. Call 119 East 
Fourth street. 



FOR SALE — FURNITURE AND 
lease of 11-room house. Address 
W 190, Herald. 

For Sale — Edison Indestructible records 
by mall, 60c. Boston Music Co.. Duluth. 



For Sale — Everard piano, mahogany 
case; $100. Toe Popkln , 29 W. 1st St 

FOR SALE — BICYCLE AND OUTFIT 
cbMp<, 20a JCwt Superior street. ' 



WANTED TO RENT — BY RESPONSI- 
ble party, six or seven-room mod- 
ern house or flat In the neighbor- 
hood of Eighth avenue east; must 
allow children. Call Ogden 384-A. or 
write W 291. Herald. 

WANTED TO RENT— BY RESPON- 
slble party, six or seven-room modern 
house; central location. Write B 295 
Herald. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

FOUND — ^CAMER01?s"'R^CLININa 
easy chairs, leather or Imported 
tapestry upholstered, the beat made 
sold and delivered fro mthe factory 
distributers" salesrooms, 2110-2112 
West Superior street where you 
don't pay retail prices for good fur- 
niture and your credit O. K. Cam- 
eror-Johnson-Horgan company, fac- 
tory distrib uters. 

LOST — BLACK COW. WITHOUT 
horns, on Aug. 17; supposed to be 
with calf in short time; If anybody 
knows, either return to or notify 
John Smata. 215 Wlcklow street. 
Duluth. Both 'phones, 1015 Melros«L 
226-A Lincoln. 



LOST— LADY'S WHITE PANAMA HAT 
with white and black wings near 
Omaha freight depot. Return to 226 
Eleventh avenue east for reward. 



BOATS AND MOTORBOATS 

horse power launch. A. Nathan Cook 
212 West Superior street. 



BRAZING. 



CAST IRON. STEEL, COPPER BR\SS 
C. F. Wiffseru A Sons. 410 sl Sup. St 



LOST — WILL PARTY DETA1NIN(? 
French poodle dog license No. 501 
turn him loose or call Melrose 1030 
or notify police and save trouble, ' 

LOST— WILL THE PARTY WHO TOOK 
black opera glasses from porch at 6I4 
Lake avenue north kindly return and 
receive reward? 

FOUND — O^JE STEAM BOILER 
safety valve. Owner may have same 
by Identifying. Call Melroee. 3521. 



WANTED TO EXCHANGE _ CITT 
lots as part payment for good farm 
team; will pay the difference in cash. 
C 839, Herald. ^^ 



^ 



/ 







linria 



mm 



mm 



ammimmmt^mmr'ifi^im 




Friday, 



THE DtJLUTHHETlAljD 



August 29, 1913, 



GET YOUR 

SUNDAY READING ON 

SATURDAY NIGHT 



IN 



THE SATURDAY HERALD 



^ Don't miss the great week- 
\j\ ender Saturday with its two 
page layout of sport news 
and gossip by Bruce^ the sport- 
authority of the Northwest; 
Illustrations by Naughton; 
Three pages of society, music 
and theatrical gossip; Reliable 
mining news and the best mar^ 
ket page in the Northwest. Four 
pages of neighboring town 
news by ourowncorrespondents 

THE SATURDAY HERALD 




One Cent a Word Ksjch Insertion. 
No Advertifiement Lees Than 15 Cents. 

# 

it- * 

* *!# salary 

* GIRLS * # See Mr. Kaltenbach, suit section, 
i# WANTED. * 

* * 
I * Over 16 years old, eighth grade H- 

"i^ graduates, to start as bundle H- 

* wrappers and work up. Apply at # 
^ once. # 

* GEORGE A. GRAY CO. * 



WANTED. 

MAKERS AND APPRENTICES 
FOR MILLINERY WORKROOM. 

Applv at once. 
J. M. GIDDING & CO. 



^ 



IS BY FAB THE BEIT SAT- 
URDAY II6HTPAPEB PUB- 
IISHEDIRTHEHOBTHWEST 



WANTED — COOKS OUT $60 PER 
month; dining room girls, all parts 
of the range; dining room girls and 
counter girl, Sioux City. Iowa; din- 
ing room girls for Dakotas; dining 
room girls for city; cooks In private 
boardfng houses, city; working house 
keepers. General housework girls, 
second girls. Central Employment of* 
flee. 125 West Superior street. 



WANTED — FIVE HUNDRED HOUSE- 
wlves to buy Respiform and Forma- 
coni, for sanitation of the house, 
kills all germs, relieves hay fever. 
For sale at drug stores tind 203 
New Jersey building. 



WANTED — MIDDLJa-AGED CHRI8- 
tlan Scandinavian lady as housekeep- 
er in small family: must be good 
cook and understand taking care of 
the house; wages $25. Address box 
487. Eveleth. Minn. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No AdTertlscmcnt Less Than 15 Cents. 

liDDlflOiArWMTr 
^NPAeES»J|llD^2l^ 

HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 

(Contianed.) 

# WANTED. » 

# Several experienced saleswomen # 

# for coat and suit department; good •JU' 
and permanent position. # 

FREIMUTHa # 

WANTED — CO^LFETENT COOK- 329 
West Second street. 

WANTED— DINING ROOM GIRL. 829 
West Second street. ^^ 

^FORREN^ROOMSr^ 

FOR RENT— THREE, FOUR OR FIVE 
rooms furnished on the easy pay- 
ment plan from $65 to $225 at R. R. 
Forward's furniture store. Its belter 
to buy furniture than to pay rent on 
It, as you do when you rent fur- 
nished rooms. R. R. Forward & Co., 
Second avenue east and Superior 
street ^^^ 

FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL. 
Duluth's newest and best moderate- 
priced hotel. Flreproor; hot and cold 
water In every room. Rooms single 
or en suite, with or without bath. 
Special rates by the week. 
On Corner Opposite Union Depot 



WANTED— STEADY, CAPABLE HIGH 
school girl to help with care of 
baby after school hours part of 
each week. Apply evenings. Mrs. 
Edward Johnson, 1006 East Third 
strf.fct. 



One Cent a Word E:aeb Insertion. 
No Advertitieiuent Less Than 15 Cents. 

TELEPHONE mRECfOFtT 

OF 
BUSINESS 
HOUSES. 

Bflow you will find a 
cunden.^ | list of reliable 
business nrms. This is de- 
-isnvd for the convenience 
: busy people. A telephone 
'urder to any one of them 
will receive the same care- 
ful attention as would be 
^iven an order placed In 
i.^rson. You can safely de- 
fend upon the reliability 
of any one of thase firms. 
Old New 

'Phone. Phone. 
DRIGGISTS — 

Eddi^ Jeronimus, Ph.G.1243 1072 

DEATISTS — ^„„ ^ 

Dr F. H. BurnettD.D.S.4608 909-X 

LAUNDRIES — 

Peerless Laundry 428 42s 

Yale Laundry 479 479 

Lutes Laundry 447 447 

Home Laundry Co 478 4.8 

Model Laundry 2749 1302 

Troy Laundry 257 257 

KEV, LOCK. SAFE WORKS— 

Duluth Gun shop 22SS-A 3969 




REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 

Gfctty-Smith Co.. 306 Palladlo building. 
A. A. Fider Co.. 300 1st N. Bank bldg. 
The Home Realty Co.. 200 Alworth bldg. 
J. F. McNaughton, 2022 W. Superior St. 
L. A. Larsen Co.. 214 Providence bldg. 
Fleld-Frey Co., 203 Exchange bldg. 
William C. Sargent, 102 Prov. bldg. 



HELP WANTED— MALE. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Lees Than 15 Cents. 

TELM/vMfED^^^LET 

(Continued.) 






WANTED. 
STRONG MAN 



* 



^ To act as receiving clerk and as 

# sist with other work. Apply su- •* 
■^ perintendent. # 

* FREIMUTHS. * 
« * 



WANTED — TEN YOUNG MARRIED 
mtn with good references, able to 
furnish bonds; will start you house- 
to-house canvassing to try you out. 
If satisfactory, can put you on new 
and established routes. None but 
live men looking for advancement 
need apply. JeMcll Tea company, 
109 West Fourth street R. G. Lewis, 
manager. 



WANTED — YOUNG MAN TO WORK 
on trains as news agent; must give 
reference and have neat appear- 
ance. Inquire between 5 and 6 p. 
m. at Union depot baggage room, 
downstairs. R. McCue. 



WANTED AT ONCE — YOUNG MAN 
experienced bookkeeper for tempor- 
ary work about one month: must be 
accurate. Apply stating experience 
and references by letter only. Ar- 
mour & Co, 



WANTED — TWENTY -FIVE FORM 
carpenters, 35 cents per hour. Bates 
& Rogers Construction Co., D. M. & 
N. dock. No. 5, Thirty-sixth avenue 
west and Michigan street. 

WANTED — FIRST-CLASS FURNI- 
ture finisher and repair man. Cam- 
eron-Johnson-Horgan, furniture dis- 
tributers, salesroom, 2110-2112 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED — MAN AND WIFE TO 

work on farm In western part of 

etate; man to run farm and woman 

to do cooking. 530 Manhattan build- 
ing. 



M'ANTED AT ONCE— A GOOD LADY 
cook and a combination dishwasher 
and chambermaid in small hotel. 
Apply at or write to Banner house. 
J. W. Serres, proprietor, Bismarck, 
N. D. 



WANTED — $2.50 PER DAY SALARY 
and commission paid woman in each 
town to distribute free circniars and 
take orders for concentrated flavor- 
ings in tubes. J. S. Ziegler Co., Chi- 
cago. 



CLIFTON HOTEL. 321 WEST FIRST 
street, modern rooms from $2 per 
week and up; also flats for rent 
furnished or unfurnished as many 
rooms as you desire. Mary Le Flohlc, 
proprietor. 



Wanted — Olrls to attend dressmaking 
school: make garments for yourself 
or others while learning. Quick, easy 
and perfect Diplomas ro graduates. 
MlBB Gray, 'Srd floor. Geo A. Gray Co. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, experienced preferred, 
newcomer considered, no washing 
and no care of children. Mrs. H. C. 
Strong. 2814 East Fifth street 



# WANTED. * 

# Sawmill men, $2.50 to $4 a day: * 
•j^ railroad labor, $2.60 to $2.75; it 
i(. woodsmen, $40 month; Dakota ^ 
7^ threehijig harvest, $2.60 and board. -JJ- 
if: Free fare If you have good bag- # 
^ gage. Steam shovel and extra ■* 
is- gangs near St. Paul; city work. « 
-^ $2.5& to $2.75; rough carpenters, * 1 WANTED — FIRST-CLASS CEMENT 
i^ $3.85. * finishers, good proposition to right 



WANTED — ONE GREEN LUMBER 
grader; also upright shingle sawyer. 
Apply Duluth Log company, Pal- 
ladio building, Duluth, Minn. 

WANTED — GOOD ENERGETIC BOY 
to learn printing trade. Call at once 
Slovenlen Printing & Publishing Co., 
405 West Michigan street 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; family of two; best 
wages. Apply Miss Chalk, Grand 
229-X, or call 1513 Jefferson street 
between 7 and 8: 30 evenings. 

WANTED— BRIGHT YOUNG MIL- 
llnery saleslady, one able to assist 
In workroom preferred. Miss Graetz, 
222 North Central avenue. Zenith 
'pho ne Cole 258-X. 

WANTED — GIRLS TO SEW ON MAC- 
kinaw coats, pants and shirts. Chrls- 
tensen, Mendenhall & Graham, 514 
West First s treet. 

WANTED — COMPETENT AND Ex- 
perienced fitter in alteration depart- 
ment Royal Cloak Co. 7 West Su- 
perior street. _^_^___ 

WANTED — GOOD COOK, OR ONE 
who has done general housework; 
wages $25. Z6i« East xnira otrcoi. 
M elrose, 1653. 

WANTED AT ONCE— EXPERIENCED 
nurse for night duty at Children's 
Home, Fifteenth avenue east and 
Fifth street 

WANTED — A THOROUGHLY COM- 
petent second maid. Apply Mrs. 
Morton Miller, 2104 East Superior 
street 



WANTED — A GIRL WHO UNDER- 
stands sewing for gentlemen's coats 
at 221 West Superior street, third 
floor. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED SALES- 
women for suits and coats. Apply to 
Mr. Kaltenbach. Freimuth's, second 
floor. 



FOR RENT — One elegantly furnished 
large front room with fireplace, run- 
ning water, steam beat, also smaller 
rooms at very reasonable rent. The 
Verona hotel. 310 West Third street 

FOR RENT— TWO NICELY FUR- 
nished, well heated rooms; modern 
conveniences; private family; desir- 
able location for teachers. 1112 East 
Second street 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
steam heated room, all modern con- 
veniences; pleaeant home for teach- 
ers; very reasonable. 307 East 
Third street 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Liees Than 15 Gente. 

"70RRENT^^^^?LAfsr77 

* FOR RENT. * 

t t 

* Nice 6-room flat Twenty-ninth *- 

* avenue west and Third street; # 

* modern, all but heat *• 

* # 

* One 8 -room flat, Twenty-eighth * 
i* avenue west and Third street. * 

* * 

* One 6-room house, modern, all but # 

* heat; Sixteenth avenue east and * 

* South street * 

* * 

Very desirable unfurnished rooms H- 

at 128 West Superior street in * 

* 
* 



first-class condition. 



All the rents very reasonable. 



ZENITH REALTY COMPANY. 

104 East Superior Street 

'Phone. Grand 2166. 



**3f***^^^'{?*if^i:^^'^f*#*«*3^^f*3Mf^ 



FOR RENT. 



We have one six-room apartment, with 
hot water heat, hot and cold water 
service, laundry, storeroom, janitor 
service; $40 per month. 

Massachusetts Real Estate Co., 
18 Phoenix Blk. 



One Cent a Word E:acta Insertion. 
No Advertisement lices Than 15 Cents. 

* t 
■» FOR RENT. g 

1 323-327 EIGHTH AVENUE W. * 

* Eight-room houses, $22.50 per # 

* month; all conveniences, with fur- * 

* nace heat; water paid. § 

* SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE. * 
■^ Water, sewer, gas, hardwood floors * 

* downstairs; East end, one block # 
■af from car line; $20 per month. * 

* * "*■ 

* I* A. LARSEN CO.. * 
^ 213-214-215 Providence Bldg. * 
7^ Both 'phones: Grand or Mel. 1920. * 

For rent — 20 Seventh avenue 
west. 6 rooms with water and 
light; rent $25.00 

For rent — 26 Seventh avenue 
west. 5 rooms, with water and 
light; rent 122.50 

For rent — 631 West Fourth street, 
modern S-room brick house; 
rent 136-00 

For rent — 410 West Fourth street. 

modern 11-room flat; rent 50.00 

R. B. KNOX, 
Exchange Bldg. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



A 



W. M. 



PALESTINE LODGE. NO. 7». 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet. 
Ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o'clock. No meeting until 
further^otice. Hugh L. 3oyc9, 
H. Nesbitt, secretary. 



IONIC LODGE, NO. 186, A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meetings 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 8 
o'clock. Next meeting, Aug. 
25. 1913. Work — Regular busi- 
Cari E. Lonegren, W. M.; Burt 




ness. 



Porter, secretary. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT; HEAT 
furnished when needed during sum- 
mer and all winter; very desirable 
location and all modern conveniences. 
109 Ninth avenue east $36. 

See Corporate Investment Company, 
100 Torrey building. 

FOR RENT— ONE THREE-ROOM AND 
one five-room apartment in the Bar- 
rington, at Eighth avenue east and 
First street; strictly modern with 
all conveniences. John A. Stephen- 
json & Co., 230 West First street 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all conveniences; also rooms 
for light housekeeping; running wa- 
ter. 201 East Second street. 



FOR RENT — SEPT. 1ST, NICELY 
furnished two-room suite, suitable 
for two or three, with or without 
board. 812 East First street 



FOR RENT — COMFORTABLE ROOM 
with meals to young lady who appre- 
ciates and desires the elements of a 
home. Call Melrose, 6492. 



FOR RENT — NICE WELL HEATED 
room for gentleman. Inquire 220 
Twelfth avenue east or 1208 East 
Third street. Melrose, 3345. 



FOR RENT— TWO LARGE UNFUR- 
nlshed rooms for light housekeeping; 
light and water furnished. Call at 
214 Sixth avenue west. 



FOR RENT — DESIRABLE ROOMS, 
centrally located, for one or two 
gentlemen, with or without board. 
•Phone, Grand 1929-X. 



THE DE ANGELTERR HOTEL. 
310 E. Sup. St., hot and cold running 
water, steam heat, light airy rooms, 
from 50 cents to ^$2.00. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
light housekeeping allowed; suitable 
for two ladles; 304 Vernon street, 
near Bryant school. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room for refined lady; references; 
walking distance. 321 East First 
street Flat C. 



* NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT CO., * 

* 417 West Michigan St •* 

* * 

GOOD PAY WHILE LEARNING 
trade in United States Navy. Many 
jobs open to men over 17 who show 
ability. Enter now for big Foreign 
Cruise, Panama Celebration, San 
Francisco Exposition. Get informa- 
tion and be examined at Navy Re- 
cruiting Station, Post Offic Bldg.. 
Duluth. Minn. Or write for free 
booklet, "Making of a Man-O' Wars- 
man." Bureau of Navigation, Box 
171 Navy Department. Washington, 
D. C. 



WANTED — BE PAID WHILE LEARN- 
Ing mechanical trade; join United 
States navy if over 17; steady pro- 
motion possible up to over $90 per 
month clear of living expenses; ex- 
cellent chance now for Interesting 
cruises; must be an American citi^^en; 
complete Information, navy recruit- 
ing station, postoffice building, Du- 
luth, Minn. Get booklet "The Mak- 
ing of a Man-O'-Warsman." Address 
bureau of navigation, box 171, navy 
dtpartment, Washington, D. C. 

WANTED — MAN FOR VICE PRKSI- 
dtnt of a company making farm 
loans; safer and more profitable than 
banking; must invest $500 and be 25 
years old or over. Farm Loans, Box 
317, Bowman, N. D. 



nien; address giving telephone num- 
ber. P. O. Box 67, City. 

WANTED — ONE LATH TIER. ALSO 
carriage rider. Apply Bradley Tim- 
ber & Railway Supply company, Pal- 
ladlo building, Duluth. 

WANTED — LOCOMOTIVE FIREMEN, 
brakemen, wages about $100; experi- 
ence unnecessary; send age, stamp. 
Railway, care Herald. 

WANTED— OFFICE BOY; ONE WHO 
has some knowledge of bookkeeping 
preferred: must be at least 20 years 
old. D 347, Herald. 



WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED LADY AS 
housekeeper: four children in family. 
Peter Carlson, Scanlon, Minn., box 
233. 

WANTED — GIRL TO HELP WITH 
care of children, daytime only. Mrs. 
H. C. Strong. 2314 East Fifth street 

WANTED— A YOUNG GIRL TO HELP 
with work and go to school Sept. 1; 
good home. 5415 Ostego street, east 



FOR RENT — ONE OR TWO DESIR- 
able rooms, unfurnished; very cen- 
tral. N. J. Upham company. Provi- 
dence building. 

FOR RENT — MODERN HEATED 
room, furnished for light house- 
keeping. 706 1^ West Second street. 
Melrose 3977. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
also room for light housekeeping; 
very reasonable. Call 119 Seventh 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT — SEVERAL THREE AND 
four-room flats. Sixth avenue west 
and Third street; rents moderate; 

food order; apply to Henry Taylor, 
03 Palladio building. Zenith 2066-Y. 



it' i^ 

# FOR RENT. « 

# # 
■35- Strictly modern 10-room house in •Jf- 
ii^ flnest restricted residence destrict, # 
7^ with garage; rent $76; possession * 

# given Sept. 1. # 

# C. L. RAKOWSKY & CO., # 
^ 201 Exchange Bldg. ^ 

# * 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER. NO. 
20. R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8 o'clock. No meet- 
ing until further notice. Trevanion W. 
Hugo, H- P.; Alfred Le Richeux, sec- 
retary. 




A DULUTH COUNCIU NO. •, 
R. & S. M.— Btiitefl cofirocA- 
tlons, first and third Fridays 
of each month at 8 p. m. 
No meeting until further 
notice. Hermon L. Dresser, T. I. M.;. 
Alfred Le Richeux, secretary. 




ness. 



DULUTH COMMANDERY, NO. 
18, K. T.— Stated conclave, 
first Tuesda|- of each montlv 
at 8 o'clock. Next meeting. 
Sept 2, 1913. Regular busl- 
John Cox, E. C; Alfred Le 



Richeux, recorder. 



SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR- 
meetings ^ every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting. Sept 11, 1913. Regu- 
lar business. Henry Nesbitt, 




secretary. 



FOR RENT. 



1214 East Second street; newly 
decorated throughout; seven 
rooms; fine lawn $30.00 



LITTLE & NOLTE CO., 
Exchange Bldg. 



FOR RENT— FIVE LARGE ROOMS 
and bath, thoroughly modern, hot 
water heat; Third street, near Fifth 
avenue east; $37.50 per month. 
Field-Frey Co., 204 Exchange Bldg. 



FOR RENT — 1218 BAST FOURTH 
street, five-room flat city water, 
gas, hardwood floors, $15 per 
month. A. A, Fider Co. 300 First 
National Bank building. Mel. 26. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FLAT, 
1015 Vi East Second street; all mod- 
ern conveniences, garret and base- 
ment included. Inquire A. A. Gin- 
gold, 125 East Superior street. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, ALL 
modern excepting heat, newly dec- 
orated; $18 per month; located at 122 
East Fifth street Apply Charles P. 
Meyers, 610 Alworth building. 



FOR RENT— SEPT. 1, FOR THE WIN- 
ter, a new five-room furnished flat; 
modern conveniences and heated; 
312 Second avenue east; call Mel- 
rose 2926. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT, 1611 
East Fourth street; modern except 
heat; water paid; $25 per month. 
J. D. Howard & Co., Providence build- 
ing^ 

FOR RENT— FOUR- ROOM FLAT WITH 
large alcove and bath; 704 West 
Second street; only $16. N. J. Up- 
ham Co., 714 Providence Building. 



FOR RENT — SEPT. 1, MODERN, 
four-room flat, except heat; $15 per 
month; 832 West Fourth street In- 
quire at 924 West Fourth street. 



ron RENT — FINE FIVE-ROOM 
brick flat, mortfrn except heat, $20 
per month. 411 East nrct Bti-««v 
Call at 601 East Fourth street 

FOR RENT — POUR-ROOM FLAT 

with bath, gas, hardwood floors, 

$11. No. 217 West Fifth street 
'Phone Owner, Broad 386-K. 



FOR RENT — 


- 811 EAST SIXTH 


street, rooms 


for light housekeep- 


ing, suitable 


for girls going out 


by the day. 





WANTED — TWO EXPERIENCED DIN- 
Ing room girls; wages $26 per month. 
Rex hotel, International Falls, Minn. 



WANTED- 


-BAGGAGE 


DRIVER: 


steady 


work; apply 


Duluth 


Van & 


Storage 


company. 


Fou 


rth 


avenue 


west. 











WANTED — PREPARE FOR Gov- 
ernment positions; $900 to start; 
thousands of appointments soon; 
write for large catalogue. Standard 
Correspondence school, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

L»,arn barber trade; always in demand, 
big wages, easy work; few weeks 
completes; tools given; diplomas 
granted. Moler Barber college, 27 E 
Nic. Ave.. Minneapolis. Estab. 1893. 

" LEARN TELEGRAPHY. 

Short hours; big salary; great demand; 
railroad wires and expert instructors. 
Free catalogue. Barry's Telegraph 
institute. .Minneapolis. Minn. 

W.XNTED — MAIL CARRIERS; $65 TO 
$100 month; Duluth exarninations 
coming; specimen questions free. 
Franklin institute. Dept 178 F, Roch- 
ester. N. Y. 

WANTED — 500 RAILROAD LABOR- 
ers in the West; ship daily; free 
transportation. Apply Stack Employ- 
ment company, 517^ West Michigan 
street. 



WANTED — ONE MILKER AND MAN 
to help around dairy. Trianon dairy, 
Fortieth avenue east and London 
road. 



WANTED — HAMMOND-CHANDLER 
Lumber company wants 100 men at 
Winter, Wis.; wages $2.00 per day. 



WANTED — BARBER; 
man will rent shop 



COMPETENT 
or pay union 



scale. 320 East Superior street. 

WANTED — BOYS; MUST BE 19. 
Grand Bowling alleys, Second avenue 
west and Superio r street. 

WANTED — A GOOD LIVE ERRAND 
boy; good wages. M. I. Stewart Co., 
310 West Second street. 



WANTED — GOVERNMENT POSITIONS 
are easy to get. My free booklet, 
Y 302 tells how. Write today — now. 
Earl Hopkins, Washington, D. C. 

WANTED — SOLICITORS FOR BEST 
proposition ever made, don't over- 
look this. Call between 6 and 6 
Fifth Avenue hotel. Ward. 

WANTED — BOY TO LEARN OPTI- 
cal traie. Twin Ports Optical com- 
pany, 129 West Superior street, up- 
stairs. 

W.VNTED — THREE FIR.ST-CLASS 
coatmakers and pantsmaker. C. S. 
Ziehifdorff, 24 Third avenue west 



WANTED— A NO. 1 STEAM FITTER. 
Apply Hotel Grand, 6219 Ramsey 
street. West Duluth. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED DELIV- 
ery man. Apply foreman. Bridgeman- 
Russell Company. 



WANTED — GOOD BRIGHT GIRL FOR 
bundling, one good at figures. Linen 
Exchang e. 209-11 East First street 

WANTED — MILLINERY MAKERS 
and apprentices at Mrs. Chessers 
Millinery. 114 West Fourth street 

WANTED — NORWEGIAN GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. J. B. 
Richards. 2321 East First street 

WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al housework. Apply 2015 East Sec- 
ond street- or call Melrose 2441. 



FOR RENT — TWO 
nlshed rooms. R. 
McCulloch street 
side 42-L. 



NEWLY FUR- 

G. Dunlop. 4331 

Old 'phone, Lake- 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED FRONT 
room with large closet, modern con- 
veniences. 5711 Cody street. West 
Duluth. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HEATED 
flat at 805 West First street; com- 

glete: rental $35. J. D. Howard & 
o.. Providence building. 



FOR RENT — TWO MODERN FIVE- 
room flats, East end. Call at 1524 
Jefferson street. 'Phone Melrose 
2895, or Grand 946-D. 



FOR RENT — COZY FOUR-ROOM 
flat; newly papered and painted; $15; 
water paid. 324 Sixth avenue east 
•Phone Melrose 5026. 



FOR RENT— TWO BRIGHT FRONT 

furnished rooms for housekeeping, 

private family. 325 East 
street. 



jplng. 
First 



WANTED — YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with housework and care of children; 
small family. 807 Park terrace. 



WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN 
or competent girl for general house- 
work. 706 Woodland ave nue. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
h(.usework, small family, no clill- 
dren. 1222 East First street 



WANTED — NORMAL SCHOOL GIRL 
to work for board and room at 1610 
East Second street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; may go home evenings. 
1925 Jefferson street. 



WANTED — MILLINERY MAKER 

and apprentice. Apply Stacks mil- 
linery department. 



WANTED— A NORMAL SCHOOL GIRL; 
a pleasant, easy place to right party. 
Call Melrose 3211. 



WANTED— ONE FIRST-CLASS SHOE- 
maker. Apply Christ Olsen, 623 West 
Michigan street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED CLOTH- 
ing salesman. Fifth Avenue Cloth- 
ing Store. 



WANTED — GOOD SMART BOY TO 
deliver groceries. 508 West Third 
street. 

WANTED — PAINTERS AT ONCE. 
Address H. L. Searle, Deerwood, 
Minn. 

WANTED — GOOD ALL AROUND 
baker. Apply Zenith 'phone. Lincoln 
SIO-A. 



WANTED— YOUNG LADY TO TAKE 
care of store. Call after 7 P. M. 
Calumet 136-M. 



FOR RENT— TWO FURNjISHED 

rooms for light housekeeping; all 
conveniences. 28 Seventh avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, PLEASANT 
room for light housekeeping, 1927 
West Second street; call 6 to 7:30 
p. m. 



For Rent — Furnished rooms, also fur- 
nished for light housekeeping. Inquire 
Pioneer blk.. Room 410, 31 E. Sup. st 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms; hot water heat and gas for 
cooking. 313 Seventh avenue east. 



FOR RENT — THREE FURNISHED 
rooms, with bath water, gas and 
electric light 162(5 East Sixth street. 



FOR RENT— UNFURNISHED ROOMS, 
Minnesota building; steam heated. J. 
B. Erd, jeweler, 29 East Superior St 

FOR RENT — STRICTLY MODERN, 
newly furnished rooms at the new 
Empress ho tel. 14 East Superior St 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS, 
1006 East Superior street; refer- 
ences exchanged; lake view. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM LOWER 
flat, modern conveniences, hot 
water heat, $32.50 per month. 1507 
East Fourth street 

FOR RENT — SEPT. 1— PLEASANT 
five-room upper flat; modern, fur- 
nace heat, reasonable. 1115 East 
Second street 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM HEATED 
flat, modern; East end; price $35.50 
per month. Field-Frey Co., 204 Ex- 
change Bldg. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE; 
all modern conveniences; centrally 



FOR RENT. 



Seven-room house, furnace heat large 
yard, water paid jy owner, $25 per 
month. 



MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE CO 
18 Phoenix Blk. City. 



4 ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 25, 
__A^ Order of Eastern Star— Regu- 
^CfWP''^ lar meetings second and 
AA fourth Friday evenings o| 
^ "^ each month at 8 o'clock. No 
meeting until further notice. Modelld 
Bronson, W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart sec. 
retary. 




FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE 
No. 420 Second avenue west; water, 
gas, electric light, bath, pantry and 
basement, coal and wood range and 
gas range, etc. Call at premises or 
401 Palladlo Building. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED, DE- 
tached, modern 8-room house, until 
May 1, or close of school year; fine 
location East end. For particulars 
see Getty-Smith Co., No. 306 Pal- 
ladlo Bldg. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUS^E AT 
Lakeside; newly decorated, electric 
lights, good well, three blocks from 
car line, $12.50, H. Bartlett, 4711 East 
Superior street. Both 'phones. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE IN 
West end; city water; one block from 
car line; will put in good shape; $15 
per month. J. D. Howard & Co., 
Providence building. 



F.OR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE 
on London road; all modern conven- 
lence.s; hot water heat. Apply 6601 
London road. Old 'phone Lakeside 
68-L. 

FOR RENT— NINE - ROOM HEATED 
house, 1822 West Second street; rent 
|35 summer, $40 winter months. N. 
J. Upham company. Providence build- 
ing^ 

FOR RENT — EXCELLENT EIGHT- 
room house. West end; hot water 
heat, larsrc i"t; water xreB;-price, ^28 
per month. Whitney Wall company. 

FOR RENT— TWO 9 -ROOM HOUSES 
In East end; completely furnished; 
$50 per month each. Little & Nolte 
Co., Exchange Bldg. 

FOR RENT — TEN-ROOM HOUSE; 
central, steam heat; only $35. See 
N. J. Upham company, 714 Prov- 
idence building. 

FOR RENT— NEW BRIQK HOUSE. 
204 East Sixth street all modern 
improvements. Inquire 211 East 
Fifth street. 

FOR RENT — FOUR. ROOM HOUSE 
with electric light, gas and water; 
rent $12. Apply at 326^ East Sixth 
street. 

HAVE US MOVE YOU WITH OUR 
large van and experienced men. Du- 
luth Van Co.. 18 Fourth avenue west. 



located, 
street. 



Inquire 517% West Fourth 



FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
flat; all conveniences. Apply 416 
East Fourth street, or phone Grand 
1977-Y. 



FOR RENT— HEATED FLAT IN WEST 
end; four rooms only $20. See N. 
J. Upham company. Providence build- 
ing 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
modern; steam heat; centrally locat- 
ed. Inquire 615% West Fourth street. 

LET US MOVE YOU TO YOUR NEW 
home. Duluth Van & Storage Co.. 18 
Fourth avenue west. Just phone 492. 

FOR RENT— FOUR AND FIVE-ROOM 
flats, walking distance; 28 and 30 
Fourth avenue east; Melrose 5648. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 321 
East Fifth street. Call at Bloom & 
Co., 102 West First street 



WANTED— DELIVERY BOY FOR 
grocery store. 2303 West Superior 
street. 

WANTED— BOY AT BECKMAN FUR 
factory. 16 East Superior street. 



WANTED — SHIPPING CLERK. AP. 
ply Northern Electric company. 



WANTED — DELIVERY BOY. 

16 East Michigan street 



APPLY 



WANTED — ERRAND 
Christie Lithograph Co. 



BOY 



AT 



WANTED— ONE SETTER. COOK & 
Ketcham. Tower. Minn 



WANTED — AT ONCE, PORTER, 
ply Leiaer company. 



AP- 



WANTED — A NURSE GIRL TO As- 
sist with second work. 1306 East 
Second street 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; small flat 229 Seventh 
avenue east. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 709 East Third 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework. 1718 
street. 



FOR GENERAL 
East Superior 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Apply 1325 East Second 
street. 



WANTED— NURSE GIRL WHO WILL 
go home nights. 2625 East Second 
street. 



WANTED — COMPETENT MAID FOR 
general housework. 2026 East First 
street 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1109 East Third street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 414 Elast Third street. 



FOR RENT — NEATLY FURNISHED 
rooms, all conveniences. Apply 
204 E ast Third street. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
front room: all modern conveniences. 
1522 Jefferson street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS; $2 
and up per week. The Dakota, 119 
West Second street 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping. 816 West 
Fourth street. 

STEAM 
Michigan 



FOR RENT — MODERN 
heated rooms. 1119 West 
street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM; ALL 
conveniences. 10 West First street 
flat F. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED HEATED 
room at 1626 East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT — FITHNTSHED ROOM. 
North Fifty-third avenue west. 



221 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS AT 
517 West Fourth street 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; call Melrose 1618. 

WANTED— SECOND GIRL. APPLY 
826 East 6eooa4 strssk 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SALE— E. CARLSON WILL AR- 
rive with a oarlosd of fresh milk 
cows Aug. 1». ««01 West Twelfth 
■t reet Lincoln Hft-t). 

FOR SALE — B. OOLDFINE WILL 
arrive with a car of fresh mllch 
cows Sunday. Avf. 24. 1784 Bast 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
modern convenience; colored people 
preferred. C 345, Herald. 



FOR REN'T — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences except heat. 1027 West 
First street; Mrs. Flood. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM HOUSE; 
all modern conveniences, heat in- 
cluded. 213 Mesaba avenue. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HOUSE; 
modern, except heat 212% East 
Third street. 



PADDED VANS for moving furniture. 
West Duluth & Duluth •Transfer Co 



REAL ESTATE LOANS. 



CONSULT WITH F. L SALTER * 

# COMPANY, * 

# 803 Lonsdale Building, » 

# If you are thinking of borrowing H- 
U' money on real estate security. Thny % 

# are always in funds, and grant ^ 

# every courtesy to their clients. ^ 
i^ Building Loans a Specialty. i^ 
» « 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 
3 LONSDALE BLDG. 



MEL. 2400— PHONES — GRAND 239. 

WE ALWAYS HAVE 

MONEY ON HAND TO 

LOAN AT 5% AND 6 PER CENT 

ON REAL ESTATE SECURITY. 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, ALL 
modern conveniences. Call 422 East 
Third street upstairs. 



rOR RENT — FIVE UNFURNISHED 
rooms, all modern conveniences. 806 
East Sixth street 



FOR RENT— TWO FLATS; FOUR AND 
five rooms. 130 West Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences. 226 Sixth avenue west 



FOR RENT— FOUR- ROOM FURNISH- 
ed flat at 629 West First street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR- ROOM FLAT, 
quire 424 Ninth avenue east 



IN- 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM MODERN 
flat; 616 Lake avenue north. 

FOR RENT— FOUR -ROOM FLAT, 
619% East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM 
West Third street. 



FLAT. 



827 



TIMBER LANDS. 

FOR 8ALB^^^^^^^300/>0M0?'^EE^ OF 
good timber; also 330,000 cords of 
pulpwood, in British Columbia; most 
of which is spruce and cedar. For 
particulars address L. B., Herald. 



MORTGAGE LOANS. 
We are in position to place your loan 
on most advantageous terms, at lowest 
cost. 

RICHARDSON. DAY & CHEADLE. 
Exchange Building. 



STRYKER. MANLE\ A BUCK 
Are always ready to make real estate 
loans at lowest rates, without sub- 
mitting applications, or any delays. 
Call or telephone. 



CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CITY 
and farm property, any amount, low- 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title 
Co., 613 First National Bank building. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON FARM AND 
city property; any amount from $500 
up; no delay; efficient service. Wm. 
Sargent. 102 Providence building. 



City and village loans in Minnesota. Re- 
pay loan monthly: easy terms. Knip- 
penberg. Commercial bldg. 'Phone 697. 



EUCLID LODGE, NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West" 
Duluth second and fourth 
\\ ednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
4"^ 27. 1913. Work— Second 

degree. W. B. Getchell. W. M.; A. Dun- 

leavy, secretary 

DULUTH CHAPTER. NO. 59, 
R. A. M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 7:30 

^efrSar^: '^^^'^^' ^ ^"^ ^ Dun!fa^^J: 




ZENITH COUNCIL. NO. 1617 
Royal league, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays of 
the month at 8 p. m. K. of P 
hall. 118 West Super/or street 
Thnm««« o *"v.'^°^® ^'^^^' Kelly-How- 
?8 F^!?"£'.y?^°"= collector, H. X. Hall, 
18 ii.a8t First street 




DU1.UTH LODGE NO. 28. I. O. O F -I 

/^^^ ,]'J''^'^ Friday eienln* ^ s'o'clcck, 
«?"S5 »t Odd FelJows- hall, ig L*ke .T,n5 

Wnrir Thi,/'!^^ ^^ meeUn* August 29. ifilS. 
Work-^Thlrd degree. J. a. Braff, N. O : W A. 
Plttwiger. Kec. Sec; A. H. Paul, Fn S« 




seert-tary 



MAJESTIC REBEKAH LODGEJ. 
No. 60. Regular meetings first 
and third Thursday ot each 
month, at I. O. O. p. hall 18 
Lake avenue north. iiext 
meeting, Thursday evening 
Sept 4. 1913. Initiation. Mabel 
Drown, N. G.; Nellie Botsford, 




K. o. T. M. 
DTH.UTH TENT, NO. 1, KN70HTS 0» 
the Miccfcbces of the World, me«u trtt 
and third Mondars of each mouth at 
Maccabee haU. 21 Lake atenue north. 
Charles Q. Putter. ccmmaDder, 62t 
North Flfty-aerenth avenue west- J B. 
Gellneau. record keeper, offlc© in b«u. Hotui. 10 »^ 
m. to 1 p. ni. dally. Zenith pfaone. G r&ad 619-X. 

DULUTH LODGE NO BObT 
Loyal order of Moose, meets 
every Monday evening at I 
o'clock. Moose hall, 224 West 
First street Work — Third 

ii Th,-^ degree. Carl Schau, secretar^ 

14 Third avenue east 



DULUTH homestead! NO slsi 
Brotherhood of American Teomco meets 
[first and third Monday eTenlngs of eacV 
'month, at Woodniau hall. Tweaty-flirt 
avenue west and First alreet. J. J, 
_^ Hushes, foreman, office 2022 Wect 84- 
penur bu«el, polh 'phones; Mrs. J. A. BcUmeur cor« 
respondent, office £022 West Superior slieet, 0I4 
'phone 2338 Melrose; Zenith phone, 621-D Llucolol 
residence No. 1 £teter street. Zenith 'phone 22»-»- 
Liucoin. 




M. ^. A. 

IMPERIAL CAMP, 2206— MEETS AJ- 

Kc.rrester hall. Fourth avenue west an^ 
First street, second and fourth Tuet>dayt 
of each month. V. C. Eaglca i-ousul* 
C. P. Earl, clerk, P. O. box 4li. 

CLAN STEWAHT. NO. 60, O. 8. C.-i- 
Meets first aud third WedQCedaya casta' 
month, 8 p. m., at U. O. F. hall, conxtg 
Fourth avenue west and First »t.'««C 
Next regular meeting Sept. 8. I9I9> 
Alexander Andersen, chief; John D. UaA*^ 

Artliur, secretary; John Burnett, financial secretaz7» 

313 Torrey building. 

DIAMO.ND LOI»GE NO. «S, K. OF P». 
—Meets every Mocdai- mening in Sloan's, 
hail, corner Twentieth avenue west ao^ 
(superior street. Boyd Yergen. C. C, 
2226 West Fist stiwc S. I.. Pierce. K. 
uf K. and 8. 







K. OF P. 
NORTH STAB LODGE, NO. M, K. or 
P. — Meeu every Tuesday evening at Ca*- 
tle t all, 118 West Superior street. Georflt 
W. I>etert. C. C. 1112 East Fifth stre^ 
8. A. Ham, 28 North Tweui> -eights, 
avenue west, K. of B. and B. 

A. O. V. W. ' 

FIDELITY LODGE NO. 105— MEETS 
at Maccabe« halL 21 Lake avenue .nortX 
every Tbur.day at S p. m. Visiting lueia*- 
bors welcome. S. L, Pierce, M. W.j 
A. K. Plering, recorder; O. i. Mur>ald> 
financier. 217 East Fifth street. 




MODEltN SAMARITANS. 
ALPHA COUNCIL. NO. 1— TAKE No- 
tice: That Beneficent degree meets sec- 
ond and fourth Thuredajs and the Sam-- 
arlian degree the first and third Thut*- 
da)-8 at U. O. F. liall, corner Fourth ave- 
nue west and First street J. Kelly, O. 
S ; Wallace P. Wallbanks, scribe; F. A. Noble, F. a. 
First NaUonsi bank buUdiug. Enuna Mahaa, Lady 
G. 8. 

ROTAL ARCANUM. DULUTH COUN- 

cil, No. 1482— Meeu second and fourtS 
Tuesday CTenlngs at Maccabce hall. 2t« 
I^«ke avenue north. Clinton Brooks, 
retary. 401 Columbia building. 



ORDER OF OWLS. DULUTH 
Nest, No. 1200- Meetings are b«M 
every first and third Wednesday 
evening of each month at Eaglet 
hall, 418 West Superior klreeC 
Joseph kl. Feaki. tecretatT. n 





East Superior street. 



A. O. U. W.— Duluth Lodge, No. 10.— 
Meets every eecond and founh Tuesday* 
nlghl at L O. O. F. hall. 18 Lake av*. 
uue north. Next m««tlng. Aug. 28. T:S« 
n B sharp. Thomas A. Johnson, >C 
W.; George F. Lindberg. recorder; T. J^ 
St. Geanaln, financier. 18 Weal Fust atit*L 




MONEY TO LOAN— $50,000— AMOUNTS 
1300. $500. $1,000. $5,000. $10,000. A. A. 
Fider Co.. 300 1st National Bank bldg. 



MONEY TO LOAN— WE BUY COM- 
mercial paper. St Louis County 
Realty company. 710 Torrey building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON CITY PROP- 
erty. first mortgraffes. J. F. McNaugh- 
ton, 2022 West Superior street 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby, 306 Palladlo building. 



FOR SALE — ONE FINE TIMBERED 
homestead to locate partv on; price 
$100. Lock Box 81, Baudette, Minn. 

TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought: mortgage loans made John 
Q. A. Cro sby. 80S Palladlo buildlny. 

I buy standing timber: also cut-over 
lands. 0«o. Ruplsy. til Z^rcsum Bide; 



MONEY ON HAND TO LOAN ON FIRST 
mortgages. See N. J Upham com- 
pany, Providence builaing. 



LOANS on improved farms, city loans, 
insurance. W. B. Roe, 414 Prov. bldg. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE. 
W. C. Sargent 102 Providence bldg. 



[oney to loan — anv amount; low rat«a 
Cooler A Underbill. 209 Bxohanse. 



PRiyATE^HOSPITAL.__ 

PRIVATE HOME BEFORE AND DUrT 
ing confinement; best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared for. 
Margaret Finkle. Call Melrose 2454- 
16 West Fifth street 



PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES DUR- 
Ing confinement; expert care; infant^ 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 2«4 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwlte: privats- 
home before and after confinement. 
829 N. 58th Av. W. Phones. Cole 171; 
Calumet 270. 



MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wife: female complaints. 41S Seventh, 
avenue east Zenith 12ZS. 



LYDIA LEHTONEN, MIDWIFE 240^ 
West Second St 'Phone Lincoln 475-A. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 

We'cARRY ?N STOCK RKFAIRSFO 
10,000 different stoves ana raa^es. 
F. WUrssrts Jk Sonsi 410 «l Subl 



1 



l- 






• "■ 




I 



1 




THE DULUTH HERAL 



MllilVESOTA f 

toricaU 





VOLUME XXXI— NO. 124. 



SATURDAY EVENING, AUGUST 30, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 



WASHINGTON WAITS FOR 
MEXICO TO ACT-MEXICO 
WAITS FOR WASHINGTON 



Lind Is at Vera Cruz and 

Will Sail on Next 

Boat. 



Felix Diaz Proclaims He 

Is Candidate for 

President. 



Many Protests Are Made 

Against Americans' 

Leaving. 



SAYS HE WILL SEEK 

MEXICAN PRESIDENCY 



WashJnKton. Aug. 30. — Indications 
wfcre today that the Mexican policy 
for the United Statea for the next few 
days will be a waiting one, while 
strict neutrality is enforced and 
Americans are urgr^-d to leave Mexico. 

Those who take that view, point to 
President Wilson's declaration to con- 
gress In his address that "the actual 
situation of the authorities In Mexico 
City win presently be revealed," and 
that "steady pressure of moral force 
will before many days break the bar- 
riers of pride and prejudice down." 



Felix UUiE Ih Candidate. 

London, Aug' 30. — "I am now defi- 
nitfly a candUfate for the presidency 
of rvlexicc." Gin. Felix Diaz, who re- 
cently arrived from Canada, told the 
Associated Press this morning:. 

Diaz is quoted as saying that there 
had never been any question as to Gen. 
Huertas candidacy for president In 
Mexico. 

"When I left Mexico," Gen. Diaz 
said, "it was with the understanding 
that a fair and open election would be 
arranged, and that I woMld be back In 
Mexico when it was held. I have the 
kindliest feeling toward the United 
States." 

"My friends in Mexico are working 
in my behalf," continued Gen. Diaz. 
"UTifortunately, at this distance I my- 
self am unable to do much, but I am 
awaiting Instructions which may 
simplify matters. 

"Even If I am ordered to proceed to 
Japan it is not certain that I shall go 
there. My action will depend upon 
developments In Mexico." 

Gen. Diaz apparently is pleased 
with the course of events In Mexico. 
He said the contention that Victorlano 
Huerta's candidacy for the presidency 
was barred by the Mexican constitu- 
tion was qiiite correct. He declares 

(Continued on page 2, first column.) 

GOME TO ARRANGE 
FOR FAiR EXHIBITS 



GEN. FELIX DIAZ. 



GATHER FOR 
RARJAEETING 

Advance Guard of Dele- 
gates Has Arrived at 
Montreal. 



Conference of Judges Will 

Precede Sessions of 

Association. 



French Commissioners Will 

Pick Site at San 

Francisco. 

New York, Aug. 30.— The French na- 
tional commission to the Panama-Pa- 
cific exposition at San Francisco, 
headtu by Albert Tinman, reached New 
York today on the steamer Provence 
The commission will spend two days in 
New York and then proceed to San 
Francisco to select and officially accept 
the site for the French national pa- 
vilion, and to arrange for space for 
French industrial and educational ex- 
hibits In the exhibition palaces pro- 
vided by the exposition. 

Viscount Dejean, first secretary of the 
French embassy at Washington, and 
representatives of the exposition met 
the commission at the dock. 

Mr. Tinman, chairman of the com- 
mission, is director of exhibitions in 
the French ministry of commerce and 
Industry. The othtr members are O. 
Rogtr-Sandoz, secretary of the French 
Foreign Expositions association; Gas- 
ton de Pellorin de Latouche, adminis- 
trator of the French-Atlantic steam- 
ship line; Alfred Savy, member of the 
International Jury of awards at the 
St. Louis exposition, and a government 
architect, and Jean Guiffrey, assltsant 
commis.-Ioner of the Louvre. 

BATTLrROYSTOVER 
FASHIONABLE HOME 



Three Persons Are Shot 

and Six Others Hurt in 

Red Bank, N.J. 

Red Bank, N. J.. Aug. 30.— Mrs. 
Frank C. Storck retains possession of 
her husband's home in the fashionable 
residential section of Red Bank, after a 
fight made to dispossess her in which 
three persons were shot, four injured 
by blows, an eighth broke his ankle 
and Mrs. btorck herself was thrown 
through a window and made uncon- 
scious when she landed on her head on 
the sidewalk. 

Storck, a piano dealer, divorced his 
wife last month. She has since frus- 
trated his efforts to force her to leave 
his residence here. Last night he or- 
ganized a raiding party, visiting the 
house with several employes and four 
private detectives, Mrs. Storck'n broth- 
ers and other members of her family 
came to her assistance and a brisk me- 
lee ensued. 

Ernest C. Duvls, employed by StorcK 
may die from a bullet wound in the 
head. Samuel Howard, brother of Mrs. 
.Storck, also was shot in the head and 
Ernest Howard. another brother, 
through the shoulder. 

Mrs. Storck and her married daugh- 
ter later swore out warrants charging 
Storck and Percy Houghton, a detec- 
tive, with a:-8ault. They were arrested 
and held to the grand Jury. 

IMPERATOR SAILS 

ON S CHED ULE TIME. 

New York, Aug. 30. — With few 
traces remaining of the fire which 
damaged her hold last Thursday 
morning and cost the life of one of 
her officers, the Imperator sailed on 
schedule time today with cabins well 
filled. The ship had been Inspected 
thoroughly and pronounced In good 
condition. 



Montreal, Que., Aug. 30. — The ad- 
vance guard of delegates and visitors 
to the Thirty-sixth annual meeting of 
the American Bar association, which 
will meet Monday, Is here today, 
guests of the local bar association. 
This afternoon a tour of Inspection of 
the tunnel now being built through 
Mount Royal was on the program. 

Tonight a conference of United 
States judges will be held, at which 
the promotion of uniformity of law, 
with uniformity of decision between 
all states of the Union, will be con- 
sidered. 

Lord Haldane, lord high chancellor 

of Qreat Britain, will deliver his ad- 
dress to tiie association Monday aft- 
ernoon. Tomorrow afternoon the dele- 
gates w^lll be entertained by the Can- 
adian Judges at the Montreal Hunt 
club. 

KelloKg on Hnnd. 

Frank B. Kellogg of St. Paul, Minn., 
president of the association, arrived 
yesterday. Other prominent Ameri- 
can Jurists and lawyers who have ar- 
rived are Chief Justice Reece of Ne- 
braska; Chief Justice Carter of Illi- 
nois, chairman of the American Insti- 
tute on criminal law, and criminology, 
which will open Its conference Tues- 
day next: Justice Pardee, senior Judge 
in point of service of the United .States 
circuit court, and George Whitlock of 
Baltimore. 

Joseph H. Choate former ambassa- 
dor to Great Britain will preside at 
the banquet Wednesday night. 

The workmen's compensation act 
was the chief topic discussed by the 
commissioners on uniform state laws 
yesterday. Members of several states 
pointed to provisions which they de- 
clared would be unconstitutional In 
their states, and Joseph Madden of 
New Hampshire moved the summary 
rejection of the w^hole act. The mo- 
tion was defeated. 

The conference decided that a per- 
iod of 520 weeks should be the long- 
est during which payment should be 
made by the employer to a totally dis- 
abled workman. 



FIGHT ON 80 CENT 
ORE RATE IS BEGUN 



Excessiveness and Unrea- 
sonableness Alleged By 
Steel Companies. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — A concerted 
attack upon existing Iron ore freight 
rates, generally known as the 80-cent 
rate, from lower Great Lake ports to 
furnaces In the Pittsburg district, was 
begun today before the interstate com- 
merce commission. Complaints wore 
filed against various railways, Includ- 
ing the Pennsylvania and the Lake 
Shore, by the Pittsburg Steel company 
and the Wheeling Steel & Iron com- 
pany, declaring that the rates were ex- 
cessive and unreasonable, and demand- 
ing material reductions. 



KANSAS CITY VOTES 
ON FREE TEXT BQOKS. 

Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 30. — Whether 
the pupils In Kansas City schools shall 
be provided with free text books was 
the question placed before the voters 
of the city at a special election today. 
A law recently passed by the state leg- 
islature provides a fund for supplying 
text books without cost to sohool chil- 
dren If the voters of the school districts 
so order. Little opposition has been 
shown, and it was believed the propo- 
sition would carry by a substantial ma- 
jority. 



TARIFF THEME 
OF SENATORS 

Administrative Features of 
the Bill Are Dis- 
cussed. 




Republicans Accuse Demo- 
crats of Attacking Civil 
Service. 



Washington, Aug. 30. — Passing over 
the cotton future tax amendment to 
the tariff bill until Monday the sen- 
ate today took up administrative fea- 
tures of the bill. 

Republican attack on the tariff bill 
In the senate yesterday cantered about 
the provision that would permit civil 
service laws to be disregarded In em- 
ploying inspectors, deputy collectors 
and agents to administer the new in- 
come tax laws. The Democratic ma- 
jority was charged with trying to 
break down the civil service laws and 
open up Jobs to "political favorites." 

Republican senators of all factions 
united In their efforts to have civil 
service extended over the new em- 
ployes, but on the closest vote of the 
day they were defeated 37 to 32, on an 
amendment offered by Senator Lodge. 
Huke Smith Bill's Defender. 
Senator Hoke Smith, who defended 
the bill for the Democrats, declared It 
was Impossible under the present civil 
service examinations to get men qual- 
ified to administer the income tax 
law. 

"A bright boy out of school could 
pass the examination," he said, "but 
men of 40 to 46, equipped from busi- 
ness experience to do such work, 
probably would fall." 

"Do you think the recommenda- 
tion of a congressman would be better 
than a civil service examination?" 
Senator Root demanded. 

"I think the Judgment of a con- 
gressman would be better In the se- 
lection of competent men than this 
examination they have been conduct- 
ing." Senator Smith replied. "None of 
the men who has passed these exam- 
inations Is as fit as the men recom- 
mended by deputy collectors of reve- 
nue." 

OntMlde Civil Ser\'lce. 
As It was left by the senate, the 
bill authorizes the collector of Inter- 
nal revenue and the secretary of tho 
treasury to employ men outside the 
civil service for the first two years 
after the income tax goes into effect. 
A letter from the cnalrman of the 
civil service commission wag read by 
Senator Sterling, saying the commis- 
sion could readily fill the new posi- 
tions. 

The Democratic members of the 
finance committee began sessions last 
night to readjust the income tax to 
meet the demands of insurgent Dem- 
ocrats, who have asked for an In- 
crease In the "additional tax" on large 
incomes. Other contested subjects also 
will be disposed of. 

PRESIDENrS TRAIN 
DELAYED DY STORM 



1,000 DEAD 
IN TYPHOON 

Storm in Japan More Dis- 
astrous Than Was 
Supposed. 



Ambassador Guthrie Has to 

Wade Waist Deep in 

Rood. 



WOMEN SPIT 
UPONGUARDS 

Militia Protect Deputies 

From Attack at 

Calumet. 



Evictions Are Planned for 

Monday— Trouble Is 

Feared. 



Toklo, Aug. 30. — Detailed reports re- 
garding the typhoon which has raged 
over Japan for several days, show that 
it was more disastrous than was first 
believed, and that the fatalities per- 
haps will aggregate 1,000. 

There was a tidal wave at Mlyako, 
Northern Hondo, In which sixty-four 
persons lost their lives, while 100 per- 
sona are missing. Hundreds of houses j 
were swept out to sea. One hundred 
persons were drowned Ip the floods or 
killed In landslides In other portions 
of Northern Hondo, and 2,000 are re- 
ported unaccounted for. 

Qreat damage was done at Hokkaido. 
Scores of fishermen were drowned, 
houses were destroyed and railroad 
bridges Inundated. A train was hurled 
fnto the river by a washout in the 
tracks and several persona were killed 
and forty injured. The Inhabitants 
along the coast have fled to the hills, 
and thousands are homeless and suf- 
fering. 

At many points persons on shore 
watching the high seas were caught by 
the waves and swept away. The mone- 
tary loss as a result of the storm will 
be heavy. 

George W. Guthrie, the new American 
ambassador to Japan, while motoring 
from Miyanoshita, was stopped by 
waist-high water outside of Yoko- 
hama. He was forced to walk to the 
railroad station, whence he proceeded 
by train to Tokio. 



LORD HALDANE GOES 
TO SEE WEST POINT 



Car Is Attached to German 

Singers' Excursion Part 

of Way. 

Springfield, Mass.. Aug. 80. — Delayed 
two hours by a severe electrical storm 
that swept the Atlantic seaboard last 
night. President and Mrs. Wilson 
passed through here shortly after 9 
o'clock today en route to Cornish, N. 
H., for the week-end. 

The president slept soundly, not- 
withstanding the thunder and light- 
ning, while the train moved slowly 
through a steadv downpour of rain. 
The president missed connections at 
New Haven and his car was attached 
as far as Springfield to an excursion 
of a German singing society. 



Admits to Reporters That 

He Favors Woman 

Suffrage. 

New York, Aug. 30. — A visit to West 
Point was foremost today on the pro- 
gram of Viscount Haldane. lord high 
chancellor of England, who reached 
here yesterday for a five-day visit to 
America. After a luncheon at the 
home of Col. Townley, superintendent 
of the military acaderc . and a review 
of the corps and cadets, Litrd Haldane 
expected to leave on Rieolal train 

for Albany, the seciusd' ' Kopplnir point 
In his trip from this vity to Mon- 
treal. 

At Montreal Lord Haldane will ad- 
dress the American Bar association on 
Monday. He plans to return to New 
York Tuesday night and sail for home 
on the Lusltanla early Wednesday 
morning. 

In the first Interview given news- 
paper men' since his appointment, Lord 
Haldane discussed freely, on his ar- 
rival, the topics of the day, but balked 
at giving his opinion as to the out- 
come of the situation In Mexico. He 
declared for woman suffrage — but not 
for the militant methods of seeking It — 
prophesied home rule for Ireland soon; 
salQ he couldn't foresee lasting world- 
wide peace In the near future, and Jok- 
ingly ventured the opinion that Eng- 
land s great seal, of which he is keep- 
er, was "very safe" In the house of 
lords during his absence. 



Scharmaa In New York. 

New York, Aug. 30. — Jacob G. Schur- 
man, American minister to Greece, re- 
turned home here on a visit today 
from Trieste. 



Calumet, Mich.. Aug. 30.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Company F of Saginaw, 
stationed at the Wolverine mine, was 
called out early today to protect a 
party of deputies at No. 3 shaft, South 
Kearsarge mine, from attack by strik- 
ers and women. The women were par- 
ticularly active, spitting in the faces of 
the deputies 'and otherwise defying 
them. 

The soldiers rescued an Allouez mine 
f'J'^nian who was attacked by strikers 
while on his way to work. Tlie strik- 
ers took him from a street car and 
were beating him when the militiamen 
arrived. 

*u^*!^!^^'"^ ^^^ women sympathizers at 
the Champion mine resumed their at- 
tacks on non-union men, striking them 
with brooms dipped In filth, and throw- 
ing missiles. One man was badly beat- 
en and three women were arrested. 

Another big parade of strikers was 
held in Calumet today 

Will Evict Strikers. 
Serious trouble is anticipated for 
Monday, as it is said strikers still re- 
siding in houses owned by several of 
the mining companies are to be evicted. 
The strike is in its fifth week and there 
have been no evictions to date, and no 
rent has been paid for the month by 
the strikers or others, and the mining 
companies want the houses for em- 
ployes. 

The strikers have arranged big dem- 
onstrations for Sunday and Labor day 
with President Moyer of the Western 
Federation of Miners the possible at- 
traction. A parade and mass meeting 
will be held in Calumet Sunday on 
Monday demon8tration.ci will take place 
both In Calumet and Hancock. 

The state military board has decided 
to reduce next week by half the present 
force of 1,000 troops, and mount 100 in- 
fantrymen for patrol duty, bringing 
that division up to 250 men. A well or- 
ganized body of deputies will take the 
place of the engineers sent home. 
Help From A. F. of L. 

It is claimed by officials of the West- I 
ern Federation of Miners that Secretary 
Morrison of the American Federation 
of Labor has given assurances of finan- 
cial support for the strikers, and has 
appealed to every organization aflTlll- 
atel with the federatka to levy assess- 
ments. 



JEROME GETS ORDER TO 
PRODUCE HARRY THAW 
IN COURT mi TUESDAY 



'^s^ 
z^-" 



MADE REPORT SHOWING ^Ifantic Effort Made By 

SLAVE RY IN PHIllPPI^^| Thaw's Lawyers to 
J'o-i Head It Off. 




WANT BAHLESHiPS 
TO USE AS SCHOOLS 



Hygienists Adopt Resol- 
ution to That End at 
Buffalo. 

Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 30. — The Inter- 
national Congress on School Hygiene 
ended today to meet in Brussels in 
1915. The sectional meetings con 
tirued until noon today. Sir James 
Kerr of London was the ohlef speaker. 
His subject was "The Illumination of 
Class Rooms," and he declared that 
one-half of the school children in 
elementary classes have defective 
vision. 

The congress adopted resolutions 
recommending thorough medical in- 
spection in all public schools, and the 
use of discarded battleships as open 
air schools, where there Is hardly ac- 
commodation for 1,500 to receive in- 
struction In the open air. The con- 
gress. It states. Is convinced that the 
open air school is one of the most 
powerful agents in the prevention ana 
cure of tuberculosis In childhood. 



DEAN C. WORCESTER. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — Dean C. Wor- 
cester reported to the war department 
that native Filipinos are sold Into pe- 
onage just as they were before the 
United States government took charge 
of Philippine affairs. Dean Worcester 
is the secretary of interior of the Phil- 
ippine insular government and has 
been since 1901. He was formerly a 
professor at the University of Michi- 
gan. It is expected that President Wil- 
son will make changes in the Philip- 
pine commission soon. 



BRYAN HAS 
WILD RIDE 

Motors Through Terrific 
Storm to Keep Speak- 
ing Date. 



Habeas Corpus May Mean 

Early Deportation of 

Fugitive. 



Pittsburg Court Delays 

Hearing Brought to 

Get Funds. 



Ignores Chauffeur's Pleas 

to Stop and Seek 

Shelter. 



State Fair Week, or Visiting Relations in the Twin Cities. 







rt^KS^^ns 



Philadelphia, Aug. 30. — Secretary of 
State Bryan had one of the most ex- 
citing experiences of his long public 
career late last night, In a thrilling 
automobile ride of fifty miles through 
a terrific thunder storm that levelled 
trees, fired many buildings In this 
section and caused much damage to 
other property. 

The secretary lectured at Doyleetown, 
twenty-flve miles north of Philadelphia, 
early In the evening, and was scheduled 
to speak at Kennett Square, thirty 
miles west of this city. A train Into 
Philadelphia and out to Kennett Square 
would not have landed him at his des- 
tination in time, so he undertook to 
go across country in the automobile. 
Started In Licrht Rain. 

A light rain was falling when Mr. 
Bryan and the chauffeur started, and 
In a short time the storm came up. 
Lightning was incessant and the rain 
came down in sheets, making fast 
driving impossible. The roads became 
bad, fallen trees were encountered, 
and the driver of the car, realizing 
that he was carrying an important pub- 
lic official, advised that they seek 
shelter in a farmhouse. Mr. Bryan re- 
fused and urged more speed. 

At Westchester the automobile was 
stopped for slight repairs, and the 
driver of the car again advised aban- 
doning the trip, but Mr. Bryan again 
refused, declaring that he would get to 
Kennett Square if he had to hire an- 
other driver. 

Among; Fallen Tree*. 

On their journey from Westchester 
to Kennett Square lightning played all 
around, and the driver Had to pick his 
way among fallen trees. 

The storm raged all the way to their 
destination, which the secretary reached 
without mishap. Mr. Bryan lectured to 
a crowd that had waited several hours 
in a large tent. The rain continued 
while he spoke, and there was three 
Inches of fvater In parts of the tent. 
After midnight Mr. Bryan motored to 
Wl!mlngton> Del., and took a train 
for Washington. He planned to leave 
Washington .t»day to deliver lectures 
at Oxford, Pa., and Belalr. Md. 

FRITZI SCHEFF SAYS 
SHE CANT PAY DEBTS. 

New York, Aug. 30. — Prltzl Scheff 
of footlight fame filed a voluntary 
petition In bankruptcy here today. She 
owes approximately |150,000. Her as- 
sets, Including real estate at Big 
Stone Gap, Va,, home of her former 
husband, John Fox, Jr., are listed at 
$75,000. 



THE DAY IN CONGRESS I 



Sherbrooke, Que., Aug. 30.— Harry K. 
Thaw will be produced in court here 
again on Tuesday morning next, on a 
writ of UAbeas corpus obtained today 
in behalf of Chief of Police Boudreau 
of Coaticook, who arrested him after 
his flight from Malteawan. 

Superior Judge Hutchinson granted 
the writ on the application of Samuel 
Jacobs, chief counsel for the New York 
state Interests. It was an eleventh 
hour move, taken to defeat Thaw's 
lawyers, who have succeeded in keep- 
ing him in jail safe from the immi- 
gration authorities. 

Those of the Thaw lawyers who were 
in town, Charles D. White and Harry 
Faser, bitterly opposed the application, 
but Judge Hutchinson said he would 
thresh the matter out in open court 
Tuesday. 

Special Train Too L.atr 

Thaw was Ignorant of todays' de- 
velopments. His lawyers even did not 
learn of It until a report of the con- 
templated move, sent out last night, 
was telegraphed back from Montreal. 
Hlg chief lawyer, R. N. Greenshlelds, 
immediately chartered a special train 
at Montreal In the hope of checking 
the proceedings. The writ had been 
Issued, however, before hlg arrival. 

Boudreau asked for the writ on the 
giTTund that, as the original captor of 
Thaw, he might be liable to damages 
should Thaw's arrest prove illegal. 

W. T. Jerome, who worked out this 
latest attack, was jubilant. He hopes 
that the writ will be sustained and that 
on Tuesday Thaw will be in the hands 
of the department of immigration for 
deportation to Vermont. 

Justice of Peace Talka. 

In the parlor of his home at Coati- 
cook, Justice of the Peace Dupuis. ac- 
ccmpanled by Mrs. Dupuis, told of the 
attempts to have him crush the Th&w 
con-'mitment. 

"I don't think the commitment was 
regular when I signed It," Dupuis said. 
"Put the sheriff who had Thaw was 
very anxious he should be held. They 

(Continued on page 2, second column.) 

NINE KlLLED^WHEN 
TOW BOAT BLOWS UP 



None of Crew of Ohio River 
Craft Escapes Un- 
scathed. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 30. — Capt. Thomas 

Flaherty, Pilot Harry Donaldf-on and 

six of the crew of the towboat Al*ce 

were killed today and six other river 

men were injured when the vessel's 
boiler exploded. 

Some of the bodies were recovered, 
and the Injured were brought to the 
marine hospital here by the steamer 
Harriet, which was near the scene of 
the accident in the Ohio river at Dam 
No. 2, at Canopolis, Pa. 

Many of the crew were river men of 
the type whose names are seldom 
known to their companions or the 
officers of the boats. Consequently 
there was difficulty in getting a com- 
plete list of the dead. 

The Alice belongs to a sand com- 
pany of Pittsburg and was towing a 
fleet of barges. She was within 1,000 
feet of the lock when the boilers let 
go. Within ten minutes after the ex- 
plosion the Alice sank and only her 
stacks were above water. Of the crew 
of fourteen men, not one is known to 
have escaped death or Injury. 

Later In the day the body of Mrs. 
Mills, a chambermaid, was recovered 
from the shattered hull of the craft. 
One of the boilers was located in the 
rand on Neville Island, fully 1,600 feet 
from the scene of the explosion. 

BIBLE SOGiETYMAN 
MURDERED IN CHILE 



HOVSB. 

Met at 11 a. m. 

Received realvnatlon of Itcpre- 
■entatlvc Davla of \Vc«t Vlrislnla, 
to become aolldtor-iceneral. 

Hetch Hetcby bill eouaidered 
Trlth view to paaaase lale thl» 
afternoon. 



senate:. 

Met at 11 a. m. 
Tariff debate eontianed. 
Lobby eonunlttce continued 
hearinsa. 



[in»»»»»inn(yi i <»nn»»»»»»ini i (»>K » im 



Rev. Carl Hansen Is Re- 
ported Killed By Work- 
man. 

New York, Aug. 30. — Advices by 
cable today to the American Bible so- 
ciety and the Methodist foreign mis- 
sion board told of the murder of Rev, 
Carl Hansen, missionary In Chile for 
the Bible society. The messages, ex- 
cept to say that the killing was at the 
hands of a workman, gave no details- 
of the tragedy. 

BARRELTOFICRAUT; 
HALF TON OF WIENERS 

Ackley, Iowa, Furnishes 
Dainties Free at An- 
nual Fete. 

Ackley, Iowa, Aug. 30. — Ten thou- 
sand visitors came to Ackley to join 
In the annual celebration of "Sauer- 
kraut day." This Is the banner sauer- 
kraut-making section of the ent^ro 
country and the annual festival is 
held to attract public attention to 
the product. The feature of this 
year's celebration was a great dinner 
served free to the visitors. Fifteen 
barrels of sauerkraut and mors than 
1,000 pounds of Wienerwursts werA 
consumed by the multitude. 



n 




~.-^-_ 
^ ' 



ss: 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1013. 



SPECIAL TO 
COUNTY FAIR 

Duluth Sends a Delegation 
of 250 Boosters to 

Hibbing. 



an effort to Kot more speclflc informa- 
tion concernlnar Prosldent Wilson's 
warning'. 

A number of large corporations em- 
ploying Americana In various outlying 
polntd In the republic are perplexed 
as to what Instructions they shall de- 
liver to their men. since the carrylnj? 
out of President Wilson's Instructions 
would m^an a cessation of their oper- 
ations. 



Will Spend Day at Exhi- 
bition, Returning in the 
Evening. 



Today Is Duluth day at the St. Louis 
county fair at Hibbing. 

Duluth Is well represented at the 
fair. A special train bearing about 
250 Duluth people and the Third Regi- 
ment band drew out of the Union sta- 
tion at 8:15 this morning bound for the 
range town. Duluth people will be 
prominent on the fair grounds this aft- 
ernoon and the Third Regiment band 
will entertain the fair crowds. 

The special train will leave Hibbing 
lor the return trip at 8:30 this evening, 
arriving here at 11:15. 

The excursion Is In charge of the 
trade extension committee of the Com- 
mercial club. Chairman Frank X. 
Gravel and other members of the com- 
mittte have been busy for some weeks 
making preparations for the trip. The 
fund for taking the band was sub- 
scribed privately and many tickets for 
the excursion were disposed of by the 
committee. The crowd to take the trip 
was not as larare as the committee had 
hoped for, but it was large enough t* 
makf- A good showing for Duluth. 

WASHINGTON WAITS 

FOR MEXIC O TO ACT 

(Continued from page 1.) 

the faot that he was still an official 
representative of the Mexican gov- 
ernment debarred him from discussing 
President Wilson's message or the 
Mexican replies. 



Lind Will Not R«tnra. 

Vera Cruz. Aug. 30. — .John Llnd has 
let It be understood that he will not 
return to Mexico City except on spe- 
cial invitation of President Huerta. 
He will probably take passage for th*» 
United States on the next passenger 
steamer sailing from this port. 

Rear Admiral Fletcher entertained 
Mr. Llnd at tea on board the battle- 
ship Louisiana yesterday afternoon. 

Eleven American refugees sailed 
from Vera Cruz on the City of Tani- 
plco for New Orleans. 

Methodintn Object. , ^ 

New York. Aug. 30 — Th»» Methodist 
Episcopal board of foreign missions 
has received a telegram from Dr. John 
W Butler, thp superintendent of its 
mission in Mexkia City, stating that 
I'resident Wilsons instructions for an 
American exodus are "much resented' 
by the American colony and American 
missionaries of all denominations ob- 
ject to leaving. 



ORGANIZATION 
IS GROWING 

Rural Mail Carriers Are 

Realizing Value of 

Association. 



Girls Wanted 

Apply at Once 

NATIONAL CANDY CO. 

1728 West Superior Street 



AVanta AmericanM to Stay. 

New Yorlc, Aug. 30. — Senor Sebastian 
Camacho, president of the Mexican Sen- 
ate, has sent a telegram to .James A. 
Scrymser of New York, president of the 
Mexican Telegraph company, request- 
ing him to protest to President Wilson 
against the withdrawal of American 
citizens from iI»^xico. The message, 
made public here today, declares that 
the American colony In Mexico ''Is sat- 
isfied and tranquil," and that "tremen- 
dous damages" will result from Its 
witlulrawal. 

■'There is great alarm here." reads 
the telegram, "'over t'^-e American gov- 
ernment's order for the withdrawal of 
all citizens of the United States resid- 
ing here. 

'You will understand that there ia 
no rea.^on for this order. The Amer- 
ican colony of this republic is one of 
the most numerous of those among ua. 
In Its totality, and with very few ex- 
ceptions, it is satisfied and tranquil, 
dedicated to its work and attending to 
the n-^ces.sitles of Its life, being re- 
spected and esteemed throughout the 
country. It would be seriously preju- 
diced In its welfare and its financial 
Interests were it to abandon a country 
in whioh it is considered and esteemed 
and where it has acquired numerous 
and cordial relations." 



MiHHlonartej* Would Stay. 

Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 30. — Several 
Southern Methodist missionaries who 
have been ordered from Mexico since 
President Wilson's message was pub- 
lished Wednesday have wired to the 
mission board In Nashville asking that 
they be allowed to remain at their 
posts. The board had taken no action 
on these requests today. The Southern 
Presbyterian mission board has sent no 
orders to its Mexican missionaries since 
publication of Pre3ident Wilson's mes- 
sage. 



JEROME GETS ORDER 
TO PRODUCE THAW IN 
COURT NEXT TUESDAY 

(Continued from page 1.) 

were so Insistent that I allowed my- 
self to be persuaded. 

"On Wednesday, I believe, some men 
v.'ho called themselves Immigration 
authorities called on me. They wanted 
me to go riglit to Sherbrooke, give 
Thaw a hearing and turn him loose. 
But I couldn't do that. They had the 
machine waiting, but I didn't go. I 
iiad a horse I wanted to sell that aft- 
ernoon. A while later one of them 
came bade He wanted me to sign over 
my rights to another magistrate. But 
I told him I though I was capable of 
dealing iwltix the situation myself. 
British fair play wont suffer In my 
hands." 

Mrs. Dupuls entered. She Is taller 
than her husband. 

"Let me tell you," Mrs. Dupuis said, 
"I'm for Thaw; I wouldn't hurt him 
for the world. My husband Is not go- 
ing to do anything haisty." 

Appeals to Ottavra. 

Ottawa, Ont. Aug. 30. — Attorney 
General Carmody of New York has 
petitioned tlio Canadian government 
for the return of Harry K. Thaw to 
the authorities at Matteawan. The at- 
torney general cites the precedents 
of cases under the Immigration act, 
and sets forth that in these cases no 
question was raised and that Insane 
cases must be deported. 



.4afterioan Has Disappeared. 

Douglas. Ariz., Aug. 30. — The disap- 

fiearance of John G. George, an Amer- 
ran mining expert, after hie release 
from a Federal prison at Empalme. 
Honora. last Sunday, has created anx- 
iety among hla friends In Arizona and 
Bonora. The Federals consider George 
friendly to the Constitutionalists, and 
it Is feared he was rearrested after 
gaining his liberty. 

George is manager of the mercantile 
department of the Richardson Con- 
struction company and is a business 
a.ssociate of John Hays Hammond- 

» 

Mexico City, Aug. 30. — The failure 
of John Llnd, personal repr*»sentative 
of President Wilson, to return to the 
capital from Vera Cruz Is taken here 
to Indicate that Washington and Mex- 
ico are agreed on one thing at least — 
that there la no good to be accom- 
plished by the trip. Mr. Llnd Is still 
In Vera Cruz awaiting Instructions. 
The Mexican government has made no 
furth'-r oroposal or concession to the 
United States. It Is considered here 
that the next move must be made by 
Washington. 

Officials here view the situation 
more brightly because of the flotation 
of a 12,000,000 peso loan which was 
taken by three local banks — the Na- 
tional, the Bank of London and Mex- 
ico 44nd thp Banco De Commerclo Y 
Industria. Thf exodus of Americans 
from the capital on account of Mr. 
Wilson's warning to them to leave the 
country has been greater, but not as 
great as had been anticipated, as many 
Americans took the attitude that there 
w^as no reason for theni to get out 
unless Intervention was a cfrtalnty. 

Many persons appeared Inclined to 
doubt ihe Juds:mpnt of the Wa.shlng- 
ton administration In Its statement 
that the fighting would become sharp- 
er as a result of cuttlnsr off the sup- 
plies of ammunition. These persons 
seemed to believe that Increased diffi- 
culty of both sides In obtaining am- 
muni*-ion would result In le.ss active 
operati<yig and therefore reduce the 
danerer to American."?. 

M.^nv Americans have spnt private 
teljgrims to friends in Washington in 



Holds Thaw Is Insane. 

Pittsburg. Pa., Aug. ?,0. — Judge J. J. 
Miller and Judge Thomas P. Trimble. 
In orphan*' court here, today refused 
Immediate con.slderatlon of a petition 
filed by counsel for Harry Thaw and 
asking that his trustee, the Fidelity 
Ttitle & Trust Company of Pittsburg, 
be permitted to pay him |10,000 of the 
1600,000 of his estate. 

"This court will take judicial notice 
that the petitioner is adjudged Insime 
in New York, and we cannot see how 
We can make any decree In this case 
in view of his standing in the sister 
state," said Judge Miller. The appli- 
cation will be argued before the en- 
tire bench of the orphan.-?' court next 
week when the regular list is taken up. 

George H. Calvert, of counsel for 
Thaw, made It plain during hl» pre- 
sentation of the case that a part of 
the funds desired was to be used by 
Thaw In having the courts of Alle- 
gheny county pass upon the question of 
his sanity, and the remainder to pay 
the lawyers now working In hla be- 
half in Canada. 



DR. MITCHELL 

Remarkable Cures 

SET HIS TREATMENT AND GET WELL 

Those who have given Dr. Mitchell's 
treatment a fair trial declare It Is most 
remarkable for the cure of all nervous 
diseases, rheumatism, neuralgia, blood 
and kidney troubles, weakness, goitre, 
tumors, all female weaknesses. His 
cures are made without the use of 
drugs or the surgeon's knife. 

Mrs. Oscar Waden, 2320 West Hunm 
street. Duluth, cured of a tumor by Dr. 
Mitchell. 

Mr. John Barker of Alabaster, Mich., 
treated for stomach, heart and kidney 
trouble and recommended Dr. Mitchell's 
treatment. 

Mr. George Ryckman, 1423 West 
Michigan street, Duluth, who was car- 
ried upstairs to Dr. Mitchell's office 
about a year ago suffering from rheu- 
matism and kidney trouble, and had 
given up hope of being cured. Is now 
-working and enjoying good health. 

Mr. Albert Rogers, Duluth, Minn., 
says: "I have just finished a course 
of Dr. Mitchell's treatment for heart 
and stomach trouble. Today I am a 
well man and give Dr. Mitchell the 
predlt." 



ST. CHARLES DEPOT 
ROBBED; TWO ARRESTS 

One Ttiousand Dollars in 
Silver Taken From Ex- 
press Package. 

St. Charles, Minn., Aug. 30. — Two 
men giving their names as J. C. Ball 
and W. O. McGinn, both of Rochester, 
N. Y., are being detained at the city 
jail pending an Investigation of the 
theft of 11.000 In silver from the local 
depot yesterday while the station 
agent was at dinner. The money was 
contained in an express package, con- 
signed to a local bank. 

A posse captured the men late last 
night about ten miles from town. They 
deny all knowledge of the crime and 
assert they won at gambflng nearly 
$100 In sliver found on their persons. 

NAVAL STORES BURN 
IN HARBOR OF CORK 



Five Hundred Bluejackets 

Help Firemen Fight 

Flames. 

Queenstown, Ireland, Aug. 30. — The 
warehouses and stores of the British 
navy on the Island of Haulbowllne, 
In Cork harbor, caught fire today. 
Great quantities of oil and thousands 
of tons of coal are stored on the Isl- 
and. Five hundred bluejackets from 
the British fleet were sent to assist 
the firemen in fighting the flames. 

The fire was under control at 5 
o'clock this afternoon. A large block 
of buildings was destroyed. Including 
the canteen, the rigging loft, the tim- 
ber store and the recreation and dining 
halls. 

ON SCE NT 0F "V0TES. 

Woman Suffragists on Auto Tour Also 
Find Other Scents. 

Waukegan. 111., Aug. 30. — Five Chica- 
go suffragists returning from Milwau- 
kee In an automobile encountered an 
obstacle near Waukegan w^hlch caused 
them to Invade a drug store and almost 
buy out the perfume supply. The auto 
ran over a small, catlike animal. De- 
spite an unpleasant odor the women 
compelled the chauffeur to back up to 
see if they really killed "kitty." 'They 
had not, and kitty, which proved to be 
a skunk, caused them to beat a hasty 
retreat. They were unable to outdis- 
tance the smell, however. 



BULGARIA READY TO 

TRE AT WIT H TURKS. 

Constantinople, Aug. 30. — The Turk- 
ish government was officially in- 
fornied today that Bulgaria was pre- 
pared to send plenipotentiaries here 
to negotiate a settlement of all Ques- 
tions In dispute. 



Fifty-Five Counties in Min- 
nesota Are Now 
Represented. 



The remarkable growth of the Min- 
nesota Rural Mall Carriers' associa- 
tion was brought out at the business 
session today, held In the assembly 
room of the Commercial club. 

State Organizer J. F. McNally stated 
that at the present time the state or- 
ganization of the rural carriers In- 
cluded fifty-five of the counties of 
Minnesota. 

Mr. McNally declared that the 
growth was chiefly due to the fact 
that the state association went after 
the "business," so to speak. In other 
words the state organizer went after 
those who were not In the state or- 
ganization, in many cases advancing 
money and assisting in the organiza- 
tion of a local. 

F. H. Hesselroth, secretary supple- 
mented the figures given by Mr. Mc- 
Nally by the statement that during 
the past year the growth of the as- 
sociation has increased with remark- 
able strides, there being 631 members 
at the present time against 332 mem- 
bers reported at the last year's con- 
vention held at St. Peter. 

The figures of the convention of 
last year showed that there were 
twenty-three local organizations. Now 
there are thirty-nine locals. There 
has been a gain in membership of 
29'J and an increase of sixteen locals 
in the work that has been done since 
the convention of last year. 

Mrs. Purdy gave an address upon 
the problems of providing for the wife 
and children, urging the necessity for 
the carrying of Insurance. Before 
closing her address the speaker de- 
clared that Duluth was an Ideal, con- 
vention city. 

During the course of the meeting 
there was a great deal of routine 
business transacted, such as the read- 
ing of the report of the resolution, 
the auditing and the constitutional 
committee. 

G. I^ Rathburn of Anoka, made a 
few remarks to the delegates, declar- 
ing that he was proud of the growth 
of the organization, and that he had 
watched its progress with a good deal 
of fatherly Interest. 



Have You Bid on the Rug? 

The Anglo Persian rug, over which 
103,211 people walked, will be sold to 
the highest bidder next week. See the 
rug In the show v/lndow alongside an- 
other entirely new rug of the same 
pattern and design. Can you tell 
which Is which? This is an oppor- 
tunity to get a fine rug at your own 
Srlce. For Information call at rug 
epartmont. third floor, George A. 
Gray company, 113-115-117-119 West 
Superior street. 

TELLS LAMAR TO PUT 
CHARGES IN WRITING 



Senator Overman Doubts 

If He Has New Lobby 

Data. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — David Lamar 
will not have opportunity to tell the 
senate lobby committee about his rail- 
road lobby here in 1909, Chairman 
Overman today told him to present 
any facts In writing and expressed 
doubts that Lamar could shed any 
new light on the subject. 

Lamar, who was conspicuous during 
the early sessions of the senate lobby 
Investigation, addressed a letter to 
Senator Overman yesterday, offering 
to furnish evidence to prove the ex- 
istence of an active railway lobby In 
Washington to control the enactment 
of legislation by the senate. 

GIRL HURLED FROM 
MOTOR AND KILLED 



Machine Skids and She Is 
Thrown Against Tele- 
graph Pole. 

Chicago, Aug. 30. — Miss Wallle Well- 
ing was killed Instantly today when 
the automobile In which a party of 
four were making a trip to Bloom- 
ington, 111., struck a telegraph pole. 
The ether passengers escaped with 
bruises. 

The machine was driven by H. R. 
Eckart. It was traveling at a moder- 
ate rate when suddenly It struck an 
elevated culvert, skidding Into a tele- 
graph pole. Miss Wellind, who waa 
sitting In the rear seat, was thrown 
from the car. Her head struck the 
pole, breaking her neck. 

NEW BAftLESHIP TO 
BE "NORTH CAROLINA" 



Secretary Daniels May Give 

It His State's 

Name. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — In honor of 

his native state. Secretary Daniels 

probably will name battleship No. 39, 

building at the New York navy yard, 

the North Carolina. The name of the 
cruiser North Carolina will be changed 
to the AshevlUe, Charlotte or Winston- 
Salem. 



YOUR NBRVUS NEED 



Hersford'N .\rid Phosphate 

HspeclaJlT recommetuled for phTnlcal and ment&I 
ezhaiwUon. nerroiunaaa and Inaomnla. 



Curtis Asraln Heads Delta Tan. 

Indianapolis, Ind., Aug. 30. — James 
B. Curtis of New York was re-elected 
for tlie fourth time, national president 
of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity at 
the annual convention. Other officers 
chosen are: Henry T. Bruck, Mount 
Savage, Md., national secretary, re- 
elected; John L. Kllnd, Madison, Wis., 
i<atlonal treasurer, re-elected; Harry 
R. Hewitt. Minneapolis, national ritu- 
alist, to succeed W. I* McKay of Chi- 
cago. 



Deadly Stom ia PraBc«. 

Biarritz, France, Aug, 30. — There 
was a cloudburst of unprecedent vio- 
lence here last evening. Streets were 
turned into rivers and the cellars 
and ground floors of many houses 
were flooded. A number of persons 
were killed by lightning. 



PASSING OF 
RESTAURANT 

^ : , 

Superior Street May Soon 

Have Only One Eating 

Place Giving Service. 

Expenses Too High to Com- 
pete With the Quick 
Lunches. 



The bachelor and the batchelorette, 
If that Is what they may be called, 
are about to be struck by the "high 
cost of living." 'No longer will the 
family man need be the only one to 
kick about the price of the necessi- 
ties required to keep body and soul 
together. 

The afore mentioned single persons, 
who have taken life easy and com- 
fortable while taking their meals In 
restaurants about the city, being 
waited on by pretty waitresses, and in 
other ways catered to by the manage- 
ment of these places, will have to 
change their habit. Why? Because 
at present the high cost of comgiodl- 
ties Is about to put the restaurants 
out of business. 

It is rumored that at least two of 
the remaining restaurants In the down 
town section of Superior street are 
about to change their style of service. 
That is instead of catering to the 
class which likes to be waited upon, 
they Intend to become quick lunch 
places similar to numerous other eat- 
ing houses now doing business on the 
street. It will be up to the hungry 
to wait on themselves or go without. 

High rents, expensive waiter serv- 
ice, and high prices of meats and oth- 
er food stuffs are given as the reason 
for the proposed changes. The res- 
taurants maintaining waiter service, It 
Is said, are not able to compete with 
the quick lunch restaurants. Owners 
of the former say also -that the other 

Filaces are able to get better prices 
or their foods and that It will be 
necessary to make the change in 
order to make the people thoroughly 
realize that the "high cost of living" 
has become higher. 

Recently two restaurants, both of 
which catered to a cheaper claSs of 
trade, have gone out of business. 
These were the Oregon, between Fifth 
and Sixth avenue west, and the St. 
Paul, between Lake and First avenues 
east. The latter place is now being 
converted to a quick lunch room. 

It Is persistently rumored that the 
Delmonico, between Fourth and Fifth 
avenues Is about to undergo this 
change, and that the Delicatessen, be- 
tween Lake and First avenues east, 
win also consider this change In the 
near future. 

If this change Is made it will leave 
only one first-class restaurant on the 
street. 

Al Wagner, proprietor of the Del- 
monico was reticient about speaking 
of the change, but employes of the 
place were not averse to stating that 
such a change might come any time. 

Andrew Hagenson, proprietor of the 
Delicatessen, stated that he Intended 
giving table service as at present un- 
til conditions Indicated that it would 
be a big loss. He Intimated that the 
cost of food stuffs might go lower, 
but If It went any higher or main- 
tained Its present standard then it 
would be a case wrhere either the 
prices of meals would have to go up 
or else the place would have to be 
changed to a quick lunch restaurant 
In order to pay expenses. 

• 

South Dakota's Valuation. 

Pierre, S. D., Aug. 30. — The assessable 
value of South Dakota this year is 
11,200,000,000, according to the valua- 
tion under the new regulations of the 
state tax commission. 



Tvro IVomen Lose Fingers. 

Garrison, N. D., Aug. 30. — Two young 
ladies of this vicinity lost their Index 
fingers. Miss Anna Bartz was coming 
from Coleharbor to Garrison on a Soo 
train when a window suddenly fell, 
cutting her finger off. Miss Alice Mon- 
nehan was assisting her father on the 
latter's farm to put a sickle Into a 
harvescting machine, when a sudden 
move amputated a digit. 



Oalces Farm Product Contest. 

Cakes, N. D., Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A farm product and 
rural school exhibition will be held 
here Oct. 3 and 4 and the farmers 
and school pupils of Dickey, La 
Moure and Sargent counties will com- 
pete. There will be a fine display of 
all kinds of grains and vegetables, 
with corn as the feature. The poultry 

exhibit win be large. 

. _^> 

Veterinarians Elect. 

Fargo, N. D., Aug. 30. — The North 
Dakota State' Veterinarians' associa- 
tion In session here this week voted 
to meet next year In Fargo and elect- 
ed these officers: President, Dr. S. L. 
Cusack, Carrlngton, N .D. ; vice presi- 
dent. Dr. S. H. Farmer, Wahpeton. N. 
D. ; secretary. Dr. A. S. Schalk, North 
Dakota Agricultural college, Fargo: 
treasurer, Dr. D. C. Taylor. 

• 

Disarm Yonns Harvest Hand. 

Sheldon, N. D., Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald. — Armed with a large cal- 
ibre automatic revolver, Paul San- 
ders, a youthful harvest hand from 
Eau Claire, Wis., was arrested here. 
He was lectured on the evil of carry- 
ing such a dangerous weapon, hla gun 
confiscated and he was permitted to 
seek employment In the harvest fields. 



CLOSED 

ALL DAY MONDAY, 

LABOR DAY 



NEW METHOD DENTISTS, 

25 IVEST SUPERIOR 8TRBET. 

(Over Bon Ton Bakery) 
Hours— -8iS0 to 6. 



FALL IS HERE 



-QBT YOUR- 



BILLIARD AND 
POOL TABLES 

In good condition for business. We 
have everything you will need, 

E. F. BURG 

334 WKiT SUPERIOR MTREGT. 





1 



OF mn HEW MiDTOOINI TO 




HARDENS 



TOMORROW AND MONDAY 






BK 




i 1 .:>'''^./ 



f ♦??>• /t/ A^ -^'j 






MAP SHOWING LOCATION 

«rTNC 







^ $25,000,000 STKLPIM 

^ DOCKS. TERMINALS 

^ AND 

INTCRSTATE BELT LINES 
OF THE UNITED STATES 
"^ STEEL CORPORATION 

"^ OULUTHt^'SUPERWR.^ 










The third adtlition to Suniiyside Gardens adjoins Sunnjslde on one side and our Parkland 
addition on the other, and Is unquestionably the finest piece of land we have yet subdivided. 



We have subdivided and sold over One Thousand Acres, in 10-acre farms, at Sunnyside, 
and we predict that our new addition will be sold off quickly. 

HERE IS WHAT SUNNYSIDE HAS TO OFFER YOU 



We are only four miles from the city limits of 
Superior. 



Only 2% miles from the Steel Company's Belt 
Line Railway, Insuring good speculative value. 



Three railroads and ten passenger trains daily 
to and from Superior and Duluth. 



Two macadamized automobile roads leadlnjf 
Into Superior and Duluth. 

Daily mall and telephone. 



The land la so easily cleared that it can be done 
from $12.50 to $lg.00 per acre. 



A fine soil, absolutely free from rocks and well 
drained. 



In a proven small fruit district, where growers 
have made as high as |1,000 an acre on straw- 
berries. 



Where the last berries on the market are 
grown, assuring high prices. 



Where your berries can be picked today and 
placed on the market in Chicago, Milwaukee, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis and hundreds of other towns 
early the following morning, without a change 
of cars. 



THERE ARE ONLY 30 TRACTS FOR SALE 

IN OUR NEW ADDITION 

Prices range from $575 to $700 for 10 acres. Terms, $25 cash, balance $10 to 12 per month, Inter- 
est at 6 per cent. Liberal discount for larger ca^h payments. Several tracts have nice creeks, a few have 
several acres cleared and seeded down to clover. The cleared land will be priced a little higher. 

There is nothing can compare with Sunnyside in point of price^ 
location, and its many advantages. Come see for yourself. Look over 
the small fruit growing on our own farm, see the good roads, and he 
convinced. Be on the ground early and get first selection* 

HOW TO REACH SUNNYSIDE 

Buy your ticket to South Range; we will meet you there and take you to Sunnj-side which Is 
only one mile away. 

If you taJke the train In Duluth and want to go Sunday, take either the D. S. S. & A. train that 
leaves the Soo Line station at 7:45 in the morning, or the C, St. P., M. & O. train, leaving the Omaha 
station at 7:50 in the morning. On Monday the Omaha leaves at 8:50 in the morning. 

If you live in Superior and want to go Sunday, take the D., S. S. & A. train leaving the Union 
depot at 8:20 in the morning on the C, St. P., M. & 0. train leaving the Omaha depot at 8:10 In the 
rooming. On Monday the Omaha train leaves one hour later, at 9:10 in the morning. 

You can return on the noon train or one of the afternoon trains, as you please. 

If you want to visit Sunnyside any other time make special arrangements with our office. 



\ % 



HEIMBAUGH & SPRING 






"^A 



;? 



*. 






1103 Tower Avenue 

BOTH PHONES- ^^^^Vt^^^^ 

'^^ Superior, ^^t^V^Jy"^- 



'^^ 



♦^ 






^^^:^,vv-.. -vfe^. Wis. X*n^St^:<^°>^^ 



1 









\ 



^. 




f 



i 



• 



4. 



I 



ASK THIS MAN TO 
READ YOUR LIFE 

His Wonderful Power to Read Haouin 

LiiTeN at Any Dldtanee AmaxeM 

All li%ho \%'rtte to Him. 



DULUTH COW TAKES FIRST PRIZE 
AND MAKES NEW WORLD'S RECORD 



i tiUL.;?cnv.i, .,i pc>.'i>lt; ill a.ll Walks ^t 

life have benefited by this man's ad- 
vice. He tells you what you are 
capable of, and how you can be success- 
ful. He mentions your friends and 
enemies, and describes the good and 
bad periods in your life. 

His Description as to past, present 
and future events will astonish and 
help you. Ail he wants is your name 
(written by yourse*!), your birth date 
and sex to Kui<le him in his worl<. 
Money not necessary. Mention the name 
of this paper and get a Trial Reading 
free. 

Herr Paul Stahmann an experienced 
Astrologer, of Ober Niewsadern, Ger- 
many, says: 

"The Horoscope which Professor Rox- 
roy worked out for me is quite accord- 
ing to the truth. It is a very clever 
and conscientious piece of work. As 
an Astrologer myself I carefully ex- 
amined his Planetary calculations and 
Indications, and proved that his work 
in every detail is perfect, and that he 
is up-to-date in his science." 

Baroness Blanquet, one of the most 
talented ladies of Paris, says: 

"I thank you for my Complete Life 
Reading, which is r«ally of extraor- 
dinary accuracy. I had already con- 
sulted several Astrologers, but never 
before have I been answered with so 
much truth, or received such complete 
satisfaction. With sincere pleasure I 
will recommend you and make your 
marvelous science known to my friends 
and acquaintances." 

If you want to take advantage of 
this special offer and obtain a review 
of your life, simply send your full 
name, address, the date, month, year 
and place of your birth (all clearly 
written), state whether Mr., Mrs. or 
Miss, and also copy the following 
verse In your own handwriting: 
"Your advice Is useful. 

So thousands say. 
I wish success and happiness; 
Will you show me the way?" 

If you wish you may enclose 10 
cents u^tamps of your own country) to 
pay postage and clerical work. Send 
your letter to ROXROY. Dept. 64-J, 
No. 24 Groote Markt, The Hague, Hol- 
land. Do not enclose coins in your 
letter. Postage on letters to Holland 
five cents. 



JEAN DULUTH BEAUTY. 



Jean Duluth Beauty, the prlz*> 
Red Polled heifer of the Jean Duluth 
farm has covered herself with glory 
In late exhibitions. At the North Da- 
kota state fair which just closed, the 
animal took first prize for beauty in 
addition to having made the world's 
record for butter fat production for 
her first calf. Up to yesterday she had 
produced 510 pounds of butter fat. 



Ker bull calf was exhibited at the 
Ncith Dakota fair along with her, and 
111 competition with the bull calf which 
won the first prize at the International 
livestock show at Chicago, won the 
first grand champion prize for Red 
Polled bulls. 

Jtan Duluth Beauty is a product of 
the local farm of that name and Is 3 
years old. 



WEST END 

HERALD BRANCH! 
Herman Olaon. Manager. 162S Weat Superior Street. 



BRING 

YOUR 



SHOES 



to us for quick repairs. Popular 
prices. All work guaranteed. 

(ffiDiSBfS 

ST.fkuL-tfiitnr/rpou9 'Duurrt^ 
123 WEST Sl'PERIOR ST. 

(Opposite Glass Block.) 




SA^S WILSON WAS 

RI GHT A FTER ALL. 

London, Aug. 30. — The Daily Tele- 
graph In Its financial columns today 
says that further reflection has con- 
vinced business men that President 
Wilson's advice to Americans to quit 
Mexico was not so foolish as appeared 
at first sight. 

'It is now seen," the paper says, 
"that the closing down of American 
undertakings by the departure of 
thtlr owners and managers, would 
gravely compromise President Huerta's 
position." 

» 
Woodmen at State Pair. 

Hamllne, Minn.. Aug. 30. — The state 
fair management has assigned to the 
Minnesota Woodmen, space in the lit- 
tle park at the northwestern comer of 
the agricultural building for Its head- 
quarters. In Its tent In this little 
"grove," the Minnesota Woodmen in- 
surgents hH-5f an ideal centrally lo- 
cated headquarters, where members of 
the order and their friends may rest, 
and here will be served free coffee and 
doughnuts. It is the first time that 
such refreshments have ever beon 
served free at the state fair. Leadln;? 
Woodmen will be in attendance to give 
information to those who desire it 



Tried for Killlniir Banker. 

Lewistown. Mont., Aug. 30. — The 
trial of L. S. McLaughlin for the kill- 
ing of Patrick Duffy, vice president of 
the Security State bank or Garneill 
and a wealthy rancher. Is in progress 
here. The defendant contends he act- 
ed In self defense. 




$$$$$^$$$$$$$$' 



H Millions of 
Dollars 

are being saved yearly in 
Bplte of the "High Cost of 
Living." These people have 
learned that something 
CAN be saved weekly, and 
a bank account helps them. 

Why not try building a 
bank account at Our Sav- 
ing Department? 

3% interest allowed. 

Duluth State Bank, 

1024 WEST Sl'PKRIOR ST. 



^^ OpM Saturday Evenings from 6 to 8. 



% %%%%%%%%% % % 




LUTHERAN 
CONFERENCE 

District Luttier League to 

Hold Meeting in West 

End. 



Dr. Frank Nelson of Minne- 
apolis to Speak Sunday 
Evening. 




THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURI- 
OUS RESTAURANT IN DULUTH. 



The annual conference of the Lake 
Superior district of the Luther League 
of Swedish Lutheran churches will open 
at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning in the 
Bethany Swedish Lutheran church. 
Twenty-third avenue west and Third 
street. The first session will be In the 
nature of regular devotional services. 

Rev. Hugo Thoren of Virginia will 
give the preparatory sermon at the 
opening of the convention. He will be 
followed by Rev. A. Esplng of Ashland, 
who will give the sermon on the regu- 
lar topic of the day. 

At the afternoon meeting tomorrow 
the topic of "The Relation of the Luth- 
er League of the Church" will be dis- 
cussed. Rev. Carl O. Swan, pastor of 
the First Swedish Lutheran church of 
this city will lead this discussion. 

Rev. A. T. Ekblad of Superior, presi- 
dent of the district Luther league, wlU 
open the evening services. His address 
will be followed by a lecture given by 
Dr. Prank Nelson, president of the Min- 
nesota college of Minneapolis and pres- 
ident of the National Luther League of 
the Augustana Synod. I>r. Nelson is 
one of the most prominent of Swedish 
pulpit speakers In America and is ex- 
pected to draw a large crowd to the 
evening meeting. 

Monday morning will be devoted to 
the bxislness session of the conference. 
In the afternoon a picnic will be given 
at Lincoln park and in the evening a 
sacred concert will be given. 

LAPLAND PROFESSOR 
WILL LECTURE HERE. 

Prof. C. G. Bcho from Lapland will be 
heard at the Swedish M. E. church at 8 
o'clock Monday evening at a social 
given by the men of the church. An 
interesting program will be given in 
which Prof. Echo will give the major 
part. He will be heard in both song, 
recitation and a short address on a 
popular topic. Refreshments will be 
served In the church parlors. 

BOYS heLpthemselves 

WHILE OWNE R IS AWAY. 

When Andrew Ehn, a bachelor living 
alone at Sixty-sixth avenue west and 
Highland street, came home last eve- 
ning he found that his home had been 
entered and many of his supplies taken. 
Among the missing articles were a 
pound of coffee and nearly a full bas- 
ket of grapes. 

He reported the matter to the police 
late in the evening and requested a 
watch kept on his home during the 
daytime. He said he believed that boys 
had stolen the various articles. Among 
the other articles missing was a small 
tin pall, an alarm clock and an electric 
searchlight. 

Entry to his home had been gained 
by crawling through one of the win- 
dow's. The windows are so small that 
he was of the opinion that only boys 
could have crawled through. 

— m 

Will Camp on River. 

A party of young men, calling them- 
selves "The Bachelors' club" will leave 
early tomorrow morning for a camp- 
ing trip on the St. Louis river. They 
will spend three days on the river. 
Those in the party will be Fred Lind- 
btck, Al Peterson, Frank Peterson, 
Elmer Bjork and George Larson. 
■» 

Labor Day Service. 

Labor day will be celebrated with 
special services at the Central Baptist 
church. Twentieth avenue west and 
First street, tomorrow evening. A ser- 
mon dealing with the labor situation 
will be delivered by Rev. J. H. Earle 
of Pomona, Cal., who will preach. All 
laboring men are Invited to attend the 
services. A special musical program 
will also be given. 



Western Boat club will be made at a 
meeting of the club Tuesday evening. 
It is expected to hold the races Sept. 14 
At least three races will be planned 
for the day. These will be for 30- 
horse power boats, boats of 250-Inch 
cylinder capacity and for boats of 200- 
inch cylinder and under. A number ot 
prizes have been secured which the 
members will compete for, among theso 
being a handsome cup donated by W. F 
Hurst. 



CHINESE GIRL 

WlU. LECTURE 



Miss Sul Wang, the young Chinese 
student, who has been one of the prin- 
cipal attractions at the Northern Wis- 
consin conference of Methodist Epis- 
copal churches during its sessions at 
Superior, will sPeak ton^errow morning 
at 10:30 o'clock at the Grace Metho- 
dist church. Twenty-second avenue 
west and Third street. 

Miss Wang gave a number of ad- 
dresses before the conference as well 
as before women of Superior during 
this week. Sh.e is an eloquent speaker 
for her age, being just 20 years old, 
and presents the problems of her race 
in a masterful manner. The young 
woman will speak of the conditions anr' 
problems which confront the natives of 
the Orient. 

The young Oriental has Just grad- 
uated from the Albion college, Michi- 
gan, and will this fall enter the North- 
western university at Chicago to take 
her master of arts degree. 

She received her first education at 
a girls \arding school in Clang, China, 
where sne had been sent by her foster 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Beebe 
of the Central China Methodist con- 
ference, who adopted her at the death 
of her parents. 



Edstrom Will Preach. 

Rev. A. Edstrom of Kansas City, 
Mo., former pastor of the First Swed- 
ish Baptist church. Twenty-second 
avenue west and Third street Is 
spending a few days visiting among 
members of his former flock. He will 
preach In the local church tomorrow 
evening at 7:45 o'clock and to the 
members of the Young People's so- 
ciety at 5 o'clock in the afternoon 

Rev. Mr. Edstrom will remain In 
the city until after the general con- 
ference which will be held In the local 
church, Sept. 9 to 14. 



Tomorrow 

■tSA.IW. 



EXCURSION 

TO FOND DU LAC 

The steamer Plowboy will leave 
dock at Tweiity-flrst avenue west 
at 9 a. m. tomorrow. Fare, 60 cents; 
children. 25 cents. 



FOR A SHORT TIME OILY 

Wc will test 
your eyes free 
of charg-e. 
J. B. ERD, 29 East Superior Street. 

DLTLUTH, MINN. 




Hesness Funeral. 

The funeral for Mrs. Theodora Hes- 
ness, 54 years old, who died yesterday 
morning will be held at 1:30 o'clock 
from the family residence, 415 North 
Twenty-second avenue west, and at 2 
o'clock from the Zlon Norwegian Luth- 
eran church. Twenty-fifth avenue west 
and Third street. Rev. J. N. Nervlg 
will officiate. Interment will be made 
in the Lutheran cemetery. 
* 

Motorboat Races. 

Plans for the final motor boat races 
to be held under the auspices of the 



West End Briefs. 

Miss Nora Olson left this morning 
for Blwablk where she will teach 
school this term. A number of parties 
were given In her honor this week by 
West end matrons. Among those who 
entertained were Mrs. Oscar Mork, 
Mrs. Charles Nolan, Mrs. C. J. Olson and 
Mrs. J. R. Olson. 

Mrs. Allen Mentzer. 2123 West Second 
street has as her guest, Mrs Louis 
Mentaer o? St. Paul. 

The West End lodge of the Daugh- 
ters of Norway will entertain at a card 
party for its members and friends at 
the Woodmen hall. Twenty-first avenue 
west and First street, Tuesday eve- 
ning. 

L .M. Johnson, 2611 West Fourth 
street, who has been 111 at the St. 
Luke's hospital is again at home much 
improved. 

John Peterson of Cotton, Minn., Is 
spending a few days visiting friends 
in the West end. 

Miss May Brown of Baraboo, Wis Is 
a guest at the home of Mrs Jule Shlr- 
vln. 2110 West Second street. 

Mrs. L E. Gratto and daughter, Irine 
of the United States block are expect- 
ed to return home from a trip to De- 
troit. Mich., on Monday. 

Mrs. William Aldrlch and son, Eu- 
gene, 217 North Twenty-eighth avenue 
west returned home today from a six 
weeks' visit to relatives at Los Angeles, 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermlne, pastor of the 
Swedish Methodist church will leave 
Tuesday for I^indstrom, Minn., where he 
will attend the annual conference of 
Minnesota Swedish Methodist Episcopal 
churches. The conference will be held 
from Sept. 3 to 10. 

Miss Lena Borgeson of Lake Park, 
Minn., is spending a week visiting at 
the home of Mrs. Andrew Johnson, 1905 
West Superior street. 

Miss Ethel Wermlne of Chicago ar- 
rived yesterday to spend two months 
at the home of her brother, Rev. and 
Mrs. C. W. R. Wermlne, 314 North 
Twentieth avenue west. 



ONE HONEST MAN 

When after many (ll8am>olntinent8 one hxs finally 
found th» real rCTnedy. shouldn't he tell It to 
othen? 1 think so. Well, 1 have found something 
at la.1t that will renew dtallty, oTorcome proatailc 
tmublen and restore rigor. 

It la a simple and harmless remedy. I do not 
make It nor sell it, but you can buy the prepar- 
ation from your own dnigglat at trltlng cost or |et 
It liy mail direct from the manufartureni. 

If you are Interested, write me and 1 will tie 
glad to tell you nartly what I itsed and all 
about It. 

ED. A. HEINTZM.WN, 208 MONROE STREET, 
HUBOK£N. N. I. 




A STRIKING COMPARISON 

Wanamaker of New York 

Donaldson of Minnea 




When You Attend the Fair 

You may enjoy the conveniences of New York 

The subjoined advertisement, clipped from the leading newspaper of the metropolis of the 
western hemisphere, representing a store that is generally regarded as a leader in Atlantic sea- 
board merchandising, has been revised as indicated on its face to fit the facts for Donaldson's 
Glass Block, Minneapolis. 

Citizens of Minnesota may perhaps note with surprise how closely in step with eastern prog- 
ress their Northwest metropolis really is, and they will surely feel a pardonable pride in claim- 
ing as their own the Metropolitan advantages so freely afforded by our store. 

Visitors who have no thought of buying find these conveniences as accessible to them as to 
any customers. 

iBesides many lus^JK^galeTtimt wii^ 
stocks of Summer things to make way for Autumfi % 
ready coming on ships crossing the ocean for us. 



r 

Every Day . Our Visitors May 



—Hear the^o^lSm the «,e*i«Ai.Tea TR^om fi^il*. j 

___ —Get into fur coats and in five minqtes transport themselves in- 
to Alaska^ in our Fur Storage house at 22 degrees above zero. 
'^ * And roo e iyo 



—Telephone, telegraph and cable. ^ _^ 

—Register letters, get money orderiTand mail Parcel Post Pack- 

—Lunch in the large restaurant or the Lwi^n LSoSSgjiC^ 

— Give a dinner party to onfe or to a thousand guests. 

— Get foreign money exchanged for - American-roj get Amer^ 
lean money exchanged for foreign. 

»— Open charge accounts without difficulty^oirred tape. 

—Read, writ6 and ineet friends in the Waiting and Rest Rooms. 

—Gel information about the store and about the city at the In- 
formation Bureau, Maht flpor,. fitgwart Buildin|fr» 

—Check h&ad baggage 6.nd packages wiSout charge. 

— ^cnd express jpackages. 

— ^Dictate letters to a y i bll g stenographer. 

— ^Be cared for in the Emergency Hospital if iU. 
Qlc fe < » eity fa e m thogo e fi ' 
■ Inapoot thoPoi^toiful Wifefeoo Plant thg e u/eh whioh Ihis %i \ 5\\ 



•—Browse about at will in the large Book Store. 
Where fs tlhere anotlier store JIke this? It !f notltTNew. 

^0 




To offset the two wireless advantages peculiar to our eastern contemporary's coast location, 
and the other item crossed from his list, we might add several attractions of distinct interest: 
Our beautiful, spacious, w^ell equipped Playground for children. 
Our Theater Ticket Service from the Tea Rooms. 
Our Artesian Drinking Fountains on every floor. 
Our window where Gas Bills may be paid— used by hundreds of people. 

Our Banking Department where more commercial paper is cashed than at the leading 
bank of the city. 

Our Fall Stocks an being received from all parts of the producing worlJ^ and as^ 
tembled for the inspection of Fair visitors. Reigning styles hold the center of the stago. 




NEW WHEAT 
IS ARRIVING 

First Heavy Receipts of 

Grain Reported By 

Raiiroadsi. 



County Elevators Are Also 

Cleaning Out Old 

Crop. 



This Is the first day that heavy re- 
ceipts of grain have b^en reported 
since the new crop^year Jstarted. Not 
only Is the new crop coming In but the 
country elevators are discharging the 
Old crop which their bins have been 



■MMMMBMA 



holding for months against the market. 

It is expected that from now on the 
influx of wheat and other cereals will 
Increase right along and as fast as the 
new crop ig harvested there will be a 
growing volume of grain coming to the 
Head of the Lakes to the terminal ele- 
vators here. This means more busi- 
ness for the grain inspection depart- 
ment, and in preparation therefor, all 
those who have been taking a sum- 
mer vacation have been called back to 
work and are now busy in the railroad 
yards and the inspection offices, pass- 
ing their judgment on the various 
kinds of grain. 

Yesterday 137 cars of wheat arrived. 
This was not as strong as a year ago 
yesterday, but then last year was a 
grain deluge year. A year ago yester- 
day 174 cars of wheat came to Duluth. 

There are reported today 310 cars on 
track. This, of course, Includes all 
kinds of grain, the lion's ehare going 
to the wheat list. Not much flax or 
any of the coarser grains are arriving 
as yet. 



few days ago. In endeavoring to get 
off a hayrack, using a pitchfork as a 
support, he slipped In such a manner 
that the handle of the fork penetrated 
his body. He was Immediately taken 
to the hospital at Fosston. 



RED LAKE COUNTY 

F ARMER IS HURT. 

Red Lake Falls. Minn., Auff. 80. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Abraham 
Paquin, commonly known as the "Oov- 
ernor," a prominent farmer of Lam- 
bert township, was seriously injured & 



RED LAKE F ALLS. 

Current Happenings Gathered in Red 
Lal(e County Seat. 

Red Lake Falls, Minn., Aug. 30. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — The schools 
will open Sept. 2, with the following 
teachers: Clyde Workman, superin- 
tendent; C. O. Relnhold. principal; Ver- 
na Tackels, assistant principal; Julia 
Hawklnson. domestic science; Paul 
Carpenter, agriculture; Florence Wat- 
son, normal training; C. D. Peterson, 
manual training. 

North Side school — Ethel Stewart, 
first and second grades; Gerda Colin- 
der. third and fourth grades; Mauda 
Clifford, fifth and sixth grades; Anna 
Gilbertsop seventh grade. 

South Side school — Miss Williamson 
first and second grades; Anna m! 
Stromberg, third and fourth grades; 
Laura Mclntyre, fifth and sixth grades. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Baum left Thurs- 
day for an auto tour of Montana and 
North Dakota. 

V. M. Higinbotham and family re- 
turned Thursday from a throe wooks' 



auto trip to Southern Minnesota and 

A. A. Latendresse. former auditor of 
Red Lake county, left with his family 
for Edmonton Alta.. where he Inlenda 
to engage In business. 

Mrs Brevette, mother of Mrs. Jo- 
seph Patnode. died early Monday morn- 
ing at the advanced age of 82 years, 

Omer Miller, winner of the state fair 
essay contest In Red Lake county left 
for the Twin Cities to attend the boys^ 
camp at the state fair. 

• — . 

Railroader "Seela' Tklnnk** 

TK^""?* ^\^^' /"^ 30.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Apparently under a 
great mental strain the Soo agent at 
Mylo was brought here for an exam- 
ination. Imagining he had a griev- 
ance against some one he armed hfm- 
self with a large revolver and threat- 
ened to shoot up the town. He wa» 
Kersuaded to return to his office but 
e later started gunning again wheik 
he was taken into custody. . 
• 

S«ttOB Want* Pore Mater. 

Sutton, N. D. Aug. 30.— (Special to- 
The Herald.)— The people of Suttoxi 
are planning some method of seeurintf 
a water supply. Samples of the water 
sent the state chemist at Fargo for 
analysis have shown badly and tho 
cit*zenB are considerably alarmed ovet 
the situation and realize the impera' 
tive necessity of trying to secure » 
purar supplj. ^ 



1 



( 



i 



TT^ T!S?'T? n 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 



NURSE WILL 
BE EMPLOYED 



Will Have Charge of the 

Infant Welfare Work 

in City. 



PREPARE MARVELS OF ILLUMINATION AT PANAMA EXPOSITION 



Will Work in Conjunction 

With the Health 

Department. 



City officials have deflnltely decided 
to ►mploy the services of a visiting: 
nurse, according: to an announcement 
made this morning by Dr. H. E. Web- 
ster, health director. 

The ad<iitional employe will have 
charge of the infant welfare work 
during the two or three months of 
Bummer, when this is considered essen- 
tial, and devote the balance of her time 
to the work now done by the visiting 
nurse employed by the Associated 
Charities. 

Ti.is arrangement will remove this 

expense from the shoulders of the 
Associated Charities, while not ceasing 
the work which has been established 
In Duluth along that line. She will 
probably work in conjunction with the 
Ixealth department, as the field is in 
the health line, but it might hIso come 
Und-t-r the welfare branch, as it may bo 
placed in the class of charitable work. 

The health department officials have 
felt for some time that a visiting nurse 
Bhould be ailded to the city's staff of 
employes. Tht-y have come across 
numerous cases where such services 
■were needed, and the possibilities have 
been growing. 

Infant work has been so successful 
that it will become one of the estab- 
lislied institutions of the city. It was 
first tried last year and has been con- 
tinued again this summer with excel- 
lent results. Many mothers have taken 
advantage of th*» opportunity afforded 
to secure pure, certified milk at rea- 
sonable cost, and have shown an eager- 
ness to obtain advice and information 
from the nurses who have been visit- 
ing th> m at their liomes and from the 
pt.ysiclan who has conducted weekly 
clinks at the milk stations. 




President Charles C. Moore at left: California Counties Building at 
Right and Triumphai Arch at Bottom, Where Astounding Illumi- 
nating Effects Will Center. 



WILL MEET WITH 

COMMISSIONERS 



Residents of Steel Plant 

Suburbs Will Tell 

Needs. 

Residents of Gary. Smlthville. Nor- 
ton's Steel Plant division. New Duluth 
and Fond du Lac will meet with the 
City commission Tuesday afternoon to 
confer with the officials relative to the 

proposed street oar extension to New 
Duluth. 

Tiie people in the western suburbs 
are very anxious that the line be built 
this year, and will urge that all means 
be taken to expedite It. They feel 
that the lack of street service Is re- 
tarding the growth and development of 
that part of the city, and want any 
obstacles which may be in the way 
eliminated with all possible dispatch. 

ASKS wTlsonTo let 

HER WEAR TROUSERS 



Marvels in the development of 
electrical lighting apparatus and il- 
luminating m.ethods will enable San 
Francisco to light the buildings of 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition in- 
side and out in a way that would 
have been imr<os.«?ible five or six 
years agp. Perfect reflections of 
whole buildings will be obtained at 
night in the lagoons as clearly as in 
daylight. There will be no glare at 
nip'ht and no dark places. 

Fiftv thousand dollars has been 
expended In a single line of experi- 
mentation — in the development of 
cnf- claps rp^ectorc? to be known as 
"jewels." The splendors of the col- 
lonades and towers will be brought 



position will be illuminated by huge 
glass fountains of thick white glass 
that by day will not suggest that 
tbov are sources of light. 

The batteries of searchlights will 
be manned by sixty men drilled to 
handle them with the precision of 
artillerymen. On clear nights, the 
shafts of light, radiating like the 
petals of a great lily, will be visible 
in the heavens fortv or fiftv miles. 
The hills of Oakland and Berkeley 
will stpnd out as if in daylight. 

In olace of incandescent lamps, 
cut glass disks, technicallv known 
as iewels, will be employed. These 
will be used to produce the special 
effects that have usuallv been made 



out as clearly and as distinctly as j nse of in outlining br'^'^ings in sil- 
Ir the light of day. The scnlnture houettes of liVhts. TlT^en viewed 



will not be shaded, but will have 
form, life, persnective. 

Most exnositions appear too bright 
and often the vn'sitor goes away with 
fired eves. This won't be true at 
San Francisco. By use of the new 
discoveries the wo^d mav find with- 
in a few years that daylirbt actu- 
allv could be dispensed with. 

Expert Ryan is working to bring 
his lighting nlans in accord with the 
plans of Jules Guerin, director of 
color. There is to be harmony in 
hue under the artificial illam'nation. 
Great mural paintings upon the 
walls of the courts will be illumi- 
natod in oart bv concealed light*. 

The three central courts of the ex- 



under the refipc^d batteries of 
search lirrht, they will sparkle like 
great stars. 

In the harbor will be great batter- 
ies of searchlights mounted upon 
pontoons; and batteries of 
Rcarchlight.s will be located upon the 
roofs of exhiKit palaces, behind the 
columns of the collonades that en- 
circle the courts and in recesses of 
tower domes and minarets. 

Indirect or reflected lightning will j 
not be seen, but the searchlights will ' 
be cast upon the statuary, mural 
decorations and facades of the 
buildings. In the courts and 
througnout the grounds wil be radi- 
ant groups of statuarji 



The Johnstad School of Shorthand ' ^"fy'-?p^%'Z%: 

SueoeMH .Shorthnud, JSpeiu'erian Touoh 

T> p«%vrltlHK, Palmer method of Pou- 

man«thip, Kngrliah. and Utfice Tralulnft. 

Daj and evening Mesalons open the 

entire year. 

Fall term openn Sept. 2. 

315 WEST FIRST STREET, 
DILLTH, MI.\N. 



Dietrich, drawing; / 
^. - - -. primary supervisor; 

Graoe Fisher, physical training; Eliza- 
beth Glasser, librarian. 



Brooklyn Girl Says She Gets 

Better Pay When So 

Dressed. 

New York, Aug. 30. — From a cell In 
the Raym.ond street jail, Elizabeth 
Trondle, a Brooklyn girl, appealed by 
letter to Pre.sident Wilson to issue her 
a permit to dress as a man. 

"If I can appear as a man and do a 
man's work I shall be more respected 
and better paid." reads her letter to 
the pre.?ldent. 'It's no crime for a 
woman to wear male attire, yet I am 
locked up In jail because I did so. I 
Want a permit from you or some one 
else to wear the costume I have adopt- 
ed." 

Miss Trondle, arrested for masquerad- 
ing a.3 a man, had been working in 
male attire at a bookbindery. She 
Claimed that because of her dress she 
received far better wages than other 

Tiromen, and refused to promise to dresg 
ike a woman hereafter. 



ACCUSED OF BURNING 
WIFE AND DAUGHTER 



Oklahoman Is Arrested 

After Fire Destroys 

House. 

Tl.shomlngo, Okla., Aug. 30. — After 
Ills wife and daughter perished In 
flames that destroyed their home today, 
Adalbert Borah was arrested, accused 
of setting fire to the residence. 

Borah and his wife were said to have 
bcf-n estranged for some time. 



Men Welcome 

Mother's Friend 

A Duty that Every Man Owes to Those 
who Perpetuate the Race. 

It is just as important that men shonld 
know of progressive methods in advance of 

motherhood. The suf- 
fering incident t o 
child-bearing can be 
easily avoided by hav- 
ing at hand a bottle 
of Mother's Friend. 

This is a penetrat- 
insr. external applica- 
tion that relieves all 
tension upon the mus- 
cle.s and enables them 

10 expand without painful strain upon the 
igaments. Thus there is avoided nervous 
•pells ; the tendency to nau.iea or morning 
iickness is counteracted, and a bright, hap- 
py disposition is preserved that reflects 
wonderfully upon the charcter and tem- 
perament of the little one soon to como. 
You can obtain a bottle of "Mother's 
Friend" at any drag store at $1.0). It 
preserves the mother's health, enables her 
to make a complete recovery, and thus with 
renewed strength she will eagerly devote 
herself to the care and attention which 
mean so much to the welfare of the child. 
"WritQ to the Bradfield Regulator Co., 22r 
Lamar Bldg., Atlanta, Ga., for their valu 
able and instructive book of guidance foi 
•expectant mothers. 




IRONWGOD SCHOOL 
TEACHERS ASSIGNED 



All Ready for Opening 

Schools in Michigan City 

Next Tuesday. 

Ironwood, Mich., Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The public schools will 
reopen next Tuesday for the fall term. 
The pupils will meet first In their old 
school rooms and told where to go. 

Following are the teachers and their 
assignments: 

Luther L* Wright school, high 
school — J, C. Watd».in, principal, his- 
tory; Harvey Drake, physics and 
physiography; W. A. Justice, chemis- 
try; Ralph G. Chamberlain, mathe- 
matics; W. W. Woodword, commercial; 
Dora Grimm, commercial; Janet Gou- 
die, Latin and German; Jean Goudie, 
English; Mildred Barnes, English; Ruth 
Douglas. English and history; Marie 
Bird, mathematics and English, public 
speaking, Mariele Schirmer, German. 

The grades — Laura Bouden, 6A; 
Edith Johnson, 4A; Marie Spaulding, 
3A; Hulda Johnson, 2A; Jennie Olson, 
2A; Jennie Nyberg, lA; Alice Worun, 
cadet. 

Methodist church basement — Clyde 
Smith, principal, 8A; Ethel Williams, 
8A; Marion Holmes, 8A; Miriam Wells, 
8A; Alfreda Anderson, cadet. 

Presbyterian church basement — Ethel 
Holmberg, 6A and 7A. 

Carnegie library — Ella Wim, 6A and 
7A- 

Geary building — Pearl Smith, 5A and 
6A; Grace St. John, 4A and 5A. 

Vaughn street school — Nina Tolan, 
ungraded sciiool; Ida Gardner, oA and 
6A. 

North Side school — Ruth Motherslll, 
principal and 5A; Irene Westcott, 7B 
and 8A; Mae Kappler, 7A; Margaret 
Drimond. 6A and 6B; Luclle Smith, 4 A 
and 5A; Florence MacDonnell, 2A and 
3A; Clara Anderson. lA and 2A; Ket- 
tle Seeley, kindergarten; Fanny Bay, 
assistant ; Bessie Deor, cadet. 

Ashland School — Alice Roche, prin- 
cipal. 3A and 4A; Selma Skud, 2A and 
3A; (Katherine Owen, lA; Frances 
Arnold, kindergarten; Lily Bergquist, 
assistant kindergarten; Agda Nyberg, 
cadet. 

Norrie School — Tekla Anderson, 
principal, 4A and 5A; Margaret Ex. 
worthy, 3A; Hazel Clarkcion, 2A and 
3A; Esther Marlowe, lA and 2 A 
Magda Grotte, lA; Mabel Tonkin, kin- 
dergarten; Stella Ledln, assistant kin- 
dtrgarten; Cora Woods, cadet. 

Aurora School — Maud Tislov, princi- 
pal, 2A and 3A; Bernice Borden, 4A 
and oA; Hilda Swanbeck, lA and 2A; 
Ada King, kindeigarten; Lily Nelson, 
assistant kindergarten; Mabel Jeiin- 
son, cadet 

Newport School — Carrie Bond, prin- 
cipal, 3A; Vera Robinson, 2A; Flor- 
ence Dickinson, lA; Edna Savage, kin- 
dergarten; Dorothy Snavely, assist- 
ant kindergarten. 

Oliver School — Myrna Huntoon, prin- 
cipal, 5A- Georgia Lathrop, 7A and 
8A; Ada Pentland. 6A and 7A; Sophia 
Tice, 4A; Helen Belknap. 2A; Ella ' 
Mays, 2A; Avis Green, lA; Laura Eli- 
boat, kindergarten; Hildur Erickson, 
assistant kindergarten; Victoria An- 
derson, cadet 

Froebel Kindergarten — FHorenc? 
Pafigett, director supervisor of kinder- 
eartens; Jessie Woods, assistant; Nel 
lie Harrington, assistant. 

School for Deaf — Anna PouFsen. j 

Domestic Science School — Cora I 
Burdice, principal, rooking'. Kettle 
Monroe, assistant: Amy Erikson, sew- 
ing; Edna Hoffman, sewing; Olive 
Apps, assistant. 

Manual Training School — Elmer E. 
•Miller, principal; Moxson Clark, assist- 
ant; Benjamin Tapper, assistant; 
Jchn Burns, assistant; Allan Hahn, 
plumbing. 

Special Teachers — Ida Peterson, 



NO BLAME ON BANK 
FOR E XCESS IVE LOAN. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — Charles 
Starek, national bank examiner at New 
York, reported today that no culpabil- 
ity attached to the National City bank 
in connection with the alleged exces- 
sive loan of $44,500,000 to the street 
rail%vay companies of Chicago last 
spring. 

The report states that in making the 
loan, which was in the nature of a 
syndicate transaction to purchsae se- 
curities, the bank merely committed 
an act beyond it.s corporate powers, as 
many other banks are said to have 
done in similar cases. 



DULUTH CENTRAL 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

FIr«t Avenue Eamt nnd Superior 
Street, Duluth. 
Office open thin evenlnic, all day Mon- 
day and Monday evening: until 8 
o'oloclc. 

Our special dlnconnt Is sood for both 
day and ni«rht sCMdtons. 

BARBRR & Mcpherson. 



PLEADS GUILTY TO 
DISORDERLY CONDUCT 



Although arrested with three men on 
a charge of disorderly conduct at 1:30 
o'clock this morning, Emma Star, told 
Judge Cutting that she had not met 
the men before and that they had 
stopped her while she was on her way 
to meet her husband. 

^\^len arraigned early this morning 
she pleaded not guilty, but shortly be- 
fore noon changed her plea and she 
was allowed to go. 

Oscar Anderson. Charles Lake and 
John Koskl were arrested with her, 
while the four were causing a disturb- 
ance on the Lake avenue viaduct. The 
Star woman declared that the men 
stopped her and insisted that she take 
a drink. She refused, she said, and for 
tills reason the men struck her and at- 
tempted to force a drink down her 
throat. It was this scuffle that attract- 
ed the attention of Officer D. Olson, 
who made the arrest. 

The three men pleaded not guilty 
when arraigned this morning and their 
cases were set for 2 o'clock this after- 
noon, ball In each cace being fixed at 
$15. 

■ — ' • 

CrOHby Man Appointed. 

Crosby, Minn., Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — H. J. Kruse of Crosby 
was named by Judge W. S. McClenahan 
as a member of the committee to look 
into the question of securing improve- 
ments at the Crow Wing county court- 
house at Brainerd, as recommended by 
the last session of the grand Jury. 



MARINE NEWS 



HARBOR IN 
THE ' WIES" 

Motion Pictures of Marine 

Scenes Will Advertise 

the City. 



Films Taken Under Direc- 
tion of State Immigra- 
tion Department. 




Extra 
Special 

Edison 
Combi- 
nation 

S or 4 MInatc 
Machine mi IS 
KecordaforMly 

$26-50 

SI Down, 
11 » Wtck 



A full line 

of Victor 

goods on 

hand. 



|H|^k Complete ■ooMfanilihcn Mft^k 
Ml^ 9«cob4 Avt. W. ••« Pkal tt ^|^ 



Motion pictures of activity In the 
Duluth harbor will be shown before 
thousands of persons in this state and 
In the East: as soon as films being 
made here are developed. 

Charles E. Bell, motion picture op- 
erator for the Baths & Seavolt studios 
of St. Paul, i^ wor%:lng on harbor scenes 
today, under Jthe direction of the Min- 
nesota state immtgration department. 
The pictures* will be used by the Im- 
migration department to advertise Du- 
luth and Northern Minnesota. Mr. Bell 
has Just returned from the harvest 
fields in Western Minnesota where he 
took pictures of the men gathering the 
big wheat crop. 

About 1,500 feet of film will be taken 
In the harbor. This Includes pictures 
of the ore trains, ore docks and ore 
boats loading at the docks. Also 
scenes at the canal with the boats 
passing out with ore and coming in 
with coal and lumber. The aerial 
bridge shows In the action of the pic- 
tures. 

When the Hamonic cam« into port 
today she was "under the gun" of the 
motion picture man and when the pas- 
sengers alighted they were "shot." 

Mr. Bell will finish his work here 
today but he said he probably would 
be sent back to get pictures of the 
coal docks and the grain boats loading 
wheat. 

"This harbor Is one of the best 'lay- 
outs' I have ever seen," said Mr. Bell. 
"There certainly Is a lot of action here 
and these pictures would greatly In- 
terest the people In the East. I had no 
idea that Duluth had such a large port 
and it Is safe to say that It would be 
news to thousands of persons.' 



DANGER OF 
CONGESTION 

Coal Docks at Head of 

Lakes Piled High With 

Fuel. 



Receipts Have Shown In- 
crease and Shipments 
a Decrease. 



Danger of serious congestion on the 
coal docks of the Duluth-Superlor har- 
bor is facing officials of transporta- 
tion companies at the Head of the 
Lakes. 

The outgoing coal receipts for the 
first seven months of the year are 
3,669 carloads behind the figures for 
1912, while in the same period 747,- 
656 tons more have arrived at the 
docks than in 1912. 

August is considered a dull month 
in outgoing shipments and although 
the docks have not reported for the 
month, yet It is estimate* that there 
will be a falling off over the mark 
set last year. 

The fcllcwing comparative table of 
shipments by rail out of Duluth and 
Superior has Just been completed by 
R H. Salter, Duluth representative 
for the Western weighing and inspec- 
tion bureau: 



Sault Passages. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.. Aug. 30. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up: Cowle, 
11 a. m. Friday; Schiller, 11:30; Corey, 
noon; Kaminlstlqula, Dickson, 12:30 p. 
m.; Orammer, 1; Byers, 1:30; Joshua 
Rhodes, 2:30; Ooulder, Lackawanna. 
3:30; Bessemer, 4; Noble, 5:30; Phipps, 
<JatPs, 6; Price, Holmes, 7:80; Osier, 8; 
Snvder, Jr., 8:80; Juniata. 9; Morrell, 
10:30; J. E. Upson, Russell, Hubbard, 
Xye, 11; Ellwood, Slnaloa, midnight; 
Leonard, Miller, 12:30 a. m. Saturday; 
Crratwlck, 1:30; Nessen, 3; Martian. 3:30; 
J. J Brown, Corrlgan. 4:30; Fisher, 
5:30;' Taurus. 6; Nottingham, A. E. 
Ames, 7; England, Carter, 8; House, 9; 
.'iteel King, 10; Morrow, 10:30. 

Down: Ranney, 11 a. m. Friday; 
Duluth, Winnipeg, Francombe, 1 p. m. ; 
McKee, Athabasca, 1:30; Sherwln, 2; 
Wilbert Smith. 2:30; William Rogers, 
."?; Venus, Argo, George Owen, 4; Henry 
Smith, 4:30; Edenborn. Magna, 6; Nor- 
way, 6:80; Perkln.i, 6:30; McKenney. 
8:30 J Houghton, Bryn Mawr, Ward 
.•Vmes, 10; Llvlng.«'tone, midnight; She- 
j nango. 1 a. rh. Saturday; George Pea- 
I vey, Lakeport. 2; Argus 3; Kopp, 3:30; 
I narlum, 7; Rjies, 7:30; Murphy, "Thom- 
I as. 8:30: WllHam Brown, 9; Keewatln, 
1 Spaldinff, Nor^h Sea, 9:80; Lynch, 10. 



Number 

1912. of Cars. 

January ...31,062 

February ...22,326 

March 22,512 

April 13,533 

May 11,476 

June 12,706 

July 16,745 



Number 
1913. of Cars. 
January ....22,717 
February ...20,267 

March 19,903 

April 17,046 

May 16,909 

June 14,794 

July 16,055 



Total ...130.360 Total 127,691 

The average number of tons In a 
car is thirty, leaving 109,070 tons less 
than the movement of last year, while 
the increase of 747,666 tons coming up 
the lakes makes the difference now on 
the docks 856,726. 

Mr. Salter predicted that the coal 
busine.ss would be heavy, starting the 
first of the week. He said the coal 
shipments were always heavy In Sep- 
tember, October and November and 
that the big spurt would take place 
about the first of the week and con- 
tinue until Christmas. 

Railroads are urging coal buyers In 
the Western territory to take their 



consignments now so that the freight 
cars would be available for the grain 
movement. If the country buyers or- 
der right away and unload their cars 
promptly It will be a great help to 
the farmers and the railroads. In the 
opinion of transportation men. 



Detroit Passages. 



Detroit, Mich., Aug. 80. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up: Philip, Bulgaria. 
Seth Thompson, 12:80 p. m. Friday; 
Milwaukee, 12:45; Polynesian. 1:30; 
Cort, Holly, 3:30; Superior City, 4:20; 
C. 8. Neff, 4:20; Fulton, Bell, 3:10; 
Huron City, Buffalo, 5:50; Selwyn 
Eddy, 6: Curry, Neptune, Corsica, 
Abyssinia, 9:30; Jacques, 9:40; Flower, 
10:30; Augustus, 11; Empress Mid- 
land, 1:20 a. m. Saturday; Pathfind- 
er. Constitution, Kerr, 2; Senator, 4:15; 
Hoyt, 5:40; Scottish Hero, 6; North 
Light, Hartwell L. C. Hanna, 6:.30: 
Andaste, 7; Palmer, Castle Rhodes, 
8:30; Oglesby, 10; Rensselaer, Marl- 
tana. Wyandotte, 11; Myron, Page, 
Redlngton, Langell, Moore, Arenac, 
11:20. 

Down: Lambert, Samuel Mather 
(small); Maida, 12:20 p. m., Friday; 
Chicago, 12:45; Wllkesbarre, Charles 
Hubbard, 1; Thomas Adams, 1:50; Linn, 
2:45; Wllpen, 3; Frank Peavey, 3:10; 
Pfntland. 3:30; Buckley, 3:50; Presque 
Isle, 4:10; H. H. Rogers, 4:20; J. A. 
Donaldson, 4:30; Alpena, 4:45; Kotcher, 
4:50; Wilkinson, 5; Canopus, 5:46; Mc- 
Qean, 5:50; Mcintosh, Montana, 6; 
Brazil, 9:80; Cuddy, 9:45; Black, 12:20 
a. m., Saturday; L. R. Davidson, 1; 
Quincy, Shaw, 2; (big) Samuel Mather, 
2:40; Crele, 3; Choctaw, Van Hise, 3:40; 
Nettleton, 4; Ohl, Maruba, 4:30; Craw- 
ford, 5; Major, Cole, Paine, 5:30; Sulli- 
van, 6; Elphicke, 7; Yuma, 7:30; Wol- 
vln, 8; St. Paul, 9:40; Agnew, 10; 
Steinbrenner, 10:40; Reed, 11; Craig, 
11:46. 



Port of Duluth. 

Arrivals: Siemens. Marsala, Watt, 
Roebling, Neilson, Martha, Angeline, 
Tremble, Michigan. Walters, Normania, 
Sonoma, Western Star, Sheadle, Klrby, 
M. S. Smith, H. H. Brown, Matthew An- 
drews, Stadacona, light for ore; Wes- 
ton, Davock, Kensington, Cx»rneliu8, Hy- 
rtrus, Ontario, Morlska^ Victory, Zillah, 
Snyder, Norris, coal; Boston, merchan- 
dise; Oliver, light for grain; Barth, 
coal. 

Departures: H. A, Berwlnd, M. T5> 
Smith, Cepheus, J. W. Moore, Matthew, 
Andrews, Siemens, Shoadle, Marsala, 
Hebard, Bransford, Block. Odanah, 
Panay, Prank C. Ball, Schoonmaker. 
Harvester, Filbert, Kirby, Western 
Star, Meacham, Maltland, ore; Cygnus, 
Perseus, Jenkins, Verona, light; Barth, 
coal for Knife River; Plumme'r, Reglna, 
Deleware, grain; Tlonesta, passengers 
and merchandise. 



subject of the proposed new harbor. 
The secretary expects to depart ftt 
midnight for St. Louis. 



Garrison In Chicago. 

Chicago. Aug. 30. — Secretary Garri- 
son arrived here today from St. Paul 
to inspect the military barracks and 
grounds at Fort Sheridan. He planned 
to hold a conference late in the aft- 
ernoon with Mayor Harrison on the 



NOW A SUBMARINE WIRELESS. 

Scientific American: The navy de- 
partment has adopted a "submarine 
violin" for the transmission of mes- 
sages between submarine torpedo 
boats and shore statloiMi or other ve»- 
sels. Exhaustive tests of the appa- 
ratus have been made on a submarine 
at Hampton Roads. Va.. and three sets 
of the signal device have been ordered 
to be placed on as many vessels. 

The mechanism is explained to be 
an adaptation of the violin. From one 
side of the submarine project two steel 
stays. From the ends of these is 
stretched taut a piano wire. Touching 
the wire is the roughened rim of a 
wheel which, when it revolves, sets up 
vibrations in the wire. The wheel Is 
controlled by a motor inside the hull 
of the submarine, and the motor. In 
turn, is controlled by a Morse key. 

When the key Is pressed the motor 
begins to revolve, the exterior wheel 
scraping the wire precisely as a bow 
agitates a violin string. The hull t)f 
the submarine acts a a sounding board. 
The key is used precisely as an ordi- 
nary Morse key, and dots and dashes 
are hummed on the wire as the key 
is depressed and released. About eight 
words a minute is the best speed so 
far attained. The receiving apparatus 
is the ordinary telephone receiver. The 
end under water may be connected by 
insulated wires to a fort, shore sta- 
tion, or another vessel. 

The experiments at Hampton Roads 
showed that the vibrations may be 
heard clearly at a distance of five 
miles. Naval officers believe that the 
device can be perfected so that the 
range of the mechanism may be greatly 
extended. Christian Berger, an Aus- 
trian, is the inventor of the submarine 
violin. He attempted to get the Aus- 
trian governmf-nt to make tests of It, 
but failed. Coming to the United 
States, he succeeded in convincing navy 
department officials of the practicabil- 
ity of the scheme. 
'• 
THE POOR MANS COURT. 

Chicago Pot^t: Kansas has a new 
"debtors' court" which promises to be 
a model for the country if it succeeds 
a.s well as it promises to succeed In 
reducing the cost of Justice to poor 
people. 

In this court no claim Is entertained 
which amounts to more than |20. The 
plaintiff Is not permitted to have a 
lawyer. Instead, he or she must oome 
in simply and tell the Judge "all about 
It." The judge will ask questions. He 
may reach out after the defendant 
and may even summon witnesses. More 
than that, he may adjourn court, put 
on his hat and go out and inve."tigate 
the situation in person. A peripatetic 
court with no technicalities whatever. 

Similar courts are in successful op- 
eration in Germany, and they ought 
to work here. There is a vast deal of 
petty injustice in the world which 
arises from the fact that there Is no 
machinery for collecting small accounts 
and .settling petty, but important, ob- 
ligations. 



:^r^^^;i^:^-.>^v^^:^^j^ 



SPEND LABOR DAY 

AT BEAUTIFUL 

FOND DU LAC 

STE^il^i CiLiUililll 

'Will make tvro trip* to Fond dii Lnr Monday, Labor Day, leaving dock 
at foot of Fifth Avenne West at a.' m. and 2 p. m. Take tbr family 
and enjoy the day on the river In Chamlierti* Grove. Take yonr luncii 
basket or seeure nteala or refreshments In grove. 

The Steamer Colombia vrlll go ronnd the horn I.«l>er Day evenlnc 
leading doi-k at 8t30 p. m. It you want an enjoyable evening, don't 
nUsM this trip 



Chalmers 

1914 



Announcement of the 1914 Chalm- 
ers Cars is made in the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post of Aug. 30, on sale Aug. 28. 

Each year the Chalmers announce- 
ment has contained big news for the 
motor buying world. This year we 
believe marks the most important an- 
nouncement ever made by the Chalm- 
ers Company. 

Watch for it. Be sure to get the 
Post" and read the two - page an- 
nouncement and description of the 
new model. 



Mutual Auto Co. 

Northwestern Distributors. 
DULUTH, MINN. 




YOU WILL RECEIVE 

Four Months Interest on January 1st, 1914 

ON ALL DEPOSITS OF ONE DOLLAR OR MORE, MADE ON OR BEFORHJ 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th, IN 

The Savings Department of the 

IV ORTHERN NATIONAL RANK 

8% PAID ON DEPOSITS 

ALWORTH BUILDING. SMALL DEPOSITS WELCOME. 



•4- 



it 



I 



4> 





I 



J I 



i 



GOOD MAN AT 
m REINS 

C. C. Daniels Says Pres- 
ident Wilson Understands 
Driving the Mule. 



Brother of Secretary of the 

Navy Pays Visit to 

Duluth. 



C. C. Daniels of Wilson. N. C, suc- 
cessor to Juilgre M. C. Burch as the 
attorney of the department of justice 
In charge of the White Earth Indian 
land cases, is In Duluth today, appear- 
ing before Judge Morris in connection 
with the litigation. 

Mr, Daniels is a brother of Josephus 
Daniels, stcrttary of the navy, an ar- 
dent Dt-mccrat and a Wilson supporter 
In the days before the Baltimore con- 
vention. 

"There wag an old saying that, left to 
themselves, the Democrats would com- 
mit politiial suicide," said Mr. Danltls 
toJay. "1 think that saying will not 
Btand up in future. President Wilson 
has taken the bucking broncho and 
the kicking mule and hitched them up 
together and ffiey are going well. Of 
course, her«r and there a mule will 
kick, but that will happen any time. 

"On the whole, I think everybody 
agr^ei- that the administration has done 
very well thus far. Problems and re- 
sporisibilitlfS have been accepted in a 
manner that promises well for the ad- 
ministration all through its course." 

This is Mr. l>anlels' first visit to Min- 
nesota, but he is no stranger to the 
West. 

"I went to Oklahoma when the *Strlp' 
was opened," said Mr. Daniels. "I 
helped to organize one of the coun- 
ties there and was county attorney. 1 
saw something of the real wild life of 
the Westj and I know something of 
land-graboing from personal observa- 
tion. T :ived in Utah and other West- 
ern states for some years, but I finally 
returned to the state of my birth." 

Mr. Daniels is big and genial. He 
talks with a distinct Southern accent 
and with a wealth of picturesque ex- 
pret-sion. He has been a successful at- 
torney in Wilson for some years, and 
has now taken a firm grasp on the 
White Earth Indian tangle with a de- 
termination to unravel It and bring the 
many cases to decision. 

GHAMP Qim TALKS 
IN MAINE CAMPAIGN 



RAILROADS 



HISJHEME 

Congressman Manahan Talks 

to Letter Carriers on 

Government Control. 



LONG 

DISTANCE 

TELEPHONE 



, LO.NC 

DISTANCE - 
TELEPHONE 



That the railroads of the country are 
a public necessity, and therefore should 
be under government control, was the 
substance of the address given by 
Congressman Manahan of Minneapolis 
before the Hural Letter Carriers' asso- 
ciation this afternoon at 2 o'clock. 

Mr. Manahan compared the railroads 
with the various brancbea of the post- 
office. 

"The government control of rail- 
roads is Important to the country" 
said Mr. Manahan. "It is Important 
because the railroads are one of the 
country's most necessary tools. They 
can unaer improper management be- 
come a dangerous tool and ruin in- 
dividuals or communities. 

"They can ruin Individuals and 
communities by giving unjust rates, 
and thereby becomes as the thief at 
nigiit. Tiiere is no difference between 
the man who steals at night and the 
railroad corporation which charges 
extrbltant rates for the transporta- 
tion of the product of the land. The 
only difference is that the railroad.*! 
are doing it under the protection of 
the law. 

"There is now pending before con- 
gress a "oill to regulate bankers ami 
banking. The bankers of the country 
shout that lawmakers and politici-irja 
have no business to meddle with their 
aftairs. We contend that we have, be- 
cause what are banks but a tool of the 
people?" 

The congressman spoke of the serv- 
ice given by the rural mail carriers 
as being one of the most important 
established by the government, pro- 
viding, as it does, a means of com- 
munication between the centers ot 
population and the sparsely settled 
communities. 



Gary Exchange 

The Duluth Telephone Company 

Announces the Opening of their new GARY EXCHANGE, which will serve all 
subscribers in the Gary, New Duluth, Smithville and Fond du Lac Districts. The 
following list gives the new Telephone Numbers, (/« Effect 7 a . m. Tuesday, sept. 2nd, 1913) 



American B/idge Co. of N. Y Steel Plant Gary 61 

Amundsen, Math Residence Lenroot Ave., Smithville Gary 121 L 

Anderson, A. C Residence 220 98th Ave. W. Gary 59L 



TWO GOMPANIES 

HAVE SAME NAME 



Bartz, J. E Residence 99th Ave. W Gary76L 

Becklinger, C Residence 303 98th Ave. W Gary 70L 

Berger, John Residence ...309 104th Ave. W Gary SOL 

Bernt, John Dry Good^ 302 Commonwealth Ave Gary 43L 

Berquist & Co., C. O Mts. ^ Qroc Commonwealth Ave Gary 40 

Berquist, Chas. O Residence Fond du Lac ...Gary 101-3 

Berry, F. C Residence Fond du Lac Gary 101-6 

Bloyer, Robert... Residence 97th Ave. W "" Gary 75L 

Brand, Frank Gen. Mds 203 Commonwealth Ave . ".*. * '. ." . . Gary 36L 

Brchich, ^ank Residence 1502 Commonwealth Ave Gary 94L 

Brmk, J. G Residence Grand Ave. W., Smithville . . . . . Gary 112M 

Canning, Michael Residence Spirit Lake Gary 45M 

Cejovich Pete Residence 1130 99th Ave. W Gary 91L 

Central State Bank Gary & Common.. New Dul. . . ^Gary 47 

Clow, Duncan J Residence Fond du Lac Garv 101-2 

Colvin Robb Lumber Co Deal. & Mfg.... Gary & Commonwealth "Gary 32 

Costello, Tony Residence 1302 9«th Ave. W Garv 531 



Gary 53L 



D 



Says There Is No Danger 

of War Witri 

Mexico. 

Trity. Maine. Aug. 30. — Champ 
Clark, speaker of the house, today 
urged the voters of the Third Maine 
congressional district to elect a Dem- 
ocrat to succeed the late Representa- 
tive Forrest Goodwin, a Repubjlcan, 
at the special election Sept. 8. 

"There Is no danger of war with 
Mexico. They are fixing that all 
right," said the speaker to his audi- 
ence. 

He also said he expected congress 
would remain In session until it ex- 
pired by limitation on Dec. 1. 



FIVE CHIGAGOANS 
HURT BY MOTORS 



Accidents Happen on Way 

to Races at 

Elgin. 

Elgin. 111., Aug. 30. — Five Chicagoans 
were Injured in automobile accidents 
on the way to the Elgin races. They 
were: 

Mrs. T. A. Spence, knee cap broken 
and badly bruised, condition critical. 

T A. Spence, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Spence, occupants of the same car 
badly bruised and battered. 

George Grundel, badly crushed. 

The Spences were stalled alongside 
the public road near Bartlett, seven 
miles southeast of Elgin, when George 
Oglesby, a Chicago druggist, ran into 
them with an automobile while trav- 
eling at a high rate of speed. The 
SpeDces were all thrown into the 
dljch. 

Grundel's car turned turtle on a 
narrow pike near Ontarloville. twelve 
miles southeast of Elgin, pinning him 
underneath. He w^as rescued by au- 
tomoblllsts. 



Minnesota Corporation 

Asks Injunction Against 

Rival From Maine. 

The Minnesota Central FUilway 
company, a Minnesota corporation, pe- 
titioned the district court this morn- 
ing for an Injunction restraining thf- 
Mlnnesota Central Railway company, 
a Maine corporation, from takinK 
steps toward securing from the sec- 
retary of state authority to operate 
in Minnesota under its present name. 

The Minnesota corporation claims in 
its petition that if the injunction ii. 
not granted its Identity will be de- 
stroyed and its business injured. The 
Minnesota corporation is now nego- 
tiating for right-of-way and fran- 
chises In Altken and Crow Win*; 
counties, where it will operate a 
street railway system. 

The Maine corporation, it is al- 
leged, has been making negotiations 
for the purchase of a right-of-wav 
from St. Paul to St. Cloud and from 
there on to Crow Wing and Aitken 
counties. To avoid any confusion 
which might result from the similarity 
in names the Minnesota corporation 
asks that the injunction be issued 
against the Maine company. 

ASKS RffURiTOF 



n^^t* w''^'' Residence Smithville Gary 35 

Dewiv heoR Residence 229 102nd Ave. W Gary46M 

nf;^5\,rf°; ? Residence 501 Commonwealth Ave Gary 57 

K 1 ;u D ??,u Residence New Duluth Gary 106L 

^^1" t ?°^ r^^""^ Spirit Lake Branch Garv 3? 

S""*u V"" ^° -I" Mouse, 1.2.. Spirit Lake 

Duluth Ice Co .Ice House, 3. . . . Spirit Lake 



Gary 34 

Gary 119L 

Gary 119M 



Erickson, Martin Residence . 



Railroad St, New Duluth Gary. 72L 



Feddew & Co., W. J Board., Con Steel Plant. New Duluth 

f TIC, Max Residence 1301 98th Ave. W 



..Gary 109L 
, . . Gary 82L 



Gary Building Co 105 Ave W C am 

Gary Land Co^ Lands. Farms ... Gary & ' Commonwealth .* .' .* .' .' .* ' Gar J 88L 

Gary Lumber Co Lumber, Bldg., Commonwealth Ave . . ! ! Galy 39 

. Material ...-^aiy^y 

Giddings, C. H Residence 123 98th Ave W r^.-.. 7«t 

Gr«„., Theron H R«idenc. 7S S. . Fond d^Lac ! ! ! ! i ! ! ! ! ! ! ! SlJ? llf-Z 

Hicks, F. M Residence 97th Ave. W Gary54L 



Johnson, Ed Residence . . 



•N. P. Sec. House, Smithville Gary 112L 



K 



HER DAUGHTER 



FAMILY 
ALL AT SUMMER HOME 



Are Together for the First 

Time Since Early 

Summer. 

Windsor, Vt., Aug. 30. — President 
Wilson arrived here at 1:30 today and 
motored immediately to the summer 
white house at Cornish, N. H. 

The president. Mrs. Wilson and Mies 
Eleanor Wilson, their youngest daugh- 
ter, were cheered as they stepped from 
the train. Miss Jessie and Miss Mar- 
garet Wilson were at the station to 
meet them. 

It was the first time that all the 
members of the family have been to- 
gether since early this summer as Miss 
Margaret, the eldest daughter, has been 
visiting in the West. 



''BOY BURGLAR" GETS 
AWAY AT MILL CITY 



Broken Leg Fails to Stop 

Him— Auto Bears Him 

to Safety. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 20. — fSpecial 
to The Herald.) — Eugene Callender. the 
alleged boy burglar confined in the 
criminal ward of the city hospital here 
because of a broken leg, escaped early 
today by leaping from his window and 

fretting into an automobile which had 
ust driven up, and which rushed him 
away to safety. Callender's injury was 
received in an attempt to t-scape some 
time ago, and the break had almost 
healed. 

Police have been unable to find any 
trace of the automobile. 



Mother Institutes Court 

Action Against Child's 

Foster Parents. 

In district court this afternoon. 
Judge Cant is hearing habeas corpus 
proceedings instituted by Mrs. Ida 
Niskanen, formerly Mrs. Koski, 
against John Mallulu and his wife, 
Fiia Mallullu, homesteaders, seventeen 
miles out of Eveleth to recover pos- 
session of her 10-year-old daughter,. 
Tyyne Alina Koski, who she claims 
is being unlawfully detained by the 
Mallulus at their home. 

Mallulu on the witness stand this 
afternoon testified that the girl had 
lived with himself and wife for the 
past eight years and that although no 
legal adoption of the child had taken 
place that they considered the girl 
as their own daughter. He also 
claimed that when Mrs. Niskanen left 
the little girl with them it was with 
the express understanding that she 
would never ask for her return. Re- 
cently the mother demanded the cus- 
tody of the girl and was refused. She 
then brought habeas corpus proceed- 
ings. 



FIGHT POSTPONED 

Xot to take place Laltor day, hnt 
Tnenday, Sept. O. at the Grand 
Opera HoiiMe, Superior. 

WKLTER rHA.MPIONSHIP. 
Spike Kelley of Chicago, 

Tommy Sheeban. ChiraKo 

Heights. 

SEMI-WI.NDrP, 

Jimmy McCtovern of Chieai^o 

—VII.— 

Jokonte Tillman of MlnneapollM. 
TWIN PORTS ATHLETIC CI.IB. 
Formerly the Badger Athletic 
Club. 

RinicHlde iieatM, $3: parqnet, 92| 
boicony, 91. SO; Kallery, fl. 

Seats on sale at Black^Tood's 
Clgrar Store. Dnluth) .Abraham's 
Poolroom and La Zar Clgrar Store, 
Superior. 



Klabo, Nels Residence 96th Ave. W. & Court St Gary 49L 

Knudson, Rev. P Residence 96th Ave. W. & Hurd St Gary 186M 

Krueger, Otto.. Residence 228 97th Ave. W Gary 186L 

Kulaszewicz, A. J Residence 501 Commonwealth Ave Gary 57 

Laidley, Hattie R Residence 416 97th Ave. W Gary 56L 

iLeWright, R • Residence 101 Ave. W. & Dickson Gary 93L 



IVf 

McEwen, W. E Residence Fond du Lac Gary 102-5 

UoIt*n ^A Ah" Residence 124 96th Ave. W Gary 194L 

Marten Edward E... Residence 302 98th Ave. W i.! .i . . .Gary 71L 

Meade-Monson Mfg. Co New Duluth ... Gary icg M 

Minn. Steel Co., Elec. En. Office New Duluth ...Gary 3 

Mmn. Steel Co., Machine Shop New Duluth . . . . Gary 7 

Minn. Steel Co., Time. Dept Spirit Lake. ...!.'!!.'!!.'.'!.*!.*... Gary i 

Minn. Steel Co., Inf., Dr. Martin Spirit Lake. Gary 2 

Mmn. Steel Co., Store Office New Duluth .. . Gary 5 

Morns, Sam Residence 98th Ave. W !.'.'.'.'... Gary 92L 

New Dxiluth Fire Hall. Commonwealth Ave Gary 97L 

New Dul Co.. L. R. Taylor, Agt. 430 98th Ave. W... Gary 33M 

New Duluth Mercantile Co 207 Commonwealth Ave Gary 31 

New Duluth Police Station Commonwealth Ave Gary 48 

New Duluth Transfer Co 419 Commonwealth Ave Gary 33 L 

Northern Pacific Ry. Co. Depot New Duluth Gary 37M 

Peters, C. W. Residence 25 98th Ave. W. Gary 74L 

Petterson Axel E Residence Grand Ave. W., Smithville Gary 42M 

Pretner & Skala Saloon 132 Commonwealth Ave. Gary 44L 

Rakowsky, Charles L Residence Fond du Lac Gary 101-4 

Kenstrom. A. G Residence Grand Ave. W., Smithville Gary 42L 

Residence 4th St. Mor. Av. Fond du Lac . . . Gary 102-4 

Residence Cor. 7th St., Fond du Lac Gary 102-2 



Runquist, Mrs. C. A. 
Rusell, J. W 



Schmidt, J. H 

Sorenson, O., Hotel. . . . 

Spirit Lake Transfer Ry 

Office Chief Engineer 

Sprague, Geo 

Sitlmovich, Geo 

Strand, Charles G. 

Strand, Charles G 

Swenson, Albert 

Swenson, Ed. 



Co. 



Residence Co. House, Steel Plant Gary 86L 

320 Commonwealth Ave Gary 43M 



••••.•, Gary Gary 20 

Residence 221 102nd Ave. W Gary 65 

Residence 9620 Grand Ave. W Gary 79L 

Saloon 99th Ave. W. & Dixon Gary 8cL 

Residence 309 101st Ave. W Gary 77L 

. Residence McLeod St., Smithville . . 

. Residence McLeod St.. 



Smithville . 



Gary 51 L 
.Gary 51 M 



'1^7}°^' V ^ Residence 430 98th Ave. W Gary 58 L 

Teller, Joe ........ Pairxter 98th Ave. W. & Dickson GarygoL 

Ihompson, H. J., Furniture Co. Manufacturers. . .New Duluth Garv^7L 

Tower, U. C.. Hdw., Retail. ... 219 Commonwealth Ave.' '.'.['. '. .Gary 38L 

Tower, UC...... Residence 99th Ave. W. & Perry Gary Ll 

Tupper, Mrs. A. P .....Residence 222 104th Ave. W ...Gar^JeL 

u 

Un. Portland Cem. Co. Plant 7 New Duluth 

Un. Portland Cem. Co., Eng Of New Duluth . *. 



.Gary 21 
. Gary 2a 



ViTgutz, August. Residence 102nd Ave. W. New Duluth. . 

w 

Wacha, Frank Confectionery . . . Commonwealth Av. & Hurt 

uS-«^ w « Residence 1105 Commonwelth Ave 

wells, W. H Residence East Fond du Lac. 

\Vilson, Andrew Residence 421 98th Ave W 

Works Peoples' College.... Smithville ..^ 



Gary 67L 



. Gary 38M 
. Gary 60L 
Gary 101-5 
Gary 52 M 
Gary 102L 



jfoho, Cassius J Residence 105 98th Ave. W 

Ifoungberg, J. F Residence «o ioand Av. V 



320 102nd Ave. W. 



Gary 73 M 
Gary 77M 




MISSIONARIES 
WILLJEMAIN 

Advice to Those in Mexico 

Is Given By 

Boards. 



who are under no special necessity 
for remaining. 

"It does not seem to me, however, 
that It necessarily follows that the 
comparatively small number of mis- 
sionaries should go, as they are for 
the most part experienced men and 
women, knowing the language and the 
people, on friendly terms with the 
communities In which they reside, and 
capable of forming wise judment for 
themselves." 



Prudence and Safety of 

Women and Children 

Advised. 



Charlton at Genoa. 

Genoa, Italy, Aug. 30. — Porter Charl- 
ton arrived here today from America 
on the steamship Re d'ltalla to be 
tried for the murder of his wife at 
Lake Com© three years, ago. 



STATE WILL SUE FOR 
$600,000 BACK TAXES 

Northern Pacific and Great 
Northern to Be Defend- 
ants in Action. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — yults to recover the 
largest back tax claim in the history 
of the Northwest It Is said, aggregat- 
liig more than $600,000. will be begun 
by the state soon against tJie Great 
Northern and the Northern Pacific rail- 
way companies. All but $50,000 of this 
sum is charged against the former 
company. 

Public Examiner Andrew Fritz to- 
day certified to the tax commission 
the amount due. The largest item In 
dispute Is 1510,859. the tax on $13 - 
447,703. deducted by the Great Northern 
from Its Minnesota revenue before re- 
porting on account of payments to the 
Allouez Bay Dock company for han- 
dling ore shipments at Superior, Wis 
This covers a period of twelve years. 



New York, Aug. 30. — A request for 
instructions was received today by the 
Presbyterian board of missions from 
Charles C. Petran, head of their Mexi- 
can mission, and after a conference of 
representatives of missionary boards 
of various denominations yesterday 

the Presbyterian board sent to Mr. 
Petran the following telegram, which 
In substance was, It It understood, sent 
by boards of other denominations to 
their representatives also: 

'The board, while It cautions pru- 
dence, leaves the mission to decide the 
question of policy in the premises. It 
is the Judgment of the board that 
women and children should be recalled 
to a place of safety. Men use discre- 
tion, avoid risk, keep In touch with the 
United States representatives, register 
property." 

Asked Bryan's Advice. 

The message requesting Secretary 
Bryan's advice in the matter, dated 
Aug. 26, was sent in behalf of the 
Foreign Mission's Conference of North 
America, including boards of all de- 
nominations. 

"Before replying," the secretary 
telegraphed back, "this department 
would like to know exact location and 
numbers in Mexico of your mlsslonar- 
Itt." 

This request was complied with and 
the further statement telegraphed 
back: 

•MlssionarlRs are experienced work- 
ers and work includes Important 
schools whose closing would be seri- 
ous. Letters indicate that missionaries 
feel safe and desire to remain. Would 
jou approve If they still feel so?" 

Secretary Bryan's final reply came 
in answer to this message. There are 
fifteen Presbyterian missionaries in 
Mexico with their families and some 
slxtv of the Methodist denomination. 

'What confidential Information the 
president may have I do not know," 
rea.ls a report of the situation made 
today to the Presbyterian board bv 
Arthur J. Brown, its secretary. "Our 
advices from the missionaries In Mex- 
ico and with the knowledge of the sit- 
uation available here. In consultation 
with representatives of other boards 
similarly situated, do not ap'pear to 
Justify us in ordering our missionaries 
to leave the country. 

Are Experienced Men. 

"The president's advice may have 
been influenced by the fact that there 
are about 10,000 Americans In Mexico, 
many of whom are so situated that 
they are more or less exposed to dan- 
ger, some of them perhaps of the type 
that might provoked It, and still others 



Davis Takes New Office. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — John W, 
Davis of West Virginia, was todav 
sworn in as solicitor general of the 
United States. He resigned yesterday 
as a member of the house of repre- 
sentatives. 



HOW AMERICA "LOOKS" TO 

ONE WHO NEVER SAW IT 



Ohio Man Gets Job. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — Secretary Bry- 
an has appointed John H. James, a 
lawyer and newspaper man of Urbana, 
Ohio, chief of the division of Informa- 
tion of the state department, succeed- 
ing Sevellon Brown, resigned. 
■ • 

I obituaryI 

Col. W. S. Stockton* brother of the 
late Frank R. Stockton, the author, 
was found dead In his apartments in 
Ihlladelphla, Aug. 29. Death Is sup- 
posed to have been caused by apo- 
plexy. Col. Stockton, who was 7fl 
years old and a bachelor, was a mem- 
ber of the Legion of Honor. 



SAVE STEPS IN THE KITCHEN. 

Better Farming: The busy house- 
wife has so much to do that she can- 
not afford to take unnecessary steps 
and make unitecessary work out of her 

kitchen duties. Much work can be 
saved by having the kitchen table and 
cabinet properly arranged and a proper 
height to prevent stooping. 

Kitchen tables and cabinets should 
be of such height from the floor that 
one can stand erect while working, 
without either stooping or stretching. 
It is easy to make the table legs 
longer or shorter as needed and thus 
add materially to the convenience and 
comfort of the work. 

A cabinet will save many steps by 
having the needed things all in one 
place. They are found on tile market 
in great variety of design and range 
of price. Frequently, however, one 
can be planned and built for the 
kitchen that will be more convenient 
than a factory article. 

The cabinets on the market can be 
modified to meet the conditions in the 
Individual kitchen; for Instance, parti- 
tions In some of the drawers will hold 
smalller articles, such as spoons, knives 
and forks, and will help to keep things 
In place. Sometimes a small table on 
large casters will facilitate the work 
and save steps. In small rooms tables 
built along the wall hung by chains or 
held up by props, which can be let 
down when not In use, may solve some 
of the problems. 

The tops of the tables and cabinets 
must be free from cracks, easy to 
clean, and If possible uninjured by 
heat. Bare boards are too hard to 
keep clean to appeal to the modern 
housekeeper. Many use oil cloth, 
which is readily cleaned and Is sani- 
tary. This, however, )iaB the dis- 
advantage of being easily destroyed 
by hot vessels set on It or by cutting 
with a knife. Zinc shetrts three feet 
by seven feet can be- bought for 
$1.50 and when carefully put on make 
a good top that lasts for years. 



Subscribe for The Herald 



V^. L. Q«orge, an English author, who haa never 
been to Amcriua, writes his iinprtsslons of the 
Lnited States for Everybodi-'e Magazine. 

I have closed my eyes; said "Amer- 
ica." There is a second chaos. Then 
details grow more numerous, and I find 
that it is not America I see, but New 
York. And, at first sight. New York is 
skyscrapers. The -rest is indefinite I 
picture the city ag almost entirely com- 
posed of skyscrapers. I see them at 
every corner of every street, thrusting 
into the sky as countless spears of 
brick and mortar. I may be haunted 
by some photograph, but this does not 
matter, for it is precisely this photo- 
graph, long forgotten and lost, which 
has helped to build up in my mind this 
vision of New York. I cannot detach 
my attention from the skyscrapers The 
word Flatlron,' the meaning of which 
I do not know, begins to preoccupy 

"^t. J^^" ^ t^*"'* o' lifts, demon lifts 
Which rush from the ground floor to 
the fortieth story at thirty. six miles an 

« u^ ,/, ^'^'"^ ^^ *he height— Insolent 
Babel-llke height. 

I suppose you have hotels but my 
vision is limited to Sherry's 'and Del- 
monlcos. I can see nothing else, not 
even the East Side. Nobody has told 
me anything about East Side except 
that it Is Inhabited by Chinamen. I add 
H'wu^xt'"** '8*ea"^ heat,' and I have done 
with New York. It Is a faint picture, 
the picture of some Kind of a town In 
the foreground of which Is a statue of 
Liberty. That Is all. 

The Aristocracy. 

Your aristocracy; I figure them as 
strong rather than languid, conscious 
of power rather than weary of power 
They are all enormously rich so rich 
that they have acquired a taste for the 
arts which we cannot afford In Eng- 
land, so rich that they cannot dine save 

u.?°"iV'\^ '" * flooded hotel vard. 
while Melba and Caruso, disguised as 
Italian peasants, sing expensive duets 

I do not know any more — or rather 
all else that I imagine concerns the 
American, not the New Yorker For 
me the New Yorker Is a fierce business 
man and the' rest Is silence. The 
American is more definite. I can even 
think of him as poor, which the New 
Yorker mainly never Is. 1 see the New 
Yorker mainly In Wall Street (a thor- 
oughfare entirely filled with straw 
hats) Indulging in "Frenzied Finance"- 
but the American may somewhere be 
humble. He is probably oppressed bv 
the trusts. 

I believe there Is a trust In every- 
thing from government to literature 
But the real American men and women 
live In many towns. They differ In 
Inscrutable ways, according to the lati- 
tude, and, In In my mind according 
to the name of the town. 

Some of these names are for me mere 
geographical expressions: Topeka At- 
lanta. Baltimore, Indianapolis — all 
these could be removed from the map 
and my vision of the United States 
would be unimpaired. They have for 

ir^K,!'*'^ P*X.?°"^"*y- "Th^y are not In- 
habited. They do not exist. But other 
towns, Boston, Newport. Chicago Salt 
Lake City, are for me living character- 
ized entitles. I cannot see them but 
I can feel them. I know they are there 
as a blind man knows when a friend 
enters the room. 

For me Newport Is costly bathing a 
Madison Square Garden by the sea 
But I cannot imagine It with any real- 
ity. I can see no lovers walking hand 
In hand by the "sad sea waves," though 



I feel that there must be such places 
and such lovers, for Dana Gibson has 
drawn scenes which make one under- 
stand why English noblemen gladlv 
marry American girls. 

Chicago Just Means "Pork." 
From Newport I pass to Chicago, 
which to me means "pork." That Is 
all. I also think of Upton Sinclair, a 
little uncertain whether his theme was 
pork or canned beef; but in my English 
L. '? P°*"^' ^^^'' Upton Sinclair and 
affinities are so completely entangled 
that I cannot disassociate one from the 
other. 

I cannot see America as small in 
anything. 

If I say "American railway, ' I think 
of five-day-long journeys through for- 
ests as vast as my own Island, over 
prairies which are generally on fire, 
and cataracts which are always In 
spate. If -'I say 'newspapers," I think 
of hordes of reporters, not of the 
modest men who In England come to 
the celebrity as single swallows. 

Your South and your Far North, too 
— I claim them for England, the Eng- 
land of "Good King George* or of the 
Mayflower. 

I see them less clearly than New 
York, but I feel them keenly, the for- 
mer In loving wise, the latter as might 
a Scotchman. Your South I think of 
as a land of languor, where the old 
Queen Anne and Georgian houses of 
our own countryside are dotted about 
In green fields, bowered in flowers, in 
orchards laden with heavy fruits, 
warmed with sunshine and cheered by 
the songs of gay-hued birds. 

The women are graceful, beautiful, 
lazy — they never do any work. The 
men are gallant, flght duels and hunt 
the fox. They, too, never work. There 
Is a touch of Spain and an air of 
France. Your South Is older than the 
sturdy Orange days — it Is Stuart coun- 
try. It is beautitul indolent, and I 
think it is absolutely sterile, devoid 
of enterprise, commerce and industry. 
Indeed, I cannot see why the busy 
Yankees preserve the land that lies 
south of the thirty-flfth parallel, save 
as historical monument. 

That Scotch Sunday. 

And your North, your New Engand, 
I see It dour, redolent with the spirit 
of our Covenanters. I feel that it 
practices the Scotch Sunday, that it 
still scourges the soul as the Roman 
Catholics scourge the body. It Is a 
harsh country, 1 think. I imagine It 
as un-American as Cumberland. I 
feel that it Is narrow, cruel, that it 
frowns on the joy of life, revels In 
the joy of death • ♦ ♦ and yet 
makes a passing good thing of trade. 
I hear that it has manses. Does not 
that show that New England is not 
the real, thrilling America? It is an- 
other England. 

Let me make an end of these topo- 
graphical imaginings by saying that 
for me you have hardly any West. I 
can think of naught save an enor- 
mous Buffalo Bin show, with a little 
mining, euchre, murder and horse 
stealing in the Brandy Gulch style. 
For me the West Is merely theatrical, 
its people supers and its houses prop- 
erties. Indeed, there is no concrete 
America for me west of the Missis- 
sippi. Even the roping of the broncho 
(who may, for what I know, be either 
a bull or a horse) does not Invest 
with reality the land we call "the 
wild and woolly west." 
. But I suspect that In this phantom 



country there live some millions ot 
men and women who do not vastly 
differ from the Americans I divine 

I know none of your politicians ex- 
cept Roosevelt, Taft, Bryan and Elihu 
iioot, and all save the first are shad- 
ows. I know the name of Elihu Root. 
1 know that Bryan is one of your elec- 
toral institutions, that Taft— well I 
''}uK^ ^"ow anything about him except 
that he has been your president. 
Roosevelt alone stands forth and I am 
not far from accepting William Wat- 
son's verdict: 

• • * Nay, thou art more; 
Thou art her fiery pulse, her conquerlne 
will; * 

Thou art America, dauntless Theodore. 

I have no knowledge of his program. 
I never read his speeches. I know 
nothing of him. except that his face is 
familiar, his voice enormous. Thus I 
cannot judge him, but I intenselv ad- 
mire him. But he is for me the Ameri- 
can type. I imagine him as readv to 
do work for tewnty-four hours a day 
or to hunt, with Kermit, the grizzly 
the rabbit or the boss. 1 do not care 
what he does. He is so tempestuous, 
he has so filled me with the thrilling 
of his vitality, that I am carried away 
by him as by some great wind. And 
much of the wondering respect I feel 
for your nation comes to me, magni- 
fied and magephoned, through your 
ambassador to the world, Theodore 
Roosevelt. 



WHERE LIQUORICE COMES FROM. 
■n.y>*""^'„r ^ people, says a writer in the 
n ide World magazine, have any Idea 
where the familiar liquorlce-root comes 
from. As a matter of fact, the bulk 
of it hails from Syria. Here It is gath- 
ered and piled Into great stacks where 
It remains until It Is thoroughly dry. 
It Is then taken to the factory to 
undergo certain processes. The fin- 
ished product Is used for flavoring 
confectionery and beer, as well as en- 
tering Into the make-up of many 
brands of tobacco. Some Idea of the 
extent of the Industry may be gath- 
ered when It is stated that, on an aver- 
age, 8,000 tons of dry liquorlce-root is 
shipped from Aleppo annually, whll* 
Bagdad yields another 6,000 tons. An- 
tioch, 4,000, and Damascus, 500 tons 
With the exception of the Damascus 
output, the whole trade is in the hand* 
of a single flrm. 

LACONIC. 
Indianapolis News: Victor Hugo, 
the great French poet and novelist, 
could be very verbose at times, but he 
knew how to be laconic also. "Les MIs- 
erables" had just issued from the press 
and Hugo, who was in the Channel 
Islands, was anxious to learn how It 
was selling. Being desperately busy, 
he contented himself with Inscribing 
the note of Interrogation on a post card 
— ••?•• — expecting that his publisher 
would give him a full account of sales. 
But the publisher gave tit for tat, the 
reply coming back simply *•!" 
». 

SUPERSTITIONS. 

Indianapolis News: In many parts 
of the modern world the believer In 
witchcraft still gets hold of hair, nail 
parings and so forth from an enemy's 
head and hands, and burns, buries or 
does something else with them In order 
to entail unpleasant consequences on 
that enemy. And universal folklore 
reveals the concern of savages to dis- 
pose of their own hair and nail clip- 
pings to prevent an enemy from get- 
ting at them. Australian native girls 
who have had a lock of hair stolen 
from them expect speedy death as a 
certainty. 

♦ 

The number of horses In the United 
States Increased from 13,500,000 In 1900 
to 21,040,000 fh 1910. In spite of the 
rapid development of the automobile. 



1 



A 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HEKALD 




August 80, 1913. 



YOU OUGHT TO KNOW 



Designed to Place Before the Pub'- 
lie the Merchandise, Craftsman' 
ship and Special Service Offered 
by Exclusive Shops and Specialty 
Stores Not Usually Advertised. 



IF 



you want Urst'Class ana prompt 
work done rightf and at pfiCC^ 
to please you— call for 



STROMQUIST & MOYE^ 

INTERIOR DECORATORS PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 

306 EAST SUPERIOR STREET 



PHONES--M*lro*« 1098-Grand 432 



Biggest Sale 
of Violins 

Ever known lor !he next week only 

V2 and Less 



Grieg Music Co, 

6 East Superior St. 



ORDER A CASE OF 

FAMILY TRADE 

BOTTLED BEER 

THE PUREST MADE IN DULUTH. 



PEOPLE'S BREWING CO 

r.icuery Phones: Cal. 204; Cole 204. 

108 EAST FIRST STREET. 
Geo. A. Gray, Mgr. 

—Melrose 1954; Grand 1258. 



THE GREER 
PRINTING CO. 



FOR- 



FME FBOiTDii 

124 WEST SECOXD STREET. 
BOTH PHONES 288 



Walcb 

This Space 

Next Week 




KALAMAZOO 

LOOSE LEAF BINDERS 

YOU WILL WANT THEM. 



F.H.LOyHSBERRY&CO 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

Providence Building, Fourth Ave. 
West and Superior Street, Dulntti. 




HavcaRei;;»onsibleWan 
Do Your ViiCrS 

Cleans windows 
in stores, offices 
and private dwell- 
Ingrs at very rea- 
sonable rates by 
the day, week or 
month. 

New buildings a 
specialty. 

Orders prompt- 
ly attended to. 

PRIDEIVCE ROBERTS "»»>" ^09 P'on^r Block 

Phones — Melrose 4196; Grand 2285- Y. 




PRINTING! 



STEEL DIE EMBOSSING, CARD 
AND WEDDING ENGRAVING. 

QUICK SERVICE AND 
THE FINEST WORK- 



Melrose 792 
Grand 75 > 



CGISOLIDATED STAMP & PRINTING CO. 



14 FOURTH 
AVE. WEST 



tit 



ES YOUR7 
ROOF LEAK i 



If it does call on 

HOLLIHAN & 
MILOSTAN, 

401 and 403 East First Si. 

Zcnitli 701, Melrose 22ii. 



DR. E. ANGEMIER, 

SPECMUST 



Rootnii A, B| O, 

Lowell Block, 
Corner Flrat Av«.| 
B. A Superior St. 

Take elevator up 1 
to second floor. 

If you are ailluK with Tumori, 
Cancers, llloud Ulaeaiiea. etc., call at 
my yffice and let mo examine you 
free. 



MULUN & STURM 

315^ EAST SUPERIOR ST. 

e.;,'*^TRACTING IN 

PLUMBlMii 5 HEATING 



o figure 
and 



Let us iiavo a change 
on installing your plumbing 
heating plant In your home. T?*^ 
guarantee to furnish the best of 
material and skilled workmanship. 

PHONES — Melrose 3707; Grand 
1726-D. 



RankinPrinttngCo 

Robt. Rankin. Manager. 

PRINTING 



OF ALL KINDS 

OUT-OF TOWN TRADE SOLICITED. 

We make a specialty of Union Label 

Water Mark Paper. 

221 West Superior St. Axa Bldg. 



DULUTH 

FLORAL CO. 

Edw. 'W. Kreimer O. J. Elaehen 

Wholesale and Retail 



\. 



121 West Superior Street 




Tentu, 

Sleeulng 

Tents. 

Horae 

and 

Wajon 

Covers, 

Tack 

envied. 

Auto 

f'TirtaJP' 

Porch 

CurtaiflR, 

DuBt • 

Cover*. 



'QjyiIER TENT & 
AWNING CO. 

S KA8T 8UPEBIOB ST. 
788^ Jtfalroaa 4667. 




RJohnson 



W. SUP. ST. 



DAUGHERTY'S 
HARDWARE 



516 EAST FOURTH STREET. 
Melrose 763. Grand 753. 



Come here for your Hunting Out- 
fits, Hardware, Paints and Building 
Supplies. 



:eLiiPi£ raoTO syppLY e©., ^ 

•^THlJ KA3IERA SHOP.'» 
17 Fourth Avenue W»s^*' Commercial Club DulldlnK. 
DevelopluK and printing dolfte ^*'>Kbt. Pricea are rlicht and flfteea 
yeara' experience to back our Huar»i^*ee. 

AN SCO CAMERAS, cr*?« PAPER and 



Suppllea for all Camera' ^pd Kudaka. 




RINTING 



Melrose 1604 
Grand 2369D 



Of Quality and Prompt 
Service at tlie 



LANE PRINTING CO. 

130 and 132 Waat michlsan St. 



I 
I 








4 k ^ 







Presbyterian. 

Flr?»t — At the First Presbyterian 
churcli. Second street and TiiirJ ave- 
xiu:- east, liiere will be Services at 
10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. The pastor, 
Rev. Robert Yost, will preach. The 
th'-me of the morning will be "Upon 
This Rock I Will Build My Church." 
The Bible school will meet at noon. 
The tiniiion branch Bible school, 1627 
Lontion road, will meet at a a. m. The 
S'j'uj.ct of the evening sermon will he 
"Is the Short Way Best?" There will 
be a midweek service at 8 p. m. Thurs- 
day. The musical program follows: 

Morn Ins. 
Organ prelude — "Pastorale" Demarest 
Anthem — "And the Wall of the .City" 

King 

Response — "Of My Faith". .Alexander 

Offf-rtory Dunham 

Anthem — "Hear Us. O Savior" 

Hauptmann 

Organ postlude Saint Saens 

Evening. 

Organ postlude — Melody" 

Woktenholm 

Anthem — ^*Holiest. Breathe an Eve- 
ning Blessing" Martin 

Anthem — "What Are These?" ..Stainer 
U:gan postlude Saint Saens 

• • • 

Lakealde— At Lakeside Presbyterian 
<hurch. Forty-fifth avenue east and 
McCuliuch street. S. M. Erickson, mis- 
sionary, will preach at 10:30 a. m. on 
•Twice Born Men of Japan." This Is 
the closing service of the day. 

Hope — The Hope Presbyterian 

church, at Xew Duluth. will be sup- 
plied Sunday morning by Rev J. C. 
Mapson of Ely, in the absence of the 
pa.sior. Rev. Mr. Mapson will also 
preach at the Highland Presbyterian 
church at Duluth Heights Sunday eve- 
ning. 

e • a 

Glen Avon— The Glen Avon Presby- 
terian church, 2100 Woodland avenue, 
meets at 10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. for 
congrfgational worship. Dr. Lawrence, 
the pastor, will conduct both services, 
speaking in the morning upon the 
theme, "Make the Tree Good," and in 
the evening upon "A Swordless Vic- 
tory." The Bible school meets at the 
close of the morning service with a 
class for anyone. The Christian En- 
deavor society holds its prayer service 
at 7 o'clock. The midweek meeting 
■win convene on Thursday at 7:45 p. m. 

• « « 

Second — During August the Second 
Presbyterian church, 1515 Went Supe- 
rior street, will combine the morning 
preaeiilnK service with the Sunday 
school. The hour of meeting will be 
10:45 a. m.. closing at 12:15 p. m. In 
the evening the Christian Endeavor 
•will unite with the church service at 
7:45 o'clock. Ti.e pastor. Rev. J A. 
McGaughey, will close both services 
with a short address. In the morning 
lie wilj preach on "A Me.ssage From 
Mount Sinai." The Thursday Bible 
study will be held at 7:45 o'clock on 
the Spaa club grounds, if weather per- 
mits. 

We<itmin.<iter — Services at the West- 
minster I'resbyterian church, Fifty- 
tighth avenue west and Ram/ley street. 
Rev. William L. Staub, pastrw, will be 
held as follows: 10:30 a. m.. regular 
service, sermon by Rev. F. J Barark- 
man, pastor at large; 12 m.. Sunday 
school, L. A. Barnes, superintendent; 
7 p. m.. Endeavor. There will be no 
evening services during the pastor's 
absence. 

— -^ 

Lutheran. 

Flr»ii \orwexrian — At the First Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church. First avenue 
east and Third street, the pa.stor. Rev. 
J. H. Stenberg, will preach at the 
morning service at 10:30 o'clock, when 
holy communion will be held. There 
will be no evening service. A prayer 
meeting will be held at 8 p. m. Thurs- 
day. 

• • * 

Bethenda — At the Bethesda Norwe- 
gian Lutheran church. Sixth avenue 
east and Fifth street. Rev. Theodore J. 
Austad. pastor, will conduct services at 
10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. The Nor- 
wegian Sunday school will meet at 9 
a m. and the English Sunday school 
at 12:15 p. m. The Lutheran Young 
People's society will hold Its social 
and business meeting Tuesday evening 
The Young Ladies' society "will meet 
with Mrs. P. Anderson Wednesday 
evening. 

• • ♦ 

St. Matthew*M — At St. Matthew's 
Evangelical German Lutheran church, 
corner Sixth avenue east and Fourth 
Street, Rev. E. Lehne. pastor, there will 
be no services owing to the absence of 



the pastor. The Sunday school will not 
meet Sunday, but will meet the fol- 
lowing week. The Ladies' Aid will 
meet at 2 p. m. Thursday, with Mrs. 
Jacob Patschkowskl, 530 Third avenue 
east 

* « • 

St. John'!* Engrll.<ih — At St. John's 
English Lutheran church, corner of 
Lake avenue and Third street, H. C. 
Rex. pastor, tiie regular morning serv- 
ice will begin at 11 o'clock. The Sun- 
day school will meet at 10 a. m. The 
church council will meet with Mr. and 
Mrs. N. P. Turnblad, 211 Twelfth ave- 
nue east, Tuesday evening. 

* • * 

St. Stephen'.^ — At St. Stephen's Ger- 
man-English Lutheran church. Sixty- 
seventh avenue west and Raleigh 
street, there will be services Sunday 
morning at 10:30 o'clock, conducted In 
the English language by the pastor. 
Rev. W. Sievers. 

« * « 

St. Lnke'a Danlah — Danish Lutheran 
Services will be held at the Norwegian 
Lutheran Synod church. Fifty-seventh 
avenue west and Roosevelt street, at 
8:30 a. m. The Sunday school will 
meet at 2 p. m. 

• * • 

St. Panl'a EnglUh — At the St. Paul's 
English Lutheran church. Twentieth 
avenue west and Third street. Rev. E. 
Wulfsberg, pastor, the regular morn- 
ing service will be held at 11 o'clock. 
There is no Sunday school during Au- 
gust. The Luther Guild will meet 
Wednesday evening with Miss Mil- 
dred Swlck, 318 Devonshire street. The 
annual Sunday school picnic will be 
held Sept. 7 at Lincoln park. 

• • * 

Flrat Swedlah — At the First Swedish 
Lutheran church Sixth avenue east and 
Third street, of which Rev. Carl O. 
Swan Is the pastor, services will be 
held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. The 
Sunday school will meet at 11:30 a. m. 
The evening services will be held at 8 
o'clock. The ladles" aid society will 
hold its regular monthly meeting next 
Wednesday afternoon in tH* church 
parlor. The mid-week services will be 
held at 8 p. m. Thursday. 

♦ ♦ • 

THnity Lutheran — At the "Trinity 
Norwegian Lutheran Free church. 
Fourth avenue east and Fifth street, of 
which Rev. O. Flagstad is the pastor 
there will be an evening service at 8 
o'clock. The regular midweek service 
will be held Thursday evening. There 
will be no morning service. The ladles' 
aid so^^lety will meet Wednesday after- 
noon with Mrs. T. Wyman, 1201 Sev- 
enth avenue east. The confirmation 
class will meet Saturday afternoon. 
^ 

Methodist. 

Flr«t — At the First Methodist church. 
Third avenue west and Third street. 
Dr. M. S. Rice will preach at the morn- 
ing service at 10:30 o'clock on "Hidden 
Helpers" and at 8 o'clock on "Ho Went 
Away Sad." The Sunday school will 
meet at noon. Watson S. Moore, super- 
intendent. The Epworth league will 
hold a devotional service for young 
people at 7 p. m. 

• • • 

Leater Purk — At the Lester Park 
Methodist Episcopal church. Fifty- 
fourth avenue "ast and Superior street. 
Rev. C. R. Oaten, pastor, the regular 
services will be resumed Sunday. Rev 



F. L Roberts of Eau Claire. W-ls., will 
preach at 10:30 a. m. and the pas- 
tor at 7:30 p. m. The evening subject 
will be "The Road to Nowhere." The 
Sunday school will meet at noon, and 
the Epworth league at 7 o'clock In 
the evening. There will be a prayer 
meeting Wednesday evening. 
mm* 

Grace — At the Grace Methodist 
church there will be a class meeting 
at 9:45 a. m., morning worship at 10:30 
a. m., Sunday school at noon, and eve- 
ning worship at 7:4 oo'clock. Miss Lui 
Wang, a native Chinese girl, will speak 
In the morning and Rev. F. L. Roberts 
of Eau Claire in the evening. R. R. 
Forward is superintendent of the Sun- 
day school. 

« * • 

rirat German — .\t the First German 
M. E. church. Fifth avenue east and 
Sixth street, of which Rev. W. A. Weiss 
is the pastor, communion services will 
be conducted at 10:30 a. m., by Rev. 
J. J. Hoffman, district superintendent. 
Thw Sunday school will meet at 11:30 
a. m. C. Manke, superintendent. The 
Epworth league will meet at 7 p. m., 
and the evening service will be held 
at 7:30 p. m. 

• • • 

Aabnry — Services at the Asbury M. 
E. church will be held at 10:30 a. m. 
and 7:45 p. m. Rev. W. H. Farrell. 
pastor, will preach In the morning and 
Rev. W. F. Hovls of the Endion M. E. 
church will preach In the evening. 
There will also be special music at 
the evening service. The Sunday 
school will meet at 11:45 a. m., I. Q. 
Wollan, superintendent. The Epworth 
league will meet at 7 p. m. 

• * * 

Pirat Swedish — At the First Swedish 
M. E. church. Twentieth avenue west 
and Third street. Rev. Carl W. R. Wer- 
mlne. pastor, the Sunday school will 
meet at 9:30 a. m., Mr. Peterson, su- 
perintendent. The morning worship 
will be held at 11 a. m. with the ser- 
mon by Prof. Charles E. Simpson of 
Moradabad, India. The evening serv- 
ice will be held at 7:45 o'clock, with 
a lecture In English by Prof. Simpson 
on "Missions." The program for the 
evt nlng service follows: 

Prelude — Selected 

Miss Ruth Larson. 
Song — "Stand Up For Jesus" 

Congregation. 

Invocation 

Song — 'The Earth Is the Lord's" 

Octette. 

Scripture reading 

^^ng •• .....••...,, 

Congregation. 

Offertory and announcements 

Solo — Selected 

Rev. Mr. Wermtne. 
Lecture — "Missions" 

Prof. Simpson. 
Doxology 

• • * 
Endlon^At the Endion Methodist 

Episcopal church, corner NMnteenth 
avenue east and First street, William 
Forney Hovls, D. D., pastor service 
will open at 10:20 a. m. with a 10- 
mlnute organ recital by Miss Carlotta 
Simonds. There will be preaching at 
10:30 o'clock on the subject, "Sun- 
I'ght and Moonlight;" Sunday school 
at 12 o'clock, William M. Gravatt, su- 
perintendent; meeting of Vesper choir 
at 6:30 p. m.: vespers af 7 p. m., led 
by Miss Elizabeth Stephenson, the sub- 
ject being "Vacation Experiences." No 



other evening service will be held Sun- 
day. Ofttciar board meeting will be 
held Tuesday night at 7:45 o'clock, and 
mid-week service, Thursday night, at 
7:45 o'clock. The musical program for 
Sunday follows: 
Organ 

(a) "Berceuse" Frysinger 

(b) "Prelude" ,. Dolmetsch 

Duet — "My Faith Looks Up to Thee" 

Nevin 

Mrs. Flaaten and Mr. Koneczqy. 

Offertory — "Offertory" Batiste 

Solo — "Come Unto Me" .Coenen 

Mr. Koneczny. 
Postlude — "Grand Chorus" Paulkes 



DULUTH CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR NOTES 



The Christian Endeavor subject fur 
next week will be "Missionary Essen- 
tials, at Home and Abroad." The ref- 
erence suggested for the lesson Is 
found In Eph. 6:10-20. The following 
services will be held in Duluth: 
Flrat Baptlat — 

This society holds its meetings at 
the church. Ninth avenue east and 
First street. Instead of the regular topic 
this week, O. A. Anderson will give 
stereoptlcon views Ulu^rating "Pil- 
grim's Progrfss." 

Flrat Cbrtatlaa — Miss Elsie Zlegler 
will have charge of the service of the 
society which meets at the church, 
Twelfth avenue east and Fourth' street, 
at 7 o'clock. 

Glen Avon Preabyterlnn— This so- 
ciety is located at Woodland and meets 
every Sunday night at 7 o'clock. Miss 
Hazel Forbes will be the leader for 
this week's service. 



I'nlon Church— The services of this 
society are held at the K. P. hall. 118 
West Superior street. The leader for 
this week's service will be Miss Mar- 
garet Tldball, and the study will be 
made of the life of General Booth. 

Weatnlnater Preabrterlan— The mis- 
sionary committee will have charge of 
the service of this society meeting at 
7 p. m. Tuesday. The regular buslne.<»s 
meeting of the society will be held In 
the church parlors. 

County Farm — The service at the 
county farm will be in charge of the 
Westminster Presbyterian society. Th^ 
incline car will be taken at 2:30 p m. 

(luarterly Rally — The next quarterly 
rally of the City union will be held 
Friday, Sept. 26, at the Second Pres- 
byterian church. Fifteenth avenue 
west and Superior street, f'he election 
of officers will be a feature of the 
service and also the report of the Los 
Angeles convention. 



Episcopal. 

St. Paura — Services at St. Paul's 
Episcopal church, Rev. A W. Ryan, 
rector, will be as follows: 8 a. m.. 
holy communion;- 10 a. m., Sunday 
school; 11 a. m., mVjrning prayer and 
sermon on "The Cost of Religion;" 4:15 
p. m., baptism, and 5 p. m., vespi-r serv- 
ice. Mr. Custance will play on the 
new organ for about half -an hour be- 
fore the vesper service. 

The musical program follows: 
Morning. 
Processional — "At the Name of Jesus" 

Monk 

"Canticles" (Chanted) 

"Te Deum, in B Flat" Custance 

Litany hymn — "Lord in This Thy 

Mercy's Day" Monk 

Hymn — 'O! Worship the King".. Craft 
Solo — ".«!avior. Most Holy" ("'Ave 

Maria") Gounod 

Miss Maude Baxter. 

Anthem — "Rock of Ages" Cu.stance 

Mlss Mary Bradshaw and Choir. 
Recessional — "Songs of Praise" 

"Innocents" 

EvenlnK. 
Processional — "At the Name of Jesus" 

Monk 

"Psalter" (Chanted) 

"Canticles" (Chanted) 

Hymn — "The Day Is Past and Over". 

Brown 

Anthem — "Glory to Thee, My God".. 

. .'. Gounod 

Orison— "Galilee" Anon 

Quartet. 
Recessional — "Songs of Praise' 

"Innocents" 

A. F. M. Custance is organist and 
choirmaster. 

• * « 

Trtnlty Pro-Cathedml — At the Trin- 
ity pro-cathedral Rt. Rev. Jame» D. 
Morrison, D. D.. L. L D., bishop; Rev. 
Thomas MacLean, L. L. D., vicar; there 
will be holy communion 8 a. m.; ser- 
mon "God or Mammon?" 11 a. m.; even- 
song in bishop's chapel, 5 p. m. ; dally, 
10 a. m. ; midweek eucharlst (Thurs- 
day), 10 a. m., and Friday lecture, 8 
P. m. 

The musical program follows: 
Morning. 
Organ prelude — "Vision". .Rheinberger 
Processional — "Oh, Mother Dear".... 

Dykes 

"Te Deum" (from ser^'lce book) 

'Jubilate Deo" Oxford Chant 

Litany hymn Spanish 

Soprano solo — "O Divine Redeemer" 

Gounod 

Mrs. B. M. Ruse. 

Hymn — "Cross of Jesus" Stainer 

Anthem — "Sweet Is Thy Mercy".... 

Barnby 

"Sevenfold Amen" Stainer 

Recessional — "Jerusalem, the Gold- 
en" Lo Jeane 

Organ postlude — "Fugue In G" 

Guilmant 

Miss Isabel Pearson i» organist and 
choir director. 

* * • 

St. Peter's — At St. Peter's Episcopal 
church. Twenty-eighth avenue west 
and First street, services will be held 
as follows: English Sunday school, 10 
a. m. ; Swedish Sunday school, 12:15 p. 
m. ; Swedish service, prayer and ser- 
mon, 11 a. m., and English service, 
8 p. m. Rev. W. E. Harmann will 
preach at both services. 

* * * 

ifoly Apoatles'— At the Holy Apos- 
tles' Episcopal church. Fifty-seventh 
avenue west and Elinor street, there 
will be an evening prayer and sermon 
by Rev. F. L Anderson at 7:30 
o'clock. Rev. Wilfrid Clarke, rector; 
Miss Colubrn, organist; Miss Linne- 
man. soloist, and Mrs. Buell, choir dl. 
rector. 

• * * 

ChHat'a — At Christ's Episcopal 
church. Proctor, services will be held 
at the I. O. O. F. hall at 11 a. m. The 
Kunday school wUl meet at 10 a. m., 
John Carruthers, superintendent. Rev. 
W. E. Harmann, pastor. 



Chapels and Missions. 

netbel — At the^ Bethel chapel the 
Sunday school will meet at 3 p. m., F. 
A. Marvin, superintendent, and In the 
evening a Gospel ijervice will be con- 
ducted by Rev. H. E Ramseyer. On 
Wednesday evening H. A. Sedgwick 
will conduct the service and on Thurs- 
day afternoon at 2:30 o'clock the wom- 
en s meeting will be held. A Gospel 
service will be held at 8 p. m. Friday, 
led by Rev. Mr. Ramseyer. 
• * • 

liOkeaidf — A| the Lakeside Swedish 
Sunday School mission, 816 Forty-sev- 
enth avenue east,^ the S'unday school 



will meet at 10 o'clock In the morning. 
Albert Stoltz is superintendent. 

* * « 

Central — At the Central Baptist 
church, Twentieth avenue west and 
First street. Rev. Milton Fish, pastor, 
services will be held as follows: 10 a. 
m., prayer meeting in the study; 10:30 
a, m., BiJiile study; sermon, "'How the 
Unbeliever Stands Before God;" 3 p. 
m.. Juniors; 5 p. m., Lincoln park 
serxice, preaching by Rev. Mr. Fish, 
and 8 p. m., worship and sermon by 

Rev. J. H. Earle of Pomona, Cal. 

* * * 

Siredlah Bethel — At the Swedish 
Bethel Baptist church. Ninth avenue 
east and Third street, L. W. Llnder, 
pastor, services will be held at 10:30 
a. m. with preaching by Rev. Arvid 
Edstam, formerly of Duluth, and at 
8 p. m. by the pastor. The evening 
.•subject will be "Real Enthusiasm." 
The Sunday school will meet at noon 
and the Y. P. society at 5 p. m. The 
pastor will speak at the meeting. The 
King's Daughters will meet next 
Tuesday evening at the home of Al- 
bert Stoltz, 1631 East Fifth street. 

* • • 

Dulnth Go.ipel — At the Duluth Gos- 
pel mission, 102 Lake avenue south, 
meetings are held every evening at 8 
o'clock and on Sunday at 11 a. m., 3 
p. m. and 8 p. m. 

Baptist. 

First — At the First Baptist church. 
Ninth avenue east and First street, 
services will be held at 10:30 a. m. and 
8 p. m. The minister, R. Edward 
Savles, will preach In the morning on 
"God, a Still Small Voice," and In the 
evening on "Behold the Lamb of God." 
The Bible school will meet at noon 
and the Christian Endeavor at 7 p. m. 

The musical program follows: 
Morning. 

Organ — "Prelude" Engelmann 

Solo — "But the Lord Is Mindful of 

His Own" Mendelssohn 

Miss Lillian Andresen. 

Offertory — "Reverie" Engelmann 

Postlude Engelmann 

Evening:. 
Organ — "Walter's Prize Song," from 

the "Meistersinger" R. Wagner 

Solo — "Just for Today" Abbott 

Offertory — '"Invocation" 

Flllppo Capoccl 

Postlude — "March' Franz Lachner 

Mrs. Clara B'. Morton, organist. 

* * • 

Swedlah Temple — At the Swedlah 
Baptist temple, Twenty-second avenue 
west and Third street, services will be 
held at 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. The 
pastor. Rev. Swaney Nelson, will 
preach in the morning and In the eve- 
ning. Rev. A. Edstam of Kansas City, 
former pastor, will conduct the serv- 
ices. The Sunday school will meet 
at 9:45 a. m. and the Young People's 
society at 5 p. m. The choir will sing 
In the evening. 



Congregational. 



Pll«;rim — At the Pilgrim Congrega- 
tional church, Lake avenue and Second 
street. Rev. C. N. Thorp, pastor, morn- 
ing services will be held at 10:30 
o'clock, with the sermon by the pastor 
on "God's Gracious Gift of Friendship." 
The Sunday school will meet at noon. 
The Thursday evening meeting will be 
held at 7:45. The musical program fol- 
lows: 

Prelude — "Canzona" Guilmant 

Anthem — "God of Abraham, Praise".. 

Buck 

Anthem 

Offertory— "To a Wild Rose" 

MacDowell-Olsen 

Postlude — Prelude and Fugue (D 

minor) Bach 

Soprano, Frances Woodbridge; con- 
tralto, Mrs. O. J. Larson; tenor, Leon 
W. Cooley; Bass, Harry G. Gearhart; 
and organist, Alice M. Olsen. 
* e « 

Plvmouth — At the Plymouth Congre- 
gational church. Fifty-fourth avenue 
west and Bristol street. Rev. Paul S- 
Nweeya, pastor, there will be no 
preaching services the last two weeks 
of August. The Sunday school will 
meet at 1:45 a. m., Mrs. C. R. Kcyes, 
superintendent. 

Seventh Day Adventist. 

seventh Day Adventlat — There will 
be preaching at the Seventh Day Ad- 
ventist church, Tenth avenue east and 
Sixth stre<»t, every Sunday night at 8 
o'clock. The subject this Sunday will 
be "The Seven Churches." B. C. Hoak 
la the pastor. 

Orthodox Christian Science. 

Orthodox — At the Orthodox Christian 
Science cluirch, Oak hall building, room 
107 Superior street and Second avenue 
west, services will be held at 10:45 a. 
m., the subject being '"Refuge." The 
midweek meeting will be held on 
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. The 
cluirch is open every afternoon except 
Sunday from 2 until 6 for a reading 
room and rest room. 



Church of Christ Scientist. 

Flrat Church— At the First Church of 
Christ, Scientist, Ninth avenue east and 
First 'street, services will be held at 



10:45 a. m. and 7:45 p. m., subject of the 
lesson, "Christ Jesus." The regular 
Wednesday evening testimonial meet- 
ing will be held at 8 o'clock. The read- 
ing room in connection with this church 
Is located at 411 Alworth building and 
is open to the public daily except Sun- 
days from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m^ 

♦ 

Christian Church. 

First — At the First Christian church, 
Twelfth avenue east and Fourth street. 
Rev. Ray E. Hunt, minister, the morn- 
ing service will be held at 11 o'clock; 
theme of sermon, "The Challenge of 
Christ." The Bible school will meet at 
10 a. m. and the young peoples society 
at 7 p. m. The evening service begins 
at 7 o'clock; theme of sermon, 'True 
Hearted, Whole Hearted." 



Evangelical. 

St. PauPa — At St. Paul's German 
Evangelical church. Tenth avenue east 
and Third street, of which Rev. Paul 
T. Bratzel is pastor, services will be 
held as follows: Sunday school, 9:30 a. 
m., and public worship, 10:30 a~ m. ; sub- 
ject of sermon, "Man's First Duty." 
There will be a membership meeting at 
2:30 p. m. The Y. P. S. will meet at 
8:15 p. m. Wednesday. The Mission so- 
fclety will meet Wednesday afternoon 
with Mrs. Edward Behning, 231 East 
Sixth street. 



IN PROBATE COIRT 



Monday, Labor day, will be observed 
as a legal holiday at the courthouse. 
As a consequence the usual calendar of 
cases for Monday In probaiei court will 
go over until Tuesday. The following 
grist of cases will be taken up by 
Judge Gilpin at that time: 

Appointment of Administrator — Rich- 
ard Long, John Heiskarl, Thomas L. 
Spellman, John Dwyer. 

Petition for Probate of Will — Cath- 
erine Coughlin. 

Final Accounts — Liza O'Donnell, Da- 
vid Hudson, Stanley McRae. Qustav R. 
Webster, John Semer ilartin Diegman, 
Charles S. Greene, Earl A. Edwards, 
Fred Takkunen. 

Petition to. Sell Land — Lloyd E. Ba- 
ker. 

Descent of Land — Samuel Blanchette. 

Proof of Will — Albert von Oppenheim. 

Claims — Valentine Sperlongo. Fred- 
erlka Bouchey, Henry Perrala, Agnes 
Childers. Bertha Travis, G A. Berg- 
Rtrom, David L. Kelley, William H. 
Stowell, MacieJ Szvbicki. 



Union Church. 

Union— The services of the Union 
church are held in the K. P. hall. 118 
West Superior street, Sunday morning 
at 10:45 and in the evening at S 
o'clock. B. V. Black Is the pastor. At 
the morning service Rev. Mr. Black 
will preach on '"God Is Love." The 
Sunday school will meet at noon and 
Christian Endeavor meeting will be 
held at 7 p. m. The midweek prayer 
and testimonial meeting will be held 
^J'ednesday evening in the hall at 8 
o'clock. "The subject of the evening 
sermon will be "Covetousness." 



FOR BASS 
FISHING ?g 




FINEST IN THE WORLD 

See—D. R. HilUs, Guide 




rSE DR. GEO. P. COLLIER'S 
CORN AXD BUNION SHIELDS 

with the healing salve, which in- 
stantly relieves pain. Price, 25c, 
with salve. For sale at all drug stores 

DruB Stor^a handllns Dr. Georgre 
P. Colller'a Corn and Bunion Shieldat 
Orphenni Pharmacy, 2«1 E. Sup. St. 
H. E. Jeronlmona, 503 E. 4th St. 
Smith & Smith, 101 \V. Snp. St. 
Lyceum DruK Store, 431 W. Sup. St. 
W. A. Abbett, 205 W. Sup. St. 
Alfred Swedberg. 3 E. Sup. St. 
Alfred SwedberRT, 201S E. Sup. St. 
S. J. Ny»ren, 232 N. Cen. Ave., W. D. 
C. J. Erirkaon, 401 N. Cen. Ave., W. D. 



cy Co., 402 Cen. 



The Spencer Phari 

Ave., W. D. 
Dr. Fred C. Bahr, 20 W. Sup. St. 



The "Happy 
Medium" 



Money should be neither meanly hoarded 
nor lightly squandered. There's a happy 
medium which is the cornerstone of success. 

It is an application of common sense to 
personal finances. It distinguishes between 
wasteful and needful expenditures. 

Many substantial savings accounts are 
now growing at the First National Bank 
out of little self-i-estralnts in spending. Let 
the "happy medium" prevail in your fin- 
ances and have a growing account, too. 



First National Bank 

of Duluth. 
Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 



Do You Know 

Merritt & Hector 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 



That the best printing and 
bindinfr is the cheapest? 
That's the kind we furnish. 

"Rush Orders a Pleasure" 

112 West First Street 



,ii» ,i 






<^ 



■ •v 










f 



1 



I 



1^ 



Saturday, 




IDEAL SUMMER VACATION ENJOYED BY MEMBERS OF 

THE Y. M. C. A. BOYS' DEPARTMENT AT STURGEON LAKE 




Camp Miller, the boys' department 
T. M. C. A. camp, closed its sixteenth 
season last Saturday. 

The camp was the largest ever held, 
there being eighty-nine in the party, j 
The boys returntd in a private car, and ! 
a happier and more enthusiastic crowd 
would be hard to find. 

Sturgeon lake, the new camp site, 
proved ideal in every particular and 
the fifty-four acres that the club owns 
provided ample opportunity lor the 
study of the woods and woodcraft. 
Henry Jenswold discovered forty-one 
different wild flowers; John Fee, nine- 
teen different kinds of trees; and Mar- 
cus Smith, ten kinds of birds. Tt-n 
12 by 14 tents housed the campers and 
there was keen competition as to 

which could make their tent and prop- , . a ui • j a ■ ^, • . . », ^, , . ^ » 

erty the moat attractive. The honozs vU Amietic^and Aquatic Champions m the Four Classes: John Fee, Towne 
were awarded to tent No. 2 In charge 
of Ralph Dunning, with the following 
members: Norman Sweeney, W'illard 
Thorpe. Stephen McGlffert, Neil Upham, 
Henry Jenswold, Donald Gallagher, 
Warren Moore and Russell Duncan. 
They were awarded Y. M. C. A. pins. 

The big clubhouse proved an added 
feature of Camp Miller. It is a 
building 20 feet by 40 feet, with a 12- 
footh porch screened in. A big fire 

8 lace on one end, the gift of J. D. 
tryker, added to the cozy appearance 
of the club. The grounds were for- 
mally dedicated to the boys of Duluth 
last Saturday, appropriate speeches 
being made. 

Swimming as usual was very popu- 
lar and every boy in camp was able to 
swim when he left with but one ex- 
ception. He was troubled with ear- 
ache and was not able to go Into the 
water. On Friday night a banquet was 
served. This was followed by the 



Peterson, Donald Gallagher and Kenneth Harris, 
sented by J. D. Stryker. (3) The New Clubhouse. 



(2) Fireplace Pre- 



riving out of the awards won during 
he two weeks. The last night at 
camp closed with a huge bonfire and 
marshmallow roast. 

There was keen competition during 
the whole camp for the honor of win- 
ning the F. A. Patrick cup which was 
to be awarded to the boy getting the 
most points. This honor went to John 
Fee who got a total of 897 points. 
Henry Jenswold came next with 395, 
and Wlllard Thorpe, third, with 392. 
Both Jenswold and Thorpe got their 
camp "M-'s" mounted on a wooden 
shield. The following .^ovs got the 
required 300 points and received 'M.'s": 
Roland Clark, Lester Stenerwald, Har- 
old Hein, Earl Shaw, Edward Meagher, 
Norman Sweeney, Willard Thorpe, 
Stephen McQlffert, Nell Upham, Henry 
Jenswold, Donald Gallagher, Russell 



Duncan, Chester Marshall, John Fee, 
Henry Bridgeman, Stuart Thompson, 
Johji Wagensteln, George Watts, Carl 
Honlgman, Harry Stoker, Louis Wade, 
Irving Grover, Howard Strange, Laur- 
ence Grannis, Alexander Kofed, Har- 
vey Owen, Clyde Peterson, Towne 
Peterson, Oliver Maggard, Ward Lux- 
on, Raymond Larson, Edwin Horngren. 
George Lewis, Jerome Norpell, Hoeard 
Parsons, Hamilton Phelps, Eugene 
Bondy, James Anderson, Paul Win- 
6hlp, George Forester. 

Swimming Prixe*. 
The following boys earned buttons 
for being able to swim 50 feet: Gor- 
don Clayton, Robert Forward, Marcus 
Smith, Raymond Larson, Arthur John- 
son, Burton Dunlop, Theodore Wahl, 
Clyde Peterson. 

Buttons were awarded the follow- 
ing for being able to swim 300 yards 
or more: Lester Stenerwald, Harvoy 
Strange, Robert Paine, Kenneth Har- 
ris Harry Stoker, Warren Moore, Nell 
Upnam, Irving Grover, Ward Luxon. 
Stuart Thompson. Jerome Norpell, 
Allan Hoyt, Stephen Relchert, George 
Watts, William Molett, Wlllard 
Thorpe, Waldomar Johnson, Frank 
Bridgeman, Shores Walker, Maurice 
Martin, James Wahl, Munroe Whlt- 
more, Oliver Maggard, Howard Par- 
sons, Laurence Grannis, Byron Bewell, 
Chetter Marshall, Wilfred Smithies, 
Norman Sweeney, Harold Heln, John 
Nelmeyer, Paul Wlnshlp, John Fee, 
James Anderson, Carl Honlnghan, 
H&milton Phelps,. John Wagensteln, 
Charles Dlers. 

Leaders buttons ^vere awarded sev- 
eral boys. Among other things they 




Your house 

can be wired without 

injury to decorations 

You should have your 

house wired — there will be no dirt 
and but little inconvenience — your 
walls and decorations will not be 
injured. If you are now using 
Electric Light you are depriving 
yourself of one of the greatest 
modern conveniences. Its bright, 
steady light enables you to read or 
sew at night without danger to 
your eyes. Then, too, handsome 
Electric fixtures and lamps will 
add to the charm and beauty of 
your home. 



had to do, was to teach one boy how 
to ewlm. j^ohn Neimeyer, Kenneth 
Harris, and m)bert Paine won the but 
tons. 

Life savers' medals were awardeJ 
the following boys for having demon- 
strated how to save from drowning 
and how to apply resucitatlou: Ken- 
neth Harris, Harry Stoker. 

Warren Moore, Kenneth Harris, 
Harry Stoker and N. D. McLeod swam 
across the lake a distance of 1 Vi miles. 
The swimming at Camp Miller was 
Ideal. The sandy beach and tne grad« 
ual slope enabled all to enjoy the 
water with perfect safety. 

The oJiampion of the boys' division 
for athletics and aquatics was John 
Fte; Intermediate champion. Town i 
Peterson. They received Camp Miller 
p<nnants. Donald Gallagher, champion 
In junior division, and Kenneth Har- 
ris, champion In senior division, re- 
ceived gold medals. 

Prize winners In the different 
event were as follows: 

Boys' division, 90 pounds and un- 
der — 

50 yard dash, John Fee, 7 seconds; 
Henry Jenswold, Harvey Owens. 

Broad jump, John Fee, 7 feet 6 
Inches; Henry Jenswold, Wilfred 
Smithies. 

Running broad Jump, Harvey Owens, 
13 feet. 2 Inches; John Fee, Henry 
Jenswold. 
Aquatics — 

25 yard dash, John Fee, -17 seconde; 
B. Dunlop, W. Smithies. 

50 yard dash, John Fee, 47 seconds; 
W. Smithies, H. Owens. 

Dive for form, W. Smithies, H. 
Owens, B. Dunlop. 

Intermediate division, 105 pounds 
snd under — 
Athletics — 

60 yard dash, Roland Clark, 7 sec- 
onds; Earl Shaw. Hamilton Phelps. 

Running broad jump, Roland Clark. 
15 feet % inch; Earl Shaw, Hamilton 
Phelps. 

High jump, Earl Shaw, 4 feet 4 
Inches; T. Peterson, H. Parsons. 
Aquatics — 

25 yard dash, Oliver MaarKard, IC 
seccnds; T. Peterson, H. Parsons. 

50 yard dash, T. Pctorson, 52 sec- 
ords; H. Parsons. H. Stoker. 

Dive for form, T. eter^on, L. Sten<ir- 
wold. H. Bridgeman. 
Juniors, 120 pounds and under — 
100 yard dash, Donald Galiagh'^r, 
l?4-5 seconds; Ted Meagher, Robert 
Paine. 

Running broad Jump, R. Palnc, 4 
feet 10 Inches; Donald Gallagher, Stan- 
ley Lamb. 
Aquatics — 

25 yard dash, Robert Paine, 10 ser- 
ords; Donald Gallagher, Wlllard 
Thorpe. 

2o0 yards. Robert Paine, 4" minutes 
23 seconds; W. Thcrpe, D. Gallaher. 

Dive for form, Stanley Lamb; D. 
GeDagher, W. Thorpe. 

Senior, 120 pounds and over — 
£20 yards, Harold Smithies. 25 3-!ll 
seconds: George Lewis, Charles Dlf^rs. 
Running broad Jump, Harold Smith- 
ies, 18 feet 6 Incheg; George Lewis, 
Cliarles Dlers. 

Shot put, Russell Duncan 28 feet 
8 inches: H. Smithies, Gustave Moisan. 
Aquatics — 

25 yard dash, K. Harris, 16 seconds; 
V/nrren Moore. George Lewis. 

200 yards, Kenneth Harris, 4 min- 
uets 10 seconds; Shores Walker, War- 
ren Moore. 

Dive for form, K. Harris, S. Walker, 
Warren Moore. 

The winners of first place In each 
event received a silk badge. 

The quoit championship went to John 

Nelmeyer, senior, and John Fee, junior. 

They received Camp Miller pennants. 

Flshlns Good. 

Fishing at Camp Miller delighted the 

heart of every boy. So many fish were 



coming In that they could not all be 
used and fishing had to be suspended 
for two days. George Atchley carried 
off the pennant for catching the largest 
black base. It measured eighteen 
Inches. Howard parsons carried off the 
special prize awarded by John Sweiger 
for the biggest fish. It was a pickerel 
and measured 33 1^ inches. 

The prize fishing crew award went 
to Irving Grover, Shores Walker, Ches- 
ter Marshall and Norman Sweeney. 
Five crews went out, and the prize was 
awarded to the crew that brought in 
the best string of cleaned fish. 

Wlllard Thorpe carried off the pen- 
nant for making the-^best selection of 
mounted knots. He mounted thirty-one 
different knots. p 

Unknown points were awarded to 
Fred Campbell, WllJffrd Thorpe and 
Russell Duncan. This is'an honor that 
Is only given for some very special 
service rendered during the camp. 

The following boys received Red 
Cross emblems for having passed In 
the first aid examination: Ralph Dun- 
ning, Marcus Smith, Milton Mead, 
Stuart Thompson, Kenneth Harris, 
Chester Marshall, Lester Stenerwald, 
Harold Heln, Jerome Norpell, Earl 
Shaw, T. Petersoiv John Fee, Oliver 
Maggard, Howard Parsons, S. McQlffert, 
Lk Orannls, George "Watts, John Wan- 
genstein, Irving Grover, Neil Upham, 
Norman Sweeney and Willard Thorpe. 
Hall of Fame. 

The following boys won places on 
the Camp Miller hall of fame, which 
will hang In the clubroom until next 
camp, when It will be taken to Stur- 
geon Lake and hung In the clubhouse 
there: 

Most popular boy — Irving Grover. 

Best athlete, senior — Harold Smithies. 

Best athlete, junior, John Fee. 

Camp humorist — Eugene Bondy. 

Most generous boy — Russell Duncan. 

Brightest boy — Louis Wade. 

Boy with biggest pull — Bunk Harris. 

Heavenly twins — Shores Walker and 
Byron Sewell. 

Boy who has done most for camp — 
Louis Wade. 

Best natured boy — Irving Grover. 

Most popular song — "Camp Miller 
Fair." 

Most handsome boy — John Sewell. 

Favorite game — Baseball. 

Boy with the best table manners — 
Byron Sewell. 

Neatest boy — Earl Shaw. 

Hard-luck boy — Allan Hoyt. 

Mascot — Clyde Peterson. 

Best swimmer — Kenneth Harris. 
Glfta to Canip. 

The following gifts were made to the 
canrtp: 

Shredded wheat biscuits — Shredded 
Wheat Biscuit company. 

Wheat biscuit — Kellogg company. 

Peanut butter — H. J. Heinze company. 

Tea, coffee, cocoa — Grand Union Tea 
company. 

Duluth Heralds — Herald company. 

News Tribunes — Tribune company. 

Pump — C. R. Cunningham, Sturgeon 
Lake. 

Plans for clubhouse — Mr. Willis. 

Ice cream and melons — Watson S. 
Moore. 

Candy — Dr. J. G. Harris. 

Installing acetylene — C. A. Duncan. 

Fireplace In clubhouse — J. D. Stryker. 

Six rowboats — H. F. Salyards. 

Victor phonograph and records — Ed- 
win Horngren. 

Bonnie Butter Bites — National Candy 
company. 

Camp Miller will be held for one 
month next year, and the date has been 
set for July 27 to Aug. 22. Accommo- 
dations next year will be made for 100 
boys. 



BLIND PIGS 



GOING OUT 

Fewer Unlicensed Drinking 

Places in St. Louis 

County. 



of Orlando H. Baker, United States con- 
sul at Borneo. The body will be 
shipped to the Baker home at Indian- 
ola, Iowa. 



CAMINEni DEFENSE 
BEGINS TO APPEAR 



Authorities Taking Steps 

to Check Illegal Liquor 

Traffic. 



Blind pigging In a number of the 
smaller range towns and In a number 
of other rural communities in St. Louis 
county is believed to have had Its day. 

Recent prosecutions of those who 
have openly and flagrantly violated the 
liquor selling law have had a tendency 
to curb the tendency of blind pigging 
which has gone unchecked and practi- 
cally without any molestation from 
the local authorities, where the viola- 
tions occur. 

Harry Faber White, third assistant 
county attorney, has returned from the 
range, where he spent part of the week 
in consultation with local authorities 
in the various communities where blind 
pigging Is known to exist. 

At Mesaba this week. Attorney White 
appeared for the state in the prosecu- 
tion of Mike Lenovich, a boardingh juse 
keeper who was convicted of selling 
liquor without a license and fined $100 
Or ninety days in the county jail. 

Lenovlch's case is an ordinary one. 
It is claimed to be a fact that a number 
of boardinghouse keepers traffic in in- 
toxicating liquors and sell it to their 
boarders. Mr. White declares that a 
number of complaints have been Issued 
within the next few days for violations 
of this sort. 



Sir Knighis, Attention 

Funeral aerviceii for Sir Knigrbt 
Maurice Ervrin will be held by 
Dalleii Lodge, Cloquet, Monday, 
Sept. 1, at 2:30 p. m. .Duluth 
Conunandery niast provide an e«. 
cort. . Sir KnIghtH. pleafle report 
to Captain General Eminent Sir 
KniKht C. \V. Wilson. All so- 
journing Sir KnightH are invited 
to attend. JOHN COX, 

Commander. 



tCLIPSE OF THE 

8UN_SUNDAY 

But Duluthians Will Have 
to Take Trip to Green- 
land to See It. 



CHICAGO CABARET 

SHOWS ARE OVER. 

Chicago. Aug. 30. — Tango teas be- 
came a thing of the p&3t In Chicago 
with the closing of cafes last night 
and cabaret shows will be seen here no 
more. An ordinance so regulating per- 
formances that cafe managers say they 
will no longer be attractive went Into 
effect at midnight. 

The ordinance forbids singers or 
dancers from mingling with the audi- 
ence or performing on the floors of 
the cafes; forbids the wearing of 
tights and puts other restrictions on 
the clothing worn by entertainers. 

The last night of liberty in the cafes 
was celebrated as an approach to New 
Year's eve. All of the cafes presented 
their complete programs to crowded 
tables. 

The ordinance applies to summer 
gardens and parks as well as to down- 
town cafes. 



Tomorrow there will be an eclipse 
of the sun, but Duluth will not be In 
on the show; therefore there will be 
no use applying for passes from the 
management. Tne eclipse will be vis- 
ible only in Iceland, Greenland, Labra- 
dor, Newfoundland and the extreme 
eastern portions of Quebec, New 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The 
eclipse will be only partial. 

This will be the second of three 
partial eclipses scheduled for this 
year. The first was on April 6, vis- 
ible In Alaska, British Columbia, Al- 
berta, and other parts of the Ameri- 
can and Canadian Northwest. The 
third in the schedule is to occur on 
Sept. 29-30 and will be visible only In 
Madagascar and Southeastern Africa. 

An eclipse of the moon is due on 
Sept. 16 but as it will take place in 
the early hours of the morning It is 
likely that few will see it. It will be 
visible best In that strip of the United 
States occupied by such cities as 
Charleston, S. C, Chicago, Denver and 
San Francisco. 



Passive Acquiescence In- 
stead of Active Part in 
Plans Alleged. 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 30. — The 
trial of F. Drew Camlnettl has moved 
swiftly in the pathway provided for it 
by the trial Immediately preceding of 
Maury I. Diggs, convicted of the same 
charges, violation of the Federal white 
slave law. The witnesses and the evl- v 
dtnce of the government are, with few 
exceptions, the same, the testimony it 
almost the same, and, so far as can yet 
be judged, the tactics of the defense 
are the same. 

MaFBha Warrington had the stand for 
the greater part of yesterday, and her 
testimony went to show that Caminett. 
was guilty of assisting In transporting 
her and Lola Xorris from Sacramenio 
to Reno, in violation of the Mann act, 
and that he enticed them to go. The 
effort of the defense was to prove that 
Camlnettl had played a passive part. 
One passage of the cross-examination 
Is representative of Its whole trend. 
Agreed to CverytblUK. 

"At the meeting between Diggs, Ca- 
mlnettl, Miss Norris ana yourself on 
the Saturday before you left for Reno 
— the meeting at which you two girlt; 
agreed to go — Diggs did all the talking 
and Camlnettl sat by and agreed to 
everything by keeping quiet. Is that 
the way you wish to be understood?" 

"Mr. Camlnettl agreed to everything."- 

"But he agreed passively, did ht 
not?" 

Here the court interrupted 

"Is it your theory, Mr. Howe," Judgi 
Van Fleet asked, "that Camlnettl wa.s 
taken along also?" 

"Our theory Is, your honor, that Ca- 
mlnettl had nothing to do with taking 
these girls to Reno. The party went 
and he went along with It. We don't 
contend that he was abducted, but we 
hold that, because of certain circum- 
stances, that party of four found it 
necessary to leave Sacramento without 
delay and took the first train, without 
regard to its destination." 

Girl's Story Different. 

Against this contention was the tes- 
timony of Miss Warrington that Ca- 
mlnettl had furnished the money for 
the trip, and that he had given $20 of 
it to Lola Norris, out of which she 
should buy her passage. In this state- 
ment, and in her repeated affirmations 
that Camlnettl had agreed to every- 
thing Diggs had proposed, the wltnes.-? 
was not shaken. 

On the whole, the story drawn from 
her went less Into detail than when sht 
told It the first time. Counsel for the 
government was more considerate, and 
when a brief re-dlrect examination 
shall have been finished next Tuesday, 
the girl's ordeal will be over. Lola 
Norris will follow her on the stand. 
Today there is no session of court. 



The Greatest 
Profits 



riNDS TARANTULA IN 
BINCN OF BANANAS 



RECEPTION FOR 
GRAND OFFICERS 



A large 4-lnch tarantula was found 
in a bunch of bananas yesterday aft- 
ernoon by Abraham Solomon, who con- 
ducts a fruit store at 506 West Supe- 
rior street. 

Mr. Solomon saw the spider crawling 
in the bananas just as he was about 
to hang the bunch up. He finally suc- 
ceded in pushing the tarantula out on 
to the floor and killing It. 

The tarantula Is exceptionally large, 
being about four inches across Its 
body and having ten legs, each about 
two inches long. 



$82,000 ALLOUED TO 
MINNESOTA MIUTIA 



A reception will be given this aft- 
ernoon at the Hotel Lenox In honor 
of the grand officers of the I. O. O. F. 
when they arrive to attend the Cas- 
cade encampment. Later a meeting 
will be held in the temple and follow- 
ing that there will be initiatory work 
On a large class of candidates. The 
grand officers who will be here are. 
Grand Patriarch A. A. Farnsworth of 
St. Paul; Grand Senior Warden E. C. 
Johnson of Virginia, and Grand Scribe 
F. H. Castner of Minneapolis. 

This evening the grand patriarch 
win be the guest at a banquet by the 
members of Progressive Rcbckah 
lodge and it Is expected that there 
will be fully 200 present. 

• ■» 

ConMnl Dies at Sea. 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 30. — A wire- 
less message from the transport Thom- 
as brought news of the death at sea 



Duluth'Edison 
Electric Co. 

216 West First Street. 



D. H., 8-30-18. 




War Department Tells Fig- 
ures for the Various 
States. 

Washington, Aug. 30. — Announce- 
ment is made by the war department 
of amounts allotted to the various 
state militia organizations under two 
appropriations of $2,000,000 each, one 
for promotion of rifle practice and 
arms, equipments and camp purposes, 
the other for supplies and ammunition, 
The money was appropriated accord- 
ing to enlisted strength and included: 

Illinois, $181,000; Michigan, $90,000; 
Wisconsin. $86,000; Minnesota, $82,000: 
Iowa, $86,000; North and South Da- 
kota, each $26,000; Montana, $22,000. 

COOK'SllURSE ON 

MISSING VESSEL. 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 30. — ^"This 
is a 'devil ship.' I have placed upon 
her the curse of my ancestors. She 
will not float many years more." 

This was the farewell of Okhuo, the 
Japanese cook of the iron four-mast- 
ed schooner American when she 
reached this port last year and he 
was taken ashore In irons for having 
Bhot and killed Capt. Albert Benson 
during the voyage. Today the schoon- 
er Is posted as overdue seventeen 
days out from Astoria for Sydney and 
sailor folk believe she has gone to 
the bottom with her crew of ten men. 
Okhuo Is serving a five-year sentence 
In prison. 

The stos^ of the cook's curse spread 
to every port on the coast and when 
the American cleared from Astoria 
Capt. Charles Johnson was the only 
man of her company who had ever 
sailed before aboard her. 



i n real 
estate are won by in- 
vesting in cities while 
they are yet towns. 

Do not wait till the 
towns become cities. 



Swift 
Current 

practically doubled 
its population in 1912, 
and affords oppor- 
tunity for a money 
making investment 
unequalled by any 
other town in the 
whole of Western 
Canada. 



It is conservatively 
estimated that by the 
end of 1913 Swift 
Current's population 
will be close to lo,ooo 
It is the railway centre 
for a vast territory 
greater than that 
which caused the 
rapid growth of any 
one of the greatest 
cities of to-day in the 
Canadian West. 
With but one railway, 
Swift Current increas- 
ed in population 1600 
per cent, in 7 years. 
Inside of 2 years it 
will have 13 railway 
branches radiating 
from it. 



Swift Current 

IS NOW ON THE EVE OF ITS 
GREATEST DEVELOPMENT. 
NOW is the time to invest 
if you want to make money 
like investors did who 
bought in the big cities of 
to-day while they were 
towns. 

Mount Pleasant 

is the cream of sub-division 
property in Swift Current 
—^already in demand for 
high - class residential 
building purp)oses. 1 1 
adjoins the original C.P.R. 
townsite and Swift Current 
is sub-divided 2^ miles 
farther out than Mount 
Pleasant. 



Western Canada Real Estate Co. 

204-12 Keat Building, Toronto 

Without oWigation on my part, please send 
maps, literature tnd prices of lots in Mount 
Pleasant, Swift Current. 

Name 



Address 



The P. N. Peterson Granite Company Placing in Position One of the Ten-Ton Barrc Granite Rooi Stones on the 
Henry Turrish Mausoleum m tbfi Calvary Cemetery, Dulutl^ 



RUNAWAY FATAL 

T O IOWA BANKER. 

Iowa City, Iowa, Aug. 30. — Anthony 
J. Goetz, a prominent capitalist, who 
was fatally hurt In a runaway Thurs- 
day night, Is dead at the University 
hospital. Goetz was president of the 
Hoimmer Mercantile company and pres- 
ident of several Iowa banks. 



(Duluth Herald.) 



Western Canada 
Real Estate Co, 

Head Office : 204-12 Kent Bldg. 
TORONTO 

Montreal, Que. Ottawa Hamilton 

St. Thomas Sault St. Marie Haileybury 
Kingston, Ont. Lindsay North Bay 

FortWilHam Halifax, N.S. St. John.N.B. 
Charlottetcwn, P.E.I. Detroit. Mich. 

London. Eng. — 
6-7 Trafalgar fildfs., Trafalgar Square 

E. A. NEIL. Mana^r. 

A, J. PETERSOX, City Sales 
Managrer. 

Room 606 Alworth Building. 
Phone, Melrose 6600. 



erected In connection with the county 
exhibition — were the scene of the 
flames. The loss was 1100,000. 



YUAN SHI KAI NEAR 
DEATH FROM POISON 



TEACHER'S BODY 

FOUND IN RIVER. 

St. Liouls, Mo., Augr- 30. — The body of 
Miss Mary O'Brien, principal of a St. 
Louis public school, was found float- 
ing In the Mississippi river yesterday. 
Relatives believe that In a despondent 
moment she jumped Into the river. Miss 
O'Brien had been mlsslnsr since Wed- 
nesday. She quit teaching last spring 
as a result of a nervous breakdown, 
due to grief over the death of her 
father. 



Mlehlsan Nary OITIcer Dead. 

Washington. Aug. 30. — Lieut, (junior 
grade) Owen St Aubln Botsford, U. S. 
N., died In the Shanghai (China) Gen- 
eral hospital Thursday, according to 
a dispatch received at the navy de- 
partment. Lieut. Bot.sford was at- 
tached to the cruiser Saratoga. He 
was 28 years old, a native of Farm- 
Ington, Mich., and graduated from the 
Naval academy In 1908. 



-^i— u 



Firebug Bnma Fire Bnlldlnipi. 

Lfondon, Ont. Aug. 30. — A firebug 
levelled with his torch within an hour 
yesterday five of the Western Fair 
buildings. The cement building, ma- 
chinery hall, main stable, dining hall 
and transportatlfio building -- all the crest, ot « w&ve, and sa^^k. 



Tokio Writer Says Attempt 
Led to Massing of . 
Troops. 

London, Aug. 30. — In a dispatch 
dialing with the effect of the Chinese 
rebellion on Japanese interf.sts, the 
Dally Telegraph's Toklo correspond- 
ent makes the revelation that the rea- 
son President Yuan Shi Kal precipi- 
tately massed the northern troops on 
the Yang Tse river and prepared for 
war, was because he wus poisoned by 
arsenic In the month of May by 
southern agents. 

The correspondent states that only 
the most violent medical methods 
taved Yuan Shi Kal's life. 



TAKE 600 INSANE 

PEO PLE T O CIRCUS. 

Peoria, 111., Aug. SO. — Supt. Qeorgl 
A. Zeller and twenty-five woniau at- 
tendants from the state ho.'spltal for 
the insane at Bartonvlllc, took 652 
Insane patients to the circus In Peoria 
yesterday. They arrived from Barton- 
vllle In a special train and were 
marched by twos through a crowd ot 
15,000 people without any disorder. 
Th«, 600 Insane were treated to pea- 
nuts, pop corn and lemonade. 



Priest Drovrna In I<ake Erie. 

Dunkirk, N. Y., Aug. SJ. — Rev. 
Father Christopher Schlesl, aged 66, 
one of the oldest missionary priests 
In the Congregation of Passionlsts, 
was drowned In Lake Erie, near hero 
yesterday. While bathing with 
Father Oswin, he was carried out on 



A 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTIf HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 



PANTALO ONS HAVE R ETURNED 

Chaste Garment Used by Stately Dames of Civil War 
Times, Revived to Cover Shortcomings 
of the Shameless Slit Skirt. 



'V' 








¥f.-.-' 



/ 



>i" w,4/^ 




HOW IT IS. 

The stately dames of the Civil war 
days would turn over In their graves 
If they only knew what the young 
women of today are doing with one 
of their favorite articles of dress, the 
pantaloon. 

In the days of the hoop-skirt the 
erentit women of the country wore flow- 
ing pantaloons, gathered at the ankles 
so they would stay down when the bell 
shaped dresses billowed with the 
lireeze. 

Now the girls who wear the tight 
fitting dresses, abhorred by the wom- 
en of the early days, have adopted the 
pantaloon as part of the much criti- 
cized dress of today. And this is the 
rea-'on: With the tight skirt the 
youi'.g women are restrained In their 
stride and oh boarding a street car, 
or going up other steps, there is not 
room enough to take the long stride 
unless the skirt slides up toward the 
knee. That being the case varying 
lengths of the person of the young 
woman getting on the car are exposed 
to the weather. 

Some sagacious dress architect has 
discovered that the pantaloon of the 
early days is Just the thing to over- 
come this disadvantage. Now the girls 
wear them and they are protected 



^ — ar 

HOW IT USED TO BE. 




HOW IT IS GOING TO BE. 



from e.\posure apd the young men are 
protected from the hot blushes that 
they have e.xperienced when boarding 
a car behind some fair young fashion 
model. 



DIAPHANOUS GARMENTS 

ARE APPROV ED BY CITY 

They Are Healthful Says Health Inspector But Are In- 
tended for Babies Only. 



Diaphanous garments are recom- 
mended by the health department. 

But they're not the •"X-ray" variety 
which have caused such a stir in many 
cities. 

The health department would have 
flimsy, gauzy material worn by male 
and female alik*^, but not when the 
wearing could cause gasps of shocked 
mod* sty and draw the rude stares of 
the masculine gender. 

The health department would have 
humanity thus decorated when it Is im- 

Kossible for anything of that kind to 
appen. To elucidate, the department 
makt^s Its recommendation in a circu- 
lar which is being sent out to mothers 



treating with the proper care of In- 
fants. One paragraph is devoted to 
properly clothing babies, particularly 
during the hot months, to the end that 
they may be made as comfortable as 
possible. Muslin is suggested as an 
excellent material. 

The mailing list is obtained from the 
birth reports which are filed each day 
at the office of the department. In 
addition to clothing, the circular covers 
a wide field of information which it *8 
considered essential that mothers 
should know. Among the subjects are 
Included bathing, fresli air, sleep, pro- 
per feeding, Infant complaints and the 
dangers of drugs and flies. 



Superior 



other members of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution took turns 
ii driving the stake, which was 
placed at a corner of the St. Louis 
courthouse square. 



Visit Steel Plant. 

A large delegation of Superior busi- 
ness and professional men left at 1 
o'clock this afternoon on the steamer 
Columbia on a trip of inspection of 
the Minnesota Steel company's plant. 
The excursion is being given under 
the auspices of the Superior Rotary 
club. 



SMUGGLING PLOT 
IN CUSTOMS SERVICE 



Three Divorces. 

Three divorces were granted by 
Judge Ross of the circuit court yes- 
ttrtlay. They were to Zelma M. Mil- 
ler against John G. Miller, on the 
gixunds of desertion and non-support; 
Charlfs L. Carlin agaitist Jennie Car- 
lin, desertion; and Margaret Rico 
from Ralph Rice, for desertion and 
cruel and inhuman treatment. 
-^^ 

Extra Vacation. 

Children of the Carpenter school 
district will probably not have to go 
to school until Sept. 22. The regular 
school term will open on Sept. 8, but 
the building operations at this school 
are in such condition that it is prob- 
able that the building will not be In 
ahupe to receive the children until 
two weeks later. 



To Protect Wells. 

An ordinance to prevent the water- 
ing of animals within fifty feet of a 
public well is being considered by the 
Sui erlor health department. It is al- 
leged that water has become con- 
taminated from this practice. The 
oroinance also will make it a misde- 
meanor to allow horses or other anl- 
mal.s to stand within fifty feet of an 
open well. 



HEADED FOR 



THE STATE FAIR 



Twin City Trains Are 

Crowded With Duluth 

Citizens. 

Trains from Duluth to the Twin 
Cities today were crowded with Du- 
luthiana on their way to see the big 
Minnesota State fair, to be held in 
Hamllne all next week. 

The reser^-ations for seats in the 
chair cars on the Northern Pacific 
railroad were all gone yesterday and 
th© other roads report the same kind 
<A "i«nd office" business. 

The Duluth people at the state fair 
BUmler several thousand each yeaf 
and this year will be no exception, ac- 
cording to opinions of passenger 
agents today. St. Louis county is well 
represented in exhibits and the people 
from this part of the state are pa- 
tiiotlc enough to go and see their own 
))rpducts If not the big pumpkins of 
otS^er localities. 

DRIVES STAKE TO 

M ARK O LD TRAIL 

JSt. Louis, Mo., Aug. 80. — Mrs. John 
K Booth, chairman 5f the Old Trails 
fcOnunittee of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, today drove the 
first stake th&t Is to mark the old 
i^i^ Xiom fik I^uiii la &aiusa« City, 



Eleven Men Dismissed at 
San Francisco — War- 
rants for Nine. 

San Francisco. Cal.. Aug. 30. — One 
customs inspector and ten customs 
guards on duty along the water front 
were dismissed from the government 
service today, and warrants for nine 
of them were sworn out, charging con- 
spiracy to smuggle opium. 

IRONW OOD N OTES. 

Ironwood, Mich., Aug. 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
King returned home this week from a 
two weeks' visit with friends and rel- 
atives at Ishpemlng, Mich., and Na- 
tional mine. 

Miss Maude Kemp spent Sunday 
visiting Bessember friends. 

Miss May Treloare left today for Su- 
perior, Wis., and Duluth, Minn., where 
she will visit friends for a few days. 

Miss Inez Rowe returned home this 
week from Norway. Mich., where she 
spent her vacation visiting relatives 
and friends. 

Miss Ruby Treloare returned this 
week from an extrinded visit with 
friends at Ashland. 

Mrs. J. W. Morse and daughter, Clara, 
of Bessemer, spent Friday with Iron- 
wood friends. 

R. A. Douglas, editor of the Tronwood 
News-Record, is on the Mesaba range 
attending the Mining Institute. 

REMOVING STAINS. 

Baltimore American: Ink stains — 
Soak in sour milk. If a dark stain re- 
mains, rinse in a weak solution of 
chloride of lime. 

Blood stains — Soak in cold salt wa- 
ter, then wash in warm water with 
plenty of soap; afterward boll. 

Grass stains — Saturate the spot thor- 
oughly with kerosene, then put In the 
wash tub. 

Iodine stains — Wash with alcohol, 
then rinse in soapy water. 

Hot tea and coffee stains — Soak the 
stained fabric in cold water, wring. 
spread out and pour a few drops of 
glycerine on each spot. Let it stand 
several hours, then wash with cold wa- 
ter and soap. 

Iron rust — Soak the stain thoroughly 
with lemon Juice, sprinkle with salt 
and bleach for several hours in the 
sun. 

Grease spots — Hot water and soap 
generally remove them. If flxeJ by 
long standing, use either chloroform 
or naphtha. All three of these must 
be used away from either fire or ar- 
tificial light. 

Pitch, wheel grease, tar stiJns— Soft- 
en the stains with lard, then soak in 
turpentine. Scrape off carefully with 
a knife all the loose surfai^e dirt; 
sponf7e clean with turpentine and rub 
gently until dry. 

Mildew — .Soak In a weak solution 
of chloride of lime for several hours. 
Rinse in cold water. 

Sowing machine oil stains — Rub with 
lard. Let stand for several hours, then 
wash with cold water and soap. 

Scorch stains — Wet the scorched 
place, rub with soap and bleach In 
the sua. 




GERMANY LIKELY TO BE A FACTOR 

IN DECIDING THE 1916 OLYMPIAD 



"Beware of Germany," Is the warn- 
ing which is being sent to this coun- 
try by every one who has made a 
close and intellectual study of the 
systematic way the kaiser's athletic 
officials are going about the business 
of getting together a team which will 
properly represent their country in 
the sixth Olympiad, which Is to be 
staged in Berlin In July, 1916. 

Most persons do not realize the ex- 
tent to which Germany is planning to 
break up American monopoly of 
Olympic championstiips. A little un- 
written history will probably illus- 
trate this. In 1908, the year the 
games were held in London, the In- 
ternational Olympic council offered 
Germany the games in 1912. The Ger- 
mans refused, after a careful study of 
the local situation, to take them. For 

several years previously their athletic 
officials had been planning to enter- 
tain tlie athletes in 1912. To that end 
they had secured a place for the lo- 
cation of the stadium and could have 
liad it ready for 1912' had they not de- 
cided after a careful canvass that In- 
terest in track and field athletics 
throughout the empire had not been 
sufficiently aroused to enable Ger- 
many to do herself Justice. For that 
reason Germany allowed the games to 
go to Stockholm. 

But 'n the meantime Germany went 
vigorously to work to prepare a team 
which would make a much better 
showing at Stockholm than its prede- 
cessors had done at London in 1905. 
On the foundation then laid Germany 
has been building ever since, and now 
has an athletic system whicli its spon- 
sors feel will make Germany not 
ashamed to be compared to the United 
States hereafter. 

FollowluK Yanke« S^stein. 
Germany makes no secret of the fact 
that the ideal system for the develop- 
ment of athletic teams is that fol- 
lowed in the United States. To that 
end Germany has been adopting Amer- 
ican methods wherever possible since 
1908, and has even utilized the coach- 
ing of several American athletes Hv- 
ng in Germany, notably James Light- 
body, formerly of Chicago university 
and a three times Olympic champion 
in 1904. Lightbody was very keen to 
be made the German Olympic coach to 
fill a position created much like that 
of Ernest HJertberg In Sweden. 

The German authorities apparently 
had other ideas, not being ready at 
that time to engage a coach. Before 
committing themselves they decided to 
send a commission to the United States 
to make a most exhaustive study of 
the athletic system in force at all of 
our large universities and athletic 
clubs. That commission sailed last 
week and will at once begin the study 
of how America does it. 

In addition to Its investigation the 
German committee expects to take 
back with It the signed contract of 
some American to coach German ath- 
letes. When the commission left Ber- 
lin it was cabled to this country that 
they had decided to offer the position 
to Alvtn C. Kraenzlein, the former Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania and world 
champion hurdler. Kraenzlein visited 
Germany last winter shortly after he 
had resigned as coach of the University 
of Michigan, a position he gave up on 
account of his wife's illness. Kraenz- 
lein returned to this country without 
getting the position, and apparently 
without much encouragement. This, 
however, may have been due to the 
fact that the Germans were not then 
ready to engage a coach and wanted 
to look over the list of available can- 
didates flrst. 

An Ideal Man for Job. 
There is no doubt that Kraenzlein 
would make an Ideal man for the posi- 
tion. He is a German by birth and 
speaks the language fluently. Like- 
wise he has been in Germany several 
times and is well acquainted with con- 
ditions there. In this country he was 
trained and developed by Michael C. 
Murphy, the most famous of all ath- 
letic coaches. Since his graduation 
from Pennsylvania he has coached at 
Mercersburg academy, the Universities 
of Wisconsin and Michigan. Thus he 
not only knows the Murphy system 
perfectly, but has gained much experi- 
ence on his own account. He is 
probably better fitted for the position 
than HJertberg was to coach Sweden. 

While here the German commission 
Intends to study exhaustively how we 
develop athletes. They will begin their 
work by an examination of our public 
school athletic system, where they will 
study how we first interest the boys in 
outdoor sport, encourage them to prop- 
erly develop their bodies, and then 
when they are old and strong enough 
supply them with competitive athletics. 
Although some persons do not realize 
it, this part of our system is fully as 
important as the expert coaching and 
encouragement given to athletics in 
our colleges, universities and athletic 
clubs. 

In other words, the Germans Intend 
to follow our development of the ath- 
lete through his entire career. Every 
bit of Information they can obtain wUl 
be taken back and used by them. The 
United States has always done every- 
thing in its power to encourage its 
rivals. America has no secret process 
and will help the Germans Just as it 
has helped Sweden, France and Finland 
in the past. 

As near as can be learned the Ger- 
man commission Intends to make the 
German nation realize that its national 
honor demands a good showing in the 
1916 meet. To that end all of the pub- 
lic schools and colleges throughout the 
empire will be encouraged to foster 
athletics, in addition to their present 
gymnastic work. In the hope that 
champions will thus be discovered. 
Similar encouragement will be given 
for the organization of athletic clubs 
throughout the country. 

Can't Be Everjvrbere. 
It will be obviously impossible for 
one coach to personally supervise ath- 
letics throughout the entire nation. He 
will probably have his headquarters in 
Berlin, and then will act as an expert 
adviser for athletes everywhere, help- 
ing to organize clubs and paying them 
visits from time to time. 

Germany retains from her 1912 team 
a very good nucleus. This Includes 
Braun, who was second to Reidpath In 
the 400-meter run In Stockholm, and 
who made 49 seconds in the quarter 
mile and 1 minute and 54 seconds In 
the half mile. Mike Murphy considered 
him one of the most wonderful mid- 
dle-distance runners he had ever seen. 
After the 800-meter run he remarked 
to the writer that Braun had a better 
sprint than any of his American rivals, 
and had he possessed more racing 
sense would have stood an even 
chance to win both the 400 and 800- 
meter runs. Braun announced after 
the Stockholm games that he would 
give up athletics, but he has recon- 
sidered and win probably run as long 
as he Is able. 

Another high-class German athlete 
Is Lische, who was second to Richards 
In the running high Jump at Stock- 
holm. Lische was, in fact, the surprise 
of the event, for prior to the meet In 
question few persons had ever heard of 
him. He Jdmped 6 feet 3 Inches at 
Stockholm, Just 1 Inch less than Rich- 
ards. He had such magnificent form, 
and was so strong and lithe that he 
attracted universal admiration. Mike 
Murphy declared that with proper 
coaching he would make a world 
beater. 

Two other men who are always sure 
to be point winners are Passemann, the 
pole vaulter and broad Jumper, and 
jlau. the •printer. Passemana was not 



In his usual good condition last year, [ running broad Jump. Rau was Ger- 
but he has done better than VI feet many's champion sprinter, but he 
for the pole vault and 23 feet for the failed to come through at Stockholm. 



MODERN BASEBALL IS A 

WELL ORGANIZED SPORT 



extra events shall not count in the 
team score. 

Deflultlou of Amatenra. 

Another point which everybody 
j he pes will be cleared up is n uniform 
definition for an amateur. ,Every 
teem which competed at Stockholm j 
last year contained men who, accord- I 
Ing to the definition of an amateur in ; 
track and field athletics, was an out i 
and out professional. This wa« par- 
ticularly true in the shooting events, i 
Some persons do not think it fair that 
there should be one definition of an j 
amateur for track sports, another for ' 
tennis and quite another for revolver | 
and trap shooting. If the commission I 
ad:*usts all the Inconsistencies placed 1 
before it it will have achieved a won- | 
drrful success. 

Whatever the convention accom- 
pllbbes will be due largely to the 
United States. This country has been j 
Insisting for a long time upon the 
necessity of such action. The inter- 
national council has not acted on 
these suggestions, but has let it be 
known that the present conference 
has its approval and If its findings are 
approved they wlU probably be made 
part of the Olympic code. 



New York. Aug. 30. — Organized base- 
ball is admirably fortified against pos- 
sible opposition, in the big leagues 
especially is this true. The best terri- 
tory is already represented in both 
major leagues, and being firmly estab- 
lished could put Up a long game at 
"cut-throat" with any aspiring outlaw 
enterprise. The major leagues have 
very wisely utilized the vast earnings 
of the ten years' peace by laying 
h-inds upon the centralized locations 
where park sites might be desired and 
by building magnificent steel and con- 
crete stands, with all attendant con- 
vtniences, where the populace has been 
educated to the very highest stand- 
aids that obtain in baseball. 

Because of the fact that baseball has 
outlived its infant days of wood, writes 
W. J. McBeth, baseball is safeguarded 
ttnfold over say even five years ago. 
E' ery American league club save New 
York boasts the most modern type of 
plant, and President Farrell's build- 
ing operations are under way. The 
majority of National league clubs are 
fortified in the same manner and those 
that are not will be within a year or 
two. When this is accomplished there 
will have been raised against possible 
opposition of a third major league 
something like |25,000,000 in real es- 
tate and fixtures alone. 

Presuming, however, that capital 
would be willing to risk such a con- 
siderable outlay On mere speculation 
that in itself would go a very short 
way toward assuring success to any 
ri^ al enterprise^ The greatest safe- 
guard to the peace and prosperity of 
organized baseball at present insti- 
tuted Is the dearth of first-class play- 
ing material. The club presidents of 
the various big leagues expend annual- 
ly millions of dollars in still-hunting 
for talent and in gambling upon the 
minor league prospects unearthed by 
the sleuths. 

One does not have to look further 
than the home -doorstep for an illustra- 
tion of the famine throughout the 
sticks. No one' In baseball pursues a 
more liberal policy than Frank J. Far- 
rell, president of the tall-end New 
York Americans. He has spent thou- 
sands upon thousands of dollars during 
the past five years, but his team is 
right where It was when Griffith 
threw up his hands In 1908. It will 
take Frank Chance a year or two to 
build up a club capable of making a 
favorable showing, and then he may 
count himself lucky. There is no sen- 
timent in baseball. 

The only way for major league 
clubs to get players nowadays is to 
go out and dig them from minor 
league obscurity, develop them and 
plant them where they may be called 
upon in time of need. A ball club is 
no stronger than Its reserve strength. 
Connie Mack was possibly the first 
manag-er to realise the full Importance 
of the "farm." He has bright pros- 
pects planted from coast to coast. He 
calls upon the Jewels as they are 



FOOTBALL MEN 

ARE REPORTING 



Gridiron Warriors Are Get- 
ting Into Shape for 
1913 Season. 

Football men all over the country 
now are reported as doing hard labor 
to fit themselves for the coming sea- 
son. Some of the Michigan players 
are pulling the same stuff, but the wise 
ones are simply trying to show up at 
Ferry field, Sept. 15, in good shape as 
to wind, but overweight. 

The Yost training system is a des- 
perately hard one. If the men report 
on edge, they will crack before the first 
game with Case, Oct. 4. The trainers 
job at Michigan is hardly second to 
that of the coach. Steve Farrell must 
battle all season to keep the team from 
going stale. 

Last year, under Yost's whip, the 
team did go stale. When pressure was 
highest, the eleven worked from early 
afternoon till after dark, outdoors, laid 
off a little while and went to it again 
inside. The increasing complication of 
the game made this necessary, as Yost 
saw it. But Farrell had not worked 
with Yost long enough to be aware of 
how much toning down the players 
needed and In the Penn game, between 
halves, the overworked machine broke 
down and the Quakers won. 

Between the Penn and Cornell games, 
several of the stars transgressed rules 
and broke training. It did them good, 
as the play and the score of the battle 
w^th the "Big Red" eleven shows. This 
year, in all probability, Farrell will 
have worked out some system of keep- 
ing the men In shape. 

Fitzpatrlck was the pastmaster of 
conditioning Yost elevens. He .eent his 
men into every game overweight. They 
started a trifle dull, but in the last half 
were there with the punch. How many 
games were won In the final session 
under the rule of Fitzpatrlck, all fol- 
lowers of Michigan's fortunes remem- 
ber. Kraenzlein. too. was successful 
in keeping the teams toned down. He 
worked on a trlflle different system 
than "Fitz," working each week>.as a 
separate problem instead of following 
a season plan. But he kept them In 
shape. 

But to keep a team In condition, at 
Michigan, the traln-er must battle Yost. 
The coach does not pretend to condi- 
tion. He teaches football after a 
strenuous fashion, and it Is up to the 
trainer to see that the men are in 
shape to use what he teaches them. 



COBB PUSHING 

JACKSON HARD 



Close to Top of Batting 

List— Major League 

Averages. 

Chicago, Aug. 30. — One little point is 
all that keeps Ty Cobb from being the 
leading batsman of the American 
league. His averaape is .390, according 
to the week's tlnofnolal figures and Joe 
Jackson's is .891. The Detroit man has 
made 124 hits in 318 times at bat and 
the Cleveland slugger's record is 164 
hits in 419 times at bat. Cobb has 
steadily gained on his rival In the last 
three weeks. 

"Three hundred hitters' In the Ameri- 
can league, besides Cobb and Jackson, 
are: Speaker, Boston, .370; Henrlksen, 
Boston, .351; j:.aJole, Cleveland, .356; 
CoUins, Ptilladelpbia, .849; Mclonia, 



needed. By getting the Jump on rivals 
it stands to reason that the crafty 
Connie hat, built up the most wonder- 
tul reserve force that can well be 
imagined. Connie stands conspicuous- 
ly as an example that "to him that 
nath shall be given." 

Shy on Charity. 

Yet in his business relations with 
his associates Mack is cold as ice. He 
pursues the well known policy of 
clinging tenaciously to everything of 
value in his pos.session. Never for an 
Instant would he entertain the Idea of 
sparing some of his surplus strength 
to help out the weak members of the 
league. Idling on Connie's bench are 
a bunch of reserves that would add 
strength to most any of the American 
league second-division clubs. Phila- 
delphia would be foolish to part with 
any of them, for Its financial success 
depends directly upon the ability of 
the White Elephants to beat out all 
opposition. Strengthening an enemy 
is not one of warfare's approved eth- 
los. Peckinbaugii of the Higlilanderc 
is an example. 

Cleveland tried every way to keep 
this fellow from Chance. The Naps 
couldn't use him just now but they 
wished to plant him in Toledo where 
he might be called upon later If 
needed. 

As a result of the scarcity of the 
Cobbs, Speakers, Johnsons, Mathew- 
sons and Archers, those clubs who 
have been favored with the best tal- 
ent are habitually rapping at the door 
if not enjoying the upper stories of 
the great amusement structure. By 
the same token it must be confessed 
that both major league clubs are but 
ill balanced. The weaker teams do 
not begin to class with the leaders 
and usually the race is over by mid- 
season. In the good old league days 
Ban Johnson, in his war on the Na- 
tional circuit, grabbed all the best 
talent of his rivals and so evenly dis- 
tributed it throughout his eignt-club 
circuit that most every entrant had a 
fair chance when the curtain rung up 
each spring. 

Limit Is Too High. 

Something should be done to give 
the weak teams of the two major 
league clubs a better chance with 
the strong. It seems that a great 
deal of the best talent is going to seed 
with the first-division clubs. Organ- 
ized baseball has been rather too lax 
in the application of a roster limit. 
From May 15 to Aug. 20 major league 
clubs are allowed to carry 25 players 
and at other times of the year 85 
players. Thes numbers appear alto- 
gether too liberal. It might be a good 
plan to get back to old conditions 
when 18 players was considered a 
wealth of luxury for any club. 

There Is no way to supply the de- 
mand under the present extravagant 
policies. By limiting the rosters the 
field will also be limited and the 
really high-class players more evenly 
distributed. 



Philadelphia, .336; Baber, Philadelphia, 
.333; Gandil, Washington. .328; Scaefer, 
Washington, .318; Dan Murphy, Phila- 
delphia. .315; Strunk, Philadelphia, .313; 
E. Murphy, Philadelphia, .307; Craw- 
ford, Detroit, .303; Bauman, Detroit, 
.303; Shotten. St. Louis, .302. 

Jake Daubert of Brooklyn, is the 
real leader among the batters of the 
National league, with ,359, though 
Pitcher Yingling of the same club is 
ahead with an average of .385 for 
twenty-nine game*. 

Other National leaguers wTio are bat- 
ting better than .300 are: Walsh, 
Philadelphia. .357; O. McDonald, Bos- 
ton, .355; Cravath, Philadelphia, .352; 
Hyatt, Pittsburg, .348; R. Miller, Phila- 
delphia, .342; Vlox, Pittsburg, .330; Zim- 
merman, Chicago, .328; Hess, Boston, 
.317; Gibson. Pittsburg, .314; Tinker, 
Cincinlati, .311; Becker, Philadelphia, 
.311; Sherwood Magee, Philadelphia, 
.309; Wagner, Pittsburg. .309; Myers, 
New York, .304; Shafer, New York, 
.302; Wheat, Brooklyn, .301; Fletcher, 
New York, .301; Huggins, St. Louis, 
.SOI. 

Walter Johnson leads American 
league pitchers in percentage of games 
won and lost and Demaree and Hum- 
phries are on top in the National. The 
first five in the American are: 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Johnson, Wash 29 5 .855 

Houck, Phil 11 4 .733 

Boehling, Wash 13 5 .722 

Bender, Phil. 18 1 .720 

Wood Boston 12 B .708 

In the National: 

Demaree, N. Y 12 3 .800 

Humphries. Chi. 12' 3 .800 

Mathewson, N. Y 22 7 .759 

McQuillan, Pitts 6 2 .740 

Alexander, Phil 18 7 .720 



ELGIN RAGE IS 

REAL THRHIER 



Drivers Are Closely Bunched 

and Records Are Being 

Broken. 

Elgin, IlL, Aug. 30. — The automobile 
race for the Elgin trophy today, with ! 
100 miles, or a third of the distance ! 
completed, developed one of the clos- 
est and fastest road contests ever run 
in this country. The leaders were 
making seventy-two miles an hour 
and frequently better, with Anderson 
in a Stutz leading. Twelve cars started 
and at the 100th mile, only sixteen ' 
minutes separated the leader from i 
Grant, the rear man. I 

Haupt, Burman and Bergdoll were j 
only seconds apart and third place was 
always shifting. "That the previous 
track record of 68.4 miles an hour 
would fall, w^as regarded as a cer- 
tainty. The crowd brought out by the 
attraction was estimated at 50,000. 



ARMY WINS 

SERVICE HATCH 



Camp Perry, Ohio, Aug. 30. — ^By mak- 
Ing a fine spurt In the skirmish stage, 
the last of the event, the United States 
army team, led by Capt. R. H. Allen, 
today won the United Service match. 
The final score of the winning team 
was 4,414. The United States marine 
corps was second with 4,409, the 
United States navy third with 4,358, 
and the national guard fourth with 
4.269. 



SANCTIONS FOOTBALL GAME. 



TO STRENGTHEN 

AMATEIR RILES 



Conference Called at Ber- 
lin to Gain More Uniform 
Standing of Amateurs. 



Philadelphia, Aug. 80. — The con- 
ference called for Berlin to suggest 
a standard set of Olympic events, 
standard rules of eligibility, the defi- 
nition of an amateur, and to straighten 
out otheV inconsistencies which have 
been brought to light by previous 
Oljmpic meets promises to settle all 
of these matters. The confc?ronce will 

b;> attended by delegates from all the 
leading countries which uavo partici- 
pated In these games. 

What the American delegates are 
most anxious about la an agreement 
upon a standard set of events so that 
they may know years ahead Just what 
the Olympic program will be. Tiiey 
likewise want to provide for a set »f 
team trophies, particularly one for the 
track and field events. It has been a 
source of annoyance to this country 
tliat the nation holding the games 
should be permitted to add to the pro- 
gram a lot of events in which visit- 
ing teams could not compete, and 
with the aid of points scored in them 
to claim the International champion- 
ship, although badly outscored in the 
track and field events which make 
up the real Olympic program. At Lon- 
don In 1908 and at Stockholm in 1912 
the United States easily won the 
standard Olympic events, but on ac- 
count of the points won by the two 
countries mentioned at their respec- 
tive meets before the arrival and after 
the departure of the American team 
the Americans could not claim the 
championship. What the Americans 
want is a provision by T^hioh Uiase 



Secretary Daniels indorses Army- 
Navy Game Schedule. 

\ Washington, Aug. 30. — Secretary 
Daniels expressed himself as heartily 
in favor of the Army-Navy football 

game being played this year as usual. 
He added that while he had called a 
conference on the subject he did not 
intend to dictate. He declined to give 
any opinion as to where he thought 
the game should be played. 

A IVib tHER F IRST. 

Wife Can Also Be a Wage-Earner, 
Says Elsie Baird. 

Zoe H. Beckley In the New York 

Mail: A famous woman poet (I forget 

if it was Mrs. Hemans or one of her 

contemporaries), said her greatest 

themes came while she was washing 
dishes in the kitchen sink. 

Not to be outdone by her, a cer- 
tain busy young woman of my ac- 
quaintance has sifted some golden 
nuggets of philosophy from the dust of 
that shadowy region "behind the 
scenes" while she rocked her baby 
and darned stockings In her dressing 
room. 

The phllosopheresB' name Is Elsie 
Baird, who. after 2 o'clock In the aft- 
ernoon and 8 o'clock at night, is "Mlr- 
za, the Queen of the Gypsies," In the 
newly added spectacle at the Hippo- 
drome. 

Five Nnsarets of Phlloaophy. 

Here are her philosophical nuggets, 
done into five sentences: 

"After you become indifferent to 
success, you win It. 

"First make sure of your real voca- 
tion. Then amuse yourself with an avo- 
cation. 

"Every woman should have a pay- 
ing profession and keep It simmering 
like a soup pot on the back of a stove. 

"Happy home life depends largely on 
this 'soup pot' of personal Independ- 
ence. 

"The modern woman haa solved the 
problem of being first a wife and 
mother and secondly a living earner." 

You see by the picture that her 
philosophy has had a cheerful ef- 
fect. 

When you see the Gypsy Queen prob- 
ably you would not get the impres- 
sion that she Is domestically inclined. 
But when she steps out of her gay 
Bilk frock, takes off her hoop earrings 
and, her gaudy beads and crosses her 
own threshold she becomes as she say."? 
"Just a plain housewife and the moth- 
er of a husky young son." 

"There is nothing," she adds, "like 
housemother duties on top of a hard ; 
day's work to make you a philosopher. I 
Success Is Capricious. 

"Take Jewel of Thought No. 1, for 
Instance. I wanted to retire from the 
stage and be a plain home person. I 
didn't give a pin for anything else. 
Then along came fate and handed me 
out a little slice of success that 1 
would have given my eye teeth for 
once on a time. Isn't that always the 
way? Be Indifferent to a thing and 
you'll win It. Bend every effort to get 
It and you'll be more apt to overbal- 
ance yourself and fall flat than suc- 
ceed in your ambition. 

•'Every woman's real work In life," 
went on Elsie Baird, footllght philoso- 
pher, "Is home making, suffragettes 
to the contrary notwithstanding. It is 
planted in every woman's heart. And 
It is every man's ambition for woman. 

"The trouble is that women should 
not stop at homekeeplng. They should 
make that their vocation, and still 
have a separate line of work — bread- 
winning work. It is perfectly possible 
Handy, L.ike th« Soup Stock. 

"It is like the soup stock pot, a 
mighty good thing to have on hand. 
"There would be mora happy homes and 
contented women If every wife had 
some raying profession outside her 
wifehood! Motherhood is my vocation." 
she finished, "and the stage is my 
avocation." 

Certainly Miss Baird has a lot of 
truth on her side. Abdul Hamld, poor 
old soul, does not agree with her. He 
thinks "the Western woman has too 
many 41bertles to remain womanly," 
and that she who ventures out of her 
home Is "lost.' 

Ida Tarbell, on the other hand, says 
In her newest book: "The business of 
being a woman Is not Incompatible 
with the free and Joyous development 
of one's talents." 

Personally, I believe the modem 
woman Is fast solving the problem of 
being first a wife and mother, and 
second, an Independent creature and 
I living earner either inside or outside 
her home. Elsie Baird and many oth- 
ers like her prove it. 

* 

Five thousand copies of the Bible 

I have been placed In the guest rooms of 

the hotels of Washington, D. C. 

through the efforts of the Gideons, or 

Christian Commercial Travelers ol 

I America. 



WHERE 



DULUTH 

HERALD 

ISDN 

SALE 



New YortK City. 

Imperial HoteL 

Hotaline Bros.. Timoa 84 

Astor House. 

Hoffman House. 

Park Ave. HoteL 

Philadelphia. 

Ryan Ticket Office, 
The Quaker News Co. 



Buffalo, H. T. 

Iroquois Hotel. 
Oeneseee Hotel. 
F. CaplUo, street stand. 

Newark. W. A 
Mstsky Bros. 

1^'asklasrton, D. <X 

Columbia News Co. 

PlttabnrR. Pa. 

Ft Pitt News Co. 

Toronta. Out. 

Klnff Edward Hotel. 

Detroit, Mick. 

Metropolitan News Co. 
Wayne Hotel. 
Hotel Ponchartraln. 
HoUl Cadillac. 

Clevclaad, O. 

Hotel HoUenden. 

Superior Arcade News Stand. 

Louliivllle, Ky. 

Edw. Herverln, street stand. 



i! 






Mt. Clei 

Llchtlg Co. 



eaa, Mick. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 

Frank Mulkern. 
Hotel Pfister. 
Ztotel Planklnton. 

ChleaKO, IIL 

Sherman Hotel. 

Congress Hotel. 

Blackstone Hotel. 

Great Northern Hotel. 

La Salle Hotel. 

Palmer House. 

Empire News Co., street etand. 

Kansas CMr, Mo. 

Tofx^a Newa Co. 

Denver, C'oL 

S. Wldon News Stand. 
Broadway News Co. 
Brown-Palace HoteL 

Hot Bprlnsa, Ark. 

Park Hotel. 
Ft. Pitt News, Co. 
Eastman Hotel. 
Arlington Hotel. 

MlBueapells, Mima. 

Radlaaon Hotel. 
West Hotel. 

J. Kavanaugh. 
^orld News Co. 
Century News Co. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Merchants Hotel. 
St. Paul Hotel. 
Hotel Ryaa 
St. Marie News Co. 



Crookston* 

N. H. Teo. 
Hotel Crookston. 



Grand Porks, H. Db 

W. W. Fegan. 
J. H. Burke. 

MInot. If. D. 

Manson Bros. 

fcTlla Lake. W. D. 
Northern RoteL 

Favtro, W. D. 

Relneke A McKone. 
Gardner HoteL 

Blsmarek. If. D. 
O. A. SelviiT- 

Maadan. N. O. 
H«d«i«n & Huff. 
Mandan Candy Faotory. 

Ja^esto^ra, If. D. 

Geo. Thompson. 

Carrfnarton, V. D. 

Arthur RevTioldB. 

Valley CKy, M. D. 

Rudolf Hotel. 

Wllllston, N. D. 

Swab & Kather. 

_f>leadlTe, Mont. 
B. A. Healy. 

Bntt«% Moat. 

Keefe Bros. 

Helena, Mont. 

W. A. Moere. 

'Wtnatpev, Mam. 

Leland Hotel. 
Steinberg's News Stand. 
Queen's Hotel. 
H. Schwarti News Stand. 

Oalsary, Alta. 

Globe News Ce. 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 
Neflon & Willi*. 



Pi 



Heattle. Wi 

Eckart News Co. 
.\cme News Co. 
Whitney's News Stand. 

Portland. Or. 

Bowman News Co. 

ipokane. Wank. 

Li. W. Woodmassee. 
Ben Stubeck. 

Salt Lake City. Vtak. 

Chas. Ludwiff. 

San Fraaelspo, CaL 

TTntted News .\g«ney. 

Wheatley News Agency. 

The Great Trans-Continental 

News Co. 
Beck & Co.. Ferry Station. 

Oaklnad. Cal. 

Enquirer News Co. 

Los Anjrelea, CaL 

Toma News Co. 

Jos. Kemp Kews Stand. 

Independent News Co. 

News Shop, Fifth * Broadway. 

Eastern News Agency. 

Hotel Hayward. 

Hotel Alexandria. 

San DIavo, CaL 

A, M. Chllds. 

The Herald aims to be on 
every prominent news 
stand in the United States 
and Canada. 

—Duluth travelers will confer 
a favor bv notifying us of any 
important stand where we are 
not now represented. 



*.-♦ 




4 
I 



I 




LATEST HAPPENINGS IN AUTO WORLD 






NOTHING DONE 
ON HIGHWAY 

Another Year Must Come 

Before Twin City Road 

Is Improved. 



New IVIodels in Automobiles 

Are Being Shown in 

Duluth. 



Much has been written about the 
roads between Duluth and the Twin 
Cities and much more could be. Some 
*utolst3 could be arrested for what 
they think of this road and yet a Jury 
might return a verdict of "Justifiable 
expression" were they to say just what 
they harbor In their thinkers. That 
road, be It stated. Is something fierce, 
to resort to the vernacular, or "Eng- 
lish as she Is spoke" these days. 

One of the moat recent to come 
over the road and say things about 
It Is James D. Keough of St. Paul. 
He motored to Duluth during the 
week and "got his," especially at this 
end of the line. He says that tiie road 
as a whole Is bad enough, but when 
one approaches Duluth it is enough 
to test the proverbial patience of Job. 

The various interests which have 
the advancement of Duluth — commer- 
cially and as a transient center — at 
heart, have waited patiently all sum- 
mer for the county commissioners to 
do something to this road, or. If they 
have not the power, to make some 
att-mpt to have those that have the 



power 
ha.'vest 



Orient. 'Sixes' have formerly been re- 
garded as the prerogative of the ex- 
tremely wealthy. In European coun- 
tries. 'Sixes' have been the vehicle of 
royalty and have b€«n almost exclu- 
sive in price. 

" 'We have received some amusing 
letters from our dealers abroad, fol- 
lowing their receipt of their first ship- 
ments of 'Sixes'.' writes Foreign Sales 
Manager Benson of the Studebaker 
corporation. 'Many of them are. too, 
from dealers to whom the 'Six' was 
well known in specification and tech- 
nical details. Apparently we have 
knocked the props from under all their 
established ldea» of automobile pos- 
sibilities. « 

■' 'Our distributors in Peru made use 
of their first 'Six' In playing a rather 
cruel practical joke on their competi- 
tors in Lima, most of whom repre- 
sent lines of European manufacture. 

" 'They removed the name plate and 
hub cap.s from the car and placed it 
in solitary majesty on their floor. Then 
they invited the other dealers in, and 
let "them go over the car thoroughly 
Inside and out. 

'"What do you think of Itr asked 

Signer Pancarvo, our representative. 

" 'They all talked It over and agreed 
that, with its electric lights, starter 
and horn. Its large tires, immaculate 
finish, six-passenger body and six- 
cylinder motor, the car must be priced 
somewhere around 1,500 libras, $4,500. 

" 'When the jury had handed down 
this decision. Signer Pancarvo produced 
the hubs caps and name plate, and 
put them into place. This opened the 
eyes of several of the wiser ones, who 
knew of the Studebaker 'Six' and had 
heard of its vogue in 'the states.' 

" 'When they realized that they had 
been stung into putting so high a 
figure on a car which they knew Pan- 
carvo Bros, would sell at a price below 
most of the 'Fours' they themselves 
were handling, some of them broke 
into loud lamentations, while others 
covered their confusion by heading a 
thirsty procession to the nearest 
Posada.' " 

* • • 

The sales of the Michelln tires 
grows merrily. It Is rather remark- 
able about this tire. Speak to a man 

who uses the Michelln and he will 
simply praise it. Speak disparagingly 
of It, if you have the courage, and 
you are going to have trouble on your 



do something. And yet "the ' hands at once. The Michelln user — and 



is past, the summer is ended 
and we are not saved." Another year 
at least must be gone through before 
anything is done and In the interim 
tourists have come and tourists have 
gone, but that road goes on forever 
like Tennyson's brook; and the tour- 
ists who have experienced it are sav- 
ing mean things about It and about 
Duluth. for Duluth will be blamed for 
its approach. 

And now comes Mr. Keough with 
his testimony, which is substantially 
the same as that furnished by others 
who have traversed the road before. 

Really and truly something should 
be done about this alleged thorough- 
fare. The only people who benefit by 
Its present condition are garages at 
each end of the line who fix the ma- 
chines that have gone over It. anf 
dentists who replace or readjust dis- 
located front teeth. 

« • • 

Dr. A. E. Eberhart and family of 
Mason City, Iowa, are In Duluth. They 
£?ame up in a model Xo. 10 Bulck this 
wefk. The doctor Is a hav fever suf- 
ferer and thinks that this is about the 
best climate he ever encountered. 
During the sneezing .season he Is very 
much enamoured of Duluth. He Is 
"•ne of the fi^w who do not complain 
bitterly of the roads; but he Is not 
dragging about them. 
• • * 

Len McNamara. local agent for the 
Studebaker car. has received the fol- 
.lowlng from the home office, which 
oontalns considerable matter of Inter- 
'ist to auto users and prospective pur- 
ijhasers. Mr. MoXamara ha.<? some of 
"the rfgular models on hand ^"<i is 
ilemonstrating them with considerable 
/mccess these days. There will be 
more Studebaker users .soon In Duluth 
than there are now if indications mean 
iinything. Following la the communi- 
cation: 

"Amazing as have been some of the 
V^merican automobile values, when an- 
nounced in the foreign market, there 
lias been no sensation of recent years 
ilmllar to that attendant on the ad- 
vent in the export market of the mod- 
«rn American light 'Six.' 

"In Europe. Australia, South Amer- 
ica and South Africa, as well as the 



this is no press agent stuff either — 
has the habit something frightful. The 
users are more pleased this year than 
usual for the reason, It is claimed, 
that the experiment in other tires of 
pulling down the price, with a conse- 
quent puillnp down in quality, has 
been a distinct failure; while with 
the Michelln whose price has been 



maintained, And Its quality unimpaired 
satibfaction is still uninterrupted. 

• « « 

The Kleyn Auto company at 529 
East Superior street, are agents for 
the Bulck and the Hudson cars and 
the Federal trucks, and with this com- 
bination they have a line to brag 
abcut; which they are not doing. The 
Bulck, among the cheaper cars has a 
wonderful record, and the Hudson, 
anrcng the medium priced cars Is also 
playing a stellar role in motordom. 
Fred Kleyn is one who can demon- 
strate a car to the best advantage and 
is enjoying a lot of success with both 
of these cars this season. 
« • • 
"I've heard of many different kinds 
of freak sales," said Charles Q. Ober- 
mcyer, Duluth agent for the Carter 
car. "but one of our agents reported 
a sale the other day that certainly 
does take the prize. He actually sold 
a car to one of his competitors. Here's 
how he did it. 

"They had been waging a pretty stiff 
campaign, so It seemed, and one day 
the competitor happened to be In the 
Carter car garage. They got to talk- 
ing about what the Carter car would 
do, when the competitor made the re- 
mark that if the Carter car was such 
a good hill climber he would like tb 
see it go up the Joi.es hill, one of the 
well known inclines of that region. 
Our agent said tliat he could drive the 
Carter car up the hill any time and 
would back up his faith by any 
amount of money. 

" 'Well I don't want to bet,' said 
thr competitor, 'but I'll tell you what 
I'll do. I'll write you a check for the. 
car, and stand at the top of the hlli 
and if vou can drive up to me and 
get it, then the car Is mine. How does 
that strike you?* 

" 'You're on,' replied our agent, and 
he proceeded to make the easiest sale 
of his entire career as a Carter cai 
representative. to use his own 
wc rds." 

* • • 
"The latest series of Kissel Kars 
was offered In the firm belief that 
they would be received with 8peed> 
favor and that belief has been more 
tJian verified In fact." says J. T. 
Peacha, Jr., of the Inter-State Auto 
(cmpany. "Not only here, but every- 
where In the country where the points 
of these up-to-the minute cars have 
been made konwn, there is the keen- 
est interest. The old Kissel slogan ol 
'every inch a car' holds good in everv 
new inch of refinement, convenience 
and mechanical attribute entering int< 
the design of these able and luxurious 
automobiles. The two 'Sixes,' the 48 
and 60-horse power models, and the 
40 'Four.' are constructed and 
equipped as no other cars at the prlct- 
could ever boast before. Road-worthi- 
ness and completeness sticks out all 
over these splendid vehicles." 



York state highway 
agreed to preside. 



commission has 



The Best Advertising. 

Ll A. "Van Patten of the Lozler com- 
pany, has written a "most interesting 
article on "Automobile Ads In News- 
papers." which appeared In the latest 
Issue of the Fourth Estate. In it Mr. 
Van Patten says: 

"The use of the newspaper as an 
advertising medium, particularly for 
automobiles, has five special advan- 
tages, as follows: 

"It offers quick action. 

'*It always precipitates results on 
the part of the prospective buyer. 

"Its wide, large page gives excel- 
lent opportunity for variety and pow- 
er of display. 

"It offers concentration in particu- 
lar cities and zones. 

"It pays attention to the automo- 
bile as a news feature. 

"There are times in the automobile 
business when quickness of action on 
the part of the manufacturer's ad- 
vertising department Is imperative 
The automobile as a product, built as 
It is in year models, is almost as per- 
ishable as fruit, and sometime, like 
fruit. It must be moved quickly. 

"A dragging or sagging season re- 
quires an advertising tonic and the 
best means is the quickest means, 
h^nce the newspaper. That is one 



NEWS AND GOSSIP OF 
THE AUTOMOBILE WORLD 



The Massachusetts highway commis- 
sion after a full investigation, official- 
ly states in its annual report, recently 
issued, that the greatest cause of the 
destruction of modern roads is not the 
automobile nor the motor truck, but 
the heavily loaded vehicle drawn by 
horses. Massachusetts has long had 
the habit of quietly pursuing Investi- 
gations, and presenttng official reports 
thereon, while others are discussing and 
getting ready to Investigate. It will 
be remembered that the first official 
notice of the damage to waterbound 
macadam by automobiles, was pre- 
sented by the Massachusetts commis- 
sion In its report for 1907. 

In two instances quoted In the cur- 
rent report, fifty to seventy-five Ice 
teams a day, carrying three tons or 
more each on 2% Inch to 3-lnch tires 
broke up within a month the side of 
the road on which the loaded teams 
traveled, while the surface lasted three 
months on the other side where the 
teams came back empty. For miles 
beyond the ice houses the roads are 



teams — two or more horses, and heavy 
loads on narrow tires — .that cause the 
failure. 

A carefully prepared statement as to 
the cause of wear, and what certain 
roads will stand is presented as one 
of the results of the careful traffic 
study entered on some years ago by 
the comml.ssion. Among the estab- 
lished results are the following: 

A good gravel road will wear rea- 
sonably well under a dally traffic com- 
posed of fifty to seventy-five light 
teams, twentv-flve to thirty loaded 
one horse vehicles, ten to twelve loaded 
two or more horse drawn wagons, and 
100 to 150 automobiles. With a larger 
number of automobiles, the gravel 
should be oiled. The oiling presents 
what is spoken of as a "blanket sur- 
face" consisting of heavy asphaltlc oil 
and sand. If the oil be applied hot the 
blanket surface will last three to five 
years; if cold. It must be renewed every 
year. 

Oiled gravel will stand fairly well 
under seventy-five to 100 light teams, 

horse ve 




L. A. VAN PATTEN 
Of the Lozier Company. 



still In good condition. These roads 

are of macadam treated with heavy thirty To ^flYty heavy one 

asphaltic oil. i l. , . 

The traffic study shows that it Is 
not the number of teams, but heavy 



reason why the newspapers carry so 
much automobile advertising. 

"It Is, of course, always a satisfac- 
tion to the man spending the money 
to see results viible to the naked eye 
and in using the newspaper, if he puts 
in the punch, he can count on results 
less than an hour after he goes into 
the office In the morning (whether he 
uses morning or evening newspapers 
or both). In our own experience we 
have found It so. and I have never 

;S . ^.^'^'*^ ^" automobile advertiser 
that did not agree. 

"It seems that automobile advertis- 
ing for some reason or other is given 
to large space, but whether or not 
there Is a good argument for large 

rJff^X " '•^JV''^':^ *^^' the newspaper 
offers excellent opportunity for size 

fook.^t'''^!; °^ <5»sPlay. The strongest 
look ng ads on automobiles In my 
n«!.^ °"o.^^^^ appeared In the newspa- 
wl^!: o^i''o?n ^^^®" °^ ^*^^t columns 
wide and 280 or even 300 lines deep— 

nUir^ Jfl ^ *'"*^ *^' '■°°™ ^ impress the 
Ultimate consumer." 

v'».!h2^' ^^'^i '^^^ t^e automobile ad- 
Inr.i^'"' fP^'^f ^ "^'^^ <lealer, say In 
Minneapolis. Is desirous to help a 

fintP""^ or promising dealer in At- 
not^^^°^'^L^^^^ *o overcome a com- 
petitor's lead In St. Louis— he concen- 
h1 hf a/-«'"pai8rn In the city or cities 
he has In mind until he gets the de- 
sired results. The newspaper la of 

menage ""^"^ ""^^'"^ '^ ^^"^ ^^' 
"One thing the newspapers have 
done for the automobile is to .give it 



COLE 



// the new way of making automobiles was not 
riglit, manufacturers would not be gravitating 
in ttiat direction. 

HTHERE are some who still cling to tradition. They 
^ are sort of Rip Van Winkling along. These people 
honestly believe that some manufacturers of automobiles 
really make all the parts which go into their cars — just as 
a lot of good people still believe that the way to grow good 
wax beans is to plant them in the full of the moon instead 
of good, juicy, black soil. 

I ET'S you and I say just one little word to these Rip 
^ Van Winkleites. "Brethren, the world is not flat, the 
moon has^ nothing to do with wax beans, and no one 
organization is building all the parts which go into any 
automobile.'' 

'T'HE great mass of motor car users know that the same 
* force which made watches, transportation, telephones 
and electric lights better and cheaper, will make automo- 
biles better and cheaper — has actually, in one instance, 
done it already. The Cole is the only example, so far, of 
the new system of motor car building. It's the best pos- 
sible car at the lowest possible price because it's made of 
the best possible parts produced under the most favorable 
economic conditions possible by the world's greatest spe- 
cialists. This is the proof — a Cole Touring Car with a 
wheel base of 120 inches, four cylinders, sturdy, quiet, with 
appealing lines, completely equipped, Delco electric, self- 
cranking and all — $1925. 




hides, twenty heavy wagons with two wide publicity Whether It ha/ Jlve^i 
or more horses, and 600 to 700 auto- or still glvr s this publicltv to^^t th^ 




Northwestern Cadillac Co., 

709 and 711 East Superior SU Duluth, Minn. 



ulamlloto Pajntinr (^^ 



^^2Mpnd^a;S East First Street '^^ 



mobiles dally, 

Waterbound macadam will stand un- 
der a dally traffic of 175 to 200 light 
teams, 175 to 200 heavy one horse ve- 
hicles, and sixty to eighty, perhaps 
more, heavy wagons with two or more 
horses. If even fifty to 100 automo- 
biles per day go over the road at high 
speed dust layers will be serviceable. 
With a re-ally good dust layer the road 
will stand 300 to 500 automobiles a 
day. although the stones will wear. 

Waterbound macadam with an oil 
and sand blanket, applied hot. will be 
economical with 160 to 200 light teams, 
seventy-five to IQO heavy one horse 
vehicles, twenty-five to thirty heavy 
wagons with two or more horses, and 
automobiles up to 1,400, or more with 
fewer teams and with fifty or more 
motor trucks. The large number of 
automobiles 8«*em8 to keep the oil 
rolled down when It would cut up and 
crumble without this traffic. This 
same road, however, will cut up and 
crumble under a traffic of 100 heavy 
one horse vehicles and fifty two or 
more horse wagons on narrow tires, 
such as loaded farm wagons, Ice wag- 
ons, loads of wood, etc. 

Chairman George C. Dlehl of the A. 
A. A. national good roads board has Is- 
sued a call for a traffic regulations 
conference at Detroit during the com- 
ing American road congress, to which 
all state highway commissioners have 
been invited, as well as national grange 
officers, automoblllsts, and vehlcl" 
makers, horse drawn and motor-driven 
Chairman John N. Carlisle of the New 



o.*„ t\ F^^'^ *"•" publicity to get the 
a'^vertlsfng or whether it gives the 
publicity purely as unadulteratid news 
is an open subject 

y^Tt^^"^^? J' }°. ^^y ^o^e newspapers 
print a lot of trash and use It as an 

oth^r'^"* ^^^.^ petting advertising. 

Others puri?ue the other extreme; hes- 

litl'' about printing the name of a ca 

if>st they be misunderstood: and va 



r 

^uri^ ^^Ir «."*^''-""^arof''Th7'do7ngs^of 

Mugsy' McGraw and Charles Webb 

Murphy and review a theatrical per- 

I^t?^t"''^ elaborating on the star's 
acting, etc. 

1*^^.!^^"^? *^. "® Inconsistent from 
editorial point of view, but at any 
e the newspapers print m«.ttpr 
fo 71 *^^ automobile anT they telm 
o? np^f^'^'^v,'* ^^ ^^ Important Item 
Of news. They are aware there are 
over 1.000.000 automobllt^ In usi [n 
n^ ♦K*: 1^^ *o ^^'^^y I'^O individuals, 
^r.lii^** the automobile Is today the 
h^^n,^,..^'"*'^*^''* plaything. It all 
neips Its an important consideration 
the automobile advertiser." 



an 
rate 



for 



Taxis and Limousines 
for Rent— Night or Day 

Theater partlM and private parties a specialty 

W. H. HEALY 

G«rage. 309 and 311 East Mlchiaaa St 

Pbonea: Melrose, 88; Grand, i6 



Strenuous Trip. 

Eugene R. Bonlure and a party of 
seven have arrived In Los Angeles in 
a Kissel Kar "6-60" after a delightful 
trip from Milwaukee. The car driven 
by Mr. Bonlure, althought taken brand 
new from the Kissel factorv. devel- 
oped no mechanical trouble save some 
minor difficulties which the owner ac- 
knowledges were due to his own inex- 
perience In handling a large touring 
car over mountain roads. . Mr. Bon- 
lure comments to Los Angeles news- 
paper men in an Interesting vein on 
the disadvantages of what is known 
^^.„*'^® northern route" to the coast, 
vve came across leisurely over the 
.same route followed by the Hoosler 
tourists.' said Mr. BonJure, "but you 
can safely wager that we will go 
back the southern way. The northern 
route may have been built first, but 
It never will be as much used as the 
southern way. It is impractical in the 
first place, for year around travel It 
is not everyone that wishes to tackle 
an 11,000-foot elevation. Some of the 
members of my party were danger- 



The Standardized Car 

BUILT AND ORIGINATED BY 

Cole Motor Car Company 

Indianapolis, U. S. A. 

REPRESENTATIVES FOR THIS TERRITORY 

The Johnson Motor Car Company 

402 AND 404 EAST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 





ously affected by the rarlfled atmo- 
sphere. There will be some terrible 
accidents on those high mountain 
roads. Several times I nearly was 
overcome. I had presence of mind 
enough to stop the car and rest until 
I had recovered. 

"Let me give this advice. The 
northern route is no place for one 
with nerves or weak heart. I am an 
earnest advocate of the southern 
route from this on. I have friends 
In Milwaukee who are planning to 
come out here. I shall urge them to 
think of none other than the southern 
route." 

The Kissel Kar which brought the 
Bonlure party across showed remark- 
ably few signs of wear. Mr. Bonlure 
declared that nowhere did he have to 
call in assistance. 

"I regard that as a remarkable 
record," he said. "I have driven cars 
for some years, but am not a mechan- 
ical expert. In fact, I am only a 
very ordinary driver. When I struck 
some of those mountain grades my 
hair stood straight on end and with 
less reliable brakes and motor I fear 
that I might not have made some of 
those places. Everywhere along the 
line we were told that we would find 
the best roads in California. We 
found this true. The new stretches of 
the state highway are perfect." 



years of exacting service, during 
which It covered 40,000 miles, A. C. 
Templeton sales manager of the Kis- 
sel Kar, Milwaukee branch, made last 
week what he modestly terms "a fair 
record." Motorists unhampered by 
Mr. Templeton's temperamental mild- 
ness, would call It remarkable. 

The run was from Milwaukee to De- 
troit, by way of Chicago, and return 
to Grand Haven, Mich., from whence 
the homeword trip was completed by 
boat. A Kissel Kar 80-horse power, 
1911 model was used, and the aver- 
age speed maintained was a little bet- 
ter than 24 miles an hour despite 
the fact that two generous cloud- 
bursts mussed up the roads en route. 



running up to 67.15 metallic Iron Th« 
developments «s to width of the ore 
on the 210 will be awaited by many 
with much Interest. i"»nr 



Costly Film. 



so H. p., 1,500 lbs $1,500.00 

40 H. P., 2,000 lbs $2,000.00 

40 H. P., 2,500 Ihs $2. 100.00 

40 H. P., 4.000 lbs $2.7.50.00 

50 H. P., 6.000 lbs $.'5,350.00 

50 H. P., 8,000 .lbs $3,650.00 

50 H. P., 10.000 lbs $4,350.00 



Tires— Michelin, 
Batavia, Miller 

FtXL LINE OF ACCESSORIES. 

Oup repair and paint shops are in hands of experts 



J-^JJ JJ:K?S' «S S- S $3,150.00 

4-CYI.I>DER, 60 H. P $2.500 00 

4.CYLINDER, 40 H. P $2 000 00 

l-CYL/NDKR, 80 H. P $ 1 700 OO 

a-PAssENGER COUPE ::;:::: ulToZ 

6-PASSENGER COUPE ,,. $8 000 00 

7.PASSENGER LIMOUSINE. . . [JJloOoioO 



A New Model. 

The latest 1914 model to be an- 
nounced by the American Motors com- 
pany of Indianapolis Is a six-passen- 
ger car known as "Type 646." The 
figures denote six cylinders, 40-horse 
power and six passenger capacity. 

This new body embodies the latest 
features In body design, stream line, 
high flush side, and deep seats. It 
'is a marked departure from the past 
policy of the company to limit the 
passenger capacity of its lower-priced 
cars to four persons and in reality 
takes the place of the well known 
"American Traveler." It lists at 
$2,950 with unusually complete equip- 
ment, e 

In many respects this new car Is 
identical with the already familiar 
"Type 644," the principal changes be- 
ing the lengthening of the wheelbase 
to 140 Inches, change In motor size 
to 4%-lnch bore and 5%-lnch stroke 
and a new and improved electrical 
equipment. 



"A Fair Record." 

With a car which ban seen thre«i 



To represent the industrial growth 
of Greater Detroit, a mass picture of 
7.000 employes of the Packard Motor 
Car company is included in an educa- 
tional film being prepared under the 
direction of the Detroit board of com- 
merce. 

In order to permit taking the pic- 
ture on the company's time, the Pack- 
ard officials advanced the regular Sat- 
urday's closing hour by twenty min- 
utes. This time cost the company 
12,000 in round figures without taking 
into account the value of the time lost 
In the course of making preparations. 
Approximately 200 foremen and de- 
partment heads were notified of the 
plans and given detailed instructions. 

The camera was focused from a 
raised platform thus giving an excel- 
lent view of the mass of workers as 
they poured from the factory. 

When thrown upon the screen the 
picture will show the moving mass 
In the Immediate foreground with a 
background formed by a building 940 
feet long, one of thirty structures 
which make up the Packard plant. 

STRIKE ORE In 

LUCKY BOY MINE. 

The cross-cut on the 210-foot level 
of the Lucky Boy-Anderson mine near 
Ely is now being driven in the ore 
body. Late reports from the property 
says Skllllngs' Mining and Market 
Letter, announces that the breast of 
the working Is in the same clean, high 
grade hematite ore as was opened at 
90 and again at 140 feet of depth. As- 
says of the ore have been made, which 
demonstrates that It Is as good as It 
looks, for it !• a Bessemer product 



Dog Killed By Car. 

o-^m H^'^T f-a'^'l'e. the magnificent 
collie dog belonging to Henry H Nes- 
bitt was run over by a westbound 
Lakeside car at Thirty-third avenue 
east last evening. Dr. Annand was 
Immediately telephoned for and he 
found the dog so badly Injured that 
he had to chloroform it 

The dog came of pure bred cham- 
pion stock, his mothers father be- 
ing champion of the United States 
and his father's father champion of 
the world. He was registered in the 
American Kennel club and was one 
of the handsomest collies In the city. 

TWENH-FOUR 

NEW CITIZENS 



Twenty-four aliens were admitted 
to citizenship at the naturalization 
heaTing which was conducted by 
Judge Fesler in district court last 
evening. The ca^es of four of the 
applicants were continued because 
satisfactory answers were not re- 
ceived by the examiner. One woman 
was admitted, Miss Ellen Branthole. 
an employe of the Y. W. C. A The 
new citizens follow: Axel Hanson. 
Ellen Branthole, John Freeman, 
George A. Jacobsen. John W. Pt-terson, 
Karlo H. Brander, Mattl Lahteemaa. 
Emil Nleml Henry H. Wagstron, Au- 
gust Ulvl. Gusta Halila, Oscar l^lnkin. 
Carl Nlkoli. R. Nange, Carl Oscar 
Theodore Eklund. Thomas E Burn- 
side, Karle Jalmar Pajunen, Thor 
Ringstad, Carl Ericksson, Max Cono- 
val, Viktor Leino, Peter A. Johnson, 
Jakof Lalnen. Peter Koutala and Sam- 
uel Sander. 



Already Fall Plowing. 

Braddock, N. D., Aug. 30. — fSpoctal 
to The Herald.) — The farmers of thla 
section do not intend to ever get 
caught without doing anv fall plowing 
again, and much work has aheadv been 
done. The wheat fields are "larger 
than anticipated and the returns from 
the machines indicate an averagi.* crop. 
Many farmers were compelled last 
spring to disc in their wheat for lack 
of plowing, and the results In Mios4 
fields were Very poor» 



^9"* 



^->-r^». .-i. "^-"i- :.-«-■- 



10 



Saturday, 



THE DULU'TH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 




THE PASSING SHOW OR VARIOUS AND 
DIVERS OPINIONS OF THE SPORT WORLD 

Michigan's Withdrawal Robs Western Football of Interest 

-Badger Clubs Card Postponed-Mathewson a 

Prophet-Elmer Miller Starring in Field. 




(BY BRUCE.) 

ITH Alonzo A. Stagg back on the job and Papa Williams returned 
from pursuits variously identified with oleasure and the chase of 
dull care, one begins to think of the pastime of the gridiron and 
speculate vaguely upon the impending events of the fall. Yea, ver- 
ily, the call of the pigskin reacheth forth and grasps the youth of 
the land by the nape of the neck. 

It looks as if the same old pins were set up in the same old precedent 
worn alley. Minnesota, Wisconsin and Chicago will be the contenders of the 
West, with nary a stifling struggle from the other teams — for, as you very 
well know, Michigan is out of it. 

It's a bally shame that the interest has to be taken out of the greatest of 
all fall sports because of the narrow difference of opinion of a very few men 
whom some of us are inclined to believe possess little knowledge of the game 
or little real grasp of the needs of football in general out here in the wild and 
enthusiastic section of the country, 

Illinois is at best but a speculation as to one team. In various years that 
have added their length to the interminable procession of the ages, the Illini 
have been figured once or twice as regular guys in the settling of the Western 
championship. Then the bubble would burst as a rule, and the high hopes 
of the Urbana chaps would flee like the irridescent dreams of the builder of 
castles in the vicinity of Seville. 

Northwestern is to the football of the West what the jester was in the 
days of old to the courts of merry monarchs. Small colleges play the Metho- 
dists and often tie or defeat the purple people and drag the ancient banners 
in the mud. 

There was a time when Nebraska came into the arena of Western foot- 
ball with palpitant senses and the belief born of victory once over Minnesota, 
that the Cornhuskers were destined to clean the teams of the conference and 
assume one of the seats of power. 

This was in the departed days of "Bummy" Booth, that strident and 
handsome giant from the gridiron honor roll of Princeton. Nebraska found 
the task too tremendous; one requiring too high a class year in and year out, 
and with the passing of several seasons the Nebraska team was found back in 
the stiff tryout game class. 

Iowa flourished once— aye. for four glorious and never to be forgotten 
^1^1^^^^^ ^^^ brilliant tutelage of Dr. Knipe, he who in the days of fame 
of old Pennsylvania formed one of the greatest backfields ever assembled 
with Brook, Osgood and Williams. 

f ?^\^^ '" ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ Nebraska the fame and glory of Iowa was short 
lived. Like the others the Hawkeyes cannot be seriously considered with 
Minriesota, Wisconsin and Chicago. And it should be also thoroughly under- 
stood that the record of Chicago since the withdrawal of Michigan from the 
conference has been anything but consistent. 

There was a big four in the West, as there has been for years, aye, de- 
cades, m the effete East. The withdrawal of Michigan has disintegrated this 
combmation and has, moreover, robbed Minnesota of her great annual game 

Starting back in i8qo the Minnesota- Wisconsin game remained the one 
big football feast of the West, speaking generally from all points of view and 
particularly from the viewpoint of the students and graduates of the Gopher 
institution But starting m 1902 the athletic entente with Michigan was start- 
ed into and the annual game with the Wolverines, furnishing some of the 
greatest gridiron struggles. East or West, came to take the place of the game 
with Wisconsin and to give to the West its one eagerly awaited contest 

Jealousy upon the part of some of the athletic officials of the University 
of Chicago, aided and abetted by some of the faculty members of other of the 
Uestern schools, caused Minnesota to break off her athletic relations with 
Michigan, and now we look forward to the opening of the football season 
each tall with a little less enthusiasm than was exhibited by followers of the 



E 



pitchers of the Giants who will beat 

the Athletics. 

* • • 

Elmer Miller Doing Well. 

T SEEMS quite natural to pick 
up a paper and hear that Elmer 
Miller, the grand personage of the 
minors, is making sensational catch- 
es. The Nashville Banner, not a flag 
but a newspaper, lies before us and 
tells in glowing and well rounded 
sentences of the wonderful catch made 
by our Elmer in the game between 
Mobile and Birmingham. 

Fielding has ever been the forte of 
this chap. Since joining the Mobile 
team he has bourgeoned forth as one 
of the nifty fly collectors of the 
Southern circuit. It was the catch of 
Miller's in the Mobile-Birmingham 
tango that saved the game, and doubt- 
less by this time the genial Doc will 
be firmly entrenched in the good 
graces of the soft spoken fans down 
below the Mas and Dix line. 



INITIATIVE FOR 

ANTI-FICHT LAW 



TO RACE FOR KAISER CUP 



1^ 



www 



\ 






V 

f 

I 




game m these parts, when we had the great game with Michigan to anticipate 
V\ isconsin should be strong this year. Chicago is difficult to dope. Min 
nesota should be stronger than last year— and for the rest, as has been stated 
belore, they can t be seriously counted upon. 



Fight Card Postponed. 
JFFICIALS of the newly organ- 
' ized Badger Athletic club stated 
yesterday that the clash between 
"Spike" Kelly and Tommy Sheehan 
and Johnny Tillman and Jimmy Mc- 
Govern would be postponed for a 
week. The exact date will be an- 
nounced within a day or two. Ac- 
cording to the statement made yes- 
terday the original card will be pre- 
sented and the boys will be held to 
their original contracts. It is prob- 
able that Kelly will come here and 
train during the coming week. 
* « • 

The Prophetic Christopher. 
i-IRlSTY MATHEWSON is al- 
most as dexterous with a pen as 
he is with the little baseball. He 
writes of the Giants, occasionally of 
some other team. Just the other day 
the subject under discussion by the 
proud pitcher was the Philadelphia 
Athletics. 

Mathewson has been calling atten- 
tion to some weaknesses in the team 
that two years ago gave the haughty 
Giants one fine young drubbing. 
Schang, the youthful and brilliant 
catcher of the White Elephants, is 
one of the weak spots of Uncle Con- 
nie Mack's team, according to the 
trend of the dope as gathered by the 
venerable Christopher. 

If our memory serves us faithfully, 
there were many predictions some 
two years ago as to the way the 
Giants would run the bases wild on 
Lapp and Thomas. Let us call at- 
tention to the fact of the turning back 
of nearly all of the venturesome mem- 
bers of the Giants who attempted to 
speed their way to second base. 

If we are all willing to concede that 
the pcnants have been won by the 
Giants and Athletics, this column is 
willing to climb the mast of predic- 
tion at this highly propitious time 
and wave a red flag for the Athletics. 

Mack has the hitters and he has, 
moreover, one of the smartest teams 
in either league. This is not precise- 
ly the case with McGraw. The little 
Napoleon of baseball, if we are to be- 
lieve some of the things we read and 
others that are brought to us by 
travelers from the world afar, does 
most of the thinking for his team. 
There is the old saying regarding two 
hea<is being better than one well en- 
dowed dome. 

New York may have the shade in 
pitchers, and undoubtedly it has. But 
in all around excellence it does seem 
to us at least as if the Athletics are 
the stronger combination, and with 
Bender and Plank groomed for the 



series, we would rather have a piece 
of silverware impulsively cast forth 
upon the chances of the pace setters 
of the American league. 

Outside of the pitcher's box, with 
the possible exception of the catcher, 
where can you find one place on the 
Giants that is the equal of the Ath- 
letics? It is first, or second, or short- 
stop or third base? Where in the 
outfield? It will have to be the 



Church Federation of Los 

Angeles Waves Aside 

Protests. 

L08 Angeles, Aug. 30.— Initiative 
petitions toward a state law prohibit- 
ing long duration bo.xlng exhibitions, 
or those professionalized either by 
gate receipts or prize awards, will be 
circulated Immediately throughout 
California. This was decided on late 
yesterday by the civil righteousness 
committee of the Los Angeles Church 
Federation, which waved aside pro- 
tests of those Interested In boxing as 
an athletic sport. 

While the boxing enthusiasts and 
churchmen argued over the question 
Jess Willard, in connection with thfc 
recent death of John Young, was be- 
ing given a preliminary hearing be- 
fore Justice Summerfleld of Vernon. 

After numerous witnesses of the 
fatal bout had testified, the hearing 
was adjourned until Tuesday. 

britishgolTerjT 
continue to win. 



h THE ELLEN. 

The Ellen Is One of the Sonderclass Yachts the Germans Are Sending to 
America to Race for the Kaiser Cup. The Elirhination Trials Have Been 
Held in Boston and the Ellen Is One of the Boats That Will Be in 
the Finals. 



BLUME IS BACK 

FROU MEETING 

Duluth President Says 

Northern Will Be Strong 

Next Season. 

President H. A. Blume of the Du- 
luth Baseball association haa returned 
from the meeting of the club owners 
of the Northern league, w^hich was 

held in Minneapolis during the pres- 
ent week. According to the state- 
ment of President Blume, Minneapolis 
will be a member of the league next 
season if such is the desire of the 
other club owners. 

Mike Cantlllon gave the other club 
owners his word that he was satisfied 
with the showing made by his club in 
Its first year in the Northern. He 
further stated that he was perfectly 
willing to go through another sea- 
son, if his club was desired in the 
league. Whether the club owners 
want Minneapolis in another year is 
a matter that has not been decided at 
the present time. 

According to President Blume It is 
likely that Port Arthur and Fort Wil- 
liams will come Into the league. It 
Is not likely that either La Crosse or 
St. Paul will be in the league.-and the 
Twin Cities of the Canadian lakes will 
take the place of one of the teams 
that will be dropped. This move, it 
Is understood. Is practically decided 
upon. 

Those attending the Minneapolis 
meeting are of the opinion that the 
league will be stronger during the 
coming season than it was during the 
one Just completed, and it is stated 
that President Burmeister will be 
busily engaged during the winter 
making strenuous efforts to line up a 
real staff of umpires. It may be that 
will be a new down town park in 
Winnipeg before the start of the 1914 
season. 



FOURTEEN IN 
ELGIN RACE 



Big Field of Star Drivers 
Entered in Big Automo- 
bile Event. 



De Palma and Joe Dawson 
Divide Honors in Cur- 
tain Raiser. 



OHIO MAN WINS 

REVOLVER SHOOT 



Kenosha, Wis., Aug. 30. — Harry 
Vardon and Edward Ray, the British 
golfers continued their winning on the 
Kenosha course yesterday, defeating 
R. Cavanaugh, C. C. Allen and James 
Anderson, a trio of Kenosha amateurs. 
The final score was 4 up for the eigh- 
teen holes. The champions had a best 
ball of 64 for the eighteen holes, and 
the amateurs were but four strokes 
behind them. 

Cavanaugh made the best showing 
of any of the amateurs, getting a 72. 

Vardon led in the medal score with 
a 67, three under par, and twelve un- 
der bogey. Ray was one stroke 
higher. 

Today Vardon and Ray will meet 
Tom Vardaman and Willie Marshall 
at Onwentsia and on Monday they 
I will be at Detroit. 



Special Prize for Slow Fire 
Goes to U. S. In- 
fantryman. 

Camp Perry. Ohio. Aug. 30. — The Na- 
tional Revolver match, held yesterday 
afternoon, was won by J H. Snook, of 
Columbus, Ohio, by a score of 393. 
There were 152 entries. The first 
event wag shot on the 75-yard range at 
slow fire with ten shots for record. 
The second event was on the 25 and 
60-yard ranges at the time fire with 
ten shots at each target. The rapid 
fire was held on the 15-vard and 25- 
yard ranges. C. E. Orr of Ohio, was 
the winner of second place, with 390 
points; C. N. McCutcheon of Colorado 
was winner of third, with 386. and A 
J McNab. U. S. infantry, and A. Smith 
of Colorado are tied for fourth place 
with scores of 367. 

The winner of the special prize for 
slow fire was H. S, Tyler of the United 
States Infantry, with a score of 70 J 
H. Snook of Ohio is the winner of the 
timed fire special prize by a score of 
170. C. N. McCutcheon of Colorado won 
the special rapid fire by a score of 

The National trophy and $450 cash 
goes to the United States cavalry team 
as first winner, second prize of $350 
goes to the United States navv team; 
third prize of $300 goes to the'Oregon 
team, and the fourth prize of $250 goes 
to the United States marine corps 
These four teams are winners in class 
A. 

By landing In 



Washington team takes first money of 
class B which is $350 and the famous 
Hilton trophy. Second prize money of 
$250 goes to West Virginia, third 
money of $225 goes to Indiana, and 
Florida gets fourth money of $200. 

The bronze Soldiers of Marathon and 
$300 goes to California, as the winner 
of the first place in Class C, which is 
thirty-first plaoe In the list of win- 
ners. Second money of $200 goes to 
Wyoming Third money of $175 goes 
to Georgia, while New Mexico wins 
fourth money of $150. 



Canadian Team Choaen. 

Ottawa, Can., Aug. 30. — Ten of the 
twelve members of the Canadian Pal- 
ma team were chosen last night and 
the whole team, the remainder of 
which will be chosen today, will leave 
for Camp Perry, Ohio, on Monday to 
seek the coveted international trophy. 

groomTng day for 

sonder yachts. 

Marblehead, Aug. 30. — Grooming day 
for the six sonder yachts which will 
sail in the German-American races 
next week found all the boats on the 
ways in the hands of workmen today. 

Although the underbodles and sides 
of the boats looked bright, the pol- 
ished surfaces were given another 
rubbing by experienced woodworkers 
and piano polishers. The yachts will 
remain out of water until a few hours 
before the first day's race Is started 
at 11 a. m. Monday. 

The revenue cutter Androscoggin 
and Gresham anchored In the harbor 
last night ready for patrol duty. 
» 

Mrs. Stallings Dead. 

Buffalo. N. Y., Aug. 30. — Mrs. 
George T. Stalling, wife of the man- 
ager of the Boston National baseball 



MOTOR BOAT RACES. 

Great Lakes Title Will Be Decided at 
Buffalo. 

Buffalo, Aug. 30. — Final arrange- 
ments have been made for the big boat 
regatta to be held on the Niagara 
river on Sept. 4, 5 and 6 under the di- 
rection of the Motor Boat club of this 
city, and In connection with the Perry 
Centennial celebration next week. Ten 
speed events have been slated, two for 
Thursday, Sept. 4, three for Friday. 
Sept. 5, and three for Saturday, Sept 



Elgin, 111.. Aug. 30. — Fourteen car* 
got away this morning in the annual 
801-mile grind over the eight-mile 
course here for the Elgin national 
trophy. The larger field and larger 
machines than appeared In yesterday'* 
race added to the Interest In the long, 
fierce contest and a crowd, exceeding 
In number that which broke through 
the lines of the militia at the finish 
Friday afternoon was on hand to cheer 
the starters. 

Bill Endicott In a Case, was first 
man away, and in the order of their 
naming the following took up his pur- 
suit at intervals of thirty seconds. 

Car — Driver 

Mason Ed. Rickenbacher 

Mason R. K. Mulford 

Mercer Spencer Wlshart 

Stutz GU Anderson 

Marmon Joe Dawson 

Mason William Hauph 

Keeton Bob Burman 

Nyberg Harry Maddea 

Nyberg Harry Endicott 

Velie Otto Honningr 

Mercer Ralph De Palma 

Isotta Harry Grant 

Erwin Special Erwin BergdoU 

Added Danger. 

The greater throng was attracted, 
perhaps, by the added elements of 
danger. Five men who drove their 
racing demons at mile-a-mlnute speed 
for nearly five hours yesterday, started 
out to repeat their performance. Their 
hands were blistered from holding the 
flying machines to the road In the 
rough spots, they felt the effects of 
the Journey in every muscle and their 
nervous systems were In bad condi- 
tion. This was especially true In the 
case of Harry Endicott, who fainted 



. 0. 

Sues^J'ni^m^r^han^rifi* wiiT "vf*^ °' ^^'^ ' ^'^"e on the thirtieth lap. He said he 
?^?h.^"^.^.^IL^^^^''.l?^lll^5^w^':l5^ i felt much better after a |ood sleep and 

that he expected to finish better than 



to the winners of the events beside 



awardpd tJ .«^h^^^? JP^i^I ^"^ .k® ! ^^^""^^ »>»« position he was in yesterday 

l^n/ rniJt^ a^^JLa^^^^^uI during the when he succumbed to the strain 

race meet. Already eighteen of the Roi„». t-i^ doi™^ ™.i,^ ™.__ vvi. _.»<__ -• 



Already eighteen of the 
boats in thi 
Canada have been entered. The regatta 
will be one of the chief features of the 



, team, died at a local hospital 
.sixteenth place the I yesterday after a long illness. 



high-powered 
?ttTng In trim 



Perry week In Muffalo. 
Already four of the 
speeders are In Buffalo ge 
for this race meet. All of the owners 
the world's famous racers will be In 
Buffalo as the guest of the Motor Boat 
club. As the Buffalo's meet is the last 
of the season, all of the big speeders 
will be here to win the International 
Interstate championship, and the Great 
Lakes championship. By the time the 
entries close next week, it Is expected 
that the list of entries will number at 
least thirty-five, as that number of as- 
surances have been received by Com- 
modore William J. Gunnell, chairman 
of the regatta committee. 



Women's Tennis Tourney. 

The first rounds of the Longvlew 
Tennis club match were played today 
before a second match is played 
scores for the first match must be 
telephoned to Miss Marie Merrill as 
the schedule which was sent out dif- 
fers from that published in the paper. 
•- 

Goodman and Thomas. 

Danny Goodman of Chicago, who was 
scheduled to meet Young Thomas of 
Eveleth before one of the Northern 
state clubs on Thursday evening will 
meet the same fighter tonight, accord- 
ing t^o advices received here. The bout 



here of Thursday evenin, 
I because of counter at 



g was postponed 
: tractions. 











kloXlNG WILL 

NOW HAVE. A CHANCE' 
To GET IN THE LiME- 
LlQHT AGAIIS- 














fa-ifoat r.««,£.,. K«,orJ"i,„ ♦Vr .."* "•-; Ralph De Palma, who was bleeding at 

St^}^^i ?-°^?^.**°**^^l" *^'« country and , the nose when be finished first. Tiad 

put cushions in the driver's seat to re- 
lieve the jar on his spine. 

The Deltal car, which Dawson 
piloted Into second place Friday, wa* 
withdrawn. One of the wheels has » 
cracked hub and buckled rims from 
running on flat tires. 

Dawson, De Palma, Grant and An- 
derson were the favorites with the 
crowd and were greeted with hearty 
cheers as they shot past the grand- 
stand. 

De PalBM Is 1%'inner. 

Two veteran drivers shared the hon- 
ors of yesterday's road race for the 
Cobe trophy — Ralph De Palma and Joe 
Dawson. The former won the 301 
miles grind in 4:31:56, but Dawson wae 
only slightly behind, negotiating the 
distance in 4:39:52. 

De Palma drove a Mercer, while 
Dawson piloted a Deltal. a new car. 
The course Is approximately 8** milea. 
requiring thirty-six laps to complete. 
Williams Chandler had driven his Ma- 
son car thirty-three laps when Starter 
Wagner signaled that the contest wa# 
at an end, and that third money went 
to him. 

De Palma's average, 66.8 miles per 
hour is slightly better than the pre- 
vious record for this event, which is 
an annual curtain-raiser to the Elgin 
trophy. The other five drivers wh,a 
entered the race were disposed of a« 
follows: 

H. Endicott went out after 259 
miles, after twice breaking hl« water 
pipe and his car catching fire. 

E. V. Rickenbelcher, pilot of a Ma- 
son, was In his twenty-eighth lap 
when the race was called. Spencer 
Wishart lasted 192 miles when a bro- 
ken spring sent him to the side line*. 

C. N. Luttrel lasted 126 miles, when 
•le quit with a burnt-out connecting 
! od. 

Ralph Mulford, another Mason pilot, 
was out In the tenth lap. after lead- 
ing the field, with his crank shaft bro. 
ken. 

There were no accidents of a serious 
nature, although Endicott was ex- 
hausted when his machine quit. 

He recuperated In the field hospital. 
The weather was fair and while the 
track w«s a bit faster than a year ago, 
it was rougher than those who had 
been working on It had expected. Ten 
thousand persons saw the race. 

MANY MnGETFOR 

BALL PLAYERS 

List of Trades and Pur- 
chases By Major Leagues 
Announced. 

Cincinnati. Ohio. Aug. 30.— Exclusive 
of those players obtained by major 
league clubs from minor league teams 
through optional agreements, 302 play- 
-ers have either been traded or pur- 
chased by major league teams from 
each other, or from minor league teams, 
during the last year, according to a 
list handed down by the national base- 
ball commission. A large majority of 
these represent purchases from the 
minor leagues, some of these plavera 
not yet having reported to their teams! 
All trades or sales from Auk so 19i» 
to date, are Included. ' *• 

r,J^t American league teams carried 
off the honors. 101 players coming to 
them during the last year, while an 
fv^"x,^9? *'J^'^'■ entered the ranks of 
the National league, or will when the 
deals or trades will have been conaum. 
mated. 

The Boston Nationals lead In men 
obtained. Twent.v-three players, new 
to the Boston National team, have been 
contracted for during the above men- 
tioned period. Cincinnati comes next 
with twenty-one. Detroit is third 
with nineteen. 

XT "^^^ ,^**™?^*,?'''*^" «^*8o Instructed the 
Nashville club of the Southern league 
tp pay the Pittsburg club 11,600 within 
three days for Player Arthur Hoffman 
The commission allowed the claims 
of the St. Louis American league club 
against Player B. Walker for 167.26. 
and against Player C. E. Wares for 
127.50. The players are now with th« 
Montgomery dUGc 



^H^MMON VAllLV^ "Bok *Tfel4 






iiidBMli 



J>' 




f 




PROCTOR AND ALL STARS 
READY FOR BIG CONTEST 



A NEW TENNIS STAR 



The crack Proctor bas«iball team 
will line up against the All-Stars Oi 
Dulutli and Superior at Desmond field, 
tomorrow afternoon In a game that 
•ho'jld prove one of the most intf rest- 
ing contests that has been played here 
for sometime. 

Darby O'Brien will be at second base 

for the all stars, while Chicken or 

tthO'Ks will be on the mound. Op- 
fcosod to the pitching of the Isaguers 
J-ill be Renauldt. the youngster of the 
Frovtor team who will Vt-ry likely be 

rivfn a trial in rast company n« xt sea- 
en. During the presc-nt season the 
I'cung-ster has made a great rt-oord and 
he l.s plckfd as one of the fin.ds of 
Bc-ml-professlonal baseball. 

Manager Nor.-<tad of the Adams team 
together with Manager Desmond of the 

fiark have gone earefully over tho 
eania of the Ht-ad of the Lakes and 
t Is announced that the stars of the 



aggregations will be seen in action as 
the team representing Duluth. 

There will be a special train down 
from Proctor and it is expected that 
one of the largest crowds that has wit- 
nessed a Semi-professional game here 
for many seasons will be on hand when 
the game is called. 

Van Ormand of Superior, said to be 
the btst St mi-professional catclier at 
the Head of the Lakes, will be behind 
the bat, and Schweitzer of SL Paul, 
who played with the Northern league 
team during the present season, will 
also be in the line-up of the local team. 

Jack Desmond has what looks like 
the l>e8t senii-proiessional team gotten 
together for .<iome time, and if the 
Proctor team wins It must be given 
credit for having one of the best ball 
clubs In the N'ortnwest. 

It Is said that O'Brien will take the 
occasion to look over gome of the senii- 
professlonal talent with an eye of lin- 
ing up some players for the 1911 White 
Sox. 





FOOTBALL COACH NOW SUPREME 

Position Not One in Which All Is Acclaim and Glory- 
Serious and Hard Work to Develop 
Winning Team. 




o* --yW 



MM 



J 



New York. Au^. Jo. — During the next • Michigan is looking forward to 

ths the football coach will | ern triumphs, while Illinois hopes for 



. .- . - „ East 

three mon 

mle supreme upon college campus and ' great improvement under its new foot 
Ifrldiron. To the candidates for places ball mentor, Bob Zuppke. 



«>n the eleven his word will be law, and 
io thr- non-playing student he will be 
l.he one person In whose hand rests the 
ifuture of the university. 

The position of football coach is not 
<)iT? !n which ail is acclaim and giory. 
?rhe task 5f developing a winning team 



TennlM Players. 

The recent national championship 
tennis tournament at Newport pro- 
duced many interesting sidelights, in 
addition to title holders. The entrants 
ranged from youths to men of midille 
age. It was a question, in many 



WILLIAM JOHNSTON, 
One of the Youngest Stars in the Tennis World and One of the Greatest 

Players. 



4-B0X)N6 COIITESTS-4 

NEW ARE\.\, MLPERIOll. 
Double Wfnd-up — 9 o'clock Sharp. 
OittiB^r l>oo«iiAnn vs. Steve Kelchel. 
Steve (>ardaer \m. Jack Hendricks. 
Prlccii — $1, 91.50 and 92. 



SUPERIOR ATHLETIC CLUB 

TicketH on nale at lUnckMrood'tt. 



calls for serious and hard work, even ! matches, of skill and finesse of wrist 
tinder the most favorable conditions, and racquet pitted against the smash 



]ilven with an abundance of satlsfac 
tory material the judgment and 
thought that must be given to the se- 
lection of Just the right combination 
is but a smail portion of the work. 
*rhe rirst and second teams must be 
<arefully drilled and traln»-d and In the 



Ing strokes and stamina of youth. 
Neither extreme came through to thj 
final rounds, but the efforts of both 
classes were none the less interesting, 
school boys of 16 and 17 faced gray 
haired players old enough to be their 
, , ^ . ^ ^ , fathers, and neither asked nor gave 

<nd. if defeat comes in the nnal and i quarter. A perfect spirit of sports- 
Mg game of the season, the coach | manshlp marked every match and the 
reaps all the blame. If the reverse Is way some of the young men wielded 



wits and racquets In these court bat- 
tles argues well for the safety of the 
Davis cup In years to come. 
, ,» . » ^ ^, F. A. Drew of St. Louis, a youth of 

t It is today E.very I is years, fought his way to the third 
r-slty has _elthe£ an round; O C. Caner went one step fur- 
ther, while young W. L. McKim was 
victorious until he faced Nat Nlles. The 



true his share of the glory Is small 
end fleeting. 

Without the football coach, however, 
football would fall far short of the 
icientiflc game that It Is today. Every 
<ollof?e and unlve 

eiumni coaching system, or an alumnus 
cf some other Institution teaching the 
joung men how to tackle, dodge, fall 
fn the ball, and the numberless other 
Iridlvldual £nd combination secrets 
that go to complete the gridiron educa- 
tion of the player. Of the several hun- 
dred colleges In various parts of the 
I'nlted States less than 15 per cent try 
to play football with the coach left 
cut. Even the leading high schools 
and preparatory academies have their 
laid coaches. 

Yale Plans Early Start. 

All the football mentors will have 
their charges at work within the next 
two or three weeks and the land will 
resound with the thud of. boot against 
ball and body against i^-f. Yale has 
jlann^'d an ear'y start, and Capt. 
tletcham will take a squad of players 
t > Sia:«con3et, Mass., on Monday for 
preliminary practice before the New 
tiaven university formally opens Its 
doors for another scholastic year. 
Coach Hought< n of Harvard Is more 
deliberate as befits a champion, and he 
vill not gather his charges about him 
At Cambridge until Sept. 15. Capt". 
Store r. however, saw to It that very 
p-omL^ing player took at least one foot- 
\%\\ away with him at the beginning 
of the -summ.'r vacation, and the men 
doubtless were Instructed to report in 
condition if they hoped to make the 
eleven of 1913. 

Cornell will start its second season 

f?pt. 15 under the coaching of Dr. Al 
larpe. Under the new regime at 
Ithaca Cornell can be counted upon as 
a factor In Eastern football this sea- 
son. Princeton, too, plans for an early 
start, while the advent of George 
Erookis at Penn.^ylvanla will certainly 
liven up the Quaker campaign. 

In the Middle West Coach Stagg of 
Chicago hopes to recapture the con- 
ftrence championship; Coach Yost of 



GOVERNMENT TO 

SETTLE DISPUTE 



Army and Navy Heads Take 
Up Question of Foot- 
ball Game. 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 30. — ft took 
Secretary Daniels and Acting f?ecretary 
of War Breckinridge very few minutes 
to decide after they got in conference 
yesterday, to take a hand in the set- 
tlement of the question as to whether 
there is to be an Army-Navy football 



of his own liking^, who would call the 
game without any notice In favor of 
the home team, as things were be- 
ginning to look a litti* dark. 

This self made umpire, reversed the 
decision of the previous umpire, and 
ordered our man at second back to 
bat, and the man that scored back to 
second. We held that he had no right 
to reverse any previoWB decision. As 
the argument was going on the Nash- 
wauk third baseman and the pitcher 
left the field and sat on the bench, the 
pitcher afterwards returned. While 
this was all going on our man re- 
mained at second, and the next man 
up 9tood waiting at the plate for the 
ball to be delivered. The self made 
umpire deemed it necessary to call 
the game in favor of Nashwauk, with 
the score a tie, a man on second and 
nobody out in the first half of the 
ninth. It looked like a bad case of 
cold feet to nearly everybody present. 
Yours very truly, 

D. K. MONROE. 



NATIONAL league "! 



S?racri*n^«n^ S^^ZJ^^ ^f^^^^*" """"'^^h ! ^a'"« ^''^^ ^^11. After a very brief con 

fir better '^ T^ wf *°"t'hf'^ ''°"'■^^ ^, feroQfe they announced they would a.sl 
rar oetter. It was the remarkable . t»,^ j«_-x„r^_->, ^« *u- ^_*:,., j 



H. W. Slocum, two players whose 
names were famous In tennis thirty 
odd years ago. Lacking the speed and 
endurance of the olden days thev 
fenced off defeat with supple wrists 
until they reached advanced rounds. 
The famous one armed player, W. F. 
Burden, also reached the fourth round 
and his skill with the racquet, togeth 

i 
c 
menL 

Sonder Tacht Coatests. 

The original International sonder 
yacht contests, the sixth of which will 
begin on Monday off Marblehead, Mass., 



Both Army and Navy officers here 
expressed the opinion that the game 
would be played as usual. 

Secretary Daniels received a tele- 
gram from Secretary Garrison approv- 
ing the proposed conference. » 



Navy'B Attitude. 

Annapolis, Md.. Aug. 30 — A statement 



HAVING ENGINE 
TROUBLE, MR. 
AUTO OWNER? 



a 



kl 



>r with his ability to snap the ball I ''^^arding the cancellation of the an- 

nto the air and serve with deadly ore- ""^^ Army-Navy football game wa.s is. 

;ision, was a feature of the tourna- ^"?^^ yesterday afternoon by the exec- 

-- " ^"® lourna u^j^.^ committee of the Navy Athletir 

association. 

"The navy's attitude throughout,"' ac- 
cording to the statem^'nt, "has Ijecn a 

_ ...^„^ ^.ido^ willingness to play the game at any 

can be traced to the visit Vo" this coun- ' P°'"* approximately midway between 
try eleven years ago of Prince Henry I Annapolis and West Point, where a 
of Prussia, brother of the German em- ' reasonable number of seats could be 
peror, and the yachting enthusiasm of ' Provided. Franklin field came nearest 
Henry Howard of Boston, a member of ^^ fulfilling the desires." 
the New York and Eastern Yacht clubs I "^^^ Navy reply to the Army's sug- 
Mr. Howard met Prince Henry In 1902 i P^estlon that the game oe played at the 
and upon renewing their acquaintance I "^^^^ Ground.s, New York, was that 
two years later In Germany the plan I ''there seemed no Justification for ask- 
of sending three representative Ger- I *"8" *he midshipmen to spend .sixteen 
man boatg to race In American waters I ^°"" *"" route during the day when the 
was formulated. In 1906 the Initial re- 1 West Point cadets would spend only 
gatta resulted. | about four hours." 

In 1907 the American boats went to I — ^-.^-^-_^_^^ 

bpaln and were defeated. This trip ' 
was the result of a visit to Madrid of 
llr. Howard, who found King Alfonso 
much Interested In the sport Thre* 
J-ears later, however, the Americans 
evened up the score by winning from 
the Spanish visitors off Marblehead 



JAP CUE STAR HERE. 

Famous Billiardist Will Play the Best 
of the Americans. 

Ikujlro Tamura. champion billiard- 
ist of Japan, has chosen Chicago as 
the place in which to fit himself for a 
campaign against the best players of 
tne United States ■ - *" ' 



DANCE iSc'SiSf 

BY ADAMS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

AT LINCOLN PARK AUDITORIUM 

Second of Series ol Prize Waltzes 
Admlsglon SOc. Door Rights 



Yankees Lose Another. 

Philadelphia, Au^. 30.— Philadelphia 
again yesterday defeated New York 
In tlie second game,^a;e the series, 
which went Into ten iriftihgs before the 
winning run was scored, the final 
score being 3 to 2. Camnltz and Tes- 
reau engaged in an effective pitch- 
ing duel, and while the Giant out- 
pitched the former Pittsburg man in 
hits, his wlldness caused his undoing. 
In the tentii after Tesreau had fanned 
Camnitz, Byrne singled and Knabe and 
Paskert walked, filling the bases. Ma- 
gee lifted a long foul fly, which 
Burns caught after a hard run, but 
Byrne easily scored the winning run 
on the catch, as Burns' throw-in" went 
high over Wilson's head. From the 
first Inning until the tenth not a hit 
was made off Tesreau, the Phillies 
bunching three of their four hits in 
the fir.st inning for two runs. 

Camnltz would have won his gam© 
within the regulation nine innings by 
2 to 1, had not Doolan made a two- 
base wild throw of Shager's grounder 
in the sixth. He eventually scored 
after stealing third, on Fletcher's 
single to center. A pass to Murray and 
bnodgrass' double g.ivo the Giants 

Vl-^lF 5'"^*. '■"" o^ the game In the 
mth. Catcher Burns, purchased from 
Montreal reported to the Phillies yes- 
terday. Score: R H. E 
New York ....0000110000 — 2 7 i 
Philadelphia ..2 000 00 0oi — 3 4 1 
Batteries — Tesreau and Wilson; 
Can<nltz and Killifer. Umpires — Bren- 
nai, and Eason. 



National League. 

itandlutf i>f ti>« CIttba. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

New York 82 39 .678 

Philadelphia 69 45 .605 

Chicago 66 56 .546 

Pittsburg 63 55 .534 

Brooklyn 52 64 .488 

Boston 50 66 .431 

Cincinnati 49 76 .392 

St. Liouis 45 77 .369 

Yesterday's Results. 

Philadelphia, 3; New York, 2. 
Chicago, 6; Pittsburg, 1. 
St. Louis, 3; Cincinnati, 2. 

Gaines Today. 

Chicago at Pittsburg. 

St. Louis at Cincinnati. 

Boston at Brooklyn, (two games). 

New York at Philadelphia, 

» 

American League. 

Staudlne oC th« Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Philadelphia 81 39 .675 

Cleveland 73 49 .599 

Washington 67 52 .563 

Chicago 65 ■'69 .524 

Boston 59 69 .500 

Detroit 52 71 .423 

St. Louis 48 79 .378 

New York 39 77 .336 

Yesterday's Results. 

Cleveland, 3; Sti l^ouis, 0. 

Games Today. 

t)etroit at Chicago. 
Cleveland at fet. Louis. 
Washington at Boston, (two games). 
pTiriddelphla at New York, (two 
games). 

American Association. 

standing of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Milwaukee 80 54 .597 

Minneapolis 77 57 .575 

Louisville 76 58 .567 

Columbus 75 60 .555 

St. Paul 60 71 .458 

Toledo 58 73 .443 

Indianapolis 49 82 .374 

Kansas City 48 85 .362 

Yestterday's Re.snlts. 

Milwaukee, 10; Kansas City, 3. 
Columbus, 5; Louisville, 4. 
Minneapolis, 3; St. Paul, 2. 
Indianapolis, 8; Toledo, 2. 

Games Today. 

Milwaukee at Kansas City. 
St. Paul at Minneapolis. 
Toledo at Indianapolis. 
Louisville at Columbus. 



of the series from Cincinnati vester- 
day, 3 to 2. Both Sallee and Packard 
pitched good ball, the former not per- 
mitting Cincinnati to score until the 
eighth inning, when the locals made 
three hits, which, with a base on balls 
VI as good for two runs, 'vvhlie Packard 
allowed the visitors only five hits. 
.Sue^.s relieved Packard at the begrln- 
nlng of the ninth, Clark having bat- 
ted for Packard In the eighth Inning. 
Magee made a remarkable throw from 
deep left field in the eighth Inning, 
cutting off Berghammer, who was 
trying to score. Score: R. H. E. 

St. Louis 00 120000 — 3 5 1 

Cincinnati 00 00020 — 2 7 1 

Batteries — Sallee and Wingo; Pack- 
ard, Suggs and KHng. Umpires — Rlg- 
ler and Byron. 



nlng, Compton, of the locals, attempted 
to score from tlilrd when Felsch snared 
Mattick's high fly, but Felsch made a 
great throw and caught Compton at 
the plate. "The score: R. H. E. 

Milwaukee 10004221 — 10 16 

Kansas City ...00110000 1— 3 12 4 
Batteries — Dougherty and Hughes; 
Allison, Daniels and O'Connor. Um- 
pires — Chill and Erwln. 

♦ 

Senators Win Out. 

Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 30. — Columbus 
won from Louisville, 5 to 4, yesterday 
by a rally In the eighth Inning. Kom- 
mers tied the score with a triple, 
Hlnchman and Miller being on bases, 
and made the winning run on Smith's 
fly. Woodburn pitched a better grade 
of ball than Ferry, but was given poor 
support. The score: R. H. E. 

Columbus 1000 00 13 X — 5 7 3 

Louisville 10020100 — 4 6 2 

Batteries — Ferry and Smith; Wood- 
burn and Severeld. Umpires — Handi- 
boe and Westervelt. 



Millers Score Victory. 

St. Paul, Minn., Aug. 30. — Minneapo- 
lis defeated St. Paul yesterday, 3 to 2, 
In a game that was a pltciilng due?, 
between Brandt and Mogrldge, the vis- 
iting twirler excelling in control, al- 
though he allowed more hits than the 
local hurler. Both St. Paul's runs were 
scored by Booe, who featured at the 
bat with two triples. The score: 

R. H. E. 
Minneapolis ....000210000 — 3 5 
St. Paul 0100000 01—2 8 

Batteries — Mogridge and Owens; 
Brandt and James. Umpires — Murray 
and Connolly. 



Indians Take Second. 

Indianapolis, Ind., Aug. 30. — Toledo's 
errors and Indianapolis' opportune hit- 
ting' WQti the second game of the se- 
ries with Toledo for the locals, 8 to 
2. Baskette nad a bad Inning in the 
fourtfi, Indianapolis made three hits 
560ht for five runs, and retired In fa- 
vor of Dahner. The score: R. H. E. 

Toledo 10 10 10 0—2 7 7 

Indianapolis ...0 10 5 2 000x — 8 8 2 

Batteries — Baskette, iJahner and 
Devogt, Young; Willis and (^asey. Um- 
pires — Johnstone and O'Brien. 

OREGON KID IS 



CHAMPION BOAT 



■ Oregon Kid W«i.'ked away with class D 
and Little Lead7r»X Lady with class C 
PeorlA, Muscat!n>^d Burlington are 
In line for the next ffsatta. Minne- 
apolis has Invited the aaSwciatlon for 
1916. 

SCHWENK TO REPORT 
TO ST. LOUIS BROWNS. 

Saginaw, Mich., Aug. 30. — A message 
that came while "Lefty" Schwtnk, 
"Iron Man" of the Saginaw baseball 
club of South Michigan league, was 
defeating Adrian here yesterday, and 
allowing them only three hits, notified 
the big southpaw to report to the St. 
Louis Americans on Monday, when the 
team is to play Detroit. 

-• — 

U I rich Program. 

Curley Ulrich has completed th<» pro- 
gram for his boxing show in Scperior 
Monday night. Steve Ketchel and 
I^anny Goodman will meet In the main 
go, and Steve Gardner and Jack Hcn- 
rlcks in the windup. Two other boute 
have been announced, 

— • 

Merriam to Coach. 

Chicago, Aug. 30.— "Ned" Merriam. 
the former star fullback of the Unl- 
Tlrtf n^ °^ Chicago football team in 
1907-08, was today appointed coach 
tor the Iowa agricultural college. 

wf/h ?l?l 7^* J!"'':'? ^^ * 440-yard man 
with the low hurdles. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



DULUTH ALL-STARS 
TO PLAY MOOSE LAKE. 



Have you found out the eaiLse? 

Poor oil. isn't It? That's gen- 
erally the reason for a large part 
of engine trouble. 

INSIST!— DEMANDI- 
Buy 



M9N0GR 
OIL 



Your engine troubles will 
cease, you'll get more power and 
you'll be a happy man again. 





has agreed, to practice with Demarest f.lTZ 7h" ^\^\^J'L^ *"1** *« *^« ^ 
until such time when the two masters!"^' ^' A^® ,^"J"^'' ^"^^^ ^^^^ they w 
of the game will start on. an extended h"'" ^""^^ °^ ^^^ contests. 



e 
will 



tour of the West. According to their I = 
plans the trip will be instituted about 



Oct. 1. or perhaps earlier. The Itinerary H^^ J^ ^^ ■"" P^ All 
will be announced later. M^^ MM. Z^ r W^ MM I | 

It was at Demarest's solicitation ■^W ^^ ^i^ ■■ ** ^^ ■■ ■■ 

D 



TOMORROW 



I Proctor vs Duluth 

a«~AT DESMOND PARK 

Game Called at 3 p. m. Admission 25c 




and upon the advice of his friends, 
Kahachl Abe, consul of Japan at Chi- 1 
cago and I. Nishl, representative of . 
the Japanese Tea Grower's association 
with headquarters In Chicago, that 
Tamura signed up with the clever Do- , 
marest Like Koji Yamada, his coun- 
tryman and pupil who came to Amer- 
ica last fall and surprised the fan.^ by 
finishing third to Hoppe and Slosson 
In the big championship tournament 
in New York, Tamu»a is here to per- 
fect his game and he figured out no | 
better way of making a start than to 1 
tie up with Demarest It might be L- ^^. „ 

added that this decision of the new To the Sporting Editor of The Herald: 
Invader from the Far East was hur- . ^ notice that Nashwauk lays claim 
ried after he had met and played with I to the g'ame played on their grounds 
the brilliant young Chlcagoan In ""' "" " "" " 

George Sutton's room on Wabash ave- 
nue. 



Cubs Beat Pirates. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. Aug. 30.— MLsjudged 
pop files and one or two timely hits 
gave Chicago five runs off McQuillen 
U\.. .® fourth Inning yesterday, and 
Pittsburg lost the first game of the 
series by 6 to 1. Cheney pitched a 
grand game, holding Pittsburer to four 
scattered hits. But for a wild pitch 
that allowed Carey to go from first to 
third In the first Inning, Cheney 
would have scored a shutout. Hen- 
lli^' ^P^ relieved McQuillen In the 
nfth did not allow the visitors a hit 
but he walked five men. Score: R. H E 
Cnlcago 00051000 — 6 9 2 

Pittsburg loooaoooo— 1 4 

Batteries — Cheney and Archer; Mc- 
Quillen, Hendrlx and Gibson, Simon. 
Lmplres — Klem and Ortn. 

Cardinals Take Opener. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. Aug. 30.— St. Louis 
by bunching hits, won the first game 



Browns Are Blanked. 

St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 30. — With men 
on bases yesterday, Falkenberg's 
speedy curves had St. Louis baffled 
and not a local player crossed the 
plate throughout the game, while 
Cleveland tallied three runs by a 
combination of hits and errors. Fal- 
kcnberg struck out ten local batsmen, 
five of them when hits would have 
counted. In the final round the com- 
edy of errors started, Cleveland scor- 
ing two runs on three errors, and a 
single and a base on balls. Score: 

R W 1^ 

Cleveland 010 000 00 2 — s' e' 6 

St Louis 000 0000 — 6 5 

Batteries — Baumgardner and McAl- 
lister; Falkenberg and Carlsch. Um- 
pires — Dinecn and Sheridan. 



Portland Speeder Takes 
Webb Trophy and Mis- 
sissippi Valley Honors. 

Keokuk, Iowa, Aug. 30. — The Webb 
trophy carrying a first prize of $1,000 
and possession of the trophy for one 
year together with the championship 
of the Mississippi Valley Power Boat 
association, was won by Oregon Kid 
yesterday. The boat is owned and was 
driven by S. F. Block of Portland, Or., 
and Harj-y Grant, engineer The time 
for the twenty miles was 26:28. 

The Kid was not pushed to win. 

Barnacle, owned by Adam Welkler of 
Chicago, twice took fire, but later fin- 
ished third. Hydro-Bullet finished sec- 
ond. Earl Deakln, its driver, was tak- 
en from the boat In the third lap after 
being injured when it turned over on 
a turn. C. H. Hanley of Muscatine, 
newly elected admiral of the associa- 
tion, then took the wheel and brought 
the boat In second. 

P. D. Q. Ill, driven by Dr. A. C. 
Strong of Burlington, took two firsts 
and second In class A. B and C 

Scarey William, owned by A. J. Rud- 
dick, Keokuk, took second in class A 
and B. Ugly Duckling, Harry Godlev, 
Davenport, Iowa, took third in C class 



Get Up Early, Boys. 

The members of the Fairmont team 
are requested by Manager Delburn to 
be on the Fifty-second avenue west 
grounds tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock. 

AIRY PERSIFL-VGE. 
♦ h^ w^° Tribune: "What lofty 
thoughts must come to you, Mr Flvre 
as you go sailing through the air' 
thou.sand8 of feet above thi earth free 

fo l^ilfv ^^'' '^''"'^ 5^°" commit 'tlS 

^3-, t^^^^ ^^'*^ Flyppe. such thought* 
rmi be Xar f^r above the heads of 
ordinary rnortals.^' 




ENJOY A fiOOO MEAL 




among pleasant surroundings — 
American and Chinese dishes, private 
dining rooms. Everything home- 
like. Music every evening 

TUXEDO CAFE 

214 We«t Superior Street. 
OppoHito Ga!«iier'ii Store. 



AMERICAN ASSN. | 



Brewers Swamp Kaws. 

Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 30. — ^Milwau- 
kee swamped the locals here yesterday, 
10 to 3. Allison, secured by Kansas 
City from the St. Louis Americans, 
started and worked well until the 
sixth, when Milwaukee, after two were 
down, scored four runs on two singles, 
a double and a home run. They secured 
two more singles In this inning, but 
they were wasted. After the sixth, 
Milwaukee found no difficulty in scor- 
ing, putting two across In the seventh 
and eighth and one in the ninth. 

Felsch, of the visitors. In his first 
three times at bat, secured two doubles 
and a home run, and in the second In- 



GERMANS HERE TO STUDY 
AMERICAN ATHLETIC SYSTEM 



FAN DENIES THAT 
KEEWATIN WAS BEATEN 



LANGFORDTOMEET 

JO HNSON IN PARIS. 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 30. — Sam Lang- 
ford, negro heavyweight, is to meet 
Jack Johnson, heavyweight champion 



last Sunday with Keewatln, by a score 
of 8 to 11. This I want to deny and set 
the truth before the fans. 

The game was marred by much 
wrangling throughout, but it was not 
until the tnlnth inning that Nashwauk 
deemed It wise to start a dispute to 
save themselves from defeat When 
Keewatln came to bat in the ninth the 
score was 8 to 11 in favor of Nash- 
wauk. Keewatln scored two runs, 
and had a man on second. The next 
oft'he'woVrdV'ln 'rboirt'^for \he'tUl"''ln ' J^t", l^ ^',*. '-^^ two bases along the 
Paris, Dec. 20. Arrangements for thS ' It ""^ ^''^® ""!' the outfielder made an 
match were completed by cable yester i ^HX"" bSt'^ t^ hi"}" ht" ^", ^^^' ^'': 
day, accordhig to Joseph Woodman kI!,?^' . i" , '* J^^^ ^^^ ^'^^e and 
manager for Langford. woodman, bounded foul. The umpire called It 

The bout Is to be of twentv rounds thi ' ,„Y ' j^ ^% held was so. Then 
and will be staged in thI ClrSe De , -t.^.T/'V^^'' °' ^^^ Nashwauk team. 
Paris, under the direction of T&orl ! hor^l ^iiiiH Y''^"^^^' «« »« "'^r of the 
^!r«„„i-J^!;^-^.Jf_5i'--tJer;^ru^^^ , XTt fi^^fhr'oVfhru^^p^rf o'^u^t \'L^. 





KNOWrfTHE 



ORLD OVER 



?oThi?2pp%fr\Tc2,"^rdinI^a%Sr'^'^ j t^' l^i^.tLVd \F tV'" ^^ This Comniittee Has Arrived in America From Germany to Study American 

ys. jthe Keewatln team, and put In one I Athletic Systems lA Pfeparation for the Olympic Games in Berlin in 1916. 



r^OING away?— mountains, 
^^ seashore, camp, a short trip or 
a long one— slip a Gillette into your 
bag. The Gillette shave is cool, 
smooth, clean— convenient. Three 
minutes does the trick— every 
morning, wherever you happen to 
be. And the new Gillette Blades 
are fine. 

Gillette Safety Razors, $5 and up. 
Uillette Blades: two sizes of Packet, 
6 Blades (12 shaving edges\ SOc; 
12 Blades {2A shaving edges), $ 1.00. 
Dealers ever3rwhere in tins city. 

GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMPANY, BOSTON 



— r 



■^1^- 





»-, . ' 



12 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 




CIETY 



]Mt»M)AV — Picnic partieM find Mailing | 
pnrtirN at Spitif lake branch of boat 
cliibt lleHMle-LewlM wediUas; dinner | 
dance at country club; Duluth peopie j 
leave for Ntate fair. i 

TlKSDAl — Ward Amea, Jr., dinner 
dnnce at country elubt tM>hoo|M opent I 
enrollment for fall term at normal 
■ehool; meetinK of I.innae aociety in 
ForeKtern' hall in the afternoon. 

WKDM'^SilAV — I'aMt PreMldentV club of 
the Roman's Kelief Corpa. reception 
for >lrn. A. t>. Kberhart at home of 
MrH. CharleM \V. C'ajnpbell In Mlnne- 
apollM. ^vhlch Duluth people tvlil at- 
tend: dancinte at Oatka branch of the 
boat club. 

Till KSDAV — Debutante dance for MImh 
Muriel l>rlndle. 

FHII>AV — First Woman'si Council meet- 
ing. Npcaker, MImn Margaret Culkln; 
mcetiuK of t entrol W. C. T. U. at 
Y. W. C. A., >Ir!». t'ulbertNOn and Mra. 
Hancock, MpcakerN: mectinie of Juve- 
nile drama ctaxM on I'ark I'oint. 

SATlitDAY — informal dancfoK at 
branchett of boat club. 



Pumnier is rapidly going: and school 
will beg-In on Tuesday, bo Duluth peo- 
ple have been busy this week en- 
joying outdoor sports and picnics. 

On Monday, Miss Ann McEwen en- 
tertained the members of her Sunday 
school class at a picnic at her sum- 
mer home at Fond du Lac. The guests 
went up on the last Herald excursion 
on the Columbia. 

Misses Gertrude and Clara Blesener 
were hostesses at a marshmallow 
roast at Amity creek, !n honor of 
their cousin. Miss Josephine Welter. 
On the same evening" Mrs. A. M. 
Worthington entertained twenty-four 
young people at a picnic dinner at 
Lincoln park. 

A picnic at PilHngs' park was en- 
joyed by the following youiv^ people 
Monday evening: Misses Margaret 
Callahan. Ethel Cro.sby, Eva Crosby, 
Myrtle Rivers, Esther Ostdahl. Mil- 
dred Burbrldge, Margaret Nici'.olson; 
Messrs. Joseph McDonald, Joseph Ra- 

Son, Russell Kilton., Robert McDonald, 
eorge Lind, Walter Yeager and Wal- 
ter Cleland. 

On Wednesday evening, Misw Jennie 
Scrosrgin of Mount Polaska, 111., was 
the guest of honor at a picnic supper 
at Fairmont park. 

Weddings have also taken much at- 
tention this week. On Monday eve- 
ning. Ml.«s Marion Cunningham be- 
came the bride of H. B. Haroldson of 
this city. Mr. Haroldson and his bride 
are now on a wedding trip in the East 
and after Nov. 1, they will be at home 
at 2204 East Second street. 

The Wedding of Mlss Hazel McKay 
to Dr. Smith of Crosby, Minn., took 
place at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. William F. McKay, 
1121 East Fourth .«<treet. After the 
ceremony, Dr. Smith and his bride left 
for a short wedding trip and will be 
at home after Sept 10 at Crosby, 
Minn. 

Miss Eva Louise Dean became the 
brldo of William W. Schaub of this 
city on Wednesday evening. The 
ceremony was performed at 8 o'clock 
at the Lester Park M. E. church. They 
will be at home after Nov. 1 at Hunt- 
er's Park. 

The wedding of Miss Matilda Fritz 
of this city to William H. Fish, Jr., of 
Washburn, Wis., was an event of 
Wednesday. 

Wednesday morning Miss Katherlne 
Pierce became the bride of Jeremiah 
McCarthy. After a short wedding 
trip they will be at home In the city. 

"The Festival," which was present- 
ed at the curling rink last evening 
and which proved such a brilliant suc- 
cess, also occupied the attention of a 




THREE "MERMAIDS" OE PHIUDELPHIA 
ARE SEEKING SWIMMING RECORDS 




Francis Haley, Sievart Thompson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ward Ames, Mr, and Mrs. 
W. C. Ryerson, Mr. and Mrs, E. P. 
Towne. Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hartley, 
Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Barnum, G. G. Bar- 
num, Jr., Mrs. J. D. Ray, Mr. and Mrs. 
George M. Crosby, Margaret Crosby, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Harrison. W. C. 
Harris of Fulton, Mo., J. A. Van Sant 
of Sterling, Ky.. Mr. and Mrs. Thom- 
as D. Merrill, Miss Esther Adams, Miss 
Marshall, Charles Agnew, Jr., G, M. 
Williams of New York city. Miss Ma- 
rlon McKenna, Miss Lou McKenna, 
Dan Mahoney, Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Wil- 
liamson, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hartman, 
Mr. and Mrs. George C. Stone, Miss 
Elizabeth Lee, Harvey Clapp, Stanley 
Coburn, A. W. Taussig, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. F. Henry, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Truss of Birmingham, Ala., Mrs. J. D. 
Kevagh of St. Paul, C. G. Obermeyer 
and Prank A. Woods. 



MERMAIDS. 

These three members of the Mermaids Club of Philadelphia are coming 
champion swimmers in their class. They are, left to right: Olga Dorner, Agnes 
Huber and Kathryne Haire. At present they have records for pulchritude only 
but they are prize winners in that class. And some day they may win medals 
for swimming too. 



MISS WILSON'S 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

REOPENS 

at 1412 East Superior St. 

Monday, September the Fifteenth 



large number of Duluth people all 
week. 



Fashion Reigns 

The fashion of the present day de- 
/nands that the complexion of the 
well-groomed woman shall be clear 
and of snowy whiteness. To possess 
this necessary requirement invest at 
once in a bottle of 

GOURAUD'S 

Oriental 



c 



ream 



and enjoy the charms that are so ad- 
mired In a fashionable woman. Goa- 
raud's Oriental Cream is a liquid pow- 
der far surpassing the dry powders 
that have to be applied so frequently 
to gain the desired effect. It whitens, 
softens and clears the skin. It is abso- 
lutely free from grease, and conse- 
quently does not encourage the growth 
of hair. 

Gonraad'!^ Oriental Cream has been in 
actual use for nearly three-quarters of 
a century. This is the surest guaran- 
tee of its superiority. Ifi,you will use 
It regularly, you will know why it 
has been popular for so many years. 
At Druggists and Department Stores. 

FERD T. IIOPKIXS & SOX, Props., 
S7 Great Jones St., New York. 



€pent$ Of Interest 



Mrs. Ward Ames. Jr., entertained at 
a luncheon at the Northland Country 
club yesterday at 1 o'clock. The tables 
were prettily decorated with Ameri- 
can beauty roses. After the luncheon 
the guests enjoyed the afternoon play- 
ing golf. 

• • • 

Miss Harriet Nixon. 423 West Third 
street, entertained seven of her girl 
friends at a luncheon at her home 
Thursday noon. Golden glow and 
golden rod formed a pretty center- 
piece. 

« • « 

Mls» Ruby Anderson and Ida T. Carl- 
son were pleasantly surprised at the 
home of the former, 718 Fifth avenue 
east, last evening by a number of their 
friends. Miss Anderson and Mis« Carl- 
son have just returned from a visit 
in the East. 

• • • 

Miss Veronica Irvine entertained the 
members of the "Why Not Be In't" 
club, and friends last evening, at her 
home, 323 East Eighth street. The 
evening was pleasantly spent in games 
and dancing, and the following guests 
were entertained: 

Mrs. S. Irvine. 
Misses — 

Rose Hltzel, Veronica Irvine, 

Claire Houser, Ella Hansen, 

Irine Martin, Hattie Sabrow- 

Josephlne Guar- ski, 

del, Anora Parquette, 

Dora Parquette, Anna Sabrowskl. 
May Harkwell, 
Messrs. — 

I. Stock, Mike Reinharts, 

H. B. Hansen, Sam Irvine, 

George Thorn, G. E. Palmer. 

Ben Obert. W. Sellers, 

Al Cramer, G. A. Benson. 

• * • 

Miss Margaret Ryan, 213 Lake ave- 
nue north, entertained ten guests at 
a luncheon at her home Wednesday at 
1 o'clock, in honor of Mrs. Harry E. 
Bostwick, who has left for Minneapo- 
lis, where she will make her future 
home. The table was prettily deco- 
rated with baskets of sweet peas. 

Mrs. Martha Wylle. Mrs. Bostwlck's 
mother, will leave the latter part of 
next week for Minneapolis, where she 
will make her home with her daugh- 
ter. 

« • • 

Rev. and Mrs. J. H, Earle and Miss 
Eva Earle of Pomona, Cal., were tiie 
guests of honor at an informal recep- 
tion yesterday afternoon and evening 
given by Rev. and Mrs. Milton Fish. 502 
North Twenty-fifth avenue west. Clus- 
ters of Shasta daisies, hydrangeas and 



golden glow formed the decorations. 
A charming violin solo. "Venetian Love 
Song," (Nevln), was g-ven by Miss 
Earle, with "Cupid's Garden" as an en- 
core. Vocal numbers "Old-Fa.shinned 
Roses. ' (Keithley), and "Aloha Oo." the 
Honolulu national song were giveri by 
Miss Ruth Glover. Mrs. Fish was ac- 
companist. Miss Earle gave several 
violin numbers at the evening's recep- 
tion, also. Fred Hanson gave a vocal 
number during the evening: Jamf-s 
Whltcomb Riley's "Just Awearyin' for 
You," with an encore. Mrs. Hanson ac- 
companied him. A vocal solo. "A Per- 
fect Day." was Riven by Mrs. Mae 
Balllle, with Miss Milne as accom- 
panist. Seventy-five guests called dur- 
ing the afternoon and evening. Assist- 
ing in receiving in the afternoon were 
Mrs. W. B. Patton and Mrs. .Jennie 
Leonard. Mrs. Fred Hanson and Mrs. 
J. E. Thomas assisted In the evening. 
Miss Earle will leave the latter part of 
next week for Pomono. Mr. and Mrs. 
Earle will remain as guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fish for some weeks longer, 

• • « 

Miss Edna Mahnke, 15 Fifty-.3econd 
avenue east, was hostess at a luncheon 
at the Tea Rooms, and an Orpheum 
party yesterday afternoon. There were 
nine guests. Miss Mahnke will leave 
tomorrow evening for Hinckley, where 
she will have charge of the model 
training school. 

• • • 

The members of the Kodapha club 
are planning an all-day picnic at their 
cabin on Monday. The affair will be 
given In honor of Ray Johns. Earl Wat- 
erworth, and Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Spink of St. Paul, who are spending 
the week-end in Duluth. 

• * * 

Miss ,Janet Haley entertained last 
evening at her home. 1810 M''est Third 
street. In honor of a number of friends 
who will leave in a few days for the 
Minnesota "U." Five hundred was 
played and a dainty lunch was served 
to the following guests: 
Misses — 

Fern Brooks, Ruth Brown, 

Ruth Scott, Effie Llndahl, 

Myra Willensen. Florence Halver- 
Marle MacDonald, son, 

Ingabore Wholin, E. McClegon of 
Hildagard Wholin Alpena, Mich 

Hazel Allen, Hazel Butchart 

Helen Grimes, 
Me.^dames — 

Robert Jennings, P. R Haley. 

• • • 

Miss Margaret Healy of 125 East 
Fourth street entertained at dinner 
Tuesday evening In honor of Miss 
Mary O'Neill of Oil City Penn., Mrs 
Farnand of Hlbblng and Mrs. F Pow- 
ers of Iron River, Mich. Besides the 
guests of honor the others present 
were: Mr and Mrs. J. G. O'Neill Mrs 

B. O'Donnel. Miss Flora Walsh Miss 
Jeanl«> Healy, James O'Neill, ' John 
Healy. The dining room was deco- 
rated with white and yellow garden 
flowers. 

• • • 

Those who motored to the Hotel 
Cloquet during the past week were: 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Burgess. Mrs. Ely. 
Harold Burgess. Mr. and Mrs. J. A 
Hayner. Mr. and Mrs. E. Windom, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. C. Pattlson, Mr. and Mrs. 
L. G. Pattlson. Miss Agnes Shaw, Mr 
and Mrs. P. Y. Crowlev. Mr. and Mrs 

C. F. Halev Miss Katherlne Halev, 



events Planned 



Mr. and Mrs. William Prindle will 
entertain at a debutante dance for Miss 
Muriel Prindle I'hursday evening. 

• • ♦ 

There will be a meeting of the 

Llnnae society at Foresters' hall Tues- 
day afternoon. 

* * • 

Tuesday morning school will open. 
Normal school students will register 
on that day and their regular classes 
will begin Wednesday morning. 

* « * 

The next meeting of the Juvenile 
Drama class will he held on Minpe- 
Bota point next Friday and the mem- 
bers will enjoy a picnic before the 
reading of the play. Yesterday the 
weekly meeting was held at Lester 
park and the play, "The Necklace," 

was read. 

• * • 

On Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. 
Ward Ames Jr., will entertain at a 
dinner dance at the Northland Country 
club. 





By PEQGY PEABODY 



Many Crimes Are Committed in 
The Name of Justice. 

Why is It that there cannot be more 
equity fixed with the law? 

There are countless cases happen- 
ing in this country every day wherein 
some great injus- 
tice is done, simply 
because the letter 
of the law must be 
carried out, or of 
some red tape reg- 
ulations which per- 
haps may do more 
harm than good. 

This question is 
raised In my mind 
from reading of a 
case of a navy de- 
serter, who recent- 
ly was pardoned by 
President Wl 1 s o n. 
• This man had not 
done right by his family — he had de. 
serted them, and his wife. With her 
small children, was compelled to go to 
court and complain against him. It 
developed that It was parental inter- 
ference that caused the separation, 
rather than any desire on the husband's 
part not to care for his family. 



? 




He soon repented, and started to re- 
turn home, when his money gave out 
and he was forced to enlist In the navy. 
After serving but a short time, he was 
arrested by the civil authorities on the 
charges preferred by his wife, and 
placed on probation, after becoming 
reconciled with his wife. He then went 
to work nobly and supported his fam- 
ily well for seven months. Then Uncle 
Sam stepped In; he was arrested for 
deserting from the navy and sent to 
prison for eighteen months. 

His family soon became needy again, 
and before long were on the verge of 
starvation. A newspaper took up the 
case, and public charity was called in 
to care for them. This paper and one 
man In official life took up the matter, 
and finally convinced the authorities 
that great injustice was being done, 
as the man was not a wilful deserter, 
and he was pardoned. Now he is with 
his family, is working regularly and 
they are happy. 

It Is unwise to let a real criminal 
escape punishment, but infinitely worse 
to punJsh one who is not, and to make 
Innocent ones suffer, as well. It Is not 
necessary to do this in order to pro- 
tect society. 



meddings 

The wedding of Miss Mary Eleanor 
Shlely of St. Paul to Edwin James 
Kenny of this city took place at the 
St. Paul Cathedral this morning at 9 
o'clock. Miss Shiely has taught in the 
Virginia schools for several years and 
is well known in Duluth. Miss Eliza- 
beth McCarthy of St. Paul, was 
one of the bridesmaids. She has a 
wide circle of friends in Duluth, also 
having taught in Virginia with Miss 
Shiely. Mr. Kenny is a graduate of 
the Michigan university, and has been 
practicing law in Duluth for several 
years, 

• • • 

The wedding of Miss Margaret A. 
Ryan to Herbert Francis Clyne took 
place at the Cathedral this morning. 
The bride was attended by her sister, 
Miss Nellie Ryan, and a brother of the 
groom acted as best man. After the 
ceremony a breakfast was served at 
the home of the bride's parents, 116 
West Fourth street. Mr. Clyne and his 
bride left this afternoon for a short 
wedding trip and will be at home in 
the olty aftor Oot. 1. Mies Ryan has 
been employed at The Herald office for 
two years. 

Personajjnention 

Miss Gladys Laberie of Spokane, 
Wash., arrived in the city Tuesday eve- 
ning to be the guest of Miss Claire 
Dillon of East Fifth street for an in- 
definite period. Miss Laberie was ac- 
companied as far as St. Paul by hef 
mother, Mrs Peabody Laberie, who is 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Hill of 

St. PauL 

• • • 

• * • 

Mrs. R. E. Denfeld, who has been 
spending a few days at Burnithfeld, 
hat, returned to her home in Hunter's 

Park. 

• * * 

Mrs L. D. Whiteside of London 
road is visiting Mrs. I. G. Ketchum of 
Tower, Minn., for a few weeks. 
« • * 

Mrs. John A. Richardson and son, 
Allen, 4102 West Fourth street, left 
Wednesday night for a short visit In 

"Winnipeg. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. O. L Mather, 201 South 
Twfnty-first avenue east, have as 
their guests, Mrs. A. W. Mather, 
cij.ughter, Laura, and son, Albert. 

• * * 

Mrs. C. W. Anglin, 113 Wlckton 
street, Is visiting in Kilbourn for three 

weeks. 

• • • 

Mrs. Frank McCormick, 2015 East 

Second street, returned Tuesday from 

a two weeks' visit with her mother 

at the Soo. 

« • • 

Mrs. James Mulcahy's guests, Mrs. 
James Mulcahy and daughter, Eva, 
have gone for a lake trip to Cleveland, 
Ohio, where they will visit for sev- 
eral weeks. 

• • « 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Hatley, 407 West 
Fifth street, have had as their guests 
for six weeks Mrs J. B. Nutter and 
daughter, Beatrice, of Chicago. 
« * * 

Mr and Mrs. A. M. Marshall were at 
the Brule during the early part of the 
week, and had as their guests Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas D. Merrill, 2626 Greysolon 

road. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. D, C. Loran«?er, 1014 
East Fourth street, have returned to 
their home after a visit with Mr. 
Loranger's parents In Ontonagon, 

Mich. 

« • « 

Mrs. P. Kraft, 412 Eleventh avenue 
east, who has been visiting for the 
past ten weeks with her son in New 
York, has returned to her home. 

• * * 

Mrs. Clara Dean, 2501 Minnesota 
avenue, has been called to Minneapo- 
lis on account of the serious Illness 

of her mother. 

• • • 

Mrs. Fred Derouin and her moth- 
er, Mrs. Theodore L. Everson of Eau 
Claire, are visiting friends in Duluth 
and Superior. 

« • • 

Mr and Mrs. J. W. Murphy, 1115 
Lincoln avenue, have as their guest 
their niece. Miss Dorothy Murphy, of 
Clinton, Iowa. 

• • • 

Mrs. H. A. Waste of Minneapolis and 
Mrs. Charles Eden are visiting In Du- 
luth on their way home from an out- 
ing at Shallow I^^ke, Minn. Mr. Waste 
attended the Methodist conference at 
Superior and Is now a guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. P. Waste, 1029 West Sec- 
ond street. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McGonagle of 
Hunter's Park have as their guests. 



Private School Work 

ClaMM in High School (ubiMtt: Latin, German, 
History, Atoebra, Geometry, Botany, Engllth, Gram- 
mar and Compoelttott. Bcglnninp Sept. 8. 1913. 
Hours, 9 a. m. to 12:30 p. m. Mrs. Mabelle Hal- 
leek' St. Clair. A. B., Ph. M., UnWorslty of Mlohi- 
(an, 20 Twelfth avtniM oast. 'Phone, Melroee, I96S. 
Reference, Mra. Tiiomaa Davis Merrill, 2625 Gray. 
iolM road; 





513-517 Nicollet Avenue, 
Minneapolis 

To State Fair Visitors 

and Women of Duluth 

NNOUNCE their complete preparedness to show all the 
late fashionable and exclusive models that will be fav- 
ored by correctly dressed Women, Misses and Girls for 

Fall and Winter 1913-1914 

Embracing in profusion the highest types of refined 
exclusive attire in a broad range of prices to suit 
every purse from the modest to the most lavish, 

TAILORED SUITS SMART MOTOR COATS 

STREET COATS WOOL TAILOR FROCKS ~ 

SILK STREET FROCKS 

AFTERNOON AND EVENING GOWNS 

DRESSY AND TAILORED WAISTS 

SMART "FIRST" HATS AND DRESSY HATS 

" NOVELTY FUR S 

NOTE — We have planned specially attractive offerings for STATE 
FAIR WEEK that arc unusual economics well worth your careful consideration. 



i 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Sargent of 
Paris, France. 

* « * 

Miss Harriet Shannon, who has been 
\islting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
E. Shannon, at Muskogee, Ind., will 
return to the city tomorrow to continue 
her kindergarten work in the schools 
of the city. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Killorin, 2710 
Greysolon road, are spending a few 
days at their summer home at Pike 

lake. 

« * * 

Mrs. W. L. Leonard and family of 
Eau Claire are guests at the home of 
Mrs. E. J. MacLeod, 1819 East Eighth 
street. 

• • • 

Miss Mlna MacAskill of 809 East 
First street left Tuesday for St Paul 
to visit friends for two weeks. 

* * * 

Miss Georgle McTague of Prince 
Edward Island, is visiting her broth- 
er, P. B. McTague of 1429 East Second 

street. 

« * * 

Miss Lily Armstrong, Detroit, Mich., 
and Miss Wlnnlfred Armstrong, St. 
Thomas, Ont., are visiting their brother, 
Edwad Armstrong, 1418% East First 

street. 

* « « 

Miss Mary Gutman of St. Paul is the 
guest of Mrs. Joseph Gutman of this 

city. 

• * * 

Mrs. P. B. McTague and daughter, 
Marjcrie, of 1429 East Second street, 
returned Wednesday from Brainerd, 
Minn., where they have been visiting 
friends for the past two weeks. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mra David Williams re- 
turned Wednesday from their wedding 
trip in Europe. 

* « • 

Mr. and Mrs. D. F Monroe and fam- 
ily of Faribault, Minn., are guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Clark, 1407 East 
First street. Mr. and Mrs. Clark and 
their guests left Wednesday for Hlb- 
blng, where tTiey will attend the fair 
and visit the mines, returning the latter 
part of the week. 

• • ♦ 

Miss Edna G. Meeker, assistant sec- 
retary of the Associated Charities, will 
leave soon for a several weeks' vaca- 
tion in Denver, where she will visit 
with relatives. 

* • * 

Mrs. George Lucore and Miss Ruth 
Lucore, and son, Warren, who have 
been spending two weeks at their 
summer home at Colbyvllle, have re- 
turned to their home. 

• * « 

Mrs. Steve Hill has as her guest, Mrs 
Orchard of Saginaw, Mich. Mrs. Hill 
and Mrs. Orchard left Friday for 
Washburn, Wis., where they will vlsl/- 
Mrs. Frank Bennett. 

• * « 

Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Wilson, 624 Wood- 
land avenue have as their guests, Mrs. 
George T. Miller and daughter, Mar- 
garet of Calumet, Mich. 

* • • 

Miss Mamie 'iray, 122 East Third 
street left Saturday for Wahton Minn., 
where she will visit with Mrs. W, 
Hackett. 

« • • 

Miss Irene Benoe of Ashland, Wis., 
who has been the guest of her sister, 
Miss Nellie Benoe of the Ashtabula 
apartments, for two weeks, has re- 
turned to her home. 

« • • 

Archie McDougall, D. G. McCloud and 
M. Olson left Sunday for a canoe 
trip In the northern lakes. They will 
return Saturday. 

* * * 

Mra C A. Smith of Hunter's Park 
1b visiting at the Washburn cottage at 
-Burnithfeld," Wright, Minn. 

• • « 

Mrs. Stillman H. Bingham. 627 Irv- 
ing place, returned Sunday evening 
from Ashland, Wis., where she had been 
visiting with relatives. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Jamar, Jr.. 34 
Kent road, have returned from Baptism 
river after a week's outingr. 

• • 

Mlsg Aline Shay of Chicago Is the 
guest of Mrs. O. V. Burgess of Forty- 
third avenue east. 

• • • 

Mrs. George T. Miller and daughter, 
Margaret, of Calumet, Mich., are visit- 
ing at the home of Dr. and Mrs. C. M. 
W'lson. 624 Woodland avenue. 

* a • 

Miss Hazel Welsh and a party of 
young girls have returned from an 
outing at Lake Nebagamon. Those in 
the party were: 

Miss Helen Wharton, Miss Frances 
Taylor, Miss Emma Lleske, Miss 
RfaVlan Aske, Miss Esther Wood, Miss 
Arlolne Welsh, -Miss Gladys Bush, 
I Miss Frances Pond and Miss Ellen 
Davies. " * " 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Livingstone have 
returned from a thre« months' wed- 



ding trip on the Pacific coast and will 
make their future home in Duluth. 

* • « 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Rock of 19 Wick- 
low street have as their gueft, Miss 
Ida Levette of Detroit, Mich. 

* • • 

Harold Coe is the guest of his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. B. K. Coe, 1411 East 
Third street. 

* * • 

Mrs, David Butchart and daughter. 
Flora, have left for a three weeks' 
trip down the lakes. 

* « • 

Miss Lola Fee, 2605 East Third 
street left today for St. Paul to be the 
•guest of Miss Cornelia Hallom, who 
has been a guest at the Fee home for 
two weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fee 
and their guest, Mrs. Otis Stantlal of 
Chicago, left l^onday for Solon Springs, 
where they will remain for several 
weeks. 

* • * 

Mr. and Mrs. 8. H. Hill, 5829 London 
road, have as their guests Mr. and Mrst 
S. M. Hill of Belvedere ranch, Clay- 
burne, Tex. They left Tuesday on the 
North American for a trip down the 
lakes. 

* • • 

Mrs. H. Galne, 527 Third avenue 
east is entertaining Miss Osborne of 
Ashland, Wis. 

* * * 

Mrs. R. C. Weddell Is spending the 
month at Fond du Lac and has as her 
guest, Miss McMillan. 
« • * 

Mr. and Mrs. William Edwards of 
Minneapolis are the guests of Mrs. S. 
K. Randall, 4301 Robinson street. 

* * * 

Mrs. Newstrand of the St. Reg;is' 
apartments has as her guest. Miss 
Irene Simons of White Bear. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Emerson, 1225 
East Fourth street, have as their 
guests, Mr. and Mrs. Emerson's moth- 
er, Mrs. H. E. Emerson, and aunt, Miss 
Jessie Klttredge, of Minneapolis. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil J. Zauft and chil- 
dren, 6810 Wadena street, are visiting 
relatives In Baraboo, Wis. 

• « • 

Mrs. Sarah F. Stewart and Miss Wln- 
nlfred Warner are visiting friends in 
Minneapolis. Miss Warner will be the 
guest of Miss Alma Strand, formerly 
of this city, for a week. 

• • « 

Miss Minnie Kremer, 2810 West First 
street is visiting relatives in Mar- 
quette, Mich. 

• • • 

Miss Blanche Mallory, 4-30 North Fif- 
ty-fourth avenue west, has returned 
from Winnipeg, where she has been 
visiting for several weeks. 

• * * 

Miss Mary Willlard has returned 
from a two weeks' visit In Amenla, N. 
D., and Crookston, Minn. 

• * • 

Mrs. S. J. Nelson and son, Mansfield. 
24 Vi East Fifth street have returned 
from a three weeks' visit In Chicago. 

• • • 

Mrs. Nettle Cornell of New York city 
Is visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank Mag- 
nuson, 306 East Eighth street. 

• • • 

Miss Anna Johnson, 1612 Je/fcrson 
street, is entertaining her cousins Miss 
Olive Johnson and Miss Elsie Roberts 
of Washington, D. C. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Rome Miller and daugh- 
ter, Mrs. H. A. Waggener, Omaha, Neb., 
are guests at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mllle Bunnell and Dr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Magle at Washington Harbor, Isle Roy- 
ale for a week. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Dean, 5217 Colo- 
rado street, have as their guests, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. F. Case of Elkhart, who 
was here for the Dean-Straud wed- 
ding, Wednesday evening. 

• • « 

Mrs. W. H. Cooper of 622 Eighteenth 
avenue east, left for Manteno, III., Mon- 
day evening for a visit with relatives, 
accompanied by her niece Miss Edna 
Nixon of Manteno, 111., who has spent 
the summer In Duluth. 

• * • 

Mrs. J. A. McCuen and daughter. Ger- 
trude. 931 East Third street, have re- 
turned from a two weeks' outing at 
Solon Springs. 

• • • 

Mies Anna Fayling, 2411 West Fifth 
street, who have been spending the 
week at Solon Springs, has returned to 
her home. 

Mrs. E. C, Alvord of Washburn, Wis., 
spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. 
Dlckerson, 1221 East Third street. 

• • • 

Mrs. William Arper, Park Point, and 
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Dennis, 3719 Minne- 
sota avenue, have returned from a fen 
days' outing at the Spirit lake branch 
o^ the boat cluD. 

. • • * 

Miss Ethel Hambly of Eveleth is 
visiting irlends In the city. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Ball of Chicago 
have returned to their hom« after vis- 



iting Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Ball, 2224 
East Fifth street. 

• • • 

Miss Gertrude Wolter of St. Charley. 
Minnn., a former teacher in the Wash- 
burn school. Is the guest of Mrs. H J. 
Atwood of Hunter's Park for a fe'Vtr 
days. 

• • • 

Walter Fraker of Kent road has a# 
his guest Wlifred McCann of St. Paul. 

« • • 

Miss Edythe Halgren and Miss Ash- 
bedell Ryan have returned from ft 
week's outing at Lake Vermilion. 

• • • 

Charles A. Gregory of 1730 Jeffersoik 
street left Wednesday for Miami, Fla.^ 
•where he will reside. Mrs. Gregory 
will Join him later. They have been 
residents of Duluth for the last twen*^ 
ty-three years. 

• • * 

Mrs. G. H. Atwood of Northwoo<V 
Iowa, who has been visiting her son^ 
H. J. Atwood of Hunter's Park, hai 
returned to her home. 

• • * 

Miss Ethel Becklinger of New Du- 
luth left for Detroit, Mich., Wednesday 
night, where she will attend the 
Thomas normal training school ior tb*^ 
winter. 

• • * 

Mrs. Harry Bostwick has left for 
Minneapolis, where she will reside. 

• • • 

Miss Viola Lenning of Minneapolis 
arrived today to be the guest 
of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. J. O. 
Lenning, for two weeks. Mrs. Len- 
ning's guest, Mrs. J. I. Clough of 
Plattsburg, N. Y., has returned to her 
home. Miss Irene Kennedy of Han- 
cock, Mich., was the guest of Mis* 
Gladys Lenning on Tuesday. 

• • • 

A. B. Burquist has been confined to 
his home for the past few days oa 
account of illness. 

• • • 

Mrs. Marie K. Richter. 110 Soutb 
Fourteenth avenue east, left Wednesday 
on the steamer North American for 
Chicago, where she will spend a two 
weeks' vacation with relatives and 
friends. 

• • • 

B. C. Wade, general secretary of th» 
Y. M. C. Jv., returned today fron& 
Sturgeon lake, where he has been 
spending the month with his son Louia. 

• • * 

Miss Zelma Kaiser, 11 East Fourtlk 
street, has had as her guest Miss 
Florence Sly of Minneapolis. 

« • • 

Mrs D. C. Blundcll and children of 
Omaha are guests of Mrs. D. H. Har* 
lam, 467 Mesaba avenue. 

• • • 

Mrs. A. H. Brocklehurst of Park 
Point is expecting her sister. Mrs. H. 
A. Hutton of CrawfordsvUle. Ind., uho 
will visit here for a month. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Norton and fam- 
ily of 5030 London road are visitlnc 
Mr. and Mrs. Pike at Cass Lake. 

• • * 

Mrs. L. E. Bleberman and dxughter. 
Miss Elsa of 2031 East First street, 
left Thursday afternoon for Wellesley, 
Mass., where Miss Bleberman will 
enter Wellesley college. 

• • • 

Miss Ludle Norris. 5901 London roa^ 



V ..» 



24 and 26 West Superior Street 
Where Popular Prices Prevail 



SEE THE 

NEW FALL 

STYLES IN 



»8c 



WAISTS 

At Leiser's |^^ 

Over 25 different styles, 
and every one a $1.50 and 
$2.00 value. 

These and many other bar- 
gains in the 

2nd Anniversary Sale. 

Beg^ins 

Next Tuesday, Sept. 2nd 

at 8 ju m* 




■ ' , - . -j ; > ja 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 



who has been visiting Miss Eva Hatha- 
tv'av- at Solon Springs, has returned to 
her home. 

• • • 

Hiss Marjorie Davis, 1220 East First 
street, who was a graduate of Michi- 

fan university this springr, will leave 
or Marshall, Mich., Sunday, where she 
^•ill teach matuematics in the high 
Bcbool. 

• • « 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Nott, 1808 East 

gecond street, left Wednesday evening: 

J or St. Paul, where they will visit for a 
ew days. Mrs. Nott Just returned from 
Eau Claire, where she has been visit- 
ing relations for a week. 

• • • 

Thomas O. Johnston of St. Thomas. 
Qnt., who has been on a trip In the 
CM-adian Nort)i\vest, and who has 
been visiting with his son, William 
O. Johnston anj family. 626 Vi East 
PIfth street, tor the past two weeks, 
returned to his home on the steamer 
Hamonic Tuesday afternoon. 

• * « 

Miss Brown, who has been teaching 
swimming at the Y. \V. C. A. this sum- 
mer. 13 taking a trip down the lakes 
or a freighter with Mr. and Mrs. 
Oscar Mitchell. Miss Margaret Whip- 
ple Is taking Miss. Browns place at 
the Y. W. C. A. 

• • • 
Dr. John R. Essinger. one of the 

netius of the University of Michigan, 
U thf guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. 
Brmkman. 211tJ East Third street. 

• • * 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Abraham, 1431 

"Kb-hk Superior street, who have been 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. E. Kayser at Cot- 
tag' -vood. Lake Minnetonka, were ex- 
pected home today. 

• • • 
r>r. Stella Wilkinson. 312 Third ave- 
nue east, has returnt-d from a visit in 
illnneapolls and St. Paul. 

• • • 
Mrs. Jackson of Toledo. Ohio, is the 

fu-st of Mrs. 3. L. Frazer, 2426 East 
ui'tilor street. 

• • • 
Mrs. E. A. Tyler and Miss Lou Tyler, 

181' 1 East First street, who are visit- 
ing at DevUa Lake. N. D.. and Mln- 
tieai'Olis, returned home yesterday. 

• * • 
Miss Mayme Burke of Helena, Mont, 

arrivel Monday evening to be the guest 
Of Miss Gertrude L. Doyle, 30 Washing- 
ton avenue. Before returning to her 
pom.- Miss Burke will visit Cincinnati 
and oiher Eastern cities. 

• • • 
Mrs. J. J. OKeefe and daughter, 

formerly of Duluth but now of Port- 
land. Or., are visiting Mrs. James 
.Fierce. 575 West Fourth street. 

• « * 
Mrs. M. S. Rice's guest. Miss Nellie 

Buchner, left Wednesday for her home. 

• • • 

Miss Ruth Qronseth and Miss Mar- 
tha tJrKnseth are spending a few days 
with friends in Virginia. Minn. 

• • • 
Jt::i«n Ritchie. 4303 McCulloch street 

ha-j r>-iurned from a month's visit in 
.'Eastf^rn cities. 

• * * 

Mfi^iS Edna Nixon of Manteno, III., 
who has been the house gu>'st of Mrs. 
W. H. Cooper, c>22 Eighteenth avenue 
sa.'it has returned to her home. Mrs. 
Cooper accompanied her and will visit 
there for a time. 

• • • 
Mr. nnd Mr.s. H. E. Emerson, Jr., 

:ia25 East FoTirth street have as th^^lr 

Suests, Mrs. H. E. Emerson and Miss 
essie Klttredge of Minneapolis. 

• • « 

Miss Clara Olson and Miss Martha 
Orenner left .Saturday for Minneap- 
olis and Maple Lake, Minn., where 
Ihey will vi.sit with relatives and 
I'riends for a few weeks. 

• • • 
Mrs. S. J. Nelson and son, Mans- 

Jleld. 24 »a East Fifth street, who have 
ue-^n visiting in Chicago lor three 
iveeks, have returned to their home. 

• * • 

Mrs C. W. Anglln of 113 Wlcklow 
atreet left Saturday for a three weeks' 
visit in Kllbourn, Wis. 



DULUTH SOCIETY TURNS OUT IN FORCE FOR SPECTACULAR 

DANCING FESTIVAL FOR BENEFIT OF CHILDREN'S HOME 




Mrs. C. J. Hockin, 630 North Seven- 
teenth avenue east. 

Miss Nell L. Woolman of the Spald- 
ing trio will return to her home In 
South Bend, Ind., by way of the lakes. 
Miss Woolman left last night on the 
Tlonesta and will visit in Mackinac 
and Petoskey, Mich. 

* • * 

Miss Margaret Besnab will return 
from a two weeks' visit in Milwaukee, 
Wis., Sunday, Aug. 31. 

* * • 

Miss Katherlne Lawler, stepdaughter 



Tenth. Mrs. Loyhed, president of the 
State Federation of Women's Clubs, ha« 
listed clubs and counties which make 
up the new district organizations, ex- 
cept the alignment in Minneapolis. A41 
to this, it is impossible to say what 
will be decided, but Mrs, Loyhed be- 
lieves that the club women will have 
to settle the question at the conven- 
tion In Bralnerd Sept. 23. 

Club women of Minneapolis find, un- 
der this new ruling, that they can be- 
long to either the fifth or tentli divi- 
sion, and one of the chief causes of 
confusion in regard to the affiliation 



of Edmund Pennington, president of "^'th the Fifth or Tenth district or 



VIEW OF INTERIOR OF RINK, SHOWING PROC ESSION HEADED BY UNCLE SAM AND COLUMBIA 






— Plitjiu bi -Vltivejiiia. 



Miss Donalda Morrison of Alpena, 
Ml<"h.. has returned to her home after 
visiting Capt. and Mrs. M. McLennan 
|.nd Mr., and Mrs. Earl A. Morrl.son, 
101? East Seventh street, for three 
laontlis. 

• • • 

Miss Alma Morrison, 221 Eighteenth 

?,Tenue east, is visiting relatives at 
•wan River for two weeks. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Finch of St. 
I'aul are visiting In the city. 

• * * 

Mrs. W. F. Gladson and sister. Miss 
ftryrtle Johnson, are spending ten days 
at Fair Hills, summer resort at De- 
ti'oit, Minn. 

• • • 

Frank J. Johnson of Calumet Mich., 
arrived in the city Sunday and will 
be the guest of his mother, Mrs. H. 
Johnson and sLster, Mrs. Charles 
Blauppi for two weeks. 

• « • 

Miss Gladys Reynolds. 1530 East 
P'ir>t street, has as her guest. Miss 
Eugenia Wagner of Oreen Bay. 

• • • 

The Misses Owens of Lakeside will 
spend the remainder of tlie summer 
With their father, John Owens, at 
Cook, Minn. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Chamberlain 
hive returned by way of the lake.s. 
fiom a three weeks' Eastern trip. Mrs 



Duluth society turned out In a body 
last evening to witness the production 
of the ••Festival" which was presented 
at the Curling rink for the benefit of 
the Children's home. 

Every box and reserved seat was 
taken and the big rink was nearly 
filled. The object of the "Festival" 
was to raise enough money to pay 
for the new laundry which has been 
put in at the home and which will 
cost $750. It is believed that the 
board was successful In this, al- 
though it Is Impossible yet to learn 
just what the net receipts were. 

Those who managed the production 
have asked The Herald to warmly 
thank all those who assisted as per- 
formers, costume makers and those 
who donated the supper. To those 
who did not find It convenient to at- 
tend or assist a hearty Invitation to 
become an associate or sustaining 
member of the home board. 

Preceding the performance the 
orchestra played a selection and the 
dance of dawn, before the festive day 
was gracefully given by Miss Harriet 
Harrison. The entrance of Kin^ 
Alexander (Mayor W ' -^ ■ - ^'"^ 



Amundson, Eben Spencer, Ray Hig- 
gins, Fred Wolvln. Lourence Gordon. 
Openlnic Dance. 
The dance of Ceres and Proserpine 
followed, telling In bea-vtiful rhythmic 
story the ancient Greek myth Harriet 
Harrison and Ruth Wanless enacted 
the roles of Ceres and Proserpine. 
Zephyrs In the valley of Enna were 
Mary Baldwin, Viola Smith, Elizabeth 
Stocking. Ethel Bunnell, Clara Eliza- 
beth Baldwin, Oregon Carlson, Helen 
Stilson, Caroline Lyder. Helen Fryberg- 
er, Gertrude Wangenstein. Helena Sil- 
bersteln, Virginia Fryberger, Ruth Wil- 
liamson, Phyllis Shaw, Florence Dra- 
per, Marpraret Flnkenstaedt and Eliz- 
abeth Lynani. 

Playmates of Proserpine: "Vallev 
Lily," Elizabeth Flnkenstaedt: "Rose 
Pink," Virginia Carlson; "Nasturtium." 
Alice Cole; "Lilac," Betty Brown: "Vio- 
let Sweet," Kathryn Wall; "Carnation," 
Helen Baldwin; "Poppy," Agnes Wan- 
less; "Golden Glow," Margaret Dale 
Ames; "Jack-ln-the-Pulpit," Jerome 
Hart; "Lily White." Margaret McDon- 
ald; "Hecate," Margaret Crosby. 

Stars In the valley of Enna:" Agnes 
Alexander. Sue Alexander. Katherlne 

8, Dorothy Cros- 
nrianta frtiir.T.r.^ I "^ • » <" <* i-'iuumii. wiiiiet Davls, Margar- 
ndants followed. I et Hoyt. Margaret Greene. Betty Mer- 
rill, Mary Wlnton. Elizabeth Horr. and 
Vera Jeffrey; "Iris," Mary Cotton; 
"Mercury," Eulnlie Chisholm. 
**Xarc1iMas.'' 
The Greek myth. "Narcissus," was 
exnuisltely interpreted by Charlent 
Bagley, with Nellie Swanson, Fannie 



.Alexander (Maj'or W I Prlnrf^'* an A "^■"■^"^"^^^, "^lue .meAaii 
the Olympian Queen hMrs A RWni 6^'^°"' Cordelia Collins 
vln) and"^ their attendants fSlowed I ^Y'.^^yf^ Llndahl. MHlet 
Mrs. -Wolvln's quiet dignity and 
Mayor Prince's bearing added much 
to the entire program which followed 
ine members of the court were^ 
row'^T*'^, "»l®" Fraker. Marjorie Mor- 
I^ '^r "li* Morrow, Ruth Paul. Walk- 
er. N. Y.; Helen Potter, Helen Wil- 
liams, Marlon Williamson, Marjorie 
Harrison. Wlllabelle Pearson VIr! 

M«!* t1^«'*'"'''*'*"a ^^^^'■'« d'Autfemont. 
May Jeffrey, Dorothy Dowse Mar- 
garet Florida, Lucile Bradley 

Messrs. Laird Goodman. Dr N H 
Gillespie. Philip Heimbach. Roger 
Smith. Carlisle Heimbach. — "^^"^ 
Kennedy. Ray Phillips, Dr 



Walter 
F. A. 



Josephs, Gladys Lovelace. Helen Watts, 
Muriel Nelson and Gertrude Earnshaw 
as narcissus flowers. 

In "The Bacchanale," Pan and the 
satyrs were the opening group of dan- 
cers, followed by Apollo and the muses. 
and Bacchus and the nymphs. The 
personnel of the dancers was: 

"The Bacchanale"— (a) "Pan and 



the Satyrs;" Pan, Violet Smith; the 
satyrs, Helen Fryberger, Caroline 
Lyder, Mary Towne, Elizabeth Lynam 
Oregon Carlson, Margaret Flnken- 
titadet, Elizabeth Baldwin and Eliza- 
beth Stocking, (b) "Apollo and the 
Muses:" Apollo, Millet Davis; the 
mupcs, Betty Merrill, Margaret Hoyt, 
Katherlne Abbott, Agnes Alexander, 
Sue Alexander, Cordelia Collins, Mar- 
garet Greene, Mary Wlnton and Vera 
Jeffry. (c) "Bacchus, Ethel Bunnell: 
the nymphs. Florence Draper, Helen 
.Stilson, Phyllis Shaw, Vlrg rila Fry- 
berger, Ruth Williamson, Gertrude 
Wangenstein and Helen Silbersteln; 
"The Spirit of Joy," Vera LindahL 

Story of Psyche. 

In the story of Psyche, the name part 
was Interpreted by Charlene Bajfley: 
with Josephine Cotton in the role of 
Cupid. The Greek maidens in the bri- 
dal procession were: 

Vera Jeffry, Agnea Alexander, Sue 
Alexander, Cordelia Collins, Dorothy 
Crosby, Vera Llndahl, Millet Davis, 
Margaret Hoyt, Margaret Greene, 
Betty Merrill and Mary Wlnton- 
zephyrs, Mary Baldwin, Elizabeth 
Storking. Clara E. Baldwin, Helen 
Stilson, Helm Frvberger, Helena Sil- 
bersteln, Ruth Williamson, Florence 
Draper, Violet Smith, Ethel Bunnell, 
Oicgon Carlson, Caroline Lyder, Ger- 
trude Wangenstein, Virginia Fry- 
berger, Phyllis Shaw and Margaret 
Flnkenstaedt; the jealous sisters, 
Agnes Alexander and Sue Alexander. 
Venus, Miss Marie Merrill; hand- 
maidens. Cordelia Collins, Marv Win- 
ton, Mary Baldwin. Violet Smith, 
Agnes Alexander and Sue Alexander: 
the three graces, Dorothy Chisholm, 
Vera Jeffry, Vera Llndahl; Jupiter, 
king on Mount Olympus; Juno, his 
queen, and muses, Cordelia Collins. 



Smith and Mary Baldwin; handmaid- 
ens, Dorothy Chisholm and Agnea 
Alexander; Mercury, Eulalie Chisholm; 
Cupid, Joseohlne Cotton; Psyche. 
Charlene Bagley. 

At the close of the story of Psyche, 
King Alexander and his court made 
their exit and the United States 
pageant was presented. 

Victor Anneke announced the en- 
trance of Uncle Sam (Harvey Clapp), 
and Columbia (Barbara Rupley). The 
Culver boys who proceeded the march 
to the stage were: 

Victor Anneke, Orrin K. Brown, Ar- 
nold Fitger, A. Bennett Kapplin. Cecil 
Meyers, Arthur McMillan, AlUster 
Guthrie, Albert McManus. 

The procession which followed 
Bhowed tha different stages of dresa 
in the country's history from the early 
days of Indian warfare to the pres- 
ent day. 

When they had taken their places, 
Miss A. Irene Blair, who directed the 
dancing, and Mrs, D. H. Day led a 
group of young women who presented 
the one-step, Boston, tango and long- 
Boston. 

An "after theater" supper was served 
In the Dutch garden by the little Dutch 
maids: Miss Frances Winton, Miss 
Louise Frlck, Miss Virginia Moore. 
Miss Elizabeth Wood, Miss Charlottr 
Wilson, Miss Marie Chrlstensen, Miss 
Maren Mendenhall, Miss Alexandria 
Van Bergen, Miss Myra Salyards. 
Miss Martha Wall, Miss Dorothy 
Moore and Miss Margaret Craig. 

Much of the credit for the success 
of the performance is due Mrs. G. Her- 
bert Jones, chairman of the general 
committee, and Mrs. T. J. Davis, chair- 
man of the home board, but every 
member of the board and many other 
Duluth women gave freely of their 
Mary Wlnton, Sue Alexander, Vioiet I time and energy in assisting. 



the Soo railroad, accompanied by Miss 
Hood, arrived In Duluth yesterday 
morning from Minneapolis, en route to 
Isle Royale, where they will spend a 
few weeks. 

• • * 

Ray Johns, Earl Watterworth and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Spink of St. Paul 
will arrive in the city tonight to be 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Watter- 
worth, 2932 East Superior street, over 
Labor day. 

• • • 
Mrs. Frank M. Thomas and son, 

Morris, 1511 East Fourth street, are 
on their way to England, where they 
will visit for three months before 
touring the continent. They expect 
to be gone about a year. 

• « * 
Mrs. C. B. Rowley, Miss lone Rowley 

and Miss Marie Canan of Brainerd, are 
the guest.s of Mrs. B. J. Donahue, 211 
East Third street. 

• • • 
Miss Alice Warren, St. Regis apart- 
ments, has as her guest Miss Lilian 
vVarren of Des Moines, Iowa. 

• • * 
Mr, and Mrs. Frank D. Truss who 

have been the guests of Mr. and Mrs 

Daniel Ryan of Woodland, left Friday 

for their home In Birmingham, Ala 

• • *> 
Mrs. Wmiam Rock, 425 Thirteenth 

avenue east, who has been visiting in 
Minneapolis and St. Paul for the past 
week, has returned home. 

• « • 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Linqulst have a» 

their guests, Charles Llnquist and Al- 
bert Peterson of Minneapolis, who are 
en route to Isle Royale for an outing 

• • • 
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Olund and chil- 
dren, Gladys and Earl, 721 West First 
street, are spending the week at Lake 
Nebagamon. 

Mrs. John Schulte. 627 West Third 
street, has been entertaining Miss 
Munroe of Port Arthur, Can., who 
stopped in the city on her return from 
a six months' visit in California. 

• • • 
Miss Margaret Grogan, 1712 Jeffer- 
son street, left Thursday for Los An- 
geles, Cal., where she will teach this 
year. 

• • • 
MLss Mary Gutman of St. Paul Is 

the guest of Mrs. Alexander Stewart. 
215 West First street. 

• • * 
Miss Byrd Johnson. 21 South Seven- 
teenth avenue east, has as her guest 
Miss Edith Steckman of St Paul. Miss 
Steckman will return to her home on 
Tuesday. 



CLUBS AND 
MUSICAL 



ganlzatlon is the fact that there is no 
ruling on the habitat of a given club. 
The question arises, must the old clubs 
affiliate with the Tenth district be- 
cause they meet in that district, or 
shall their affiliation be determined by 
the place of residence of their mem- 
bers, or a majority of the members? 

Mrs. Loylied's announcement lists th« 
rearrangement as follows: 

First district — Not changed. 

Second district — Adds Lincoln and 
Redwood counties. 

Third district — Adds Washington 
county. 

Fourth district — Loses Washington 
and Chisago counties. 

Fifth district — Loses part of Henne- 
pin county and part of Mlnncapoll.3. 

Sixth district — Adds Aitkin and Bel- 
trami and loses Wright and Meeker 
counties. 

Seventh district — Adds Douglas and 
Meeker counties, loses Redwood and 
Lincoln. 

Eighth district— Loses Pine, Mill© 
Lacs, Kanabec, Isanti, Anoka and Ait- 
kin. 

Ninth district — Loses Beltrami 
county. 

Tenth district (newly created) — Com- 
prises Pine. Mllle Lacs. Kanabec. Isanti, 
Anoka, Chisago. Wright all of Henne- 
pin excepting Minneapolis and St. An- 
thony, and the Third, Fourth and Tenth 
wards of Minneapolis. 

The clubs belonging to the Tenth 
district are the Home Economics club. 
Sandstone. Pine county: Ladies' Read- 
ing club. Sandstone; Women's Civic 
league, Taylor's Falls, Chisago county; 
Study club, Montioello. Wright county; 
Library and Improvement club, Howw 
ard Lake. Wright county; Home Eco- 
nomics club, Excelsior, Hennepin coun- 
ty; Woman's club. Wayzata. Hennepin 
county; Phlloleotlan aoclety. Anoka» 
Anoka county, and all clubs in tha 
Tliird, Fourth and Tenth wards of Min- 
neapolis. 



Echo Club Meets. 

The regular monthly meeting of tha 
Woodland Echo club was held last eve- 
ning at the home of Miss T. Goodwin. 
3020 West First street. After a short 
business meeting, the evening waa 
pleasantly spent with games and mu- 
sic. A dainty lunch was served. 



Will Study in New York. 

Wilhelm LIndstrand, the young ten- 
or who will go to New York this fall 
to become the pupil of a noted teacher 
there, has begun taking preliminary In- 
struction from John Koneczny, the 
well known vocal teacher of Duluth. 
Mr. Koneczny predicts great thing.: for 
the young man and hopes to help him 
materially on his way toward stardom 



REDI STRIC TED. 

New Congressional District Causes 
Confusion for Club Women. 

complete rearrangement of the 
club women's organization of 
Minneapolis will be caused by 
the congressional redlstrictlng 
and the club women are un- 
certain as yet as to what will 
be done to arrange the diffi- 
culties. Minneapolis Is in two congres- 
sional districts, the Fifth and the new 




Visiting Soloist. 

One of the soloists at St. Paul** 
church tomorrow morning w-iU be 
Miss Maude Baxter of Joliet, 111. Miss 
Baxter has a beautiful lyric voice, a 
charming personality and good inter- 
pretative ability, having received her 
musical training under some of the 
best teachers in Chicago. She will 
sing an English adaptation of Gou- 
nod's "Ave Maria." 



Gives Recital. 



Miss Pauline James Lee, a talented 
colored pianist who is visiting In the 
city, gave a recital for her friends 
Tuesday evening at St. Mark's A. M. 
E. church and was assisted by her 
brother. Master Clarence Lee. 



RESULTS OF THE WORK DONE BY 
MRS. CAROLINE BARTLETT CRANE 



Chamberlain visited In Chicago and 
Port Colborne where she was met by 
Mr. Chamberlain. 

• • • 
Mis."? Agnes Ryback of Minneapolis 

hiis as her guest. Miss Victoria Rus- 
sell of Duluth. 

• • • 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Carlson and 

aaughter, of 1D13 East Third street 
have returned from a trip abroad. 
Ttiey visited many points of interest 
up Germany. France. Italy and the 
British Isles. 

• « • 

Mrs. Beatrice A. Cameron of Hlb- 
Wng has returned to her home after 
visiting here with Mrs. J. C. H. Engle. 
t(01 Minnesota avenue, and Misses 
A4la and Ethel Grenler at Camp Ethel- 
atla, 3»)02 Minnesota avenue. 

• • • 

Mrs. R. I. Moore and daughter, Lois. 

to 5 East Fourth street are at Loch 
iti Bell near Carlton for three week.«». 

• * • 

Howard De Vey returned Sunday 
from the West, where he nas been 
Working during the summer months 
W'th an engineering crew on the 
Milwaukee railroad. 

• • • 
Mrs. C. V. Doolittle of Mlnneapo- 

iln is visiting Mrs. John H. La Vaque, 
216 East First street. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Casmlr, 412 East 

J'lfth street, has as her guests Mrs. 
ullus Goldberg and Mrs. Harry Hacker 
of St. Paul. 

• • * 
Mlss Stella Baker returned to Chi- 
cago Tuesday morning on the North 
American after visiting Mrs. S. B. 
Beicer, 121% Tenth avenue east. 

• « « 
:Mr3. John Wright of Chicago is tha 

Kae^ of her sister, Mrs. VVfUiam H. 
tnnlng of Park Point. 

• • • 

Miss Wlnnlfred McDonald has re- 
turned from a month's outing at Pike 
laJce. 

• • • 
Walter Merrltt. who has been the 

etiest «f his uncle and aunt. Mr. and 
[19. F. A. Merrltt. 615 W»>st Second 
■tit-et, for six weeks, left Monday for 
niii home In Saginaw, Mich. 

• • • 
:vrrs. J. F. Tllson and Mrs. O. K 

W?!nman, 1419 East First street have 
as their guest Miss Elizabeth Rankin 
Of New York. 

• • • 
:tfr. and Mrs. Ira W. Bowleg, 409 

South Nineteenth avenue east have as 
thMr guest Miss Virginia Sullivan of 
Virginia, Minn. 

• • • 
Mr. and Mrs Emll Haaglnson of East 

Bl3:th street have as their guest Mrs 
Hfaginson'g sister, Miss Helen Mar- 
guerita Bosel. of Henderson. Minn. 

Itfrs. R. a. Henderson, 210 North Flf- 
tetnth avenue east has as her guests 
ilrs. Walter Swain and Mrs. William 
Way Of Cleveland, Ohio. 

• • • 

-.^'^'■■*, ^•. ^- Thomas and son Frank 
19(4 Sixtieth avenue east, who h^ve 



fo'?hIi?''ho^i" ^'■^'"^'•^^ ^^^« '^'"^'^-^ 

• • • 

Miss Olive Drew. 2045 Woodland ave- 
of'^St^aul*^^*" ^^^^^ ^^^^^ Helen Hunt 

• • • 

Mrs. C. M. Brooks and daughter. 
Fern, with their guest. Mrs. Sensiba of 
Chicago are spending the week in Two 
Harbors. 

• « • 

Mr and Mrs. W. A. Kennedy, 5830 
London road have as their guests Dr 
and Mrs M U. Hunt of Anderson, Ind.. 
who arrived yesterday. 

• * * 

William Schupp and daughter. Emilv 
have returned from the coast and will 
leave for Toronto soon to join Mrs 
Schupp. 

• • • 

TK^^A *?*^ ^""^^ ^- ^ PlnfiO, 1277 East 
Third street have as their guest their 
son, Frank Pineo of Madison, Wis. 

• • • 
Mrs. E. C. Blundell and children of 

Omaha have returned to their home 
after spending a week with Mrs. D. H. 
Haslam of 467 Mesaba avenue 

• ♦ • 

Mr .and Mrs. Thomas J. McKeon 
will leave tonight for Washington to 
attend the national convention of the 
Improved Order of Red Men. They 
will go by way of Montreal, Que.. 
Boston and New York. Mr. McKeon la 
the attorney general of the society. 

• • • 

The Misses Marie Cyr and Ida An- 
derson left today for a two weeks' 
visit in Minneapolis. St. Paul and 
Stillwater. 

• • • 

Miss Virginia Blood. 2301 Princeton 
avenue, who has been visiting in Min- 
neapolis and vicinity for the past 
month, has returned to her home 
« « * 

Mrs. Sarah F. Stewart and Miss 
Wlnnlfred Warner returned today 
from a week's visit In Minneapolis. 

• • • 

Mrs. Fred D. Foster and daughter. 
Evelyn, of Minneapolis, who have 
been the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert I. Oooch. 7091^ East Fourth 
street, have returned to their home. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bradbury will be 
at 1028 East Second street after next 
week. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ford are taking 
a trip to Winnipeg In their machine. 

• « * 

Miss Lojs Trott has returned to her 
home after 8p*-ndlng three weeks with 
friends In Minneapolis 

• • * 

Miss Ada Bush. 5S01 East Superior 
street, and her guest. Miss Mary Wls- 
berg of Minneapolis, left todav for a 
trip down the lakes on a freighter 
Miss Bush returned the early part of 
the week from a visit In Wausau, Wis. 

• • • 

Mrs. Jennett Brown. Mrs. George 
Clark and Mrs. James G. Harris who 
have been spending the summer in 
Scotland, returned to their homes yes- 
terday. 

• • • 
ave| Mr. and Mrs. Charles Alliss of St. 



Paul are visitors at the home of U. 
L. Murphy, 4620 Gladstone street. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Casmlr, who 
have been at Isle Royale for an out- 
ing, spent yesterday in Duluth on 
their way home to Minneapolis. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Putney have 
gone to Elslgundo, Cal., where they 
will reside. After a short wedding 
trip Mr. Putney and his bride visited 
the bride's mother, Mrs. Colbrath. 
Ashtabula flats, before leaving for 
California. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Hubbell, Mrs. J. 
B. Cotton and family have returned 
from a two weeks' trip down the lake 
on the steamer H. A. Berwind. 

• * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank E. Moorehouse 
of Minneapolis, who have been visit- 
ing Mrs. Moorehouse's parents. Dr. 
and Mrs. I. T. Burnslde. returned to 
their home this afternoon 

• • * ' 

Mrs. Ernest Nltchkey and sister, 
Clara, of Staples, Minn are guests of 
Mrs. F. J. O'Neil of Momingside park 
for a few days. 

Miss Alice Newstrand of the St. 
Regis apartments left yesterday for 
St. Peter, Minn., where she will have 
charge of the department of shorthand 
and typewriting in the school of com- 
merce of Qustavus Adolphus college. 

• • * 

Miss Elsie Astell of Madison, Wis., 
is In the city for a few days as the 
guest of her brother. L. Keith Astell 
of 101 East Fourth street, and her 
cousin. Miss Mollle Astell, 109 West 
Third streeet 

• « • 

Mr. and Mrs. George Warren Gra- 
ham of Proctor, are week-end visitors 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Butchard, 17 Fifty-seventh avenue 
east. 

• • • 

Miss Adella Wood, 5219 East .Supe- 
rior street, who has been visiting In 
Virginia for a few weeks, has re- 
turned to her home. 

• • • 

Mrs. John Sinclair and daughter, 
Viola, 2408 West Third street, and 
their guest Miss Oeraldtn Watson. 
Twenty-second avenue west, have re- 
turned from a lake trip on a freighter 

• • « 

Mrs. Thomas Cameron. 1115 East 
Fourth street, who has been vl.'»ltlng 
her daughter, Mrs. T, A. Slneed at 
Reglna, Sask.. and her son, O. A. 
Cameron, of Winnipeg, has returned 
to her home. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Abbe, formerlv 
of Duluth, are the guests of Mrs 3 
H. Harper, Twenty-sixth avenue east 
and Superior street. 

• • • 

Mi.ss Katherlne King, who has been 
spending her vacation at Manomet 
Bluff on Cape Cod, Boston and Wor- 
cester, Mass., has returned to take 
up her duties as principal at the 
Brj'ant school. 

• • • 

Miss Julia Martin, 1005 East Supe- 
rior street, who has Just returned 
from a visit at Detroit and Bliffalo 



left yesterday to visit her mother at 
Brainerd. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Johnson, 2827 
Minnesota avenue, have had as their 
guest Miss Ida Johnson of Chicago. 

• * • 

Dr. J. E. Cavanaugh of the Fargo 
sanitarium, is visiting in the city for 
a few days. 

• • • 

Mrs. John Murphy and sons, James 
and Raymond. 312 East Fourth street, 
are at Solon Springs for a few days. 

• • * 

Mrs. R A. FolkertB of 10 McLeod 
street left Thursday evening for a 
trip through the East. 

• • • 

Mrs. Rose Gosselin, 216 North Sixty- 
fourth avenue west, is entertaining her 
sister, Mrs. Susan Cross, and her niece. 
Miss Viola Cross, of Cheboygan, Mich., 
and Miss Tlllie Baker of Boyne City, 
Mich., for ten days. 

• * • 

Miss Tlllie Thorn of the public 11- 
brary has gone to Chicago, where she 
will visit for two weeks. 

• • * 

Miss Alva Patenaude, 1623 Jefferson 
street, left today for St. Paul, where 
she will visit for two weeks. 

• • • 

Mrs. John Casey, Chatham apart- 
ments, has as her guest, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. J. Enright and two children of Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Mrs. A. M. White of Rice 
Lake, Wis.; Mrs. Peter Houlihan of St. 
Paul and Mrs. A. McDougal of Spooner, 
Wis., have returned to their homes 
after visiting Mrs. Casey for a few 
days. 

• • • 

Mrs. Arthur A. Elder, 912 East Sixth 
street, who has been visiting In Rock 
Island, 111., for several weeks has re- 
turned to her home. 

• • • 

Mrs. Arthur Fisher, 220 North Twen- 
ty-second avenue, west, has as her 
guests Mrs. James Intnan and Mrs. 
Robert Staley of Minneapolis, Mrs. 
James Stlnson of Glennwood, Minn., 
and Mrs. John Henry of Thief River 
Falls. 

• • • 

Rae Abraham, 2422 East Third street, 
returned Wednesday evening from a two 
weeks' visit with relatives at Lake 
Minnetonka. 

• • • 

Mrs. William Clifford. Misses Allison 
and Bessie Clifford of 1917 East First 
street, returned Tuesday on the Ha- 
monic from Eastern Canada 

• • * 

Mrs. Theodore Nauffts and daugh- 
ter, Eleanor, who have been spending 
the summer at Swan Lake, have re- 
turned to their home. 

• • • 

Miss Bell Pepper, Miss Genevea West 
and Miss Lucile Bishop of Rhlneland- 
er. Wis., have returiid from a lake 
trip. Miss Bishop, ^ho Is the guest 
of Miss Pepper, will return to her 
home tomorrow, 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Stilson ahd chil- 
dren of 1831 East Second street have 
returned from Yellowstone park. 

• • • ' 

Mr, and Mrs. Ralph Hall an4 chll- 



Classes in Hand 

Wrought Jewelry 

Kthel Wlieeler Lawrle, fonnerly of the Craft 
Bhop, will accept a few pupils to complete lier 
clawea In Hand Wrought Jewelry, and will de- 
siifn aiid execute special articles of jewelry to 
order. 

Mrs. Lanrle la a pupU of Jesale M. Preston 
of Cblcaco. and a graduate of the Mlnne«polls 
School of Fine Arts, 

4210 London Road. Duluth. 

Talaphona, Lakeildo, 26 1 -L. 



dren, 5613 Highland street, returned 
Thursday from a three months' visH 
with relatives in Glenn Falls. N. Y. 
Mrs. Comfort and family returned with 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall. 

* * 

Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Hugo. 2407 East 
Third street, left yesterday to visit their 
daughter, Mrs. Robert D. Smith, of 
Winnipeg. Mr. and Mrs. Hugo will 
motor there. 

Miss Edna BJorge left Thursday for 
Spokane, Wash., where she will resume 
her duties in the schools of that city. 

^ • • • 

George H. Brandt, 2827 Minnesota 
avenue, has returned to Chicago where 
he will resume his studies in the Chi- 
cago Art institute after spending sev- 
eral weeks with his parents. 

* * * 
Miss Julia Martin of 1006 East Su- 
perior street has returned from a visit 
at Detroit and Buffalo and left yester- 
day for a visit with her mother at 
Brainerd. 

* * * 
Mrs. Thomas Keegan and son, Thom- 
as, 1622 Jefferson street, have returned 
to their home after spending the sum- 
mer months with Mr. and Mrs. C. Flan- 
nigan of St. Paul at their summer 
home at Lake Elmo. 

* * * 
Mrs. Marie K. RIckter, 110 South 

Fourteenth avenueeast, Is In Chicago 
for two weeks. 

* • 

Miss Ida Johnson, 2827 Minnesota 
avenue, has left for Chicago after 
spending her vacation with her par- 
ents. 

* • 41 
Miss Mildred Chisholm, BUS London 

road, will leav« Sunday for Meadow- 
lands, Minn., where she will teach this 
year. Her sister, Miss Flora Chisholm 
will teach in Virginia this winter and 
will leave Sunday also. 

* * • 
Miss Agnes Dwyer of Hudson Wis 

is the guest of Mrs. A, V. Kelly, 1218 
East Second street. 

* • • 

Miss Hazel Wilson left yesterday 
to attend the county fair at Hlbblng 
and will visit friends and relatives 
on the range. 

* * • 

Miss Elsie Schwelger will leave to- 
morrow for Ely. Minn., where she will 
resume her work as a teacher In the 
Lincoln school. 

Miss Nan Brown of Seattle, Wash 



Mrs, Caroline Bartlett Crane, who 
made a "survey" of Duluth some time 
ago, and her work as a professional 
municipal sanitarian form the subject 
of an article in the American Maga- 
zine for September. Mrs. Crane is 
widely known as minister, writer and 
lecturer and her admirers will be par- 
ticularly interested in being told how 
successful she has been in the work she 
has chosen. She is hired by cities, 
which gladly pay her |100 a day lor 
her services, furnish funds for all ex- 
penses, a secretary, automobiles, the- 
aters and halls for meetings, official 
authority to conduct her investigations, 
and an escort to accompany her Fifty- 
two cities in the United States have al- 
ready hired her. She calla her visits 
"Sanitary Surveys." 

When a city desires Mrs. Crane's 
services it calls upon her as a profes* 
sional municipal expert, and places the 
keys Of the municipality at her dis- 
posal. She personally Investigates the 
city's resources, and everything that 
concerns community life. She stirs up 
public opinion, and in this manner 
makes her work effective. 

Reaults InHpiringr. 

"The practical results of Mrs. 
Crane's surveys all over America pre- 
sent a sum total of improvement that 
is Inspiring." says the article In the 
American Magazine. "Sometimes she 
has appeared as a, prophet of warn- 
ing. In 1910 Mrs. Crane told Erie, Pa., 



A6ED DUKE SEEKS 

DIVORCE FROM HER 



i^fL**i ^*" ,the danger of a terrible 
epidemic unless it purified its water 
supply In 1911 Erie had 103 deatl!s 
from typhoid, untold suffering and a 
municipal expense of $12,000. At Sea 
Breeze Fla., a great hotel was con- 
demned for lack of fire escapes and 
proper fire protection; the hotel burned 
to the ground two weeks later and 
the guests barely escaped with their 
lives, some by Jumping from the win- 
^^T^^\ -A. Rochester, N. Y., school 
building, the twin of one condemned 
by Mrs. Crane, was also burned be- 
fore that active city could put through 
various improvements u'>on which Jt 
had determined after her visit 

"At Harrodsburg, Ky., where an 
angry official sued Mrs. Crane, but 
afterward found his case quashed, the 
contract system of caring for the 
poor was abandoned and a new alms- 
house built. A tuberculosis sanitarium 
rose at Paducah, Ky., and at Valley 
City, N. D., a beautiful new Infirmary 
replaces the old poorhouse. At Albert 
Lea, Minn., the citizens boast a new 
municipal hospital; at Big Rapids, 
Mich., a fine new abattoir. At Roch- 
ester, Minn,, the father of a child in 
one of the public schools altered a 
whole classroom to demonstrate Mrs 
Crane's system of scientific lighting, 
while at Mankato, Minn., the bakeries 
and market places went through a 
thorough cleaning and scouring to get 
upon the 'white list' sue-o-««t«H k» 
Mrs. Crane. 



suggested by 




General Result*. 

"Of equal if not greater value are 
the general results. In some twenty 
cities which Mrs. Crane has surveyed 
permanent civic leagues have been be- 
gun, under various names, to work at 
various tasks. During the vear after 
her survey of Kentucky that state se- 
cured more advanced health legisla- 
tion than In all Its past hlstorv; In- 
Irludlng an appropriation of 130,000 an. 
nually for a state bacteriological labor- 
atory, an annual school for county 
and city health officials, and a law 
forbidding the Importation of any but 
tuberculin-- tested cattle. Her Min- 
nesota report, a volume of 240 pages 
w ^i'""^ ^^^^ ^y women's clubs as a 
handbook on sanitation. Health offl. 
cers and faithful officials have found 
their first public recognition through 
her keen-eyed vigilance, and have 
gone to work with renewed courage 
while careless officials have been 
awakened to some sense of their 
grave responsibility." 



ANTONIE VON BARTOLF. 

Antonie von Bartolf is the morganat- 
ic wife of Duke Ludwlg of Bavaria, 
who Is trying to get a divorce from her. 
She is forty years his Junior. She was 
a Munich ballet dancer named Barth 
when she married the duke. On her 
marriage she received the name of von 
Bartolf. The duke's first wife was a 
young actress named Mendel. His 
family took her up, but his second 
marriage did not meet with their ap 



.o^^rxt D„Tu;h.-uT.y'-,„sr!;i reV^'i^z'^ sit^^^s." ""'" '» 




WOODS FOR COOPERAGE. 
Indianapolis News: In the cooperage 
industry the use of elm wood Is still 
in the lead, but the figures seem to in. 
dlcate that spruce will soon displace 
It, and the indications are that at no 
distant date the use of elm will be 
restricted to the manufacture of hoops 
for which It Is eminently superior The 
supply of elm will sooti be exhausted 
at the present rate of consumption but 
if It Is made use of only for the hoops 
It will last a considerable length of 
time yet. Birch has many points In 
Its favor for cooperage and will ulti- 
mately be the successor of elm. 
— - e 

CORN SOUP. 
Woman's World: Cut fine one small 
onion and a sprig of parslev. Cook 
In two level tablespoons of butter unUl 
the onion is soft and yellow. Then add 
one cup of soft corn and a cup of wa- 
ter. If any chicken broth is at hand 
use that Instead of the water. Cook 
slowly fifteen minutes. Pour through 
a sieve and press as much of the corn 
through as possible. Add to this mix- 
ture one cup of cream or milk, pepper 
and salt and two tablespoons of but- 
ter. Return to the fire and heat. When 
hot, thicken or bind with two lev^ 
tablespoons of flour dissolved and 
rubbed smooth In a small amount of 
wat^r or milk. When the soup is thicto- 
eiied and boiling, pour around the com 
ttmbales and serve at once. This Iji ^ 
hearty and dalloioua soup. 




1 




\ 




1 



Ms 



11 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 80, 1913. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AM INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

Pnbli«hed every eveiiinsr except Sun- 

tlay h>- The Herald Company. 

Both Telephones — Business Office, 324; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 

Etiteretl as second- cIms matter at the Duluih post- 
offlcf under the act of congr*— of M« fch 3. 18i0. 

OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DUllTH 

SI BJ*CKIPTIU!« RATES — By mall, pay- 
able in advance, one mi-nth, 35 cents; 
three months, |1; six mf>nth8, $2; 
one year, |4; Saturday Herald, $1 per 
year; Weekly Herald, |1 per year. 

Daily by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 
cents a week. 4?; cents a month. 
Stilsciiber!) will confer a favor by maklnB known 

any c:D)i>I»ir.t of serrice. 

Whcr. changing the adiir«s» of jour paper, it to 
ln!p<irLa;',t ti etrp both old a.id new «ddresac«. 

The I'uluth Herald accepts adver- 
tlsinK contracts with the distinct guar- 
anty that it has the largest cir^jalatlon 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 



He 



THE HERALD AND 
VACATION 

TJjose going away for the summer 
or even for a short vacation should 
not leavo without sending in an or- 
der for The Herald to follow. Keep 
up with what's going on in Duluth. 
Get all the latest news. Its like a 
daily letter from home. Have your 
address changed if you are already 
H subscriber. I>o not miss a single 
cor y Both phones, 324. 




GUESS AGAIN, MR. VICE PRESIDENT 

\:ce I'resident Marshall, whose fer- 
tile mind sprouts epigrams as a 
fecund field yields grain, said recent- 
ly that "the trouble with Americans 
is that they squeeze the dollar too 
tightly." 

Franklin P. Adams in the Chicago 
Evening Post very properly makes 
reply to this amazing statement, as 
follows: "One of the troubles with 
Americans is that they are ashamed 
to let anybody, from waiters up, think 
that they care anything whatever 
about a dollar or any of its multiples." 

That's a shot in the clout, F. P. A.! 

For once the vice president, with 
all his wisdom and vigorous thought, 
is absurdly wrong. 

If there is anything the average 
American does not know how to do 
it is how to squeeze a dollar. 

While the thrifty folk of Belgium, 
F'rance, Germany and Britain keep 
the eagle on the dollar in a constant 
outcry of pain, the pressure of the 
average American on his coin is so 
light that the eagle keeps constantly 
in flight, and lives a life of joyous 
freedom. 

It is a stupendous folly, too. and 
has more than a little to do with the 
much complained of high cost of liv- 
ing. It was no fair answer to the 
bitter appeal of the disinherited mul- 
titude to say that the cost of high 
living is more responsible for the 
trouble than the high cost of living; 
yet it bore much truth, this statement 
— an unhappily large amount of truth. 

The American comes by this habit 
naturally enough. It comes from the 
tradition that one American is as good 
as another, and better than anybody 
else. It roots, too, in the idea which 
prevailed when the continent was be- 
'mg raped of its riches by a few. that 
there was no end to the natural 
wealth of the country. 

Hence it is that the nine-hundred- 
dollar clerk must live like the fifteen- 
hundred-dollar bookkeeper, and the 
fifteen-hundred-dollar bookkeepei 

must strive to emulate the five- 
thousand dollar manager. 

Hence it is that so many live as far 
beyond their incomes as tradesmen 
will allow, shutting their eyes to 
the .Lord-knows-what that is to be 
visited upon them when their earn- 
ing capacity ceases, suddenly or in 
the due course of nature. 

Hence it is that no matter hov/ 
gaunt the pocketbook. every true 
American is shamed unless he can vie 
in extravagance with those whose 
pocketbooks are corpulent. 

Hence it is that no matter how 
much he may inwardly writhe, out- 
wardly the true American on a thous- 
and dollars a year must tip the porter 
and the waiter and the chauffeur as 
royally as though he were a golden 
prince of fortune. 

Thrift is an offense. Providence is 
out of fashion. Saving is a vice. They 
are all grouped with parsimony in the 
category of solecisms. 

The average American would be 
vastly better off. and so would the 
country, if he would learn how to 
squeeze the dollar a little more tight- 
ly, or wotild put a little rosin on his 
fingers to make the dollar stick better. 

For his lack of squeezing dollars, 
the lack of dollars some time is going 
to squeeze the average American 
mighty hard. 



provender as you used to get? 
does not. 

The brown sugar of your youthful 
days has disappeared from the house- 
hold. 

Its going was due to the "Dutch 
standard," and to the machinations of 
the sugar trust, working through a 
complacent and obedient Republican 
government. 

One of the features of the new 
tariff law that is about to be is that 
it abolishes the Dutch standard; and 
unless young people have lost the 
taste for it, presently they can have 
their bread and brown sugar and but- 
ter again. 

The Dutch standard is simply a 
grading of sugar according to color, 
from the darkest to the whitest in 
sixteen shades. SeveVal of the darker 
grades are suitable for household 
uses, and the reason your mother used 
to have them in the home was that 
they were cheaper and could be used 
for cooking. The fine white sugar 
was kept for the tea and coffee, 
though in many homes the brown 
sugars served all purposes. 

The sugar trust is interested chief- 
ly in refining. It cut into its business 
to have the cheaper brown sugars 
competing in the home with its high- 
ly refined white sugars. So by a 
clever manipulation of the Dutch 
standard, the Republican party and 
the government, the sugar trust had 
the tariff duties arranged so that one 
kind of sugar cost about as much to 
the consumer as another. As the 
brown sugars were no longer cheap- 
er, because of this device, it was not 
profitable to import them any more; 
so boyhood lost its favorite delicacy. 
And now it is to come back. Also, 
the household once more is to have 
the privilege, if it wishes to use it, 
of having several grades of sugar in 
the home — white sugar for finer uses, 
and brown sugar for cooking and to 
mix with rich butter on top of fat 
slices of bread for the youngsters. 

If today's boyhood has the same 
discriminating appetite that boyhood 
had when you were a boy, the boy- 
hood of today ought to be pretty 
strongly Democratic when it grows 
up. 

It will owe its bread with brown 
sugar and butter to the Democratic 
party. 



of red tape and precedents that has 
often made courts of justice places 
where injustice is inevitable, and 
where those who win often lose as 
surely as those who lose. 

The judges and the lawyers of this 
country could hardly be engaged in 
a better business than this. 



The Krupps have offered $16,000,000 
for the exclusive right to sell cannon 
in China, which indicates that the In- 
fluence of the Carnegie Palace of 
Peace has not yet become overwhelm- 
ing in all quarters. 



Kissing having been officially con- 
doned by the Chicago health depart- 
ment, probably there will be less 
tendency toward Indulging In that city. 
It Is ever the forbidden fruit that is 
the most tempting. 



JOHN LIND. 

By the way, at the other end of the 
line in this Mexican negotiation 
stands a stalwart figure that is as 
notably admirable and efficient, in its 
humbler sphere, as the splendid fig- 
ure of President Wilson at this end. 

The figure is that of John Lind, 
Minnesota's first citizen, and the 
president did well to accord him warm 
praise for his work in the message to 
congress which placed before the 
world the full story of this country's 
attempt to help its sister republic out 
of the coil into which it has unhap- 
pily entangled itself. 

Lest it be said that our praise for 
the dignified and able work of our 
fellow-citizen is prompted by local 
pride, in lieu of further comment of 
our own we append this fitting word 
of praise from the Chicago Journal: 

"Lind's handling of his difficult mis- 
sion has been a masterpiece of quiet 
efficiency. The proposals he brought 
were rejected by Huerta, but Lind so 
managed that the whole civilized 
world knows and admits that Huerta 
is in the wrong. 

"Lind refused either to bully or be 
bullied. He upheld his country's dig- 
nity without giving offense to the sen- 
sibilities of any rational citizen of 
Mexico. He made the thinking peo- 
ple of that unfortunate land under- 
stand that the great Republic of the 
north is their friend, and never more 
truly friendly than in refusing to ac- 
knowledge the blood-stained dictator 
who seeks to maintain himself in pow- 
er by sheer terror. 

"It was John Lind's work to repair 
so far as might be the damage done 
by the mischievous meddling and 
flamboyant folly of H, L. Wilson. 
That work has been done." 

And well done. 



But even so, it's a little early to begin 
studying .Spanish as preparation for 
service In Mexico. 



BROWN SUGAR AGAIN, PERHAPS. 

Do you remember, when you were 
a lad, how you used to rush into the 
house during the forenoon, hungry 
from play, and beg mother for a 
lunch? And do you remember how 
she used to take a large, fat slice of 
bread, spread it liberally with butter, 
and sift over it and work into the 
butter a fine, soft brown sugar that 
made it a delicacy fit for the gods? 

Of course you remember. But 
have you seen any of that toothsome 
brown sugar in recent years? When 
your lad comes in hungry and begs * 
"piece" does he get any such royal 



From the way some of the crowd 
acted at Sherbrooke the other day, 
maybe John Lind won't necessarily be 
out of a job even when Mexico has 
quieted down. 



UNIFORM COURT PRACTICES. 

Federal and state judges from every 
state in the Union are conferring in 
Montreal today, at the meeting of the 
American Bar association, to form 
plans for a complete reform of the 
rules of pleading and practice on the 
law side of the supreme court of the 
United States, and all Federal dis- 
trict courts, for the purpose event- 
ually of making uniform the practice 
in all the courts of the United States. 

The aim, of course, is to simplify 
litigation and to reduce cost and de- 
lay to a minimum. And this is a con- 
summation devoutly to be wished. 

The legal profession, sad to say, 
has been the least progressive of all 
professions in this country, and it has 
permitted the accumulation of a mass 



THE KAISER JOINS THE BLUE 
RIBBON BAND. 

The German emperor has quit 
drinking for good. 

He is no reformed drunkard, for 
there is no evidence that he ever 
drank to excess. But like most of his 
people he was fond of the famous 
beers and light wines of the Father- 
land, and, probably, he had the Ger- 
man habit of drinking without abus- 
ing the practice. 

In passing, it might be said that 
all things considered, the American 
people are the most foolish drinkers 
on earth, and the Germans the wisest. 
But hereafter, not even in modera- 
tion, will there be any touch of in- 
toxicants in the kaiser's drinks. His 
favorite tipple these days, the cable 
reports, is lemonade with a dash of 
orange juice; though he has not car- 
ried his reform so far as Mr. Bryan, 
and still serves his guests what they 
prefer. 

The case is striking, not only be- 
cause of the eminence of its subject, 
but because of the wisdom and sound- 
ness of the emperor's reason for 
abandoning the use of alcohol in any 
form. 

As The Herald said the other day 
in a passing reference to the kaiser's 
"reform," he quit drinking because he 
found that drink, even in moderate 
quantities, affected his efficiency as 
a human being, and therefore as the 
great ruler of a greater people. 

"Some time ago," says the cable 
report, "the kaiser demanded the lat- 
est alcoholic statistics as to suicides, 
accidents and crimes which resulted 
from immoderate drinking. After a 
study of these statistics he experi- 
mented on himself and found that 
even small quantities of liquor les- 
sened his energy and capacity for 
work. Whereupon, with characteris- 
tic impulsiveness, he cut out alcohol 
entirely. He never misses an oppor- 
tunity to descant on the value of tem- 
perance, and the result is that the 
members of his suite who like their 
wine touch it lightly when dining in 
his presence." 

The kaiser's experiments and his 
deduction are in entire accord with 
modern knowledge. Psychologists 
are familiar with similar experiments. 
For instance, there are recorded ex- 
periments where healthy men not 
given to drinking were put through 
a course of sprouts with and without 
alcohol. It was conclusively demon- 
strated that even so moderate a dram 
as a single glass of beer caused a 
marked change. There was a loss of 
judgment, a dulling of the faculties 
and a loss of keenness and quickness 
of perception that was too marked to 
be overlooked. 

The effect of so small a dose is, of 
course, temporary. So are the effects 
of larger doses. But it is pretty well 
established by experience that even 
though it is so slight as not to be 
discoverable at the time, there is a 
decided permanent effect which, aug- 
mented by habitual drinking even in 
moderate daily quantities, in time 
makes chronic these acute results of 
alcohol on the human system. 

The kaiser preaches by his example 
a pretty good temperance lesson. 

Nobody ever was the better for 
liquor. Millions have been made 
worse by it. 

Those who let it severely alone 
adopt the wisest policy. 



ing the present failure of the Filipinos 
to measure up-fo our standards. 

But if this cgfentry must wait until 
civilization in the islands has risen to 
our standards, how long a wait will 
it be? Decades, certainly; centuries 
not improbably. 

It is time for the statesmanship of 
this country to apply itself to the 
problem of how to get rid of the Phil- 
ippines. That is the actual problem, 
though it will not be expressed that 
way in the language of statesmanship. 
The pending jpiJl provides for freedom 
in 1920. Perhaps that's too soon. Per- 
haps, if treaties could be arranged 
that would insure a hands-off policy 
in all other nations, it could be done 
sooner, experimentally at least. 

But the Philippines are an awkward 
possession, and our ownership of 
them in trust is a charge from which 
we should free ourselves at the ear- 
liest possible moment. Only the dic- 
tates of humanity, and never those of 
greed, should bring about a single 
day's delay. 



Edward Payson Weston having 
bought a farm in Minnesota, the rest 
of the country can say goodbye to him. 
He'll never be willing to get far 
enough away from there to walk 
across the continent again. 



It doesn't seem possible that some 
congressmen's objection to finishing 
both the currency and tariff matters 
this session Is due to a fear that there 
will be nothing to do at the next. 



THE PHILIPPINE PROBLEM. 

Dean Worcester's report that there 
is not only slavery in the Philippines 
but that it is prevalent will be used 
as an argument, doubtless, by those 
who openly advocate a "leave-it- 
alone" policy as to the Philippines, 
with more or less disguised approval 
ox the folly of permanent occupation. 
" The purpose of this nation is — or 
should be — to free the Philippines as 
soon as it can be done in honor and 
decency. 

These island possessions are not 
only a profitless expense, but an act- 
ual peril. Our interest there brings 
this country into a dangerous area, 
and exposes it constantly to the 
menace of Eastern complications the 
end of which no man can see. 

To Philippine freedom this country 
is pledged as emphatically as it could 
possibly be. Permanent occupation, 
which is what most of those desire 
who oppose early severance of the tie. 
iu unthinkable because it is not only 
undesirable, but dishonorable. 

The only question fit to be dis- 
cussed is how soon the Philippines 
can safely be set free. The fact of 
slavery is important only as indicat- 



MISSOURrS ROAD DAYS. 

Through the efforts of Governor 
Major of Missouri, during two days 
lately a host of men all over the state 
turned out and worked on the roads. 
Unquestionably these men showed 
a fine public spirit. Unquestionably 
they worked up' a wholesome sweat, 
got blisters on their hands that will 
do them no harm, and worked up 
splendid appetites for supper and 
sleep. 

The value of the work they did on 
the roads is another question. 

We should imagine, on the whole, 
that it would not be great. 

Governor Major, enthusiastic over 
the success of this celebration, wants 
all the states to take it up. He hopes 
to make the observance of Road Days 
next year as sure in all the states as 
Thanksgiving or Christmas. 

It will do no harm if he succeeds 
in making the movement a national 
one, and doubtless much good. 

But the good will not come from 
the road work thus accomplished. It 
must come through awakening public 
interest in the subject of good roads; 
and in this way the Major movement 
may achieve much. 

There has already been too much 
amateur road work throughout the 
country. 

There is no more economy in ama- 
teur road-building of this sort than 
there would be in amateur house- 
building. 

If Duluth should turn out its peo- 
ple for a couple of days and set them 
to building a city hall, it would get 
some kind of a building out of it, and 
perhaps it would be one that could 
be used for a little while. 

But it would be the work of ama- 
teurs, and of amateurs improperly 
directed; and labor of that kind is of 
precious little value. 

If Duluth needs a city hall — which 
goodness know* it does — the thing 
for it to do is to find the money to 
pay for it, an architect to design it, 
and a skilled constructor to build it. 

So with roads. 

The present good roads impulse is 
almost entirely toward increasing ap- 
propriations for roads, and that's 
wise and helpful. 

But under amateur management and 
haphazard methods, such as those 
which prevail almost universally, 
money put into roadwork brings an 
average of something like fifteen 
cents' worth of road for each dollar 
spent. 

If the efficiency of these expendit- 
ures could be doubled by expert work- 
ers, obviously the gain would be as 
great as if the expenditures were 
doubled. 

In other words, it is as fruitful to 
get thirty cents' worth of roads for 
the taxpayers* dollar instead of only 
fifteen cents' worth as it is to spend 
two dollars instead of one; and plain- 
ly it is vastly more economical. 

We applaud Governor Major for his 
effort to awaken public interest in 
good roads in Missouri an^ the nation. 

But we urge upon him less admir- 
ation for amateur road-building, and 
greater consideration for the need of 
making each dollar of the taxpayer's 
money bring a dollar's worth of 
roads. 

Increased efficiency in road-mak- 
ing will not only bring greater re- 
sults for the same expenditure, but 
it will encourage the taxpayers to let 
loose of still more money for roadi^ 
when th#y know that it is to be fairly 
and effectively spent. 



complishment of such a change as 
that borders on a venture into the 
field of prophecy. But there can be 
no denying that Mr. Dickson has 
voiced a principle of public service 
that amounts to a law of nature. 

History is full of instances of the 
operation of that principle. Even the 
forcing from King John of the Magna 
Charta was only the application of 
what Mr. Dickson has stated in more 
modern terms. The American Revo- 
lution was another example of it, for 
when those in authority in the affairs 
of the colonies overstepped the 
bounds of reason in their exercise of 
that authority, the colonists took mat- 
ters into their own hands. 

It has been the same in countless 
cities in this country where munici- 
pal ownership has taken the place 
of private monopoly and arrogance. 
It was that principle which led to the 
establishment in this country of the 
parcel post. And it is that principle 
which is operating to bring about gov- 
ernment ownership and operation of 
railroads in Alaska and sooner or later 
throughout the country. 

The lesson is one that public serv- 
ice managers, in many instances, have 
been slow to learn, and that some 
even yet refuse to recognize. But the 
principle is as old as society itself. 
Mr. Dickson's words may have start- 
led the underwriters, but if it did it 
was only because they have kept 
themselves blind and deaf to the 
teachings of the past, and even of re- 
cent years. The difference is that to- 
day the principle is recognized and 
applied where heretofore it was only 
vaguely felt and blindly groped after. 



Woodrow Wilson 

as Party Leader 

From the SirlnglMd Republican. 



Twenty Years Ag[o 



Prom Ttw Herald of thU dat«. lUX 



Fifteen barrels of sauer kraut and 
over a thousand pounds of wieners 
were served at a picnic in Iowa the 
other day. And the chances are that 
there were some small boys who didn't 
get enough. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(Readere of The HeraJd are Invited to malte free 
Uie of this Cf.lumn to exuwes their Ideas about the 
topics of genera] interest, but discussions of sectarian 
religious differences are barred. Letters must not 
exceed 800 words — the shorter the better. They must 
be written on one side of the paper only, and they 
must be at-compaiiled In erery case by the name and 
address of the writer, though theae need not be pub- 
lished. A signed letter Is always more effective, bow- 
erer.) 



A MEAN QUESTION. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I would like to know through your 
Open Court column if you have heard 
anything from the West Duluth anglers 
who went up the St. Louis river to get 
that nice big mess of fish and to let 
The Herald take pictures of the fish. 
I have been waiting to see the picture 
of them -In The Herald for over a 
month. 

A SHOW ME ANGLER FT^OM WEST 
DULUTH. 
West Duluth, Aug, 29. 



A DANGEROUS SPOT. 



Honest, now, how would you like to 
be looking forward to going back to 
school next Tuesday? 



A PRINCIPLE THAT AMOUNTS TO 
A LAW. 

"In ten years," said G. E. Dickson 
of Chicago "before the accident un- 
derwriters' meeting in that city, "pri- 
vate insurance companies will be a 
memory and the government will be 
doing the business, unless the under- 
writers wake up and meet the de- 
mands of the people." 

To set an aciual time for the ac- 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I would like to call the attention of 
the proper city officials to a condition 
that exists on Second avenue west. On 
the w^est side of the avenue, between 
Second and Third streets, there is about 
as dark a spot as one would care to 
traverse at night, and in addition to 
that Is the fact that the sidewalk Is 
constructed in such a way that the 
slightest misstep will precipitate one 
down an incline about two feet to the 
ground. It Is a very easy matter to 
get hurt at this place, and only a few 
days ago an elderly woman, well 
known In the city, stepped off the walk 
there and has been laid up ever since. 
It is probably not a very easy matter 
to regulate the construction of the 
walk at this point, but it can be lighted 
so that pedestrians may guide theli 
footsteps. The place is extremely dan- 
gerous for elderly people and for 
younger ones as well. I would suggest 
that a gas lamp be placed at the alley- 
way between the two streets, on the 
west side, so that the dangerous points 
may be seen at night. 

PEDESTRIAN, 
Duluth, Aug, 29. 

« 

When the La«t Child Leaves. 

For half your life you've labored with 
"the children"' in your mind, 

Sometimes a little step ahead, some- 
times a mile behind. 

And many a night you've pondered on 
the whencenege of the how, 

But you did it, yep, you did it; raised 
'em one and all, and now — 

Lordy, but it's lonely when the last 

child leaves; 
The year Is at the autumn and the very 

weather grieves; 
The skies are gloomed and raining, 
The whipped trees are complaining 
And there's sobbing In the chimney 

and a weeping at the eaves. 
For oh! it's lonely, lonely, when the 

last child leaves. 

There's a good deal of that feeling 
when the baby went to school, 

Or the big boy went to work (as Inde- 
pendent as a mule!) 

Or the girl went off to college, with a 
happy, hurried kiss, 

But always there were comings-back. 
It never was like this! 

So, oh. It's lonely, lonely, when the 

last child's left, 
The living room has suffered loss, the 

bedroom cries of theft. 
And eke the cheerful dining room 
Becomes a sad, repining room. 
For every room is lonely when the 

whole house is bereft. 
So, oh! it's lonely, lonely, when the 

last child's left. 

You cannot change the universe, you 
wouldn't if you could; 

Your link is in the chain of life, and 
somehow that Is good, 

But you were first to them so long, in 
all their joys and cares, 

And now the last one's left you to re- 
membrances — and prayers. 



Such sensational manifestations of 
political anarchy a« the Sulzer-Tam- 
many war remind one that the Demo- 
cratic party came Into power with a 
reputation for disorderliness and lack 
of discipline and unity which it was 
obliged to live down in order to win 
permanently the confidence of the peo- 
ple. Divisive elements are still active 
within it; the feudist spirit is not dead; 
party ties hang loose in many states; 
personal ambitions and vanities here 
and there rival personal hates in ob- 
structing the party's success as a gov- 
erning organization. It Isn't the 
disgraceful Tammany-Sulzer vendetta 
alone that tends to shake confidence; 
when we see the governor of Alabama 
deliberately Imperiling the Democratic 
legislative program In the United 
States senate by making a temporary 
appointment to that body without un- 
questioned authority. In order to pro- 
mole some friend's senatorial candi- 
dacy — heedless of all the appeals from 
the senate leaders — we again realize 
what a tremendous task President Wil- 
son has assumed in taking up the na- 
tional leadership of the party now in 
power. 

To an unparalleled degree, the suc- 
cess of a political party in Ub great 
undertaking of governing the country 
seems to depend upon the ability, the 
Insight, the determination and the 
power of a single man. The success of 
the Wilson administration in national 
affairs would make up for many fail- 
ures of Democratic administrations in 
state affairs; while Democratic disci- 
pline and unity would undoubtedly be 
promoted in all parts of the country in 
proportion as the Democratic president 
gained in the prestige of a triumphant 
leadership. The sum of it all is that 
the Democratic party sinks or swims 
with Woodrow Wilson. 

The character and tendency of the 
president's leadership are becoming In- 
creasingly interesting and significant. 
That he Is a man who measures up to 
the immense burdens and difficulties ot 
his position is more widely believed to- 
day, doubtless, than six months ago 
when he was about to take office. His 
leadership of congress has thus far 
afforded, perhaps, the severest test of 
the president's capacity. It may be said 
that, on the legislative side, the work 
is only begun. Not even the tariff bill 
has yet become a law. The banking 
and currency bill is still in its forma- 
tive stage in the Democratic caucus. 
Yet a surprising amount of prestige has 
already been won by Mr. Wilson be- 
cause of the directing part he has 
played in the working out of the legis- 
lative program. His latest ultimatum 
against a congressional recess before 
the banking bill has been considered 
by both houses calls fresh attention to 
the supreme personality that now dom- 
inates the Washington situation. To 
illustrate the fact that the president's 
dominating role of leadership, as played 
by Mr. Wilson, has begun to arouse 
the admiration of his political friends 
and to excite the criticism of his polit- 
ical foes, we have gathered in another 
column several expressions of opinion 
that serve to illuminate the greatest 
political problem of the day. 

It is much to the credit of the presi- 
dent that thus far during the present 
session he has shown every moment 
that he knows precisely what he wants 
done and that he is determined to gel 
solid results. He marks out a policy, 
a program; he stoutly adheres to it. 
ThreatB from the opposition to the 
tariff bill in the senate to delay indefi- 
nitely by stale debate the passage of 
that measure move him not. Snarling 
protests against currency legislation at 
this session meet with the reply that 
it is the business of the Democrats to 
control the^r own congress to the end 
that they may pass bills through it. 
Having the whip hand, the president Is 
not afraid to make his power felt and 
to hold his party followers as strongly 
as possible to their tasks. 

There can be no sort of doubt that 
this kind of leadership in a president 
makes an impression upon the people 
and is approved by them. Nor is there 
the slightest doubt that the way to 
success for the Democratic party In 
governing the country Is under a lead- 
ership at once competent and trust- 
worthy. The situation is such that 
nothing short of leadership both able 
and strong will place the Democratic 
administration, and with it the Demo- 
cratic party, where the majority of the 
American people will be compelled to 
say that it has made good. But we 
are not to conclude that such leader- 
ship can be had unless the party in 
power accepts it. If the leadership is 
to be successful, it must have loyal and 
unswerving support. Whether this ec- 
sential condition is to prevail, the Dem- 
ocratic members of house and senate 
must determine; upon them, in short, 
rests the final responsibility for the 
success or failure of a president of the 
type of Woodrow Wilson. 

Every consideration of political ex- 
pediency, every possibility of popular 
approval In the latter years of the ad- 
ministration, every dictate of political 
wisdom, it must be said, calls upon the 
party, both in congress and out of it, 
to support freely and loyally the lead- 
ership which the president regards as 
his political prerogative and which he 
gives so much evidence of exercising 
with prudence, sagacity and distinc- 
tion. 



•••Ed. Smith, who has been repr©-^ 
senting the American Steel Barge com» 
pany at Cleveland, is in the city. Um 
will leave within a few days for Buf- 
falo, where. he will be employed in'* 
similar capacity. 



•••The pill & Wright mill, which hi 
been leased by F. A. Gooding, ie grind- 
ing again on full time. Mr. Gill is lb 
charge of the mill. 



•••Harry Hofhelmer of Norfolk, Va.^ 
and Mrs. A. H. Heller of Chippewa 
Falls, Wis., are here visiting their 3l»- 
ter, Mrs. B, Heller. 



•••Charles E. Snell is entertalnln*^ 
his mother and sister, Mrs. S. A. and 
Miss LIna M. Snell of Medina. N. Y. 



•••A. E. Rosenbusch and wife 
yesterday for a week's visit at 
world's fair. 



left 
th* 



•••F. A. Booren and Miss Lena Sal- 
vorsen of West Duluth were married at 
West Superior yesterday and have 
taken up their residence in Mr. Boo- 
ren's restaurant building on Central 
avenue. 



•••W. R. Chadsey of New York ha» 
filed with the secretary of state of Wis- 
consin articles of incorporation for the 
Chicago, Superior & Pacific Railway 
company, for which he has received a 
charter. This is the old original W^ls- 
consln Central railroad chartered In 
1853, upon which nearly $3,000,000 wa« 
expended, from the Illinois state line 
northwesterly In an air line to Lake 
Superior. It is understood that the in- 
tention Is to connect Duluth and Su- 
perior and Minneapolis and St. Paul 
with the Wabash air line from Chicago 
to Detroit. The move Is said to be 
backed by the Canadian Pacific road. 



•••Articles of incorporation wer« 
filed yesterday by the Hebrew congre- 
gation of Aguddas of Achlm of Duluth. 
The object is to build a church. 



•••Alex McEachren of West Superior 
was married this morning at E^Q 
Claire, Wis., to Miss Grace McLean of 
that city 



•••President Alfred Merritt returned 
from New York this morning in the 
car Missabe of the Duluth, Mlssabe Jb 
Northern railroad. With him were C. 
W. Wetmore and Mrs. Wetmore of New 
York, C. N. Fay of Chicago and Ia. 
Brome of Trinidad. Messrs. Merritt an4 
Wetmore said that the Missabe road 
has arranged for all the money It 
needs. 



•••Walter Avery of Detroit, well 
known to many Duluthians, is In the 
city today. 



SATURDAY 
NIGHT TALK 



Trees Full of Sap. 

The Psalter is a choice manual of 

devotion not merely for its splrltucd 

Insight but for the richness of ite 
imagery. It is full of telling figurea 
and similes that haunt the memory. 
Where else may one, seeking a nobl^ 
vocabulary, so refresh his soul as at 
this pure well of English undefiled? 

■'The trees of the Lord are full of 
sap," declares the Psalmist in happy, 
phrase. He means that God is a goo4 
provider. There is nothing meager 
about the Almighty's provision, for 
the world that he has made. He opens 
his hand lavishly to satisfy the desire 
of every living thing. 

Elsewhere the good man is likened 
to a tree nourished by the bounty 01 
God. "He shall be like a tree planted 
by the rivers of water, that brlngeth 
forth his fruit in his season, whose 
leaf also shall not wither." The treef 
that God nourishes are juicy with sap 
and the men that he sustains groW 
fresh and vivid to the end of life. 

Human trees there are that with* 
ered, and one need not look far afield 
to see them. The zest, the delight ot 
life has departed. Disillusionment 1* 
written on the faces of many weary 
folk who have made full trial of what 
the world has to offer. They wear 
the expression the French call pass^ 
They have drained the cup of humaa 
pleasures only to make wry faces a^ 
last ever the dregs found in the bot^ 
torn. 

Was ever more melancholy confes- 
sion penned than that of Lord Byroa 
at 367 

My days are In the yellow leaf 

The flowers and fruits of love ara 

gone; 
The worm, the canker, and the grief 
Are mine alone. 



Robust Federalism 



So, oh! It's lonely, lonely, when the 

last child's gone, 
Seems most like a waste of time just 

living on and on, • 
With no one left to do for. 
To hustle for and stew for. 
And you know the dusk around you is 

the twilight, not the dawn. 
So, oh! its lonely, lonely, when the 

last child's gone. 
— Edmund Vance Cooke in Harper's 
Weekly. 



The Best They Conid Do. 

Boston Transcript: She — I wonder 
why they hung that picture? 

He — Perhaps they couldn't catch the 
artist. 



New York Globe: The importance 

of the nasty Diggs case is in its im- 
plications. 

If the Mann act has the meaning 
given to it by Judge Van Fleet then 
there has been an epochal enlargement 
of Federal authority, and on Federal 
grand juries and district attorneys 
has been laid a great responsibility. 
If Judge Van Fleet is right, on the 
Federal government and Its district 
attorneys is placed the obligation of 
punishing a sort of crime heretofore 
supposed exclus-lvely to be the duty 
of the state and the local courts. In 
every case of what is called "immor- 
ality," If the two cross a state's bor- 
ders, the man, if he pays the ferry 
fare, is a "white slaver." and liable to 
twenty years at hard labor in the pen« 
Itentlary. Judge Van Fleet ruled, first, 
that the prior behavior of the woman 
was of no consequence — that the of- 
fense was committed even though her 
character was of the blackest; second, 
that the fact that she went willingly 
was no defense. 

Alexander Hamilton was something 
of a Federalist, and enhanced the 
powers of the central government. 
But he was a mild and weak one com- 
pared with Judge Van Fleet. Either 
he Is wrong or Federal district at- 
torneys, if they would fearlessly do 
their duty and avoid the charge of be- 
ing respecters of persons, must 
crowd their calendars with "white 
slave" cases. 



.:■>'■ 



Medleal Advtee. 

Pittsburg Post: "Doctor, how can I 
prevent my husband from talking in 
his Bleep?" 

"Well, you might try giving him a 
few opportunltiee in the daytime." 



Am I wrong in declaring satiety and 
disgust to be the portion pre-em« 
inently of those who spend life in car- 
nal pleasure-seeking? My own ob- 
servation at least points solidly to 
that conclusion. It is the sinnera 
rather than the saints who are jaded 
in the end. A career of physical de- 
lights is more than likely to issue ia 
acrid disgust and self-loathing. 

The impotence of mere things to 
satisfy is clearly enough proclaimed 
by the average face one sees In Van- 
ity Fair. Ennui, which has been de- 
scribed as "the want of a want and 
the complaint of those who have noth- 
ing to complain or' is the special' 
portion of the Idle and the selfish. Ail 
the high flavors grow stale finally.. 
The passing show becomes but van- 
ity and vexation of spirit. 

One may become wearied and blaas 
as he grows older — but he is uAder no 
necessity of becoming so. Life ought 
to be sweeter and fresher as the yeara 
pass. Enthusiasm should increase and 
not diminish. The best work, the ma- 
ture judgments, the mellowest spirit 
should come later rather than earllen. 
Spring Is beautiful and summer la 
vivid but nature- yields her- finest, 
fruitage In autumn. 

A gray head still active and inter-^ 
ested and enthusiastic is a better find 
than that of a bank note, to borrow 
Stevenson's comparison. Nothing hear- 
tens us more than the testimony of a 
pilgrim who, having been over lone 
stretches of the road, pronounces It: 
good. Grandfathers and grandmothera. 
retaining their delight In simpla- 
things, sensible to beauty In nature, 
with kindly sentiment toward tha 
world they live In, and doing some*- 
thing for Its welfare — these are bea-> 
cons of hope to the younger genera- 
tion. Their way shineth more and 
more unto the perfect day. They haya- 
entered Into the Increasing joy andi 
peace that make the peculiar inherit- 
ance of righteous lives. 

THE PARSON. 

• 

Hay and Cora. 

Chicago Record-Herald: "Aren't yoia 
going away for your hay fever thia. 
year?" 

"No." 

"Have you outcrown It?" 

"Not at all. I sot la wronc 
com." 



IP 



Bcaaieai 



A.--« 




Saturday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 



16 



QrCifYO THE CUB 
OV/V/V/X REPORTEl 



>*M^iM^l^aM^I#«M#«^tMMM^««MN««M#M^»^IMWMM< 



Now the Boss Is Looking for a Doctor 



By "HOP" 




I 



THE ELUSIVE PARAMOUNT 



By SAVOYARD. 



\ 



i 



Washington. Aug. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald). — It is a pathetic spectacle 
—the piper to whose strains the com- 
pmy will no longer dance, and doleful 
le the exhibition when the country will 
»> longer hearken to issues presented 
bir a political party. There Is Jim 
Mann, minority leader of the national 
hjuse of representatives, running up 
aid down the earth in pursuit of a 
piramount. He reminds of the little 
n.gger who dally visited the Carnegie 
library and always called for the same 
V ilume. When handed to him he took 
the book to his seat and opened It at 
B certain page that displayed a royal 
Bengal tiger rampant chasing a pick- 
aninny in terrified flight. In gratified 
surprise the reader gazed a moment 
Oil the picture, and in gleeful satis- 
fc.ction exclaimed, "Gosh, he ain't cotch 
hm ylt!" 

And Jim Mann has been chasing an 
Issue ever since March 4 and hasn't 
••( otch It ylt." In the California case 
h'S sought to put the calendar in issue; 
b'lt the country only smiled. The ghost 
of protection was Invoked and It 
proved elusive as an issue. The agri- 
cultural schedule of the tariff was 
wept over by the henchmen of monopo- 
ly and the farmers only laughed, and 
now the Hon. Mann seeks a paramount 
In a private opinion Secretary McAdoo 
ej:pressed not at all complimentary to 
\^'all street. It is meet. Nobody but a 
Republican ever defended Wall street 
In either house of the American con- 
gress. 

* « * 

And speaking of the agricultural 
schedule. It has been urged by some 
senators like McCumber that this phase 
o( the tariff Is sectional and that 
Bduthern produ' t.^ of the soil are treat- 
ec better than Northern. There is not 
©: e word of truth In that charge. Cot- 
ton Is the chief Southern agricultural 
pioduct. It Is on the free list, always 
has been on the free list. Corn ia the 
leading product of the soil at the 
North. It Is ■•protected" In the pres- 
ent law and on the free list in the pro- 
pt'sed law. Mark you, there Is a great 
dtal of corn produced at the South, 
and yearly the yield of that cereal at 
the South increases In quantity. The 
tl -ne Is not very distant when Texas 
will grow more corn than Iowa. 

• • * c 

Now, let us see how a tariff on corn 
arid on cotton would operate. In 1911 
the country Imported 56,375.119 pounds 
of cotton valued at $2,9.39,575. and no 
dity was paid on it at the custom 
he use. How about corn? That same 
vear we Imported of corn 52,295 
bushels, valued at $37,843, and it paid 
a tariff of $7,S44. At the same rate 
of dutv that corn paid — over 20 per 
cent ad valorem — the cottom imported 
would have yielded a revenue of $587,- 



protected by a tariff in far greater de- 
gree than corn. We imported only 
$450,974 worth of wheat In 1911 and 
thus cotton can be better protected 
than wheat for we import more of cot- 
ton in value than we do of both corn 
and wheat — more than six times as 
much. But the knaves will keep on 
charging and the fools believing that 
it is a sectional measure. 

Again, sugar cane is exclusively a 
Southern product Under the proposed 
tariff that goes, on the free list In 
1916. Rice Is exclusively a Southern 
product, barley is almost exclusively a 
Northern product. Under the proposed 
Democratic tariff the duties on both 
these articles are cut precisely In 
two. 

Here are the three great Southern 
products — cotton, sugar, rice. The first 
absolutely on the free list, the second 
on the free list after 1916, and on the 
third the duty reduced on^-half. 
* • • 

The Payne-Aldrlch tariff Is chock 
full of sectionalism. There is a duty 
on corn; there Is no protection for 
cotton. The Northern farmer gets his 
binding twine free; the Southern farm- 
er Is heavily taxed on cotton ties. Why? 
Because the grain growers of the j 
North were then In the Inveterate habit 
of voting the Republican ticket while 
the cotton planters at the South voted 
the Democratic ticket. Let me tell 
you — it is no more certain that the 
sun will rise In the East tomorrow 
morning than that cotton would have 
a tariff "protection" and cotton ties be 
on the free list, today. If Mississippi 
and Arkansas had been as reliably Re- 
publican states when the Dingley and 
Payne tariffs were enacted as Iowa 
and Minnesota then were. 

But what's the use of talking about 
it? Only the knave will say and only 
the fool will believe that you can ef- 
fectually "protect" cotton, or corn, or 
■wheat, by a tariff. We produce a sur- 
plus of all those products, and the 
price is iixed in tlie mart at Liverpool. 
I have tried to Illustrate it this way: 
You can Increase the value of the 
Kentu-'ky mammoth cave by a tariff 
on the pauper caves of Europe as eas- 
ily as you can Increase the value of 
American cotton, or corn, or wheat, by 
a tariff on these articles. 

The country has voted for tariff re- 
form. The president has urged it. The 
house of representatives has voted it 
and we will get It as soon as the 
standpatters and the progressives In 
the United States senate will allow 
It. At present their motto is "the pub- 
lic be damned." 

But the country will get tariff re- 
form and the people Intend to see that 
it shall have a fair trial. In the phil- 
osophy of Penrose, Lodge. Galllnger 
and the other standpatters business Is 



MINNESOTA'S STATE FAIR OPENS MONDAY 




■i^.-N. 






■y«^v 






i^bMb 



fair has grown Into. The greatest 
single educational and entertainment 
agency in the world. Is It surprising 
that even the men who fought for It 
in its Infancy would be astonished at 
Its size and popularity today? 
The Work of Yeors. 

It Is easy to understand that this 
giant institution has not been built 
up in a year, or In a few years, and 
that it could not have grown to its 
present size unless it had been found- 
ed on right principles and supported 
by earnest men of broad vision. 

The Minnesota Territorial Agri- 
cultural society, the progenitor of the 
present Minnesota State Agricultural 
society, was organized In 1853; held 
its first fair in 1855. Since that time. 



fairs of Increasing size and value have 
been held each year, with but few ex- 
ceptions. For thirty years the Institu- 
tion had no permanent home, but held 
its annual exhibitions In different 
cities, including St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
Red Wing, Rochester, Winona, Owa- 
tonna and Fort Snelling. In 1885 
Ramsey county donated the present 
site to the state and on Sept 7-15 
was held the first fair on the present 
grounds. This fair marks the begin- 
ning of a period of prosperity and 
greatness not equalled by any similar 
organization in the world. The popu- 
larity of the institution culminated 
last year, when 372,805 people passed 
through the turnstiles In six days. The 
managers expect 400,000 this year. 




CROWD IN MAMMOTH FIREPROOF GRANDSTAND. 



_. ^ .devilishly unpatriotic in not foisting a 

81 > financial panic and industrial depres- 

Thus you see that cotton can be I slon on the country. 



Tl)QDocToii's Helps 




r DONALD McCASKEY. M. D. 

M«nb«r or Suff, G«ii«raJ Hocpltal. 

LaacMtar, Pa.; Fellow of the New 

Y«tk AcMleeny of MedklM 




I 



r WHAT TO DO FOR RINGING IN THE EARS 



"An anxious reader" from Buffalo has written: 

"About ten months ago one of my ears commenced to have a ringing sound 
In It. It has continued ever since. There Is no pain, but Just this unpleasant 
ringing sound. I had a doctor examine It to see if any wax had collected on 
tht ear drum. He said 'no,' that the drum looked all right. This noise creates 
a confusion In my head, and I am afraid It will grow worse and make me deaf. 
Win you please advise me as to what I shall do?" 

The examination which your doctor made of your ear reveals that the outer 
ear canal is all right That is, the wax is not present in any abnormal amount, 
and the surface of your ear drum Is In good condition. If the outer surface 
of your ear drum Is In good condition, your doctor would have found many 
particles of dried-up scales, scabs, and accumulations of wax mixed with a moist 
discharge. The ear drum, after he had cleaned out the ear canal, would have 
be<n inflamed. As he found none of these conditions, you can eliminate any ear 
trouble as existing in the outer ear canal. The ear is divided Ito three caals. 

Now for the next step. 

The very fact that you can hear with your ears shows that the Internal 
eai. to which the nerve of hearing is attached, is working. If It wasn't, you 
couldn't hear. With these two separate divisions of your ear not affected, 
therefore, the trouble points to your middle ear canal. In this there are three 
tiny ear bones which connect the drum membrane with the nerve of hearing. 
Th.s middle portion of your ear has a canal about the thickness of a small 
goose quill that Joins the ear with the throat. This ig called the Eustachian 
Tu je. It permits the air to circulate freely between the space in your middle 
ear and the outside air as you breathe it through the nose. 

Prom your letter, there has most likely been developed an Irritation at the 
end of this canal, at Its throat exit. This has resulted in considerable Inflam- 
mation and discharge, which likely will be found to be shutting off the air 
from the ear. When auch a condition occurs It does not take nature many days 
to ;ib8orb the quantity of air within the middle ear cavity, which leaves a vac- 
uuia. This latter pulls and draws the ear drum In. whereas the ordinary healthy 
ear pushes the ear drum equally from both within and without keeninir the 
membrane nicely attuned. * 

It is when such a stopped-up condition develops In the Eustachian Tube 
that a marked ringing In the ears occurs. There may be some nasal trouble 
wh ch would set up the irritation back in your throat, and thence on up into the 
ear Sometime ago a patient came to me complaining of earache and rln^InE- 
wh ch had lasted several years. He had been dropping Sweet OH In the outer 
canal of the ear. On examination, after I had cleansed the outer canal and 
found the drum all right, I discovered that the nostril on the affected side 
wa^i plugged shut by a cherry-slxed tumor. This had existed since childhood 
and the patient told me he had been treated for nasal catarrh but without 
anj benefit. I discovered, after questioning, that when a child he had S 
hit with a baseball on that side of his nose, since which time his nostril wis 
clOi.ed^ By an operation of ten minutes' duration, the growth was removed 
Free breathing was brought about at once. A nasal spray of Dobell's SolutTnn 
procurable at any drug store, was prescribed, and within a week all ?ieea; 
ayniptoms disappeared. If, therefore, after clean.slng your nose and thr^ ^ 
with Dobell's Solution, It does not relieve your sym'^ptoms af?e? one week%' 
trial, you need the skilful attention of a nose and throat doctor TheJe mav he 
» dsep-seated cause that you can't remove youraeH ^ ^^ 



Many people In the Northwest know 
that the fair held annually at Ham- 
line is a big, helpful Institution. Very 
few however, know that the Minne- 
sota State fair is unquestionably the 
greatest annual exposition held an- 
nually anywhere In the world. This 
is true, not only as far as gate re- 
ceipts and attendance is concerned, 
but it is true in the matter of size and 
quality of Instructive, educational ex- 
hibits and the number and quality of 
its amusement features. 

"A modern state fair is a celebration, 
a festival, a vacation, a recreation." 
This declaration was made by one of 
the best known authorities on the 
modern state fair, and Is approved by 
the small army of men working to 
build up state fairs In various parts of 
the United States. The managers of 
the Minnesota institution believe In 
and are emphasizing this twentieth 
century spirit They have proceeded 
on the theory that the fair must be the 
people's playground as well as the 
people's school, and by a most liberal 
offering of premiums they have at- 
tracted from all parts of the country 
the best results In every line of in- 
dustry. This they have placed in the 
most effective setting and have made all 
provisions for attracting people to it 
by unusual entertainment offerings. 
The whole Is pervaded by a spirit of 
Joyousnesa j 

ElxcecdB Other State Fairs. 
In its size and comprehensiveness, 
Minnesota exceeds the country's other 
state fairs. So is it better equipped In 
Its facilities for entertaining great 
' crowds. The grounds are situated 
midway between Minneapolis and St 
Paul on land donated to the state by 
Ramsey county, and formerly used as 
the Ramsey county poor farjn. There 
are 300 acres inside the fences and 
some forty acres outside, used for 
trackage, loading platforms, etc. 
These grounds are directly connected 
with the Minnesota Transfer and in 
this way have the best possible freight 
transportation. They are reached by 
street car from either city for 5 cents, 
and practically 600,000 people live 
within a 5-cent carfare radius. 

On the 300 acres of land Inside the 
fair grounds fences there are 106 
buildings, large and small, that are 
used from year to year. In addition 
to this there are always a large num- 
ber of temporary buildings erected for 
state fair week, and hundreds of tents 
house exhibits, eating places and other 
concessions. 

Of the principal buildings, the one 
that probably entertains the largest 
number of people during the week, is 
the grand stand building, erected at a 
cost of $240,000 five years ago. This 
structure seats 11,000 people In full 
view of the races and other entertain- 
ment features. It Is supplemented by 
bleachers, making a total seating 
capacity of 25,000. In addition to the 
amphitheater the grand stand con- 
tains two show rooms of immense 
floor space. On the first floor of the 
building Is housed the automobile ex- 
hibit, and on the second is the liberal 
arts display. 

At the Coliseum. 
The live stock pavilion, or coliseum, 
in the day time is the center of inter- 
est for those who come to exhibit or 
study cattle and horses. All of the 
Judging In these departments Is car- 
ried on In the show ring. At night the 
building Is given over to the society 
horse show, where the best known 
breeds of show horses from all over 
the United States take part In an en- 
tertainment which nightly attracts 
many thousand people. 

Other fireproof buildings on the 
grounds are the steel and machinery 
building, the largest unit of the 
world's greatest display of farm Im- 
plements and Inventions; the poultry 
building and the dairy building The 
other large buildings. Including the 
•big dome" building, the h^me of 
agriculture, and the horticultural 
building, although not fireproof are 
carefully protected and are visited by 
several hundred thousand people dur- 
ing fair week. 

The land occupied by the Minnesota 
State fair Is yalued at $929,137. The 
appraised value of the buildings Is 
$731,800. The electrical equipment has 
a valuation of $23,475.96. Personal 
property on the grounds is valued at 
$34,182.23, making a total valuation of 
the plant and equipment of $1 7is 
718.19. * ' '• 

The upkeep of this Immense plant 
Is naturally expensive. Although no 
buildings have been built this year 
the managers have expended $43 OOO In 
small improvements and repair's and 
In the beautlflcatlon of the grounds in 
addition to this they have expended 
Or contracted to expend practically 




^■i;: 







KURTZMANN 



The piano of disfinction 

Walnut, Mahogany, Oak. 
$350-$400 

"THE HOUSE OF MELODY" 



I 

n 




Stelnwty Pianos C O Pianola' Planot 
■Talking Machines 

309 and 311 WEST FIRST STREET, ELKS* BUILDING 

Melrose 1714 Grand 1004 



I 



n 



i 




FATHER JAEGER'S BEES' NEST. 



1879 
Oldest Bank la Oalnth 



1913 

Ualtetf States Dcposltarr 





k 



<^v,;^v 



*«#i 




WOMEN ESPECIALLY NEED BANK ACCOUNTS 

Women have an even greater need for a Savings Account than 
men, and the ones who are dependent on some one else have the 
greatest need of all. 

Your husband— your father— your brother, maybe, provides for 
^*l^" u Supposing an accident were to happen to the breadwinner 
Which would suddenly throw you on your own resources? You 
would have to find work yourself. But It isn't always easy to obtain 
a situation right away, and what would you do In the meantime' 

If you had a bank account to tide you over you would have far 
less occasion to worry. «» = *»i 

It doesn't require a lot of money to start a bank account — one 
dollar Is sufficient here — and you can add to It as you can spare the 
money. We pay 3 per cent compound Intereat on uiTlnKB accounts 

AMERICAN EXCHAN6E NATIONAL BANK 

S^TlBfs Department open every Satnrday night from 6 to 8 o'clock 




-^ V 



..(*^'i 



NEW HEADQUARTERS OF THE BROTHERHOOD OF AMERICAN 

YEOMEN. 



1200,000 In preparation for the 1913 
fair. For premiums and purses they 
have offered |91,000. They have 
scoured the country for the best en- 
tertainment attractions. They have 
arranged for a number of startling 
new educational exhibits. in fact, 
they have spared no expense or work 
to make the 1913 fair the last word 
In expositions, and everything is now 
In readiness for the entertainment of 
400,000 people during the week 
This Year*s Featuren. 

A few of the 1913 features are: 

Twelve great exhibition departments 
crowded with men and women's mas- 
terpieces. 

A short course of moving pictures in 
the agricultural building. 

Women's special entertainments and 
Bocial gatherings at Reat cottage and 



women's headquarters. 

A state-wide baby health contest. 

A society horse show In the Coli- 
seum. 

Twenty-seven thousand five hun- 
dred dollars worth of horse races with 
Uhlan, 1:58, the world champion trot- 
ter, starting against the state record 
on Tuesday afternoon, as a headllner 

Famous Frontier Days' show every 
night In front of the grand stand, 
concluded by magnificent fireworks. 

World's champion automobile driv- 
ers In fastest dirt track cars on Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

Children's day on Monday with free 
exhibition by Twin City playground 
pupils. In Coliseum. 

Stock judging, parades, ten bands 
and orchestras, free vaudeville acts. 
etc. 

This is what the Minnesota StaU 



GRAND LAKE EXCURSION TO 

PORT WING 

TOMORROW, SUNDAY, AUG. 31 

STEEL STEAMER EASTON will leave Booth's Dock, foot 
of Lake avenue south at 11 a. m., a-nving at Port Wing 1 :30 

&m. Returning, will leave Port >/ing ot 5 p. m.. arriving 
uluth 7:30 p. m. *- ' 5 

ROUND TRIP $1.00. 

Refreshments served. Tickets now on sale at office. 



FAMILY TIBAOE 



f ^ HAVE A CASE OF 

I REX OR MOOSE 

BROUGHT TO YOUR HOUSE 
Call Grand 484-117 WEST FIRST 8T.-M*lrose 4689 



DOLUTH BBEWINC ft WALTINt CO^PAHY | 





16 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



August 30, 1913. 




m tbe Lyceum 



star In a new comedy, "Little Kick;" 
the sreat Golden, In his master Il- 



lusion. "The Tlg»r God;" Mflton Pol- 
lock and company In George Ade's 
farce, "Speaklnsr to Father;" Andrew 
Mack In a musl<ml monologrue satire, 
"The Ship's Concert;" Anna Dancray, 
celebrated ParlsMnne; Edwards Davis 
and company In Us allegrory of rhyme 
and melody, "Tbe Kingdom of Des- 
tiny;" W. L. Ablaerdon in the playlet, 
•Honor Is Satlefled:" Marie IJoyd, the 
Liondon favorite; Miss Orford and her 
wonderful elephants; S. Miller Kent 
and company fn **The Real Q;" Edwin 
Stovcns and Tina Marshall In a mu- 
sical and dranuitlc travesty, "The 
Troubles of R. ajid J." 



Sunday and Monday the Klnemacolor 
company will present at the Lyceum 
what is considered their most beautiful 
picture. "Hiawatha," a dramatization 
of Longf el low's famous poem. Tiiey 
will also take Duluth patrons on a 
visit up Scotland's famous river. "The 
Clyde." The black and white feature 
for these days is a two-part Kay F!ee 
feature "Banzai. ' a marvelously staged 
and acted Japanese drama with scenes 
laid in Tnklo, Japan and California. 

On Tuesday and Wednesday "Mixed 
Signals," a breezy story of tlie sea will 
head the Klnematolor program, also 
"Haunts of the Otter" will be shown in 
Kintmacolor. The black and white fea- 
ture for tht'se days Is "The Adventur< s 
of Jacques." featuring J. Warren Ker- 
rigan in a beautiful costumed and mas- 
siv> ly staked story of the French revo- 
lution. 

On Thursday. Friday and Saturday 
the Kinemacolor company will pre- 
sent one of its funniest comedies, "A 
Narrow Escape," and will also sliow^ 
the authentic modes in millinery. "Tne 
House of Bondage."* a three-part Kay 
Bee will be the black and white fea- 
ture for these days. This Is a drama of 



Puritan days in which a girl Is charged 
with witchcraft, escapes from prison 
and returns to the settlement to .s^ive 
warning of an Indian attack, lo.jlng 
her life in the ensuing battle. A very 
thrilling scene showing a great storm 
at sea when a man is hurled from the 
top of a mast to the deck and sever.il 
excellent battle scenes with the In- 
dians are shown. 

Mr. Sigurd Erdtman will be heard In 
new solos on Sunday, Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

« • • 

The first performance of "Every 

Woman," the dramatic spectacle which 

j will be offered here shortly by Henry 

; W. Savage, at the Drury Lane theattr, 

! London, is described as one of the most 

' remarkable occasions in the recent his. 

tory of the world's metropolis. The 

great theater was filled with literary, 

social and political celebrities, and the 

audience paid the tribute of applause 

j to the dead author who did not live to 

I see the first performance of his play, 

I and the dream of whose life had been 

I to have a play produced at Old Drury. 

j Queen Mary attended the third per- 

I formance of the play in London. 



J\i tM Empress 



A refreshing show of vaudeville acts 
will open at tne Empress theater Sun- 
day matinee for an engagement of 
four days. 

The acts compose an Empress 
vaudeville road show. This assures 
Empress patrons the best of vaude- 
ville novelties. As headline feature 
of this program will be seen Ned 
Copeland's Five Lunatics, who present 
a farce comedy sketch, A School 
House Riot." Thiri act is said to be 
on^- rapid fire display of song. Jokes, 
funny sayings and actions. The songs 
are for the most part especially o'om- 
p(>8ed parodies for this act. There are 
also some very bright and catchy 
ntw songs that have not been heard 
in Duluth as yet. The lines of the 
sketch are full of comedy and are real 
mirth producers. 

Another "big time" act Is the Three 
Dixie Girls, singers of Southern songs. 
These three dainty and pretty girls 



have a line of Southern songs that 
are pleasing audiences all over the 
circuit. The girls sing In good har- 
mony. The solo numbers are gems 
while the other numbers are treats 
In harmony and rendition. The girls 
are said to wear some very stunning 
and classy costumes. 

Another act that Is expected to 
please Is that of Russell and Hill, two 
women singers and Impersonators. 
Russell and Hill have an excellent 
repertoire of songs and their manner 
of presenting them Is also pleasing. 
Miss Russell Impersonates men with 
cleverness and always receives a 
warm reception from the audience. 

A fourth act will close the bill. Ow- 
ing to a serious accident Ennle and 
Mudred Potts, who were booked, were 
unable to come, and in their place an 
act direct from cnicago will fill In. 
The pictures will be of the usual high 
standard. 



Walsh, Cronln Wilson, Miss Marie 
Hassell, Frederick Lloyd, Miss Cath- 
leen Doyle,' Miles Wood, Miss Florence 
Born and Douglas Jeffries. Philadelphia 
will be the first city to see the delight- 
ful Arnold Bennet-Edward Knoblauch 
play this season, but the tour Is to In- 
clude practically the entire country 
North and South, out to the Pacific 
coast and through Canada. 

• • * 

Miss Billy Burke will give her final 
performances In "The Amazons" at 
Washington during the week of Nov. 
24. Her first appearance in the new 
W. Somerset Maugham play, "The Land 
of Promise," will be given at Atlantic 
City on Dec. 8. 

* • • 

R. H. Burnslde has been engaged by 
Cohan & Harris to stage "The Beauty 
Shop," a musical play built especially 
to exploit Raymond Hitchcock during 
the coming season, which will be Mr. 
Hitchcock's fifth under the direction of 
this firm. 

• * • 

The licensing of "Joseph and His 
Brethren" In London, despite the old 
law that forbids the presentation of 
plays based upon Scriptural subjects 
on English stages^ Is hailed with Joy 
by London critics, not only for 
"Joseph's" sake, but because ft lets 
down the bars for so many other good 
plays, notably Maeterlink's "Mary 
Magdalene" and Rostand's "La Sa- 
maritaine." 

* « • 

Rehearsals have begun at the Little 
theater, in New York, of the new 



comedy of home life, by Mark E. Swan, 
"Her Own Money,'' which Winthrop 
Ames will present at the Comedy the- 
ater Monday night, Sept. 1. Julia Dean, 
Beverly Sltgreaves and Sydney Booth 
have been engaged for three of the im- 
portant roles. 

* * • 

While Irene Franklin is busy making 
new friends in vaudeville, being at the 
present time in the midst of her first 
tour of the Orpheum circuit since she 
became one of the most popular head- 
Uners in the varieties, she Is also busy 
reading playg and preparing to say 
good-bye to the entertainment field In 
which she has won success and fame. 
Miss Franklin Is going into the legiti- 
mate, and her present vaudeville tour 
Is said to be her last. She has Just 
completed unusually successful en- 
gagements In San Francisco, where she 
was retained for the third week, and 
lyOs Angeles, where she remained for 
two, and Is on her way East. Salt Lake 
City Denver, Des Moines, Omaha, Lin- 
coln, Kansas City. Sioux City, Minne- 
apolis, St. Paul, Duluth, Chicago and St. 
Louis are still to be visited, for the 
tour wtilch Miss Franklin and her hus- 
band Burt Green, began early last 
spring and which has taken them 
through Canada and around the 
circle will not end in the Middle 
West until Just before the holidays. 
They will then go Immediately to New 
York and begin arrangements for Mies 
Franklin's debut as a star in the legiti- 
mate. It is understood that she will 
be under the direction of Arthur Hop- 
kins. 



Each night for more than a year th« 
young man called on the princess at her 
home. And each night when the prin- 
cess would appear dressed in a gown 
of some soft, clinging fabric and greet 
the young man with the shyest, friend- 
liest smile, he felt that he could wish 
for no greater happiness. 

Then came a time when the young 
man's employer, who is the ogre iD 
the tale, decided that he must work at 
nights. The young man and his prin- 
cess talked it over and decided that 
perhaps it might be best for him to. 
work nights until he got another Job. 
They agreed that the young man waa> 
to call in the mornings instead of at 
nights. 

They also agreed that as soon as th# 
young man had sufficient money savca 
up they would be married. 

For several weeks the young man 
called on his princess every mornlnfiT* 
but as time wore on his visits grew lestf 
and less frequent, finally stopping alto- 
gether. Cold cream, curl papers and 
an early morning temper had done It, 

And the moral Is this: "If you want 
to meet the only girl face to f&cs^ 
choose the wrong time to call." 
♦ 

An English capitalist has been In 
the Philippines In quest of 26,000 of 
80,000 acres for a cocoanut plantation, 
but as so large a tract is difficult to 
obtain he is reported to have got 
5,000 acres on the Island of Lepac. 



Jit the Orpbeum 



Sam Chip and Mary Marble are com- 
ing back to the Duluth Orpheum next 
week as headliners on the new vaude- 
ville bill. 

The names of Chip and Marble have 
been famous In musical comedy and 
vaudeville circles for a dozen years or 
more. They have been seen In Du- 
luth in several popular musical com- 
edies, and once before in vaudeville, 
having plaved over the Orpheum time 
In a sketch called "In Old Edam." 
They have deserted this little musical 
playlet for a new one this season, and 
have a new vehicle by Herbert Hall 
Winslow called "The Land of Dykes." 
The locale of the sketch Is the same 
as the old one. Holland, and Mr. Chip 
and Miss Marble portray the little 
Dutch youngsters in the way for which 
they are famous. The sketch as pro- 
duced by Mr. Chip and Miss Marble 
has been heralded as one of the really 
artistic novelties of the vaudeville 
season. 

Conlin, Steele and Carr are three 
lively young people who have been 
twice booked to appear at the Du- 
luth Orpheum and have failed to come, 
because of some mishap at the last 
moment. They will be on next week's 
bill, and Duluth Orpheum patrons will 
have an opportunity of seeing an act 
that is said to be one of the breeziest 
and liveliest in vaudeville. There are 
two men and a young woman In the 
act, and they are said to diffuse more 
merriment during the twenty minutes 
they are on the stage than almost any 
other trio on the circuit. The act 
was in Minneapolis this week and hag 
been the hit of a strong bill. 

Regular patrons will remember a 
dainty little sketch called "Drifting" 
that was seen in Duluth two years 
ago. It was presented by Agnes Scott 
and Henry Keane. There is nothing 
pretentious about the act. It Is sim- 
ply a little Idyll of joy and romance, 
but it scored heavily because it was 
BO different from the usual noisy vau- 
deville sketch. It will return to Du- 
luth and will be seen on next week's 
bill. 

"The Three Collegians" are likely to 
add their full share of music and 
comedy to the week's program. They 
have a little skit called "The Re- 
hearsal' and they are said to have 
caught the college spirit and atmos- 
phere and preserved It. The three 
young men are recent graduates of 
eastern colleges, and they sing, play, 
dance, swing clubs, and Joke with all 
the enthusiasm of the youngest fresh- 
men. 

Andrew F. Kelley promises some- 
thing of an innovation in the line of 
a monologue. He Is a dapper looking 



man in a frock suit, but carries with 
him an inimitable Irish brt)gue. He 
does not dance a step or sing a note, 
but simply walks on the stage and 
tells a string of stories. One or two 
of the stories are told with a Scotch 
burr to them, but the greater part 
of thern are Iri.sh stories, and the suc- 
cess he has met witn In his vaude- 
ville tour Is good evidence of the 
quality of the stories, for he depends 
On them solely. 

The Anker Brothers are billed as 
two sensational gymnasts. They were 
seen here last with Harry Lauder in 
his all star vaudeville show. 

The seventh act on the bilj will be 
offered by La Vier a trapeze per- 
former who Is said to have something 
new in the line of aerial acts. 

The motion pictures of news hap- 
penings and the overture by the Or- 
pheum orchestra will complete th« 
bill, which will continue all week with 
a daily matinee. 

« * * 

For the week of Sept. 7 the head- 
line act will be the Chung" Hwa 
Chinese Four, the only Chinese quar- 
tet in America. 

• * • 

The following is a partial list of 
the important booking Martin Beck 
has made for the Orpheum circuit for 
the coming season: Fritzl Scheff, the 
celebrated prlmadonna: Mile Dazie 1p 
Sir James Mathews Barrle's one-act 
fantasy, "Pantaloon;" Lulu Glaser, as- 
sisted by Tom Itichards in the "lay- 
let with music. "First Love;" Blanche 
Walsh In a dramatic incident, "Coun- 
tess Nadine;" Mme. Karina Karlnowa, 
prima ballerina of the Copenhagen 
opera; the cheeriest comedienne,' 
Stella Mayhew, with Billie Taylor; the 
new song birds, a satire on the latest 
phase of the grand opera craze with 
William Burress and company of 
thirty; Maude Lambert, the favorite 
primadonna, and Ernest Ball, the pop- 
ular composer; Saharet, dansesque In- 
ternational: Katherine Kidder, In an 
adoption of her famous role, Mme. San 
Gene, called "The Washerwoman 
Duchess;" Eisa Ruegger, the noted 
celloist; Taylor Granville, Lauro Pler- 
pont and company in the scenic drama, 
"The System ;" Billie B. Van and com- 
pany, playing a farce called "Props;" 
Catherine Countess and company in 
"The Birthday Present;" the Olympla 
girls, a London ballet; Henry Wood- 
ruff and company in "A Regular Busi- 
ness Man;" the Lambs' gambol suc- 
cess, "The Dance Dream," a terpsl- 
chorean novelty; the musical comedy 
oddity, "The Little Parisienne," with 
Valerie Serice and a large company; 
Nina Morris and company in "The 
Yellow Peril," by Albert Cowles; Prin- 
cess Rajah In a new series of Oriental 
dances; Master Gabriel, the little big 



m ibe Rex. 



At the Rex theater, beginning Mon- 
day matinee, will show to its patrons 
a pretty railroad story by the Kalem 
company entitled "The Substitute En- 
gineer." The plot is strong, telling of 
two men in love with a waitress. Both 
take examinations for engineer, one 
fails, and the exciting situations that 
follow makes this an exceptional ofl'er- 
Ing. Another drama on the program 
entitled "Flood-Tide," Is worthy of 
mention. The remarkable scenery pro- 
vided by the rugged wreck-strewn 
Cornwall coast and the plot of the play 
make this an olTering of exceptional 
merit. The noted American actor Marc 



Mac Dermott takes the leading part 
as the hero, (the artist.) The picture 
shows the daring escape by slidin?? 
down a rope over a high precipice into 
the water. 

Two comedies by the Blograph com- 
pany affords every one a ohance to for- 
get the blues. They are entitled "Stif- 
ragette Minstrels" and "Father's Chick, 
en Dinner." The Pathe Weekly will 
gring before the spectator the most Im- 
portant news happenings of the week, 
from all parts of the world. Mrs. Run- 
kel and Miss Barry will sing solos and 
duets, while the Rex orchestra will 
play several selections. 



GOSSIP OF THE RIALTO 



TWO WELL KNOWN COMEDIANS 

AT THE ORPHEUM NEXT WEEK 










SAM CHIP AND MARY MARBLE . 



When she appears in "The Conspir- 
acy" at the Comedy theater London, 
on Sept. 15, Marie Doro will under- 
take her fourth part In as many Ameri- 
can-made plays before London audi- 
ences, English and American audi- 
ences In trteir attitudes toward foreign 
artists differ this way: every foreign 
actress who appears in London is ex- 
pected to demonstrate the genius of a 
great artist, and lacking one lota of it, 
fails. Every foreign actress who ap- 
pears in New York is suspected of hav- 
ing the genius of a great actress, and 
given credit for it whether she pos- 
sesses it or not. London Is the most 
difficult of English-speaking centers 
for the newly arrived foreign artist, 
and New York the easiest. In the one 
city the absence of "personality" is as 
Important as In the other its presence 
is all sufficient, 

* * • 

John Galsworthy, whose newest play, 
"The Mob," Charles Frohman will bring 
out in America this season at about the 
same time it is done In England, is In 
some respects in a class by himself — 
if likened to other living English play- 
wrights. Mr. Galsworthy Is the only 
honor man from Oxford university now 
writing for the stage. He is a man of 
long lineage and comfortable means. 
He writes frankly, not to please, but to 
teach first and incidentally to entertain. 
Seldom is he seen about the clubs or 
haunts of other contemporary British 
playwrights. Mr. Galsworthy's "Justice" 
worked fundamental changes and con- 
sequent great Improvements In Eng- 
land's prison system. Fault was found 
with his "Strife" that in the end it 
left the question of capital and labor 
as much up in the air as ever; but that 
was a view of "Strife" taken only by 
the one-eyed. It is said that "The Mob" 
not only takes sides, but is packed with 
a deeper feeling than is usual in Gals- 
worthy plays. 

« « • 

W. Somerset Maughan, whose new 
play, "The Promised Land," will be 
acted In this country by Miss Billie 
Burke at the end of her brief prelim- 
inary season in "The Amazons, " lives 
in a smart-looking bachelor's house In 
May fair; and to all who admire it, Mr. 
Maugham calls it "the house that Billie 
Burke built." It was from the snug 
forfline that came from "Mrs. Dot" that 
Mr. Maugham built, furnished and dec- 
orated one of the most charming resi- 
dences In Mayfair. 

* * « 

"The End of Love" — one of the come- 
dies lately announced by Charles Froh- 
man as among the budget of plays 
brought from abroad — Is the work of 
Roberto Bracco, one of the most skill- 
ful and quite the most fertile of Italian 
playwrights. It was the Bracco com- 
edy, "Inrtdele," which Madame Nazl- 
mova acted with great success for two 
seasons, calling it "Comtesse Coquette." 
"The End of Love" is another Bracco 
comedy done with his characteristic 
lightness, brightness and quickness of 
touch, revolving about a plot that Is 
sex against sex in a comic way. 

* * * 

Several years ago there was much 
talk about a Russian invasion of the 
musical field. We had Russian conduc- 
tors, Russian pianists and violinists, 
Russian singers, Russian symphonies, 
overtures and songs. We delighted in 
them all. At that time, however, noth- 
ing was heard of Russian opera. Is 
there to be a second invasion — an oper- 
atic one? Paris, London and other Eu- 
ropean capitals are giving cycles of 
Russian operas. No feature rivals these 
in novelty and interest. Is this the an- 
swer to the question ral-sed by the 
Wagner centenary celebration. What 
next in opera? Is Russia to minister 
for a time to our need for new operatic 
Joys and thrills? The Russian operas 
now making the rounds are not con- 
temporaneous products. They are forty 
and fifty years old. They are the works 
of composers Russia herself has long 
neglected. 

« • * 

A closer merger between the Shn- 
berts and Klaw & Erlanger is predlcfed 
by showmen along Broadway. They 
say the signs are pointing that way 
and an undercurrent of friendliness be- 
tween the two "Syndicates" will event- 
ually bring them together In one office. 
The main purpose of this would be one 
big system operating the legitimate 
field. 

* « • 

Philip Bartholomae has engaged the 
excellent actresses Miss Luclle Watson 
and Mrs. Thomas WhlfTen for "The Bird 
Cage." an American comedy which he 
will produce early In September. The 
scene of the play Is laid at Coronado 
Beach. The author Is a Callfornlan, 
and "The Bird Cage" Is his first play. 
« • « 

Maude Adamg will this season suc- 
ceed John Drew at the Empire theater 
at the close of Mr. Drew's New York 
season In "Much Ado About Nothing" 
Miss Adams' season will begin with 
performances In "Peter Pan" for four 
weeks, and then New York will have 



its first sight of the newest Barrie play, 
"The Legend of Leonora." The prob- 
ability is that Miss Adams will remain 
in the Empire theater throughout the 
rest of the season. 

* * * 

Madame Nazimova, frankly confess- 
ing herself the poorest sailor that ever 
sailed the seas, cabled Charles Froh- 
man on her recent arrival in London: 
"It was Indeed a bon voyage; the 
steamer behaved like a perfect lady all 
the way over; but then it is the ocean 
that makes perfect steamers as it Is 
life that makes perfect ladies." 

* * * 

Boston will be the first city to see 
"Vhe Merry MArtyr," the new musi- 
cal play J)a8ed on Leo Birlnski's 
comedy "Narrentanz," written by Glen 
MacDonough, with music by Hugo 
Rlteenfeld. Maclyn Arbuckle will play 
the leading role, a pompous governor 
of a Spanish province, and It is 
whispered that he threatens to sing 
and to make matters worse, dance the 
tango. Klaw & Erlanger promise a 
beautiful production of the play and 
have provided an able cast 

* * * 

August Thomas has completed and 
delivered to Charles Frohman the 
final manuscript of his new play for 
John Mason, entitled "Indian Sum- 
mer." Miss Martha Hedman will play 
the leading feminine role. > 

• • « 

One of the most Important of the 
numerous well known English actors 
that Cyril Maude will bring over with 
him in his American tour Is Lenox 
Fawle, already well known and well 
liked here. Mr. Pawle originated the 
role of Brooke-Hoskynes, the retired 
butler in "Pomander Walk," and 
played the part of the old book seller 
in the all star revival of "Liberty 
Hall" last spring. Mr. Pawle was a 
member of Maude's London Playhouse 
company for many seasons, and will 
here play many of the roles created 
by him in England. 

• ♦ • 

Klaw & Erlanger have purchased 
from Arthur L. Hopkins all his rights 
and interests in Eleanor Gates' re- 
markably successful play, "The Poor 
Little Rich Girl." It will be ex- 
ploited hereafter under their manage- 
ment and be sent to the largest cities 
thioughout the country during the 
present season. The tour will begin 
on Monday, Sept. 29. 

• ♦ • 

Miss Doris Keane, who played the 
leading feminine role in "Romance" 
throughout the engagement of that 
famous play at Maxine Elliott's 
thiater last season, and who has been 
sptndlng her summer vacation In 
Europe, is now on her way back home. 
Miss Keane will continue In "Ro- 
mance'' both in New York city and on 
tour throughout the coming dramatic 
year. There are to be four compa- 
nies playing the piece next season. 

♦ • • 

Perclval Knight, who became fa- 
mous two years ago by singing "I 
Have a Motter," in "The Arcadians," 
has been engaged by Charles Frohman 
to play the part of Lord Hurllngham 
In support of Donald Brian, in "The 
Marriage Market." 

• « • 

By Sept. 1 there will be fifteen 
companies presenting "Within the 
Law." Six of the organizations are to 
present Bayard Veiller's melodrama ijv 
the United States and Canada. Five 
more companies will present the play 
in Great Britain, two in Australia, one 
In Berlin and one In Vienna. Of all 
American plays produced, "Within the 
LaV" seems to be the one which 
will bring the most fame to Mr. Veil- 
ler, its author. 

• * * 

Ethel Barrymore will play C. Had- 
dcn Chamber's new play, "Tante," 
during the coming season. 

* * • 

When Charles Frohman's production 
of the pollce-detectlve play, "The 
Ccnsplracy," is produced In London it 
will be called "The Scarlet Band." Miss 
Marie Doro will appear in the pari 
acted in tliis country by Mary Keener. 

* * • 

"Kiss Me Quick," the new farce by 
Philip Bartholomae, now running at 
the Shubert theater, Boston^wlll be the 
opening attraction at William A. 
Brady's Forty-eighth street theater, 
beginning early In September. In the 
cast are Helen Lowell, Louise Drew, 
Sadie Harris, Laura Laird, Emily Galla- 
way, Mary Hastings, Arthur Ayles- 
worth, Robert Kelly, Frederic Santley, 
Richard Taber and others. The play 
will remain In Boston until the end of 
August, subsequently being played In 
the principal New England cities. 

• * « 

The company which Klaw & Erlanger 
will present In "Milestones," under the 
direction of Joseph Brooks, has been 
organlKed In London and will sail for 
New York early in September. Prom- 
inent In the cast «re Stanley Warm- 
Ington, Miss Aurioi Lee, Miss Blanche 
Ripley, Harold Holland, Miss Sybil 



MODERN PLAYWRIGHTS ASHAMED 

TO WRITE LOVE SCENES 



From the London News: There 

seems to be a remarkable decline In 

love scenes. Outside of musical 

comedies there are now fourteen plays 

running at West End theaters, but In 

only one — "Milestones" — can there be 

said to be a love scene, and even In 

"Milestones" the love making is not al- 
lowed to come nearer to the present 
day than 1860. 

Forty or fifty years ago It would 
have been impossible to go to any 
theater without seeing at least two 
pairs of lovers fall into each others 
arms, and at the end of the play they 
would have stood hand In hand for the 
final curtain, doing their best to look 
suffioiently happy. In those days the 
proposal was, in fact, an important 
part of the dramatist's stock in trade, 
and he took great pains to arrange for 
his hero and heroine to be left alone in 
the drawing room, so that the hero 
might make a speech of the "guiding 
star" type and the heroine might look 
at her shoes. The audience was quite 
happy to allow the lovers ten or fifteen 
minutes. 

Epigrams — Not Kisses. 

But now, apparently, such a scene is 
thought waste of time, and It is prob- 
able that any hero who failed to ex- 
press his feelings In a few terse sen- 
tences would be liable today to en- 
couragement from the gallery in the 
crude form of "Buck up old chap!" or 
something of the kind. The taste for 
love scenes seems, indeed, to have died 
an unnatural death. 

We are all artistic nowadays and so 
unwilling to admit that we have any 
feelings or emotions, that we look at 
love on the stage with Impatience and 
insist on having something farther 
from life and more fantastic. We do 
not want kisses on the stage. We want 
epigrams Instead. 

Bores the Audience. 

The only love scene that is really 
tolerated is of the burlesque, humor- 
ous type. So long as fun is made of 
the hero's difficulties in pulling him- 
self together and coming up to the 
scratch, the audience will not be bored; 
but the moment he thinks It his duty 
to become serious — presumably for the 
sake of the gallery — and brings about 
that tedious, sentimental, old fashioned 
situation, the audience will lose in- 
terest at once and if they do not titter 
they will talk. And it certainly seems 
that the audience is right. It has al- 
ways been agreed In real life that love 
making Is something to be laughed 
at and that lovers are to be avoided 
because of their peculiarly boring 
properties; but In the theater .this 
agreement seems only just to have 
been arrived at. In the old days we 
were expected to take love on the 
stage seriously and to put up with 
lovers from whom In real life we 
should make a point of escaping. Now. 
luckily, we are rarely troubled with 
them, and if they do happen to appear 
for a few moments — we can laugh. 
The Old FaHhioned Proposal. 

It seems, too. that we propose in a 
different way from our grandfathers. 
In the 1860 love scene In "Milestones" 
the hero says: 

"When you look at me With that 
trustful look of yours I can do any- 
thing — anything! No other woman's 
eyes ever had the same effect on me. 
It's only because you believe In me. 
No, that Isn't the only reason; it isn't 
the chief reason. The chief reason is 
that I'm in love with you.'' 

Here" the heroine looks down and 
says "Ohl" 

The earnest hero goes on: 

"I've known you all my life. But I 
wasn't aware of all that you meant to 
me until these difficulties began. 
You're essential to me. You can't 
Imagine how much depends on just 
you. * • • You're too modest, too 
womanly to realize it. Why, some- 
times a tone of yours, a mere Inflec- 



tion, almost knocks me over. Rose, 
be mine!" 

The New PropoHnl. 

If this Is a fair version of a Victor- 
ian love scene — and it Is certainly sup- 
ported by the fiction of that time — It is 
clear that methods have changed since 
then. The modern equivalent M'ould 
be something like this: 

"The Hero — Would it bore you very 
much if I tried to be serious for a 
moment? 

"The Heroine (pretending to col- 
lapse) — My dear John, I believe you're 
going to propose to me. Please don't. 
You'd do it so awfully badly. 

"The Hero — Yes, I know. Shall we 
take it as read? 

"The Heroine — Yes, and carried 
unanimously. (They shake hands.) 

"The Hero — What about a game of 
golf? 

"The Heroine — ^Just the thing. "We 
want something to buck us up after a 
crisis of this sort. (They go out 
laughing.)" 

In "The Headmaster" at the Play- 
house there Is a fairly good example 
of the modern love scene, terse and un- 
rhetorical, between the headmaster's 
daughter and one of the young mas- 
ters. In "Open Windows" at the St. 
James's there are two young lovers 
who meet to kiss in a dark room and 
are genially chaffed by the girl'.^ fath- 
er. They say next to nothing. And 
that Is really about all of set lovemak- 
ing now to be seen on the stage. 
No Rhetorical Love Scenes Nott. 

Probably the explanation is that peo- 
ple, especially young people, are no 
longer willing to be lyrical or rhetori- 
cal. 

"The rhetorical love scene," said E. 
A. Baughan, "has completely gone out. 
The love scene of today has to be terse 
and restrained, and must never last 
more than a few minutes. The truth 
seems to be that we are not so inter- 
ested as we used to be In the romantic 
or lyrical expression of love. A Byron 
would not be worshiped now as he 
was In his own day, and I doubt very 
much if another Tennyson would be 
read. There is still poetry, but it is 
poetry of a very different type. The dif- 
ference between the Victorian age and 
this age is the difference between Ten- 
nyson and John Masefleld. It ia no* 
that the influence of love Is less. But 
it is expressed differently and kept 
more out of sight. The old methods 
make us laugh, but whether we are 
justified In laughing is another matter. 
There are often tears behind the laugh- 
ter. 

Sense of Huuor Fatal. 

"It must be remembered, too, that the 
attitude of women is changing. I imag- 
ine that no man would have the cour- 
age to propose to a suffragist in the 
Victorian manner. Then women are at 
last developing a sense of humor, which 
is fatal, of course, to elaborate love 
scenes. Apparently in the old days it 
was usual for the woman to weep when 
being asked for her hand, but now it 
seems to be correct for her to laugh. 

"And though love itself is as influen- 
tial as ever, I doubt If it takes up quite 
as much of a man's or woman's life as, 
say. forty years ago. They used to spe- 
cialize on love then, but now it is only 
one of many other interests. You must 
go to opera or musical comedy for the 
lyrical expression of love. The mld- 
Victorlan girl of shrinking modesty 
and supersensitive feelings has become 
the self-conscious, ragtime 'flapper' of 
musical comedy. Our grandfathers pri- 
vately worshiped colorless sweet 16 In 
a poke bonnet; we publicly worship in- 
sipid youth In a oeehlve hat. Both 
have one thing In common — youth. But 
at least we know that such admiration 
Is not love." 



BUT, OHl WHAT A DIFFERENCP:. 

Kansas City Star: This is a modern 
tale of a young man and a girl. The 
young man called the girl his princess. 



BOTH PHONES 241 S. 

SMond Avenue East and Suparlor St. 




THEATER H INTERNATIONAL VAUDEVILLE 

THIS THEATER IS A PART OF THE GREAT ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 

M. Meyerfeld, Jr., President. Martin Beck, Managing Director 



I STARTING SUNDAY MATINEE, AUGUST 31st | 



SAM CHIP and MARY MARBLE 

IN THE PICTURE BOOK PLAYLET 

''THE LAND OF DYKES'' 

Written By Herbert Hall Winslow. 



JAMES P. CONLIN 

LILLIAN STEELE 

EDDIE CARR 

lOLHES OF VAUDEVIIliE. 

THE THREE COLLEGIANS 

Present 
"A BIT OF COLLEGE LIFE." 



ANDREW F. KELLY 

"The Man Witli the Natural 
Brogue." 



ORPHEUM 

SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

EVERY NIGHT 8:15 
PRICES: 10c-25c-50-7Sc 



A 

X 
I 

N 



D 

A 

I 



10c 
and 



AGNES scon 
HENRYKEANE 

"DRIFTING" 



ANKER BROTHERS 

PREMIER GYMNASTS. 



LA VIER 

DAUNTLESS DOINGS ALOFT. 
Assisted by Hazel Sherwood. 



NEWS VIEWS 

EXCLUSIVE 

PATHE WEEKLY 



uau ORDER SEATS BY 
25c I EITHER PHONE 2416 



THE 



REX 



THEATER BEAUTIFUL 



Commencing Monday, Sopt, 1st, 

for MONDAY, TUESDAY 

and WEDNESDAY. 

THE SUBSTITUTE ENGINEER 

An Interesting and exciting 
railroad story with many thril- 
ling situations. 

FLOOD TIDE 

This is a drama built in Eng- 
land with the noted American 
actors, Marc MacDermott and 
Connie Lee, 

SUFFRAGETTE MINSTRELS and 
FATHER 'S CHICKEN DINNER 

Two laughable comedies by 
the noted Blograph artists. 

PATHE WEEKLY 

The week's Important happen- 
ings of the world before you. 

Musical Selections by the Rex 
Orchestra. 

Solos and duet by Bemlce 
Haiian Runkel and Ethel Fran- 
ces Berry. 

Don't Miss See the Rex Program. 

ADMISSIOI 10c 



LYCEUM 

WEEK COMMENCING TOMORROW 

SONOAY and MONDAY 

KINEMACOLOR 

"Hiawatha" 
"On the Clyde" 

(Black and White.) 

"Banzai" 

(Two-part Kay- Bee Feature.) 

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY 

KINEMACOLOR 

"Mixed Signals" 

"Haunts of the Otter** 

(Black and White.) 

"Adventures of Jacques" 

(Two-part American.) 

THUNS., FRIDAY and SAT. 

KINEMACOLOR 

"A Narrow Escape" 
"Amongst the Philippines" 

"Authentic Moiles in Millinery" 

(Black and White.) 

"The House of Bondage" 

(Two-part Kay-Bee.) 

SI6URD ERDTMAN 

SOLOIST. 
Matinees, 10c; Nightg 10c and 20c. 



1 



Fmpress 

4 DAYS STARTIN6 
SUNDAY, AU6, 31 

SUPREME VAUDEVILLE 

NICK COPELAND'S 

FIVE LUNATICS 

IN THE FARCE COMEDY 

^•A SCHOOL HOUSE RIOT** 

THREE 

DIXIE GIRLS 

Singers of Sontbem Songs. 

RUSSELL ft HILL 

Songesters and Impersonators 

ERNIE ft MILDRED 
POTTS 

That Novel Duo. 

Matinee Daily, lOc, Exc^t 
Sunday. Nlghtfi, lOc, 16c, aOc 
and 2Ao. 



L* »M Hi*- * I ■-1 I*' 




I 



k>A. 



*# ; 




Saturday, 



OUR PROBLEMS OF RACE HYGIENE 

A Foreigner's Impressions of Our "National Stock" as 
Affected by Immigrant and Negro Population. 

- ■ 

By Gino C. Speranza, Member of the New York Bar. 



AL MILITIA BOYS RETURN, 
HARDENED. FROM DELIGH 



(l^xeluMlve 8«rvirr the Survey Preiw 
Bureau.) 

Our legislation which aims at safe- 
guarding our •'native sto